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NEW: The Romano-British Villa and Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Eccles, Kent A Summary of the Excavations by Alex Detsicas with a Consideration of the Archaeological, Historical and Linguistic Context by Nick Stoodley and Stephen R Cosh with contributions by Jillian Hawkins and Courtnay Konshuh. Paperback; 205x290mm; 276 pages; 132 figures, 22 tables (colour throughout). 790 . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695878. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695885. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Romano-British Villa and Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Eccles, Kent presents a study of the central and lower Medway valley during the 1st millennium AD. It takes as its focus the Eccles Roman villa and Anglo-Saxon cemetery, excavated between 1962–1976 and directed by Alec Detsicas. An account of this important villa throughout its long history is outlined, and a re-assessment of the architectural evidence which Detsicas presented, with fresh interpretations, is provided. In the middle of the 7th century, a large Anglo-Saxon cemetery was established south of the villa. It started as a typical ‘Final Phase’ cemetery but continued into the late Saxon period. The evidence from the cemetery is presented as a site report, with a burial catalogue, a discussion of the grave goods and a study of the wider aspects of mortuary practice. The monograph also includes a chapter on some fragmentary Iron Age evidence and a discussion of an Anglo-Saxon timber building and its relationship to the cemetery. The evidence from the villa and Anglo-Saxon cemetery is discussed within the context of the Medway valley, which highlights the important contribution that Eccles makes to archaeological knowledge. The significance of the area is further investigated by studies devoted to the pre-English place-names of the valley and the documentary evidence of the area during the Anglo-Saxon period. The volume concludes with a general discussion, which draws together all the strands of evidence and evaluates the significance of the Medway valley during the 1st millennium AD.

About the Authors
Nick Stoodley was awarded his PhD from the University of Reading and is currently an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Winchester. His research interests concern the archaeology of early Anglo-Saxon England, with a particular interest in the region of Wessex. He has published monographs on Anglo-Saxon cemeteries and contributed papers on aspects of the period’s mortuary ritual to edited volumes. He is the lead archaeologist for the community-based Meon Valley Archaeology and Heritage Group, which is currently investigating settlement patterns in this Hampshire valley. ;

Stephen R. Cosh is an archaeological writer and illustrator specialising on the Roman period. He is the co-author of the four-volume corpus of Romano-British mosaics and has written numerous articles and specialist reports. He was awarded the degree of D Litt from the University of Reading in 2006.

Jillian Hawkins was awarded her PhD from the University of Winchester and is a place-name specialist.

Courtnay Konshuh is a lecturer at the University of Calgary and was awarded her PhD from the University of Winchester.
NEW: Lyde Green Roman Villa, Emersons Green, South Gloucestershire edited by Matthew S. Hobson and Richard Newman. Paperback; 205x290mm; 212 pages; 58 figures, 44 tables, 27 plates (colour throughout). 787 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 85. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270463. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270470. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Lyde Green Roman Villa, Emersons Green, South Gloucestershire was excavated between mid-2012 and mid-2013 along with its surroundings and antecedent settlement. The excavations took place as part of the Emersons Green East Development Area, funded through the mechanism of commercial archaeology by Gardiner & Theobald LLP. The results of the stratigraphic analysis are given here along with specialist reports on the human remains, pottery (including thin sections), ceramic building material, small finds, coinage and iron-working waste. Six open-area excavations allowed the archaeologists the rare opportunity to trace a substantial part of the site’s layout. Three ancillary buildings within the villa compound, including a bathhouse, were excavated. Evidence of advanced water management was uncovered in the form of lead piping, ceramic drain tiles and an enigmatic stone structure built into a canalised spring line. The villa’s economy included stock raising, crop processing and iron and textile production. The settlement appears to have originated in the mid-1st century AD, or slightly earlier.

About the Editors
Matthew Hobson is a specialist in Roman Archaeology, with a focus on Britain and the Maghreb and has authored numerous academic publications. He has taught undergraduate and post-graduate courses at universities in the UK and in the Netherlands and directed excavations in the UK, France, Italy and North Africa. In 2017-2020 Matthew arranged and delivered educational courses in the use of satellite imagery and GIS for Heritage Managers across the Middle East and North Africa. ;

Richard Newman is a specialist in Landscape Archaeology, with a focus on Northern England and Gloucestershire. He has authored or co-authored numerous publications. Major archaeological projects include, in the 1990s, the Second Severn Crossing English Approach Roads, and more recently, the East Anglia One cable trench. He has been a visiting fellow at Newcastle University and worked at Lancaster and Bournemouth universities. His PhD was in the post-medieval landscape history of west Gloucestershire.

Table of Contents (provisional)
Editors’ foreword ;

Chapter 1 Introduction – Richard Newman, Matthew S. Hobson, and Damion Churchill ;

Chapter 2: Research objectives, methodologies and summary of results – Richard Newman, Matthew S. Hobson, and Damion Churchill ;

Chapter 3: The development of the landscape before the 1st millennium AD – Richard Newman and Robert Young with contributions by Adrian Bailey, Kimberley Colman, Lynne Gardiner, David Jackson, Mike McElligott and Megan Stoakley ;

Chapter 4: Dating the origins of the rural settlement at Lyde Green: a Late Iron Age enclosure system? – Richard Newman and Matthew S. Hobson with contributions by Lynne Gardiner, Mike McElligott, Ed McSloy and Megan Stoakley ;

Chapter 5: The Romano-British period and the villa estate – Mike McElligott, Richard Newman, Matthew S. Hobson and Megan Stoakley with contributions by Don O’Meara and Lynne Gardiner ;

Chapter 6: The Romano-British artefacts (mid-1st century AD to 5th century AD) ;

Chapter 7: The development of the landscape from the Roman period to the present day – Richard Newman with contributions from Ed McSloy and Megan Stoakley ;

Chapter 8: Lyde Green and the Romano-British villas of South Gloucestershire – Richard Newman ;

Chapter 9: Appendices ;
Appendix 1: Catalogue of Bronze Age pottery ;
Appendix 2: Table of radiocarbon dates ;
Appendix 3: Catalogue of decorated Samian and Samian stamps ;
Appendix 4: Petrographic report of thin-section analyses ;
Appendix 5: Fabric descriptions of ceramic building material ;
Appendix 6: XRF methodology and tables ;
Appendix 7: Met
NEW: Roman Amphora Contents: Reflecting on the Maritime Trade of Foodstuffs in Antiquity (In honour of Miguel Beltrán Lloris) Proceedings of the Roman Amphora Contents International Interactive Conference (RACIIC) (Cadiz, 5-7 October 2015) edited by Darío Bernal-Casasola, Michel Bonifay, Alessandra Pecci and Victoria Leitch. Paperback; 210x297mm; 512pp; 175 figures (colour throughout). 784 2021 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 17. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781803270623. £68.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270630. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £68.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Roman Amphora Contents: Reflecting on the Maritime Trade of Foodstuffs in Antiquity gathers together the results of the RACIIC International Congress (Roman Amphora Contents International Interactive Conference, Cádiz, 2015), dedicated to the distinguished Spanish amphorologist Miguel Beltrán Lloris. The aim is to reflect on the current state of knowledge about the palaeocontents of Roman amphorae. With over 30 specialists from different countries, the text examines four elements diachronically throughout the Roman period up to the 7th century, with some insights on pre-Roman times: 1) the intimate relationships between amphorae and their contents, from an interdisciplinary perspective (from tituli picti to the evidence from underwater sites, including the problems of reuse); 2) the contribution and current state of knowledge concerning archaeometric approaches (especially organic residue analysis); 3) the evidence at regional / provincial level (from Lusitania to Egypt); and 4) recent case studies, from Corinth, Pompeii and Arles to the Fretum Gaditanum, which allow us to illustrate the different and combined study methods, necessarily interdisciplinary (archaeological, archaeobotanical, archaeozoological, epigraphic, palynological or biomolecular), in order to advance in this transcendental theme and its significance for the economic history and maritime traffic of the Ancient World.

About the Editors
Darío Bernal-Casasola is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Cádiz in Andalusia, Spain, specialising in the Roman Economy and Maritime Archaeology. He studied at Madrid and his main research topics are marine resources exploitation in antiquity and Roman trade. He has directed field projects in Spain, Italy and Morocco. ;

Michel Bonifay is Research Director at the Centre Camille Jullian (Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, CCJ, Aix-en-Provence, France). He is an archaeologist specialising in the classification, production and distribution of Roman African ceramics and their economic significance. He has been involved in field projects in Tunisia, Libya and Algeria. ;

Alessandra Pecci is Lecturer in Archaeology, Universitat de Barcelona. She specialises in archaeometry and food practices, mainly through the organic residue analysis of archaeological materials, mortars and plasters. She has participated in international and interdisciplinary projects in Italy, Spain, Turkey and Mexico. ;

Victoria Leitch is an Honorary Research Fellow at Durham University and a Research Associate at the Centre Camille Jullian (Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, CCJ, Aix-en-Provence, France), specialising in Roman African/Libyan ceramics. She is Publications Manager at the Society for Libyan Studies and Editor of Libyan Studies.
NEW (REPRINT AND OPEN ACCESS): The Roman Cemetery at Lankhills Pre-Roman and Roman Winchester. Part II by Giles Clarke. Hardback; 215x276 pages; 614pp. 777 2021 Winchester Studies 3. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270081. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270098. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Winchester Studies 3.ii: Outside the north gate of Venta Belgarum, Roman Winchester, a great cemetery stretched for 500 yards along the road to Cirencester. Excavations at Lankhills from 1967 to 1972 uncovered 451 graves, many elaborately furnished, at the northern limits of this cemetery, and dating from the fourth century A.D. This book, the second in a two-part study of Venta Belgarum, which forms the third volume of Winchester Studies, describes the excavations of these burials and analyses in detail both the graves and their contents. There are detailed studies and important re-assessments of many categories of object, but it is the information about late Roman burial, religion, and society which is of special interest.

This is a reprint of the volume originally published in 1979 (Oxford, ISBN 9780198131779). The reprint is based on scans of the original publication, with minor changes to present folding or pull-out sections on standard folio pages. A brief introduction to the reprint is provided by the author, Giles Clarke.

Reviews of the 1979 edition:
This meticulous and detailed work is of major importance for the study of Roman burial practices and their relevance for our knowledge of Roman religion. No such comprehensive study has appeared elsewhere … a model of what such a work should be.Prof. J.C. Mann, British Book News (1980) ;

The excavation and report on the Lankhills cemetery is something of a landmark. It is a lesson to Roman archaeologists about what they have been missing through neglect of their cemetery sites, and also a lesson to every-one engaged in cemetery site studies, whatever their period, in how to analyse and present their evidence to maximum advantage. This model publication will be an indispensable work of reference for many years to come.Dr Sonia Hawkes, Times Literary Supplement (1980) ;

… auch ein Musterbeispiel für die gesamte spätantike provinzialrömische Archäologie.’ [‘… also a model example for the whole of provincial Roman archaeology in the late Roman period.Prof. Jochen Garbsch, Bayerische Vorgeschichtsblätter (1981)

NEW: I reperti e i motivi egizi ed egittizzanti a Pompei Indagine preliminare per una loro contestualizzazione by Nikola D. Bellucci. Paperback; 174x245mm; 596 pages; 51 figures, 63 plates (colour throughout). Italian text. 773 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 83. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699241. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699258. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

I reperti e i motivi egizi ed egittizzanti a Pompei. Indagine preliminare per una loro contestualizzazione presents a synthesis of Nikola Belluci’s research on Egyptian and Egyptianizing material from Pompeii. Starting from the historical context in which to frame these phenomena and proceeding with a review of terminology in order to offer a common lexicon for future research, the work provides a first up to date corpus of Egyptian and Egyptianizing subjects and finds from Pompeii. More specific analysis focuses on the various Nilotic scenes. Furthermore, the first results of correlations between frescoes and finds allow us to understand better the general and particular distribution of the various types of subjects and finds, evaluating their diffusion among regiones, insulae and domus. The volume includes numerous plates and a rich and up to date bibliography.

About the Author
Nikola D. Bellucci holds Masters degrees in Classical Philology and in Archaeology and Cultures of the Ancient World from the Alma Mater Studiorum (University of Bologna), and a doctorate from the University of Bern, where he is a member of the Department of Mediterranean Archaeology. He is a collaborator with the Pompeii Artistic Landscapes Project (PALP) and is the author of numerous scientific publications, including L’Egitto dei Flavi (with Brunella L. Longo) (2020) and Racconto d’Egitto (with Ahmed F. Kzzo) (2020), both published by Archaeopress.

in italiano
I reperti e i motivi egizi ed egittizzanti a Pompei. Indagine preliminare per una loro contestualizzazione, rappresenta la sintesi delle ricerche svolte dal dott. Bellucci su questa complessa e articolata tematica. Partendo dal contesto storico in cui inquadrare tali fenomeni e proponendo una riflessione terminologica al fine di offrire un lessico comune per future e auspicabili ricerche, l’opera raccoglie, mette in luce, definisce e fornisce un primo e aggiornato corpus dei soggetti e dei reperti egizi ed egittizzanti nel contesto pompeiano, permettendo così anche analisi più specifiche riguardo le diverse scene nilotiche presenti a Pompei. Inoltre, primi risultati di correlazioni tra affreschi e reperti consentono ora di comprendere meglio la distribuzione generale e particolare di questa varia tipologia espressiva valutandone la diffusione tra Regiones, Insulae e domus. Composta di due sezioni per un totale di nove capitoli, con cinque appendici di dati e tre tavole di supplemento fotografico, il volume offre inoltre una ricca e aggiornata bibliografia sul tema.

Nikola D. Bellucci, dottore magistrale in Filologia classica (Th. Papirologia), dottore magistrale in Archeologia e culture del mondo antico (Th. Egittologia) presso l’
NEW: Arqueología de la arquitectura en el oppidum oretano de El Cerro de las Cabezas (Valdepeñas, Ciudad Real): los bastiones de la puerta S by Jorge del Reguero González. Paperback; 203x276mm; 94pp; 48 figures (colour throughout). Spanish text. 145 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271088. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271095. Institutional Price £9.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Arqueología de la arquitectura en el oppidum oretano de El Cerro de las Cabezas focuses on the two bastions that make up the south gate of the Iberian oppidum of Cerro de las Cabezas (Valdepeñas, Ciudad Real). It comprises two defensive constructions whose internal space fulfilled a socioeconomic function related to the storage of cereal. Primarily archaeoarchitectural, supported by the digitisation and study of the photographic archive of the excavation, the research aims to analyse the construction techniques and materials of both structures, define their successive construction phases within the historical process of the settlement and to evaluate the architectural ensemble within a spatial area of enormous importance within the urban framework. All this allows us to understand the continuous changes and transformations that this space suffered between the 5th and 3rd centuries BC to defend Punic influence and presence in this Iberian oppidum.

About the Author
Jorge del Reguero González holds a degree in history and a masters in Archaeology and Heritage from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM). He has participated in several annual research projects at the Iberian oppidum of El Cerro de las Cabezas (Valdepeñas, Ciudad Real), supported by non-invasive archaeological actions (geophysical surveys) and analysis of construction techniques through the archaeology of architecture. He has also participated in excavations at the Tartessian site of Casas del Turuñuelo (Guareña, Badajoz) and the eastern necropolis of the Spanish-Roman site of Baelo Claudia (Bolonia, Cádiz).

en español
Se aborda en el presente trabajo un estudio arquitectónico sobre los dos bastiones que configuran la puerta sur del oppidum ibérico de El Cerro de las Cabezas (Valdepeñas, Ciudad Real). Se trata de dos construcciones defensivas cuyo espacio interno cumplió con una función socioeconómica relacionada con el almacenamiento de cereal. A través de este trabajo de investigación, de carácter arqueoarquitectónico, apoyado en la digitalización y reestudio del archivo fotográfico del proceso de excavación, se pretende analizar las técnicas y los materiales constructivos de ambas construcciones, definir sus sucesivas fases constructivas dentro el proceso histórico del asentamiento y valorar el conjunto arquitectónico en un área espacial de enorme importancia dentro del entramado urbano. Todo ello nos permitirá conocer los continuos cambios y transformaciones que sufrió este espacio, entre los siglos V y III a.C., para defender, seguidamente, la influencia y presencia púnica en este oppidum ibérico.

Jorge del Reguero González es graduado en Historia por la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM) y Máster en Arqueología y Patrimonio por la citada universidad. Ha participado en varios proyectos de investigación, de carácter anual, para el estudio urbano y territorial del oppidum ibérico de El Cerro de las Cabezas (Valdepeñas, Ciudad Real), apoyado en actuaciones arqueológicas no invasivas (prospecciones geofísicas) y análisis de las técnicas constructivas mediante una lectura propia de la arqueología de la arquitectura. Ha colaborado en las excavaciones en el yacimiento tartésico de Casas del Turuñuelo (Guareña, Badajoz) o la necrópolis oriental del yacimiento hispanorromano de Baelo Claudia (Bolonia, Cádiz).
NEW: Later Prehistoric Settlement in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly: Evidence from Five Excavations edited by Andy M Jones and Graeme Kirkham. Paperback; 205x290mm; 380 pages; 178 figures, 62 tables (60 pages in colour). 778 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699579. £52.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699586. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £52.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Later Prehistoric Settlement in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly reports on the excavation between 1996 and 2014 of five later prehistoric and Roman period settlements. Three of the mainland sites – Killigrew, Nancemere and Higher Besore – are located in central Cornwall, near Truro, with the fourth, at Porthleven, situated on the south coast in west Cornwall. The fifth settlement, Porth Killier, is on the island of St Agnes on the Isles of Scilly. All the sites were multi-phased, revealing both similar and contrasting patterns of occupation stretching from the Bronze Age into the Iron Age and beyond. Despite having broadly comparable chronological sequences, there are considerable differences in both the tempo and intensity of occupation, and significant contrasts in practices associated with them. Significantly, all four mainland sequences culminate with an enclosed settlement in the Late Iron Age and especially during the Roman period, a time of significant economic and social change following the conquest. During this period there continued to be differences in the character of occupation. Notably two of the enclosures seem to have been strongly associated with industrial activities, including metalworking at Killigrew, suggesting that the working of iron may have been a controlled or ritualized activity undertaken within a dedicated space. The volume presents the results from each of the five settlement sites, before reviewing the key themes which have emerged from the investigations.

About the Editors
Andy M Jones is Principal Archaeologist with the Cornwall Archaeological Unit. His research interests include the Neolithic and Bronze Age, as well as the archaeology of the uplands and coastal areas of western Britain. Ongoing research projects include the social responses to the later prehistoric drowning of the Mount’s Bay landscape in west Cornwall and social organization of metalworking in the British Bronze Age. His recent publications include: Excavation of Later Prehistoric and Roman Sites along the Route of the Newquay Strategic Road Corridor, Cornwall (2019); An Intellectual Adventurer in Archaeology: Reflections on the work of Charles Thomas (2018); Preserved in the Peat: An Extraordinary Bronze Age Burial on Whitehorse Hill (2016); and Metalworking in the Middle Bronze Age and Beyond: New evidence from Tremough, Cornwall (2015). ;

Graeme Kirkham was formerly a project archaeologist with Cornwall Archaeological Unit, now a freelance historic environment consultant and independent researcher; joint editor of Cornish Archaeology since 2003. Current research interests include medieval and post-medieval responses to prehistoric monuments and a range of landscape history topics.
NEW: The Shaping of the English Landscape: An Atlas of Archaeology from the Bronze Age to Domesday Book by Chris Green and Miranda Creswell. Paperback; 219x297mm; 134 pages; illustrated in colour throughout. 767 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270609. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270616. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Shaping of the English Landscape is an atlas of English archaeology covering the period from the middle Bronze Age (c. 1500 BC) to Domesday Book (AD 1086), encompassing the Bronze and Iron Ages, the Roman period, and the early medieval (Anglo-Saxon) age. It was produced as part of the English Landscape and Identities (EngLaId) project at the University of Oxford, which took place from 2011 to 2016, funded by the European Research Council.

In this book, you will find maps (produced by Chris Green) and discussion of themes including landscape agency, settlement, foodways and field systems, belief and the treatment of the dead, mobility and defence, making things, and material culture. Alongside are artworks (produced by Miranda Creswell) dealing with similar themes and depicting archaeological sites from across England. The authors hope to inspire and encourage debate into the past history of the English landscape.

Includes contributions from Anwen Cooper, Victoria Donnelly, Tyler Franconi, Roger Glyde, Chris Gosden, Zena Kamash, Janice Kinory, Sarah Mallet, Dan Stansbie, John Talbot, and Letty Ten Harkel.

About the Contributors
Chris Green is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the School of Archaeology within the University of Oxford. He worked on English Landscape and Identities throughout the lifespan of the project. Chris specialises in applications of Geographic Information Systems and data science in archaeology. He particularly enjoys making maps. ;

Miranda Creswell is a visual artist based in Oxford. She is currently Artist in Residence at the School of Archaeology and previously worked within the team on English Landscape and Identities, documenting working methods and also creating the Recording England artworks presented in this book.
FORTHCOMING: A Quaint & Curious Volume: Essays in Honor of John J. Dobbins edited by Dylan K. Rogers and Claire J. Weiss. Hardback; 174x245mm; 204 pages; 87 figures, 10 tables (colour throughout). Print RRP: £49.00 (Open Access eBook). 801 2021. ISBN 9781789692181. Book contents pageBuy Now

John J. Dobbins, Professor of Roman Art and Archaeology, taught at the University of Virginia in the Department of Art from 1978 until his retirement in 2019. His legacy of research and pedagogy is explored in A Quaint & Curious Volume: Essays in Honor of John J. Dobbins. Professor Dobbins’ research in the field of Roman art and archaeology spans the geographical and chronological limits of the Roman Empire, from Pompeii to Syria, and Etruria to Spain. This volume demonstrates some of his wide-reaching interests, expressed through the research of his former graduate students. Several essays examine the city of Pompeii and cover the topics of masonry analysis, re-examinations of streets and drains, and analyses of the heating capacity of baths in Pompeii. Beyond Pompeii, the archaeological remains of bakeries are employed to elucidate labor specialization in the Late Roman period across the Mediterranean basin. Collaborations between Professor Dobbins and his former students are also explored, including a pioneering online numismatic database and close examination of sculpture and mosaics, including expressions of identity and patronage through case studies of the Ara Pacis and mosaics at Antioch-on-the-Orontes. A Quaint & Curious Volume not only demonstrates John Dobbins’ scholarly legacy, but also presents new readings of archaeological data and art, illustrating the impact that one professor can have on the wider field of Roman art and archaeology through the continuing work of his students.

About the Editors
Dylan K. Rogers, PhD (2015), University of Virginia, is Lecturer of Roman Art and Archaeology at UVa and previously served as the Assistant Director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens from 2015-2019. He is the author of Water Culture in Roman Society (2018), and is the co-editor of the volumes, What’s New in Roman Greece? (2019) and The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Athens (2021). His research specialty is Roman fountains throughout the Roman Empire, investigating their impact on surrounding landscapes through the lens of sensory archaeology. He has also published on the topics of wall-painting in Pompeii, Roman mosaics, the siege of Athens by L. Cornelius Sulla in 86 BC, and archaeological archives. Rogers has worked on archaeological excavations in Pompeii, Sicily, Greece, and Turkey. ;

Claire J. Weiss, PhD (2018), University of Virginia, is a classical archaeologist whose research focuses on Roman urbanism, especially the sidewalks of ancient Roman cities and the relationship of these structures to urban social and economic organization. She has conducted archaeological field work and excavations in Pompeii since 2001, serving as the Assistant Director and Project Coordinator of the Via Consolare Project in Pompeii from 2006 to 2018, and now co-directing the Roman Colonial Urbanism Project.
FORTHCOMING: Colonial Geopolitics and Local Cultures in the Hellenistic and Roman East (3rd century BC – 3rd century AD) Géopolitique coloniale et cultures locales dans l’Orient hellénistique et romain (IIIe siècle av. J.-C. – IIIe siècle ap. J.-C.) edited by Hadrien Bru, Adrian G. Dumitru and Nicholas Sekunda. Paperback; 205x290mm; 228 pages; 38 figures, 4 maps, 3 tables, 7 charts, 17 plates (colour throughout). Papers in English and French. Print RRP: £38.00. 791 2021. ISBN 9781789699821. Book contents pageBuy Now

Colonial Geopolitics and Local Cultures in the Hellenistic and Roman East (3rd century BC – 3rd century AD) presents contributions taken in the main from a panel held during the Celtic Conference in Classics 2014 (Edinburgh, Scotland, June 25-28th 2014), but also incorporates a number of papers given previously at another panel which convened at Mamaia (Romania, September 23-27th, 2012). What changes in the material culture can we observe, when a state is overwhelming a local population with soldiers, katoikoi, and civil officials or merchants? One of the main concerns of local geopolitics was the central question of how agricultural land was distributed to the Greek or Roman colonists after it had been seized from the native population? In what way did the state watch over and administer the colonised territories? What were the exact social, legal, cultural and political relationships between the natives and the newcomers? Did the language of the colonists dominate the local vernacular language or not, and in what way? Did onomastics change or not in particular regions over centuries? What were the mutual influences between native and colonial cultures? This collection addresses these questions, focusing on the Hellenistic and Roman East.

About the Editors
Hadrien Bru is a French historian and epigrapher working on Hellenistic and Roman Anatolia and Near East, Maître de Conférences HDR in Ancient History at the University of Bourgogne-Franche Comté (Besançon). His notable publications include: L’Asie Mineure dans l’Antiquité : échanges, populations et territoires (2009), Le pouvoir impérial dans les provinces syriennes. Représentations et célébrations d’Auguste à Constantin (31 av. J.-C.-337 ap. J.-C.) (2011), L’Anatolie des peuples, cités et cultures (IIe millénaire av. J.- C.-Ve siècle ap. J.-C.) (2013) and La Phrygie Parorée et la Pisidie septentrionale aux époques hellénistique et romaine. Géographie historique et sociologie culturelle (2017). ;

Adrian George Dumitru is a Romanian historian of the Hellenistic world. He holds a PhD from the Universities of Bucharest and Paris IV Sorbonne and his research focuses principally on the Seleucid kingdom and the city of Byzantion. He is the author of a number of papers dedicated to those subjects (his most recent deals with the neglected topic of the tyrants of the Hellenistic Near East) and he also teaches seminars on Roman history at the University of Bucharest. ;

Nicholas V. Sekunda holds a PhD from Manchester University. He has held research positions at Monash University in Melbourne and at the Australian National University in Canberra. He currently holds the post of Head of Department of Mediterranean Archaeology at Gdansk University. He has participated in excavations in England, Poland, Iran, Greece, Syria and Jordan, and now co-directs excavations at Negotino Gradište in the Republic of North Macedonia. Nicholas is the author of a number of books concerning Greek Warfare.
FORTHCOMING: Hunde in der römischen Antike: Rassen/Typen - Zucht - Haltung und Verwendung by Heidelinde Autengruber-Thüry. Paperback; 205x290mm; 482 pages; 487 figures, 8 maps (colour throughout). German text. Print RRP: £70.00. 786 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 84. ISBN 9781789698367. Book contents pageBuy Now

Hunde in der römischen Antike: Rassen/Typen, Zucht, Haltung und Verwendung deals extensively with the living environment of the dog in Roman antiquity, based on literary and iconographic sources as well as archaeological and archaeozoological finds. The knowledge gained from this is documented by numerous images. Older research opinions, some of which have gone unchecked for more than a hundred years, are examined and—where necessary—corrected.

For the first time, a catalogue of the more than eighty dog breeds/types documented from antiquity is presented with their names, origins, appearance and the special characteristics of these animals. The ancient theories of dog breeding are compared with modern practices. A catalogue of the previously known dog names has been revised with around sixty new names added. The book examines how dogs were housed, what accessories were used and how the animals were fed. It sheds light on illnesses, medical treatment and the care of elderly dogs. A catalogue of epitaphs and extant canine tombstones gives an insight into the emotional world of grieving animal owners. Dogs not only served as guards, shepherds, hunters and lap dogs but also had other important roles such as sacred animals in temples or as waste disposers for sanitation. But they were also used corporeally: their fur was tanned, and their body parts were needed for magical rituals. In short, dogs played an important role in many areas of life, such that everyday life in the Classical world could not be imagined without them.

About the Author
Heidelinde Autengruber-Thüry completed her studies in history at the University of Vienna with a master's degree (with distinction) in 1999 and a doctorate in 2017. She acquired her specialist practical and theoretical knowledge in the field of cynology through many years of collaboration with the Irish Setter Club of Austria.

Auf Deutsch
Hunde in der römischen Antike beschäftigt sich umfassend mit dem Lebensumfeld des Hundes in der römischen Antike. Als Grundlagen dazu dienen die Quellen der griechisch-römischen Literatur, der Kunst und die archäologischen sowie archäozoologischen Funde. Durch zahlreiche Bilddarstellungen werden die daraus gewonnenen Erkenntnisse dokumentiert. Ältere Forschungsmeinungen, die zum Teil seit mehr als hundert Jahren ungeprüft übernommen und bis heute tradiert werden, werden überprüft und – wo nötig – richtiggestellt.

Erstmals wird ein Katalog der über achtzig aus der Antike belegten Hunderassen/-typen mit Namen, Herkunft, Aussehen und den speziellen Eigenschaften dieser Tiere vorgestellt. Der Wissensstand der Antike über Hundezucht wird mit den heutigen Standpunkten der modernen Hundezucht verglichen. Ein aus dem vorigen Jahrhundert stammender Katalog der bis dahin bekannten Hundenamen wurde adaptiert und konnte um circa sechzig neue Namen erweitert werden. Es wird untersucht, wie Hunde untergebracht wurden, welches Zubehör Verwendung fand und wie die Tiere ernährt wurden. Krankheiten, medizinische Behandlung und die fürsorgliche Pflege sehr alter Hunde zeigen weitere Aspekte der Hundehaltung. Eine Zusammenstellung der überlieferten Grabgedichte und erhaltenen Grabsteine für Hunde geben Einblicke in die Gefühlswelt der trauernden Tierbesitzer. Hunde dienten nicht nur als Wach-, Hirten-, Jagd- und Schoßhunde, sie hatten auch weitere wichtige Aufgaben wie zum Beispiel als heilbringende Tiere in Tempeln oder als Abfallentsorger für die Siedlungshygiene. Aber auch als Rohstofflieferanten wurden sie genützt, ihr Fell wurde gegerbt und ihre Körperteile wurden für magische Rituale benötigt. Kurz gefasst lässt sich sagen, dass Hunde in vielen Lebensbereichen des antiken Menschen eine wichtige Rolle spielten und sie aus dem täglichen Leben nicht wegzudenken waren.

Heidelinde Autengruber-Thüry legt hier die Druckfassung ihrer Dissertation vor. Sie hat ihr Studium der G
FORTHCOMING: New Approaches to the Archaeology of Beekeeping edited by David Wallace-Hare. Paperback; 205x290mm; 296pp; 137 figures, 1 map, 11 tables, 4 plates (colour throughout). Papers in English, French, Spanish and Portuguese. Print RRP: £48.00. 785 2021. ISBN 9781789699937. Buy Now

Pre-Order and save 25%: Click here to download the special pre-order form.

New Approaches to the Archaeology of Beekeeping aims to take a holistic view of beekeeping archaeology (including honey, wax, and associated products, hive construction, and participants in this trade) in one large interconnected geographic region, the Mediterranean, central Europe, and the Atlantic Façade. Current interest in beekeeping is growing because of the precipitous decline of bees worldwide and the disastrous effect it portends for global agriculture. As a result, all aspects of beekeeping in all historical periods are coming under closer scrutiny.

The volume focuses on novel approaches to historical beekeeping but also offers new applications of more established ways of treating apicultural material from the past. It is also keenly interested in helping readers navigate the challenges inherent in studying beekeeping historically. The volume brings together scholars working on ancient, medieval, early modern, and ethnographic evidence of beekeeping from a variety of perspectives. In this sense it will serve as a handbook for current researchers in this field and for those who wish to undertake research into the archaeology of beekeeping.

About the Editor
David Wallace-Hare (PhD University of Toronto) is a specialist in Roman environmental history and Latin epigraphy whose research concerns the history and archaeology of Roman and medieval beekeeping. Currently the Friends of Classics and Barbara Schuch Endowed Postdoctoral Fellow in Classics and Digital Humanities at San Diego State University, his current project collects references to bee forage plants in Roman, Late Antique, and medieval textual sources. This work is a foundation for a global historical bee forage database called Reforage to encourage individuals and communities to transplant historical bee friendly plants to integrate into urban spaces, schools, and campuses.

FORTHCOMING (OPEN ACCESS): The People of Early Winchester by Caroline M. Stuckert. Hardback; 215x276mm; 528pp; extensively illustrated with photographs, line drawings, maps, and charts. Print RRP: £80.00 (eBook to be Open Access). 782 2021 Winchester Studies 9. ISBN 9781803270142. Buy Now

Winchester Studies 9.i: The People of Early Winchester traces the lives, health, and diseases of Winchester's inhabitants as seen in their skeletal remains from the mid-third century to the mid-sixteenth century, a period of over 1,300 years. Although the populations of other British urban areas, York and London in particular, have been studied over an extended period, this volume is unique in providing a continuous chronological window, rather than a series of isolated studies. It is particularly notable for the large sample of Anglo-Saxon burials dated to the 8th - 10th centuries, which provide a bridge between the earlier Romano-British material and the later medieval samples.

This study includes information on demography, physical characteristics, dental health, disease, and trauma collected from over 2,000 skeletons excavated from the Roman Cemetery at Lankhills and the Anglo-Saxon and medieval cemeteries of the Old and New Minster and Winchester Cathedral, as well as other Early Anglo-Saxon sites in neighbouring areas of Hampshire. The study establishes the underlying continuity of the population in spite of massive culture change between the Roman and Early Saxon periods, and delineates the increasing tendency to rounder skulls seen in the medieval period, a trend which is found in continental Europe at the same time. There were also significant differences through time in disease patterns and trauma. Leprosy, for example, is found only in post-Roman skeletons, while decapitations are seen only in Roman skeletons. Weapons injuries are confined to Anglo-Saxon and medieval individuals, although broken bones were common during the Roman period.

This is a new edition of the volume originally published in 2017 (Oxford, ISBN 9780198131700). The new edition will appear online first, with a printed edition to follow in the future.

About the Author:
Caroline M. Stuckert (Connie) holds a B. A. in history from Bryn Mawr College, and an M. A. in physical anthropology and Ph. D. in archaeology and physical anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania. She has taught at Muhlenberg College and the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests centre on the British Isles from the Iron Age through medieval periods, and she has conducted research and participated in excavations in both England and Ireland. In addition, she has enjoyed a 25-year career as a consultant and senior museum executive. A native Philadelphian, Connie has spent extended periods in Britain, and currently lives in the Philadelphia suburbs.

Reviews of the 2017 edition:
Just one of an incredibly comprehensive series examining the history of Winchester, this book uncovers the story of the city's occupants from AD 250 to 1540, as told by their skeletal remains.Emma Watts-Plumpkin, Current Archaeology ;

This volume is a valuable contribution to long-term population history. The production and illustration standards are high, and Caroline Stuckert should be congratulated for finally bringing all of this important research to publication ...Sam Lucy, Antiquity

Table of Contents:
List of illustrations ;
List of tables ;
List of abbreviations ;
List of references ;

Part 1 IntroductionMartin Biddle and Birthe Kjølbye-Biddle ;
1:Introduction ;
2:Concept ;
3:The origin, growth, and completion of this study ;
4:The outcome: a summary ;

Part 2 Romano-British Populations from Lankhills and other cemeteries in WinchesterCaroline M. Stuckert ;
1:Introduction ;
2:Demography ;
3:Physical characteristics ;
4:Dentition ;
5:Pathology ;
FORTHCOMING: Investigations into the Dyeing Industry in Pompeii Experimental Archaeology and Computer Simulation Techniques by Heather Hopkins Pepper. Paperback; 205x290mm; 212 pages; 86 figures, 25 tables plus illustrated gazetteer. Print RRP: £38.00. 755 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . ISBN 9781789697421. Buy Now

The scale of processing associated with the dyeing industry in Pompeii is a controversial subject. To determine the scale of manufacturing would allow an understanding of the operation of Pompeii’s economy and its part in the Roman World. Previous studies have taken a theoretical approach, and no conclusive answer has been reached. Conversely, Investigations into the Dyeing Industry in Pompeii uses a new multi-disciplinary triangulated approach. A replica was constructed to gauge the operating parameters of a dyeing apparatus within the framework of the principles of experimental archaeology. The remains were re-examined in situ with the new operational and ergonomics understanding. The replica was amended to allow exploration of design features and ventilation. The throughput of the apparatus was placed within the context of the industry with modern manufacturing systems theory. Computer simulation was used to explore the long-term mechanical effects of the dyeing process on the materials used in the construction of the original apparatus and to determine if 'ratcheting' failure was due to creep. These combined methods have given an understanding of the significance of the industry that is grounded in engineering and archaeological principles but within the context of Pompeii.

About the Author
Heather Hopkins Pepper graduated with BSc Archaeology and PhD in Roman Engineering from the University of Bradford. She was made AIfA in 2009. She continues to research, present and publish widely, diversifying through collaboration with different disciplines, including recent experiments through the European Textile Forum to explore the choice of materials used in dyeing apparatus. She edited and co-edited the first and second proceedings of the European Textile Forum in 2013 and 2018.

Table of Contents (Provisional)
Preface ;
Timeline of previous work relevant to this study ;
Chapter Zero: Preface to the published thesis ;

An investigation of the parameters that would influence the scale of the dyeing industry in Pompeii: an application of experimental archaeology and computer simulation techniques to investigate the scale of manufacture of the dyeing industry and the factors that influence output ;
Chapter One: Introduction to the dyeing industry of Pompeii ;
Chapter Two: Literature Review ;
Chapter Three: Experimental Replica ;
Chapter Four: Review of Remains in situ ;

Full Gazetteer of Dyeing Apparatus in Pompeii ;
Chapter Five Application of Ergonomics to Apparatus and Skeletal data ;
Chapter Six: Flued Experimental replica ;
Chapter Seven: The Finite Element model ;
Chapter Eight: Discussion ;
Glossary ;
References ;

Appendices ;
Appendix One: Coding Pompeii: The layout of the city and address description ;
Appendix Two: Understanding the economic influence of the dyeing industry in Pompeii through the application of experimental archaeology and thermodynamics ;
Appendix Three ;
Appendix Four: Assembling lead data for model ;
Appendix Five: Abaqus input decks ;

Online Content
Iron Age and Roman Settlement at Highflyer Farm, Ely, Cambridgeshire by James Fairclough. Paperback; 205x290mm; 154 pages; 91 figures, 28 tables (colour throughout). 765 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698428. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698435. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Iron Age and Roman settlement at Highflyer Farm, Ely, Cambridgeshire presents the results of archaeological work carried out by MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) at Highflyer Farm in 2018. Remains dating from the Neolithic to the post-medieval period were recorded, with most of the activity occurring between the early Iron Age and late Roman periods. Excavations in 2000 at Prickwillow Road, undertaken directly to the south of Highflyer Farm, had recorded the southern extent of this Iron Age to Roman settlement.

Two features, a pit and a posthole, were dated to the late Neolithic to early Bronze Age. In the 5th to 4th centuries BC a small open early Iron Age settlement was established and was at the lower end of the settlement hierarchy, perhaps occupied by a single family or a seasonal group. In the middle Iron Age, there was a well-planned linear settlement split into three main sections, which consisted of a similar large rounded enclosure at its northern and southern extent, both probably domestic. A complex sub-rectangular arrangement of enclosures and boundaries lay within the centre, a roughly equal distance apart from the circular enclosures. In the late Iron Age and then the early Roman periods, a significant reorganisation of the site occurred with successive enclosures and rectilinear field systems established.

In the middle Roman period, the settlement was reorganised around three routeways with two distinct areas of linked paddocks and compartmentalised enclosures. There were three probable different separate areas of domestic activity, including a rectangular posthole structure centrally located in the main enclosure system. It is possible that there was significant export and trade of livestock occurring from this relatively wealthy settlement with cattle dominating. The routeway system continued into the later Roman period though the number of enclosures reduced. On balance, it is more likely the Roman settlement finished in the late 4th century, but an early 5th-century date should not be ruled out. Post-Roman activity was sparser, with a single sunken feature building identified as well as a waterhole and a few other features dated to the 5th and/or 6th century.

Includes contributions by Sander Aerts, Rob Atkins, Paul Blinkhorn, Andy Chapman, Chris Chinnock, Nina Crummy, Mary Ellen Crothers, Rebecca Gordon, Tora Hylton, Sarah Percival, Adam Sutton and Yvonne Wolframm-Murray.

Illustrations by Sofia Turk.

About the Author
James Fairclough is a Project Officer with MOLA Northampton, where he has worked since 2014, leading numerous sites, including the Saxon cemetery at Great Ryburgh and areas on the A14 infrastructure project. Between joining MOLA and graduating with a degree and Masters from the University of Manchester in 2012, he worked for Archaeological Solutions on sites across East Anglia. As well as working in the commercial field, James continues to help supervise research projects in the Vale of Pickering in North Yorkshire, targeting preserved Mesolithic sites. This work has been in conjunction with a number of universities and has included sites such as Star Carr and No Name Hill.
Epigraphy in the Digital Age Opportunities and Challenges in the Recording, Analysis and Dissemination of Inscriptions edited by Isabel Velázquez Soriano and David Espinosa Espinosa. Paperback; 205x290mm; 258 pages; 123 figures, 15 tables (colour throughout). 762 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699876. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699883. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £42.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Epigraphy in the Digital Age: Opportunities and Challenges in the Recording, Analysis and Dissemination of Inscriptions originates from the International Conference El patrimonio epigráfico en la era digital: Documentación, análisis y socialización (Madrid, 20–21 June 2019), organized by the Complutense University of Madrid and the University of Santiago de Compostela. Taking the results of the conference as a starting point, the book presents epigraphic research using digital and computational tools, bringing together and comparing the outcomes of both well-established projects and newer ones, so as to establish a comprehensive view according to the most innovative trends in investigation. 21 contributions have been gathered together, involving 38 scholars, which address issues related to open-access databases, SfM Photogrammetry and Digital Image Modelling applied to textual restoration, EpiDoc (TEI-XML edition), and Linked Open Data. In this manner, the book offers a dialogue based on very different perspectives and previous experiences to generate common research questions, methodologies, practical solutions, and significant results. The outcome is intended more a starting point and platform for future research than as a definitive point of arrival in terms of so-called ‘digital epigraphy’.

About the Editors
Isabel Velázquez Soriano is Professor of Latin Philology in the Department of Classical Philology at the Complutense University of Madrid. She is the principal Investigator of the Research Group ‘Textos epigráficos antiguos de la Península Ibérica y el Mediterráneo griego’ (TEAPIMeG no. 930750) at the Complutense University of Madrid, Director of the Epigraphic Archive of Hispania, and editor of Hispania Epigraphica series at the same university. Isabel Velázquez Soriano is a specialist in the study of epigraphic and literary texts from Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages. ;

David Espinosa Espinosa has a PhD in Ancient History from the Complutense University of Madrid. A Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Santiago de Compostela and the University of Vienna, he is now Lecturer in Ancient History at the University of Oviedo. His research focuses on the granting of Latin rights in the western Roman provinces, the Roman civil wars during the Republic, and Roman epigraphy. Director of the digital epigraphic corpus Epigraphica 3.0, he has among his book publications Plinio y los ‘oppida de antiguo Lacio’. El proceso de difusión del Latium en Hispania Citerior (2014).
La necropoli romana di Melano (Canton Ticino – Svizzera) by Christiane M. A. De Micheli Schulthess. Paperback; 203x276mm; 118 pages; 20 colour figures, 6 black & white figures, 12 black & white plates. Italian text. 140 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699784. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699791. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Roman necropolis of Melano (Canton Ticino, Switzerland), excavated in 1957 and 1979, is one of the few from this period discovered in the Sottoceneri region, where the findings are mostly isolated burials or those in small groups. It consists of 26 cremation and inhumation tombs and stands out for its variety of types and the materials used in their construction. Cremation burials, the most numerous, range from the simplest, single-chamber burials, up to double-chamber and multiple cinerary niches. Inhumation tombs, generally belonging to children or adolescents, have yielded clues as to the use of wooden boxes as coffins or the placement of the body on a cot or stretcher. The grave goods include all the main material classes of the Roman period typical of the region, together with finds that bear the imprint of a centre that developed along the shores of Lake Ceresio and activities related to it, such as fishing. The stratigraphy of the necropolis and the grave goods indicate continuous use from the 1st to the 3rd century AD.

About the Author
Christiane M. A. De Micheli Schulthess graduated in 1990 from the University of Zurich, majoring in Classical Archaeology, Egyptology and Ancient History. In 2001, she completed her PhD thesis, ‘Aspects of Roman Pottery in Canton Ticino (Switzerland)’, at the University of Nottingham (UK). She has pursued various studies in Classical and medieval archaeology, focusing in particular on Roman pottery and since 2000 has taken part in the excavation of the multi-period site of Tremona-Castello.

in italiano
La necropoli romana di Melano (Canton Ticino – Svizzera), scavata nel 1957 e nel 1979, costituisce a tutt’oggi una delle poche di quest’epoca scoperte nel Sottoceneri dove i rinvenimenti sono invece perlopiù sepolture isolate o riunite in piccoli gruppi. È costituita da 26 tombe fra cremazioni e inumazioni e si distingue per la loro varietà a livello tipologico e per i materiali impiegati nella loro costruzione. Fra le sepolture a cremazione, le più numerose, vi sono quelle più semplici, a vano singolo, fino a quelle a doppia camera e a loculo cinerario multiplo. Le tombe a inumazione, generalmente pertinenti a bambini o adolescenti, hanno restituito indizi riguardo all’uso di deporre il corpo in cassa lignea o su un lettino o barella. Nei corredi funerari sono presenti tutte le principali classi materiali d’epoca romana tipiche della regione unitamente a reperti che recano l’impronta di un centro sviluppatosi lungo le rive del lago Ceresio e dedito a particolari attività ad esso collegate, come la pesca. La stratigrafia verticale della necropoli e gli oggetti di corredo ne indicano un uso continuato dal I al III sec. d.C.

Christiane M. A. De Micheli Schulthess si è laureata nel 1990 all’Università di Zurigo, specializzandosi in Archeologia classica, Egittologia e Storia antica. Nel 2001 ha completato la sua tesi di dottorato Aspetti della ceramica romana nel Canton Ticino (Svizzera) presso l’Università di Nottingham (GB). Ha svolto diversi studi di archeologia classica, in particolare sulla ceramica romana, e medievale. Dal 2000 partecipa agli scavi archeologici del sito multiperiodico di Tremona-Castello.
Les pratiques funéraires en Gaule lyonnaise de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle by András Márton. Paperback; 205x290mm; 482 pages; 299 figures; 379 maps (black & white throughout). French text. 752 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 81. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698077. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698084. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Les pratiques funéraires en Gaule lyonnaise de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle aims to provide an overview of Roman burial practices in the Gallia Lugdunensis province during the Early Roman Empire.

Among the different approaches proposed by R. Reece for the study of Roman cemeteries, this work focuses on grave treatment and grave furnishing. The funerary practices are thus apprehended through the study of the structure of the tombs and the selection and treatment of the grave goods and human remains. The main objective was to propose a synthesis of the published finds which could serve as a basis for future research.

The analysis consists of a documentary review of the published data (presented in the catalogue and numerous tables) as complete as possible, accompanied by a detailed analysis of the latest information available to highlight trends regarding the entire province, and the peculiarities seen at a regional level. Many graphics and maps support this analysis.

Many general trends, common to the western provinces of the Roman Empire, were detected, but also many particularities linked to the regional nature of the funerary practices and the economic and social situation of the communities. Some of these particularities reflect more profound cultural differences due to the unequal penetration of Mediterranean funerary practices into the territory of the province. They reflect the somewhat 'artificial' formation of the Gallia Lugdunensis, which incorporated tribes belonging to different cultural spheres (sharing particularities with Aquitania and the Belgic Gaul or more exposed to the Mediterranean influences).

About the Author
András Márton was born in Budapest. He studied at the Eötvös Lorand University where he obtained two master degrees, one in History and another in Archaeology specializing in Roman provincial and Classical archaeology. After graduation, he worked at the Hungarian National Museum and the Museum of Fine Arts in Budapest. He defended his thesis summa cum laude at the Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest under the direction of Professor Patrick Galliou. He lives in France and is involved in research programs at the Louvre and the Museum of Fine Arts of Lyon. He has published many scientific papers and co-authored several books. His research interests are pottery studies and ancient funerary practices.

En français
Les pratiques funéraires en Gaule lyonnaise de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle, qui est la publication non remaniée d’une partie de la thèse de doctorat de l’auteur soutenue, avec félicitations, à l’Université de Bretagne occidentale (Brest, France) en 2013, vise à donner un aperçu des pratiques funéraires romaines dans la Gaule Lyonnaise au cours du Haut-Empire. Parmi les diffff érentes approches de l’étude des nécropoles romaines, ce travail se concentre sur les tombes et le traitement du mobilier. Les pratiques funéraires sont ainsi appréhendées à travers l’étude de la structure des tombes, de la sélection et du traitement du mobilier funéraire et des restes humains. L’objectif principal est de proposer une synthèse des résultats publiés qui puisse servir de base aux recherches futures. L’analyse consiste en une reprise documentaire (présentée dans le catalogue et les nombreux tableaux) aussi complète que possible des données publiées, accompagnée d’une analyse détaillée des informations aujourd’hui disponibles afifi n de mettre en évidence les tendances concernant l’ensemble de la province, mais aussi les particularités que l’on peut distinguer au niveau régional. L’analyse est soutenue par de nombreux graphiques et cartes. Bien sûr, des tendances générales, communes aux provinces occidentales de l’Empire romain, peuvent être détectées, mais des particularités liées aux spécififi cités régionales et à la situation économique et sociale
The Archaeology of ‘Underdog Sites’ in the Douro Valley From Prehistory to the Modern Age edited by Santiago Sánchez de la Parra-Pérez, Sonia Díaz-Navarro, Javier Fernández-Lozano and Javier Jiménez Gadea. Paperback; 203x276mm; 390 pages; colour illustrations throughout. Papers in English and Spanish. 139 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699890. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699906. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Archaeology of ‘Underdog Sites’ in the Douro Valley brings together the best presentations from the eighth and ninth meetings of Archaeology of the Douro Valley, held in Ávila and Astorga (Spain), respectively in 2018 and 2019. However, instead of a simple collection of articles, the aim of this publication is to show the importance of projects that have been left in the background despite obtaining interesting archaeological data about the occupation of this valley and its evolution. Moreover, we must take into account that many of these projects support new activity in a rural territory that is increasingly neglected politically and economically. Hence the use of the term ‘underdog’, defined as a person or group of people with less power or money than the rest of society. Overall, the volume provides a general and interdisciplinary view of the different types of occupation in the territory of the Douro Valley. The chapters are divided into four sections, three of them chronological: Prehistory and Protohistory; Antiquity and Late Antiquity; and the medieval and modern ages. The last section is thematic and includes diachronic studies, museology, and the archaeology of mining. Therefore, the present volume is a medium to showcase the latest research carried out in this important territory and to contribute to knowledge of its history, updating the archaeological state of the art in the valley and presenting results that may be used in the most diverse types of comparative studies.

About the Editors
Santiago Sánchez de la Parra-Pérez is a pre-doctoral researcher at the University of Salamanca (Junta de Castilla y León and European Social Fund). His main research focuses on Latin epigraphy in Hispania. ;

Sonia Díaz-Navarro is a pre-doctoral researcher at the University of Valladolid (Junta de Castilla y León and European Social Fund). Her research is based on the osteoarchaeological study of the peninsular populations of recent prehistory (Neolithic-Bronze Age). ;

Javier Fernández-Lozano is assistant professor at the University of León. His main lines of research are the archaeology of mining and the study of the geological processes responsible for the formation of mountains in the Iberian Peninsula, using techniques based on 3D laser, spectral analysis and gravimetry. ;

Javier Jiménez Gadea is director of the Museum of Avila. He specialises in the Middle Ages, Islam and heritage management.

En español
Esta monografía reúne las mejores contribuciones presentadas en las VIII y IX Jornadas de Arqueología del Valle del Duero, celebradas en Ávila y Astorga en 2018 y 2019, respectivamente. Más allá de constituir una recopilación de artículos, el objetivo de esta obra es poner de manifiesto la importancia de proyectos arqueológicos que han sido relegados a un segundo plano, a pesar de arrojar interesantes resultados sobre la ocupación del Valle del Duero y su evolución y constituir un recurso de dinamización de un territorio, eminentemente rural, cada vez más abandonado. A ello se debe que el título de este monográfico empleé el término ‘underdog’, definido como una persona o un grupo de personas con menos poder o dinero que el resto de la sociedad.

A lo largo de la obra el lector encontrará una visión general e interdisciplinar de los diferentes modos de ocupación y explotación del territorio en torno al valle del Duero. Los capítulos están estructurados en cuatro secciones: tres de corte cronológico –Prehistoria y Protohistoria, Antigüedad y Antigüedad Tardía y Épocas medieval y moderna– y una temática –Varia– que recoge trabajos de corte diacrónico, museológico o sobre la Arqueología de la minería.

Santiago Sánchez de la Parra-Pérez trabaja actualmente como investigador predoctoral en la Universidad de Salamanca (Junta de Castilla y León y Fondo Social Europeo). Su investigac
Fores et Fenestrae: A Computational Study of Doors and Windows in Roman Domestic Space by Lucia Michielin. Paperback; 205x290mm; 296 pages; 146 figures, 39 tables, 52 renders. 749 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 82. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696172. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696189. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Fores et Fenestrae aims to analyse Roman doors and windows and their role as an essential part of daily life. They are the structures that connect not only rooms but also houses themselves to the outside world. They relate to privacy, security, and light in domestic spaces. Until very recently, the role of doors and windows in shaping the life and structure of Roman private dwellings has been greatly underestimated. The reason for this lies primarily in the difficulties linked to their study. The low level of preservation of walls and the widespread use of perishable and recyclable materials hinder in many cases a correct assessment of these structures. To achieve greater understanding, the author followed a computational approach. The two cores of the research are the analysis of the database and the observation of results based on new 3D models. 1855 doors and windows were surveyed across eight towns of Roman imperial Italy. The information collected has been organised in a database comprised of nine tables and mined through statistical analyses. Three 3D models of different dwelling types have been generated simulating natural materials and light conditions to observe the role of doors and windows in context.

The work is subdivided into three sections. The first explains the study’s methodology and analyses previous scholarship on the topic, highlighting how the issue of doors and windows has often be ignored or only superficially considered. The second section collects typologies of complementary sources to better comprehend the results of the statistical analyses and to integrate the 3D models; literary, epigraphic, and visual sources are considered. To these are added the analysis of the archaeological sources. The third part constitutes the core of the analysis. It is composed of two chapters, the fi rst of which provides a detailed overview of the statistical analyses produced from the sample collected. The latter chapter investigates the results of the renders and analyses views and natural light in the Roman house.

About the Author
Lucia Michielin holds an MSc in Geotechnologies for Archaeology (Università degli Studi di Siena) and an MA in Classical Archaeology (Università degli Studi di Padova). In 2019 she obtained a PhD at Edinburgh University. She has previously worked in commercial archaeology and has been involved in many surveys and cultural heritage projects in Italy and Croatia, in cooperation with UK, US, and Italian universities and research centres. She currently holds the post of Digital Skills Training Manager at Edinburgh University.
Frontiers of the Roman Empire: The Roman Frontier in Egypt Frontières de l’empire romain : la frontière romaine en Égypte by David J. Breeze and Michel Reddé. Paperback; 185x248mm; 96pp; 150 figures (colour throughout). Full text in English and French. Print RRP: £14.99. 745 2021 Frontiers of the Roman Empire (FRE) . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699456. £14.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699463. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The frontiers of the Roman empire together form the largest monument of one of the world’s greatest states. They stretch for some 7,500km through 20 countries which encircle the Mediterranean Sea. The remains of these frontiers have been studied by visitors and later by archaeologists for several centuries. Many of the inscriptions and sculpture, weapons, pottery and artefacts created and used by the soldiers and civilians who lived on the frontier can be seen in museums. Equally evocative of the lost might of Rome are the physical remains of the frontiers themselves. The aim of this series of books is not only to inform the interested visitor about the history of the frontiers but to act as a guidebook as well.

The Roman military remains of Egypt are remarkable in their variety and in their state of preservation. They deserve to be better known. They include forts, quarries under the authority of the army and whose materials were used in the monumental buildings of Rome, as well as the roads which crossed the desert landscape and brought the Mediterranean into con¬tact with the Indian Ocean. It is hoped that each reader of this book will enjoy learning more about the remarkable Roman inheritance of Egypt.

The full text is presented side-by-side dual-language in English and French.

About the Authors
Professor David J. Breeze has published several books on Roman frontiers and the Roman army. He is a former chairman of the International Congress of Roman Frontier Studies and led the team which successfully nominated the Antonine Wall as a World Heritage Site. ;

Michel Reddé is a professor emeritus at the School for Advanced Studies at the Paris Sciences et Lettres University. He has directed or collaborated on several archaeological sites in Egypt and in France (Alésia). He has been director of the European project on studying north-east Roman Gaul.

French Description
Prises ensemble, les frontières de l’Empire romain constituent le monument le plus important de ce qui fut l’un des plus grands États du monde. Elles s’étendent sur environ 7.500 km à travers une ving-taine de pays autour de la Méditerranée. Depuis plusieurs siècles, les vestiges de ces frontières ont fait l’objet d’études par des curieux puis plus tardivement par des archéologues. Bon nombre des inscriptions, sculptures, armes, poteries et autres objets créés et utilisés par les militaires et les civils qui peuplaient ces frontières sont visibles dans les musées. Mais les vestiges physiques de ses frontières sont tout aussi évocateurs de la puissance que fut Rome. La présente séries de livres est conçue non seulement pour informer le visiteur curieux de l’histoire des frontières mais également pour servir de guide sur le terrain.

Les vestiges militaires romains en Égypte sont remarquables tant par leur diversité que par leur état de conservation : ils méritent d’être mieux connus. On y dénombre des forts, des carrières exploitées sous l’autorité des militaires et dont les matériaux ont servi aux constructions monumentales de Rome, ainsi que des pistes qui traversent des paysages désertiques et mettaient la Méditerranée en relation avec l’Océan Indien. Nous espérons que le lecteur prendra plaisir à en apprendre davantage sur l’étonnant héritage romain en Égypte.

Le Professeur David J. Breeze a publié plusieurs livres sur les frontières et l’armée romaines. Il est ancien président du Congrès International d’Études sur les Frontières Romaines et il a dirigé l’équipe qui a réussi à faire inscrire le mur d’Antonin au patrimoine Mondial. ;

Michel Reddé est professeur (ém.) à l’École pratique des Hautes Études/Université de Paris Sciences et Lettres. Il a dirigé ou collaboré à de nombreux chantiers archéologiques en Égypte et en France (Alésia). Il a été directeur du projet ERC Rurland.
Spectacle and Display: A Modern History of Britain’s Roman Mosaic Pavements by Michael Dawson. Paperback; 176x250mm; 256 pages; 60 figures. 740 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 79. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698312. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698329. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Spectacle and Display: A Modern History of Britain’s Roman Mosaic Pavements is the first narrative to explore responses and attitudes to mosaics, not just at the point of discovery but during their subsequent history. It is a field which has received scant attention in the literature and provides a compelling insight into the agency of these spectacular remains. Analysis shows how mosaics have influenced and have been instrumental in the commodification of the past, the development of conservation practice and promoting the rise of the archaeologist. ‘The most spectacular remains of Roman Britain’ is a familiar description applied to the discovery of mosaics floors. They are exceptional symbols of Roman life in the province of Britannia and each new discovery is eagerly reported in the press. Yet one estimate suggested that 75% of all known mosaics from Britain have been lost, and they are commonly displayed out of context, wall mounted as artwork in museums and exhibitions and far from their role as floors. This is a contested narrative in which spectacle and survival, conservation and fine art, ownership and curation provide the discourse and texts of contemporary attitudes.

About the Author
Michael Dawson is a heritage consultant, Heritage Director at RPS (UK and Ireland). He is editor of the international journal Historic Environment Policy and Practice and is panel lecturer with Oxford University Dept. of Continuing Education. He has excavated in Britain, Bulgaria and Romania, publishing widely both in Britain and eastern Europe and has been instrumental in making the case for the Roşia Montană World Heritage nomination.
The Greeks and Romans in the Black Sea and the Importance of the Pontic Region for the Graeco-Roman World (7th century BC-5th century AD): 20 Years On (1997-2017) Proceedings of the Sixth International Congress on Black Sea Antiquities (Constanţa – 18-22 September 2017) edited by Gocha R. Tsetskhladze, Alexandru Avram and James Hargrave. Paperback; 205x290mm; 778 pages; 476 figures, 16 tables; Papers in English, French and German. 736 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697582. £85.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697599. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £85.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Greeks and Romans in the Black Sea presents the Proceedings of the Sixth International Congress on Black Sea Antiquities, dedicated to the 90th birthday of Prof. Sir John Boardman, President of the Congress since its inception. It was held in Constanţa in September 2017 with the same theme as the first of these congresses, which took place just down the coast in Varna 20 years earlier (‘the Greeks and Romans in the Black Sea and the importance of the Pontic region for the Graeco-Roman world between the 7th century BC and 5th century AD’), celebrating the work of successive congresses in bringing together scholars and scholarship from Eastern and Western Europe and the extensive progress of ‘Black Sea Studies’ in the intervening years. Overall, 85 papers were received for publication from authors in Western and Eastern Europe—there is also a full set of the abstracts submitted to the Congress in Appendix 2. As with previous congresses, the work is divided into sections, the largest of which, the fourth, is, following a pattern established with the first congress, devoted to New Excavations and Projects. The opening lectures and various papers in the first sections reflect (on) the ‘20 years on’ in the title. The vast majority of contributions are in English, a handful each in French and German.

About the Editors
Gocha Tsetskhladze (PhD Moscow, DPhil Oxford) is a classical archaeologist who specialises in ancient Greek colonisation and the archaeology of the Mediterranean, the Black Sea, Caucasia, Anatolia, and Central and Eastern Europe in the 1st millennium BC. He is the founder and series editor of the publication series Colloquia Antiqua; and founder and editor-in-chief of the journal Ancient West and East. He has organised many international conferences, notably the International Congress on Black Sea Antiquities that he established in 1995. ;

Alexandru Avram has been a professor of ancient Greek history at the University of Le Mans since 2002 after having taught at the University of Bucharest. He is also a fellow of the Vasile Pârvan Institute of Archaeology, Bucharest and, since 2011, has been co-director of the excavations at Istros (Histria). His academic interests include Greek archaeology and amphorology and Greek and Latin epigraphy, in particular from the region of the Black Sea and Asia Minor. ;

James Hargrave has a PhD in Economic History from the University of Durham and a Diploma in Archive Administration from the University of Wales (Aberystwyth). He specialised for 25 years in cataloguing large collections of papers accumulated by dukes, prime ministers, businesses, etc., but his historical interests stretch from antiquity to railway finance and equipment, Central and Eastern Europe, and the British Empire-Commonwealth, including comparisons between colonisations and empires ancient and modern.
Peoples in the Black Sea Region from the Archaic to the Roman Period Proceedings of the 3rd International Workshop on the Black Sea in Antiquity held in Thessaloniki, 21-23 September 2018 edited by Manolis Manoledakis. Paperback; 205x290mm; 200 pages; 93 figures (28 pages in colour). 738 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698671. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698688. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Peoples in the Black Sea Region from the Archaic to the Roman Period includes papers presented at the Third International Workshop on the Black Sea in Antiquity, which, like the two previous ones, took place at the International Hellenic University, Greece, on 21-23 September 2018. The ‘Peoples’ of the title are defined widely to include not only those that either inhabited or colonised the Black Sea area, but also those who are considered to have visited, acted in, or influenced the region. Papers draw on a mix of archaeological evidence, epigraphy and written sources, as well as maps to explore the activities and characteristics of these peoples. The contributors are scholars from ten countries, and their papers cover all shores of the Black Sea.

About the Editor
Manolis Manoledakis is Associate Professor of Classical Archaeology at the International Hellenic University in Thessaloniki. He has participated in various research programmes and is the director of the International Hellenic University’s excavation in Neo Rysio, Thessaloniki. His research concentrates on the archaeology and ancient history of the Black Sea as well as central Macedonia, ancient topography and geography, ancient Greek religion and cults, Greek mythology in its historical context, and ancient Greek painting and vase-painting.
Le commerce de céramiques fines à ammaia, une ville du sud de la Lusitanie (50 – 550 apr. J.-c.) by José Carlos Quaresma. Paperback; 210x297mm; 228 pages; 133 figures; French text. 737 2021 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 16. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696837. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696844. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents the entire assemblage of fine wares (terra sigillata, lamps and thin-walled wares) from Ammaia, a Roman and Late Antique town located in the hinterland of southern Lusitania (presently in Portuguese territory). Despite its distance from the Atlantic coast, Ammaia took advantage of its proximity to Augusta Emerita, the capital of Lusitania. This aspect is particularly strong between c. AD 50 and c. AD 150, when the local market imported large quantities of fine wares from the capital. The Late Antique phase reveals a balanced capacity of importation at Ammaia, whose fine wares, essentially related to terra sigillata, were provided by wares from northern Hispania (Douro and Ebro valleys) and North Africa (Tunisia). Moreover, recent research at Ammaia has provided excellent stratigraphic contexts dated to between c. AD 50 and c. AD 150, crucial for the understanding of the chronological evolution of Italian, South-Gaulish and Hispanic terra sigillata. In the final chapter, the author undertakes a wide-ranging analysis of southern Lusitania with regard to the consumption of fine wares and amphorae. Several chronological phases have been established, based on stratigraphic and typological evidence, for the period between c. AD 50 and c. AD 550: that is the Early Empire (from the Claudio-Neronian period onwards) and its transition into the Late Roman period and the post-Roman phase. In the final sub-chapters, this analysis focuses on the problematic 5th century and up to the latest Lusitanian stratigraphic evidence of around the middle of the 6th century AD.

About the Author
José Carlos Quaresma is a professor at the New University of Lisbon. His research centres on Roman and Late Antique Archaeology, with special focus on ceramics, trade and the ancient economy. Over the last decade the author has carried out studies not only within Portugal (roughly equivalent to the Roman province of Lusitania), but also in Spain (Tarragona and Mallorca) and southern France (Arles).

French Description:
Ce livre présente l’ensemble de céramiques fines (sigillées, lampes et parois fines) d’Ammaia, une ville d’époque romaine et tardo-romaine, située dans l’hinterland de la région méridionale de la Lusitania (actuellement dans le territoire portugais). Malgré la distance de la côte atlantique, Ammaia a profité de sa proximité avec Augusta Emerita, la capitale de la provincia de la Lusitania. Cet aspect est particulièrement important entre c.50 et c.150 apr. J.-C., quand le marché local a importé de grandes quantités de céramiques fines de la capitale. La phase de l’Antiquité Tardive démontre une importation équilibrée à Ammaia, dont les céramiques fines, essentiellement formées par des sigillées, sont fournies par les productions du Nord de l’Hispania (les vallées du Douro et de l’Èbre) et l’Afrique du Nord. En plus, la recherche plus récente à Ammaia a livré d’excellents contextes datés entre c.50 et c.150 apr. J.-C., un aspect crucial pour la compréhension de l’évolution chronologique de la sigillée italique, sud-gallique et hispanique. Dans le dernier chapitre, l’auteur met en place une analyse à large spectre de la Lusitania méridionale, par rapport à la consommation de céramiques fines et d’amphores. Quelques phases chronologiques furent établies, basées sur l’évidence stratigraphique et typologique, pour la période entre c. 50 et c. 550 apr. J.-C., c’est-à-dire le Haut-Empire (à partir de la période claudio-néronienne) et sa transition vers la période romaine tardive et la phase post-romaine. Au cours des derniers sous-chapitres, cette analyse se concentre sur les problématiques du Ve siècle, jusqu’à la dernière évidence stratigraphique lusitanienne, au milieu du VIe siècle.

José Carlos Quaresma est professeur à l’Université Nouvelle de Lisbonne. Ce livre fut écrit au cours d’une bours
Visions of the Roman North: Art and Identity in Northern Roman Britain by Iain Ferris. Paperback; 175x245mm; 236pp; 107 figures, colour throughout. 729 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 80. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699050. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699067. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Visions of the Roman North: Art and Identity in Northern Roman Britain is the first book to present an analysis of art from the northern frontier zones of Roman Britain and to interpret the meaning and significance of this art in terms of the formation of a regional identity at this time. It argues that a distinct and vibrant visual culture flourished in the north during the Roman period, primarily due to its status as a heavily militarized frontier zone. Artworks from forts and the frontier-works of Hadrian’s Wall and the Antonine Wall, along with funerary monuments from military and civilian cemeteries, are analysed and discussed. The book also explores religious sculpture depicting classical deities, Romano-British gods and goddesses and eastern deities such as Mithras in terms of the use of imagery in various belief systems and in terms of the establishment of individual and group identities.

About the Author
Iain Ferris is an archaeologist living in Pembrey, Carmarthenshire, Wales. He has over forty years of experience working in professional archaeology in Britain and abroad and in teaching archaeology at Birmingham and Manchester universities. His research interests include Roman art and material culture and Romano-British archaeology and artefacts. He has directed major archaeological research excavations in northern and midland England and is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries. He has published widely in academic journals and is the author of nine books, all on Roman art and archaeology.

Reviews
‘…this is amongst the very best books on Roman Britain which I have ever read. It engages with what made Northern Britain special and culturally distinct in the Roman Empire. There is a real understanding for Northern Roman Britain here, and an understanding for a unique artistic culture that raises it very high indeed as a book on the provincial art of the Roman Empire.’ – Revd Professor Martin Henig, University of Oxford
El tesoro de Regina Turdulorum (Casas de Reina, Badajoz) by David Martínez Chico. Paperback; 203x276mm; 94 pages; 9 figures, 3 tables, illustrated catalogue (30 plates); colour throughout. Spanish text. 137 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699401. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699418. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Regina Turdulorum Hoard (Casas de Reina, Badajoz) was buried with 818 imitative antoniniani of Divo Claudio type, minted in copper. The vast majority of the coins bear the reverse legend CONSECRATIO. This figure makes the Regina Turdulorum hoard one of the most important in Spain and Portugal. In numismatic terms, the most common reverse type is the funeral pyre, as opposed to the eagle. In addition to this main group, there is a second group, where there are curious imitations that follow various prototypes for the manufacture of the reverse. The study of the posthumous coinage of Claudius II and his imitations represents one of the most complex tasks in ancient numismatics. The work is considerably complicated by the fact that they are highly copied coins, which means that regular issues are very difficult to distinguish from the imitations. In this sense, the hoard provides vital information for the western monetary circulation of the Roman Empire, contributing to the debate on Gallic and African imitations. It also opens the way to the hypothesis that Hispania may have been another centre for issuing Divo Claudio imitations. Although the latter remains to be proven, the tentative and open nature of this book provides the opportunity to open new lines of study in the hope that they will be resolved sooner rather than later.

Spanish Description:
El tesoro de Regina Turdulorum (Casas de Reina, Badajoz) se compone de 818 antoninianos de imitación, fundamentalmente del tipo Divo Claudio, acuñados en cobre. La inmensa mayoría de las monedas tiene en el reverso la característica leyenda CONSECRATIO. Esta cifra convierte al tesoro de Regina Turdulorum como de los más importantes en España y Portugal. A nivel numismático, la tipología de reverso más común es la de pira funeraria, frente a la de águila. Junto a este principal grupo se añade otro segundo, donde hay curiosas imitaciones que siguen varios prototipos para la confección de los reversos. El lector debe ser consciente que el estudio de las acuñaciones póstumas de Claudio II y sus imitaciones representa una de las tareas más complejas en numismática antigua. La labor se complica considerablemente por el hecho de ser monedas muy copiadas, de tal modo que las emisiones regulares son muy difíciles de distinguir de las imitaciones. En este sentido, el tesoro aporta una información vital para la circulación monetaria occidental del Imperio Romano, contribuyendo al debate de las imitaciones galas y africanas. Y abriendo paso a la hipótesis de que Hispania posiblemente fue otro centro emisor de imitaciones divoclaudianas. Aunque esto último estaría por demostrarse, el carácter provisional y abierto de este libro brinda la oportunidad de abrir nuevas líneas de estudio, con la esperanza de que se resuelvan más pronto que tarde.

David Martínez Chico es un historiador, arqueólogo y numismático, así como fundador y director editorial desde 2014 de Revista Numismática Hécate. Anteriormente, en 2008, fundó plataformas numismáticas como Foro Imperio Numismático, consciente de la importancia en la difusión y transferencia de conocimientos en su campo.
Rougga I: Le forum et ses abords (fouilles 1971–1974) edited by Maurice Euzennat† and Hédi Slim†. Paperback; 205x290mm; 518 pages; 214 figures, 54 tables (13 colour plates). French text. 706 2020 Archaeology of the Maghreb 2. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698251. £85.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698268. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Located in Byzacena, 12 km south-east of Thysdrus / El Jem, the municipality of Bararus / Henchir, Rougga is known for its large Roman cisterns first reported in the 18th century and for the discovery in 1972 of a hoard of Byzantine gold coins. ROUGGA I gives an account of the overall results of the excavations carried out at the site of the forum, from 1971 to 1974, by the Tunisian-French mission under the direction of Maurice Euzennat † and Hédi Slim †.

Situé en Byzacène, à 12 km au sud-est de Thysdrus/El Jem, le municipe de Bararus/Henchir Rougga est connu pour ses grandes citernes d’époque romaine signalées depuis le XVIIIe s. et pour la découverte en 1972 d’un trésor de monnaies d’or byzantines publié en 1982 dans le volume III de la monographie générale du site. Ce volume I, rédigé pour l’essentiel au début des années 90, rend compte du résultat global des fouilles menées à l’emplacement du forum, de 1971 à 1974, par la mission tuniso-française sous la direction de Maurice Euzennat† et Hédi Slim†. L’ouvrage comprend trois parties : tout d’abord, une présentation générale du site par les deux chefs de mission et Pol Trousset ; ensuite, une description de la stratigraphie du forum et du mobilier qui en provient, par Roger Guéry† avec la collaboration de divers spécialistes ; enfin, une étude architecturale extrêmement précise des différents éléments qui composent le centre monumental de la cité : citernes, platea et portiques, xyste et temples, par Gilbert Hallier†. Ces travaux permettent de mieux appréhender la place du municipe de Bararus au centre d’une riche région agricole qui a laissé les traces de cadastration parmi les mieux conservées d’Afrique. Ils mettent en évidence sa longue durée d’occupation, du IIIe s. av. J.-C. (avec quelques traces antérieures remontant à la Préhistoire) jusqu’au XIe s., et l’originalité des partis architecturaux qui ont présidé à la construction de son centre monumental à l’époque flavienne, ses transformations au IIe s. et son abandon à l’époque byzantine.

Maurice Euzennat (1926-2004), Directeur de Recherche au CNRS, Membre de l’Institut. ;

Hédi Slim (1935-2019), Directeur de Recherche à l’Institut National du Patrimoine de Tunis, Directeur de la division du Recensement général et des Études. ;

Roger Guéry (1926-1997), Ingénieur au CNRS, archéologue-céramologue. ;

Gilbert Hallier (1923-2010), Architecte d.p.l.g., Directeur de Recherche au CNRS, architecte-archéologue. ;

Pol Trousset, Directeur de Recherche honoraire au CNRS, archéologue-géographe.

Préface de Fathi Bejaoui, Directeur de Recherche à INP.

Postface de Pierre Gros, Membre de l'Institut.

Ouvrage publié avec le concours de l'Institut Français de Tunisie et du Programme Investissements d’Avenir, Initiative d’Excellence d’Aix-Marseille Université - A*MIDEX, AMX-MED-012.
Ex Asia et Syria: Oriental Religions in the Roman Central Balkans by Nadežda Gavrilović Vitas. Paperback; 205x290mm; 266 pages; 40 figures, 7 maps, illustrated catalogue (colour throughout). 721 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 78. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699135. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699142. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £42.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Ex Asia Minor et Syria: Religions in the Roman Central Balkans investigates the cults of Asia Minor and Syrian origin in the Roman provinces of the Central Balkans. The author presents, analyzes and interprets all hitherto known epigraphical and archaeological material which attests to the presence of Asia Minor and Syrian cults in that region, a subject which is yet to be the object of a serious scholarly study. Thus the book both reviews previously known monuments and artefacts, many of which are now missing or are destroyed, and adds new finds, exploring their social and geographical context from all possible angles, and focusing on the thoughts and beliefs of the dedicants and devotees of the particular cult in question. New conclusions are presented in a scientific framework, taking account of the latest theoretical developments.

About the Author
Nadežda Gavrilović Vitas obtained her PhD in archaeology from the University of Belgrade. She has worked at the Institute of Archaeology in Belgrade since 1999, mainly focusing on Roman religion, epigraphy, settlements and necropolises. She is the director of the archaeological projects and excavations ‘Mediana – the residence of Constantine the Great’ and ‘Building with octagon in Niš Fortress’ in Niš.

Reviews
The volume is immaculately researched and annotated, with numerous illustrations that otherwise would be very hard to access. A work of importance for archeologists, art historians, Balkanists and anyone interested in the spread and evolution of the pagan cults of the Roman Empire.—Caroline Stone, AramcoWorld, July 2021
Excavations at Stanground South, Peterborough Prehistoric, Roman and Post-Medieval Settlement along the Margins of the Fens by William A Boismier, Edmund Taylor and Yvonne Wolframm-Murray. Paperback; 205x290mm; 314 pages; 120 figures, 91 tables. 716 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698442. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698459. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

MOLA (formerly Northamptonshire Archaeology) undertook archaeological excavations at Stanground South between September 2007 and November 2009 on behalf of Persimmon Homes (East Midlands) Ltd and in accordance with a programme of works designed and overseen by CgMs Heritage. The site is situated on the south-eastern outskirts of Peterborough, on glacial tills overlooking along the Fen edge. The works comprised five areas of set-piece excavation and a series of strip map and record areas, targeted on areas of archaeological potential identified by previous evaluation works. In total, an area of 70ha was subject to archaeological mitigation.

The excavations recorded archaeological remains dating from the Bronze Age to the medieval period. The earliest features comprised four burnt mounds dating to the early Bronze Age, one of which was associated with two superimposed buildings and a small group of up to six cremations. In the middle Bronze Age there was a substantial unenclosed cemetery (urnfield) comprising 78 cremations (as well as a further possible three outlying cremations to the urnfield). In the late Bronze Age/early Iron Age a substantial droveway, up to 65m wide, was constructed leading northwards from the Fen edge to higher ground. A series of post-built roundhouses were later constructed within the confines of the droveway.

In the middle Iron Age, the droveway was partitioned to form a series of enclosures, within one of which a settlement was established adjacent to the Fen edge. This included roundhouses and a number of two-post and four-post structures.

In the later Iron Age, an enclosed settlement had developed to the north-west. This comprised several roundhouses within a substantial rectangular enclosure, which was open at its southern end. It appears that this began as an unenclosed site, which was later enclosed. Removal of cattle horn for working may have been occurring.

In the Roman period (2nd and late 4th centuries AD) a series of small enclosures were constructed on the eastern side of the later Iron Age enclosed settlement. These contained structures and features apparently associated with rural industry, which may have also exported surplus to market. Industries including the processing of hide, late Roman cheese making (with seven presses recovered), late Roman pottery production and some metalworking.

The economy of the site from the later Bronze Age onwards was focussed on pastoralism, with limited evidence for grain cultivation. During the Roman period, this seems to have specialised further towards dairy farming. The environment of the site seems to have undergone little change from the later Bronze Age, being largely open with areas of woodland and wetter areas. Peat growth during the Iron Age resulted in the covering of some of the Bronze Age features.

During the medieval period, large portions of the site were given over to open field cultivation, evidenced by the remains of ridge and furrow cultivation. The area was partitioned in the post-medieval period by the construction of a series of drainage ditches, which form the basis of the current field pattern.

About the Authors
William A Boismier’s professional background includes four university degrees and extensive fieldwork experience across Eastern and Southern England with archaeological remains ranging in date from the Palaeolithic to the medieval and postmedieval periods. He has published reports and other work in monographs, journals and other peer-reviewed outlets and has written a number of ‘grey literature’ reports, project designs and period summaries. He currently works as an archaeological consultant. ;

Edmund Taylor is a Project Manager for the York Archaeological Trust. He gained his degree in Archaeology from the University of Bradford in 2000 and soon after joined Northamptonshire Archaeology (now Mola Northampton)