Mohamed Kenawi

Mohamed Kenawi is a Researcher and Training Manager for the Endangered Archaeology of the Middle East and North Africa project, University of Oxford. He was Head Researcher (2011–16), then Acting Director (2016–17), of the Hellenistic Centre of Bibliotheca Alexandrina, Alexandria. Published works include Alexandria’s Hinterland: Archaeology of the Western Nile Delta, Egypt (2014) and Unearthing Alexandria’s Archaeology (2018). He is Egypt Coordinator for the Manar al-Athar open access photo-archive.

BOOKS BY THIS CONTRIBUTOR

Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit II: Coin Finds 2012–2016 / Late Roman and Early Islamic Pottery from Kom al-Ahmer

Mohamed Kenawi

This volume presents over 1070 coins (ca. 310 BC–AD 641) and 1320 examples of Late Roman and Early Islamic pottery. Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit emerge as centers of an exchange network involving large-scale trade of raw materials to and from the central and eastern Mediterranean. READ MORE

Hardback: £65.00 | eBook: £16.00

Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit I: Excavations in the Metelite Nome, Egypt

Mohamed Kenawi

This volume presents the results of the Italian archaeological mission at Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit, Beheira, Egypt between 2012 and 2016. It provides details of the survey and excavation results of the different occupation phases, which range from the Late Dynastic to the Early Islamic period. READ MORE

Hardback: £65.00 | eBook: £16.00

Unearthing Alexandria’s Archaeology: The Italian Contribution

Mohamed Kenawi

Presents an archival survey, historical research, and archaeological description of the main Italian excavations in Alexandria from the 1890s to the 1950s, offering detailed descriptions of excavations at Hadra, Chatby, Anfushi and more, accompanied by often unpublished photographs and a catalogue of rare photographs of further sites in Alexandria. READ MORE

Paperback: £38.00 | eBook: £16.00

Alexandria’s Hinterland

Mohamed Kenawi

This volume contains detailed information about 63 sites and shows, amongst other things, that the viticulture of the western delta was significant in Ptolemaic and Roman periods, as well as a network of interlocking sites, which connected with the rest of Egypt, Alexandria, North Africa and the Eastern Mediterranean and Aegean. READ MORE

Paperback: £48.00 | eBook: £16.00