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H 290 x W 205 mm

370 pages

118 figures (colour throughout)

Published Jun 2022

Archaeopress Archaeology

ISBN

Paperback: 9781803270883

Digital: 9781803270890

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Keywords
pre-Lapita; Lapita; post-Lapita; Papua New Guinea; Pacific; Pacific archaeology

Related titles

Caution Bay Studies in Archaeology 2

The Archaeology of Tanamu 1

A Pre-Lapita to Post-Lapita Site from Caution Bay, South Coast of Mainland Papua New Guinea

Edited by Bruno David, Katherine Szabó, Matthew Leavesley, Ian J. McNiven, Jeremy Ash, Thomas Richards

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£58.00

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Presenting results from Tanamu 1, the first site to be published in detail in the Caution Bay Studies in Archaeology series. Yielding well-provenanced and finely dated assemblages of ceramics, faunal remains, and stone and shell artefacts, these remarkable sites extend the range of the Lapita cultural complex to the south coast of Papua New Guinea.

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Contents

Chapter 1. Emerging Out of Lapita at Caution Bay – Bruno David, Ken Aplin, Cassandra Rowe, Matthew Leavesley, Katherine Szabó, Thomas Richards, Ian J. McNiven, Fiona Petchey and Herman Mandui ;
Chapter 2. Tanamu 1: A 5000 Year Sequence from Caution Bay – Bruno David, Thomas Richards, Ian J. McNiven, Ken Aplin, Fiona Petchey, Katherine Szabó, Jerome Mialanes, Cassandra Rowe, Bryce Barker, Sean P. Connaughton, Matthew Leavesley, Herman Mandui and Chris Jennings ;
Chapter 3. The Ceramics of Tanamu – Bruno David and Holly Jones-Amin ;
Chapter 4. The Stone Artefacts of Tanamu – Jerome Mialanes, Anne Ford, Bradley Goodall, Maria Codlin, Mark McCoy, Glenn Summerhayes, Bruno David, Thomas Richards and Ian J. McNiven ;
Chapter 5. The Molluscan Remains of Tanamu 1: Subsistence and Resource Habitats – Brit Asmussen, Patrick Faulkner, Katherine Szabó and Sean Ulm ;
Chapter 6. The Non-molluscan Faunal Remains of Tanamu 1: Implications for Site Taphonomy, Environmental Change, and Resource Exploitation – Ken Aplin ;
Chapter 7. The Worked Shell of Tanamu – Katherine Szabó ;
Chapter 8. Tanamu 1: Conclusions and Future Directions – Katherine Szabó, Bruno David, Ian J. McNiven and Matthew Leavesley ;
Appendix A. Chert Fracture Types by XU, Tanamu 1 Square A ;
Appendix B. Chert Fracture Types by XU, Tanamu 1 Square B ;
Appendix C. Mollusc Weight (g) per XU for Tanamu 1 Square A ;
Appendix D. Mollusc MNI per XU for Tanamu 1 Square A ;
Appendix E. Mollusc Weight (g) per XU for Tanamu 1 Square B ;
Appendix F. Mollusc MNI per XU for Tanamu 1 Square B ;
Appendix G. Non-molluscan Faunal Remains by Weight per XU, Tanamu 1 Square A ;
Appendix H. Non-molluscan Faunal Remains by Weight per XU, Tanamu 1 Square B ;
Appendix I. Representation of Burning Categories in Bone by Weight, Tanamu 1 Square A ;
Appendix J. Terrestrial Vertebrate Taxa per XU, Tanamu 1 Squares A and B ;
Appendix K. Large Vertebrate Remains Encountered During Excavation of the Stepping-out Squares ;
Appendix L. Occurrence of Fish Family and Crab Taxa by XU in Square A ;
References

About the Author

Bruno David is Professor of Indigenous Archaeology at Monash University and is a Chief Investigator with the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage. He specialises in landscape archaeology, the archaeology of rock art, and the archaeology of Indigenous Australia and Papua New Guinea. His latest books are The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology and Anthropology of Rock Art, and The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Indigenous Australia and New Guinea (both co-edited with Ian J. McNiven). ;

Katherine Szabó studied archaeology in New Zealand and Australia and has held research fellowships and academic positions in Australia, the United States, Germany and the United Kingdom. She has pioneered research into the use of shell as a raw material for artefact production and has worked on archaeological material spanning Pleistocene to ethnohistorical collections from across the Asia-Pacific region. ;

Matthew Leavesley joined the University of Papua New Guinea as a lecturer in 2006. He has undertaken research in all four regions of Papua New Guinea and many different provinces. He is interested in both evolutionary and ethnographic approaches to archaeology. ;

Ian J. McNiven is Professor of Indigenous Archaeology at the Monash Indigenous Studies Centre, Monash University, Melbourne, and a Chief Investigator with the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage. He is an elected Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries London, the Royal Anthropological Institute, and the Australian Academy of the Humanities. ;

Jeremy Ash is an archaeologist at the Monash Indigenous Studies Centre at Monash University. His work focuses on the archaeology of the recent past, with particular interests in agency, archaeological and Indigenous storytelling, historicising ancestral landscapes and the archaeology of missions and frontiers. ;

Thomas Richards is Executive Director of the Heritage Conservation Branch in the Government of Saskatchewan, Canada and Adjunct Senior Research Fellow with the Monash Indigenous Studies Centre, Monash University, Australia. As a director of the Caution Bay Archaeology Project since 2009, Tom has been involved in researching Lapita settlements, as well as sites from earlier and later periods, from the south coast of Papua New Guinea.