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NEW: Die Entstehung komplexer Siedlungen im Zentraloman: Archäologische Untersuchungen zur Siedlungsgeschichte von Al-Khashbah by Conrad Schmidt, Stephanie Döpper, Jonas Kluge, Samantha Petrella, Ullrich Ochs, Nick Kirchhoff, Susanne Maier und Mona Walter. Hardback; 210x297; 590 pages; 358 figures, 68 plates (colour throughout). German text.. 803 2021 Arabia Orientalis: Studien zur Archäologie Ostarabiens 5. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271002. £96.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271019. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Die Entstehung komplexer Siedlungen im Zentraloman: Archäologische Untersuchungen zur Siedlungsgeschichte von Al-Khashbah presents the results of a survey conducted in 2015 and beyond by the Institut für die Kulturen des Alten Orients of the Universität Tübingen in Al-Khashbah, one of the largest Early Bronze Age sites on the Omani Peninsula. Ten monumental buildings, 273 tombs and other structures from the Hafit (3100-2700 BC) and Umm an-Nar periods (2700-2000 BC) were documented here. This makes Al-Khashbah ideally suited for the investigation of the beginnings of complex settlements and social structures in northern Inner Oman at the transition from the 4th to the 3rd millennium BC, because many of the achievements previously attributed to the Umm an-Nar period, such as monumental architecture and the smelting of copper, can already be proven here in the preceding Hafit period. In the Umm an-Nar period, the development of Al-Khashbah continues steadily, giving the site additional importance. According to the results of the survey, however, copper production at the site no longer seems to play a role in this period.

Aus den auf die frühe Bronzezeit folgenden Epochen des 2. und 1. Jahrtausends v. Chr. sowie des 1. und 2. Jahrtausends n. Chr. gibt es in Al-Khashbah nur äußerst wenige Befunde. Erst im 18.–20. Jahrhundert n. Chr. erfährt der Ort eine intensive Wiederbelebung, wovon insbesondere die alte Lehmziegelsiedlung im Norden der Palmenoase, eine kleine Siedlung im Osten des Untersuchungsgebiets, eine Reihe von Bewässerungsanlagen, mehrere Friedhöfe, Petroglyphen sowie zahlreiche an der Oberfläche gefundene spätislamische Keramikscherben zeugen.
NEW: Dana Island: The Greatest Shipyard of the Ancient Mediterranean edited by Hakan Öniz. Paperback; 174x245mm; 232 pages; 311 figures, 18 plates (colour throughout). 759 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699517. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699524. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Dana Island: The Greatest Shipyard of the Ancient Mediterranean presents the dramatic archaeological discoveries from Dana Island, off the coast of Rough Cilicia in southern Turkey, where underwater investigations and surface survey in advance of excavation have revealed nearly 300 ancient rock-cut slipways, the largest number of such naval installations discovered to date. Further slipways have been lost to erosion or await excavation. The slipways accommodated a range of different sizes of warship and are identified as ship-sheds, grouped within a shipyard area, behind which are various structures seen as workshops used in shipbuilding, as well as living spaces, military and religious buildings, managerial facilities, barn areas for animals, baths and dock areas, shops, villas, columned areas, watchtow¬ers, and many other buildings whose functions cannot yet be understood. The majority are mortarless stone structures, and some of the architectural forms show resemblances to Iron Age masonry. The volume presents and analyses the slipways, their use and possible dating. Water supply is discussed, and cisterns documented. Further chapters focus on the tombs found on the island, its geology, plant usage, and the geoarchaeology of the island’s structures. Extensive contextual sections review the island’s geographical situation and ancient naval history. Finally, computer modelling is used to produce stunning 3D visualisations of the ancient shipyard and naval base.

About the Author
Hakan Oniz completed his masters and PhD in Underwater Archaeology at Selçuk University, Konya. He is one of the founders and was the first coordinator of the UNESCO UniTwin Underwater Archaeology Network between 2012 and 2015. He is the head of the Mediterranean Underwater Cultural Heritage Division in the Mediterranean Civilizations Research Institute of Akdeniz University, Head of the Department of Restoration and Conservation of Cultural Heritage in the Faculty of Art, and Director of the Underwater Archaeology Research Center in the same University. He manages several Underwater Archaeology research and excavation projects on the Turkish Mediterranean Coast, is Secretary and bureau member of ICOMOS-ICUCH (International Committee of Underwater Cultural Heritage), a member of the UNESCO National Observation Committee of Underwater Archaeology, and a member of the CMAS Scientific Committee.

Table of Contents
List of Figures ;
Acknowledgments ;
Foreword – Ahmet Ünal ;
The Prehistoric Strategic Location of Dana Island – Şengül G. Aydingün ;
The Importance of the Southern Mediterranean Coast – Ahmet Ünal ;
Hittites And Seafaring – Özlem Sir Gavaz ;
Ancient shipsheds on Dana Island: Some preliminary observations – Olaf Höckmann and Hakan Öniz ;
An Ancient Naval Yard On The Southern Coast Of Anatolia – Mustafa H. Sayar ;
Dana Island Ancient Shipyard, Rough Cilicia: Archaeological Observations – Hakan Öniz ;
Coastal Aeolianite as the Geological Heritage of Dana Island: Preliminary Results – Ahmet Evren Erginal, Oya Erenoğlu, Hakan Öniz and Savaş Sarialtun ;
Geoarchaeological Investigation Of Architectural Structures On Dana Island – Savaş Sarialtun, Hakan Öniz and Günay Dönmez ;
The Ancient Naval Base/Shipyard on Dana Island – Ahmet Denker and Hakan Öniz ;
Usage Forms Of Plant Species On Dana Island And Its Surroundings From Past To Present – Zerrin Koşdemir ;
The Tomb Types Of Dana Island (Ancient Pityoussa) – Günay Dönmez and Ercan Soydan ;
Water Cisterns On Dana Island – Dilber Bala, Hakan Öniz ;
The Possible Role of Dana Island in the Events Of 1200 BC – Haldun Aydingün ;
Mavikent Harbor: The Mainland Connection Point of the Dana Island Shipyard?
NEW: Transhumance: Papers from the International Association of Landscape Archaeology Conference, Newcastle upon Tyne, 2018 edited by Mark Bowden and Pete Herring. Paperback; 203x276mm; 144pp; 49 figures, 2 tables (colour throughout). 148 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271286. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271293. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Transhumance presents a collection of papers exploring the practice, impact and archaeology of British and European transhumance, the seasonal grazing of marginal lands by domesticated livestock, usually accompanied by people, often young women. All but one were first given in 2018 at the Newcastle and Durham conference of the International Association of Landscape Archaeology. Their range is wide, geographically (Britain, Italy, Spain, France and Norway) and temporally (prehistory to the present day). The approaches taken include excavation and artefact analysis, fieldwalking, archaeological survey, landscape archaeology and history, analysis of ancient texts, inscriptions and records, ethno-archaeology, social network analysis and consideration of the delicate balances between the natural resources that transhumants exploit and the intangible cultures that are developed and sustained as they do so. The volume re-emphasises that much of European history and culture has been and in some places continues to be dependent on the annual migrations to and then back from the mountains, forests and bogs. It notes and explains how transhumance systems are not timeless and unchanging, but instead respond to wider economic and social changes. But, it also shows how transhumance itself contributes to changes, and continuities, including how the organisation of access to common pastures crystallises principles that underpin much broader legal and social systems.

About the Editors
Mark Bowden BA, MCIfA, FSA, worked for over 30 years for Historic England and its predecessor bodies as a landscape archaeology surveyor and investigator, before retiring in 2020. Among his many research interests are common lands and he has undertaken much survey work in England’s uplands. He was founding Chair of the Landscape Survey Group 2014-2021 and is now an independent researcher. ;

Pete Herring MPhil, MCIfA, FSA, has spent over 40 years studying all aspects of the historic landscape of Cornwall and Britain, chiefly for Cornwall Archaeological Unit and Historic England. He has often turned to consideration of the commons and those who seasonally inhabited and used them, but has also enjoyed placing them in relation to the histories of the more permanently settled farmland and urban areas.
NEW: Later Prehistoric Settlement in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly: Evidence from Five Excavations edited by Andy M Jones and Graeme Kirkham. Paperback; 205x290mm; 380 pages; 178 figures, 62 tables (60 pages in colour). 778 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699579. £52.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699586. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £52.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Later Prehistoric Settlement in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly reports on the excavation between 1996 and 2014 of five later prehistoric and Roman period settlements. Three of the mainland sites – Killigrew, Nancemere and Higher Besore – are located in central Cornwall, near Truro, with the fourth, at Porthleven, situated on the south coast in west Cornwall. The fifth settlement, Porth Killier, is on the island of St Agnes on the Isles of Scilly. All the sites were multi-phased, revealing both similar and contrasting patterns of occupation stretching from the Bronze Age into the Iron Age and beyond. Despite having broadly comparable chronological sequences, there are considerable differences in both the tempo and intensity of occupation, and significant contrasts in practices associated with them. Significantly, all four mainland sequences culminate with an enclosed settlement in the Late Iron Age and especially during the Roman period, a time of significant economic and social change following the conquest. During this period there continued to be differences in the character of occupation. Notably two of the enclosures seem to have been strongly associated with industrial activities, including metalworking at Killigrew, suggesting that the working of iron may have been a controlled or ritualized activity undertaken within a dedicated space. The volume presents the results from each of the five settlement sites, before reviewing the key themes which have emerged from the investigations.

About the Editors
Andy M Jones is Principal Archaeologist with the Cornwall Archaeological Unit. His research interests include the Neolithic and Bronze Age, as well as the archaeology of the uplands and coastal areas of western Britain. Ongoing research projects include the social responses to the later prehistoric drowning of the Mount’s Bay landscape in west Cornwall and social organization of metalworking in the British Bronze Age. His recent publications include: Excavation of Later Prehistoric and Roman Sites along the Route of the Newquay Strategic Road Corridor, Cornwall (2019); An Intellectual Adventurer in Archaeology: Reflections on the work of Charles Thomas (2018); Preserved in the Peat: An Extraordinary Bronze Age Burial on Whitehorse Hill (2016); and Metalworking in the Middle Bronze Age and Beyond: New evidence from Tremough, Cornwall (2015). ;

Graeme Kirkham was formerly a project archaeologist with Cornwall Archaeological Unit, now a freelance historic environment consultant and independent researcher; joint editor of Cornish Archaeology since 2003. Current research interests include medieval and post-medieval responses to prehistoric monuments and a range of landscape history topics.
NEW: The Shaping of the English Landscape: An Atlas of Archaeology from the Bronze Age to Domesday Book by Chris Green and Miranda Creswell. Paperback; 219x297mm; 134 pages; illustrated in colour throughout. 767 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270609. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270616. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Shaping of the English Landscape is an atlas of English archaeology covering the period from the middle Bronze Age (c. 1500 BC) to Domesday Book (AD 1086), encompassing the Bronze and Iron Ages, the Roman period, and the early medieval (Anglo-Saxon) age. It was produced as part of the English Landscape and Identities (EngLaId) project at the University of Oxford, which took place from 2011 to 2016, funded by the European Research Council.

In this book, you will find maps (produced by Chris Green) and discussion of themes including landscape agency, settlement, foodways and field systems, belief and the treatment of the dead, mobility and defence, making things, and material culture. Alongside are artworks (produced by Miranda Creswell) dealing with similar themes and depicting archaeological sites from across England. The authors hope to inspire and encourage debate into the past history of the English landscape.

Includes contributions from Anwen Cooper, Victoria Donnelly, Tyler Franconi, Roger Glyde, Chris Gosden, Zena Kamash, Janice Kinory, Sarah Mallet, Dan Stansbie, John Talbot, and Letty Ten Harkel.

About the Contributors
Chris Green is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the School of Archaeology within the University of Oxford. He worked on English Landscape and Identities throughout the lifespan of the project. Chris specialises in applications of Geographic Information Systems and data science in archaeology. He particularly enjoys making maps. ;

Miranda Creswell is a visual artist based in Oxford. She is currently Artist in Residence at the School of Archaeology and previously worked within the team on English Landscape and Identities, documenting working methods and also creating the Recording England artworks presented in this book.
NEW: Assessing Iron Age Marsh-Forts With Reference to the Stratigraphy and Palaeoenvironment Surrounding The Berth, North Shropshire by Shelagh Norton. Paperback; 205x290mm; 234 pages; 113 figures, 20 tables (colour throughout). 758 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698633. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698640. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Iron Age marsh-forts are large, monumental structures located in low-lying waterscapes. Although they share chronological and architectural similarities with their hillfort counterparts, their locations suggest that they may have played a specific and alternative role in Iron Age society. Despite the availability of a rich palaeoenvironmental archive at many sites, little is known about these enigmatic structures, and until recently, the only acknowledged candidate was the unusual, dual-enclosure monument at Sutton Common, near Doncaster.

Assessing Iron Age Marsh-Forts considers marsh-forts as a separate phenomenon within Iron Age society through an understanding of their landscape context and palaeoenvironmental development. At the national level, a range of Iron Age wetland monuments has been compared to Sutton Common to generate a gazetteer of potential marsh-forts. At the local level, a multi-disciplinary case-study is presented of the Berth marsh-fort in North Shropshire, incorporating GIS-based landscape modelling and multi-proxy palaeoenvironmental analysis (plant macrofossils, beetles and pollen).

The results of both the gazetteer and the Berth case-study challenge the view that marsh-forts are simply a topographical phenomenon. These substantial Iron Age monuments appear to have been deliberately constructed to control areas of marginal wetland and may have played an important role in the ritual landscape.

About the Author
Shelagh Norton (BA, MPhil, PhD) specialises in the reconstruction of macro-and micro-palaeolandscapes, and in particular, the interpretation of plant macrofossil and coleopteran remains from wetland contexts. Her research is based on the practical application of archaeological principles in a real-world context both in the UK and New Zealand, where she worked as a Regional Archaeologist for Heritage New Zealand. Her publications include The Archaeological and Palaeoenvironmental Potential of the Weald Moors, Shropshire (Transactions of the Shropshire Archaeological and Historical Society, 2016). She is an active member of the Hillfort Studies Group (University of Oxford), Worcestershire Archaeological Society and Worcestershire Archive Services.

Table of Contents
Summary ;
Chapter 1: Assessing Iron Age marsh-forts - an introduction ;
Chapter 2: The British Iron Age, hillforts and marsh-forts - Literature Review ;
Chapter 3: Methodology and Resources ;
Chapter 4: Marsh-forts in a landscape context ;
Chapter 5: North Shropshire’s marsh-forts ;
Chapter 6: The Berth – a marsh-fort in its landscape context ;
Chapter 7: The Berth – stratigraphic sequencing and radiocarbon dating ;
Chapter 8: The Berth – Palaeoenvironmental Reconstruction ;
Chapter 9: Assessing Iron Age marsh-forts – Discussion and Conclusions ;
Bibliography ;
Appendix 1 – Radiocarbon dates ;
Appendix 2 – Samples weights and volumes ;
Appendix 3 – Full species lists
FORTHCOMING: Irish Late Iron Age Equestrian Equipment in its Insular and Continental Context by Rena Maguire. Paperback; 205x290mm; 294pp; 63 figures, 6 tables, 119 plates. Print RRP: £44.00. 802 2021 Queen's University Belfast Irish Archaeological Monograph Series 2. ISBN 9781789699913. Book contents pageBuy Now

Irish Late Iron Age Equestrian Equipment in its Insular and Continental Context is the first practical archaeological study of Irish Iron Age lorinery. The volume examines the bits and bosals (Y-pieces) holistically, using practical stable-yard knowledge merged with archaeological techniques such as morphometrics, use-wear, GIS, functional comparison to European and British equipment and distribution analysis to place it within its time and place. Irish Iron Age artefacts have always been beset by issues of chronology, but by using these various analytical methods, a more precise timeframe for the objects is indicated. A complex relationship with Roman Britain and the Empire also becomes visible, with aspects of identity and belief being expressed through the sophisticated equestrian equipment. The analysis of the bridle components reveal that the Ireland of the first centuries AD shares some characteristics with other boundary zones of the Roman Empire, such as Scotland and northern Germany, but also has its own unique interpretation of introduced technology. The Ireland of the Late Iron Age, then, is a society in flux, picking and choosing which traditions it maintains. The horse and associated equipment were very much at the heart of the social changes set in motion by contact with the Roman Empire, and as such, the examination of the snaffles and bosals allows us to bring the people of the Late Iron Age in Ireland into focus.

About the Author
Rena Maguire studied Archaeology at Queen’s University Belfast, graduating with a BA Hons. in 2013. She was awarded an MSc in 2014 and a PhD in 2018. She has worked for the Historic Environment Division of the Northern Ireland Civil Service, and currently is a visiting Research Fellow at QUB. She has published extensively on ancient equitation and its associated technology and is an enthusiastic horsewoman.
FORTHCOMING: The Early Iron Age Metal Hoard from the Al Khawd Area (Sultan Qaboos University) Sultanate of Oman by Nasser S. Al-Jahwari, Paul A. Yule, Khaled A. Douglas, Bernhard Pracejus, Mohammed A. Al-Belushi, Ali T. ElMahi. Paperback; 210x297mm; 334 pages; 98 figures, 30 tables, 18 plates (colour throughout). Print RRP: £58.00. 797 2021 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 7. ISBN 9781803270821. Book contents pageBuy Now

Numerous metallic artefacts, which anciently were deposited in a hoard, came to light per chance on the campus of the Sultan Qaboos University in Al Khawd, Sultanate of Oman. Mostly fashioned from copper, these arrowheads, axes/adzes, bangles, daggers, knives, socketed lance/ spearheads, metal vessels, razors, rings, swords, and tweezers compare well with numerous documented artefact classes from south-eastern Arabia assigned to the Early Iron Age (1200–300 BCE). Discussion of the international trade between ancient Makan, Dilmun, and Mesopotamia during the 3rd millennium BCE dominates the archaeological literature about Arabia archaeology. The Al Khawd hoard and its contemporaries lend weight to the suggestion that 1st millennium BCE Qadē (the name of south-eastern Arabia at that time) was even more important than Bronze Age Makan in terms of the copper trade volume. A reassessment shows the Early Iron Age by no means to be a dark age, but rather an innovative, successful adaptive period characterised by evident population growth.

About the Authors
Nasser S. Al-Jahwari, Full Professor at Sultan Qaboos University, is a specialist in landscape archaeology, settlement patterns, and quantification in archaeology. He has directed several archaeological projects and intensively published in scientific journals. He is a also heritage expert for ICOMOS and UNESCO, and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Oman Studies. ;

Paul A. Yule, since 1986 has conducted fieldwork in the Sultanate of Oman, Zafar in Yemen, Orissa in India, and Tigrey in Ethiopia. His most important work focuses on Arabia in the first half of the 1st millennium CE. Editor and referee for different institutes and periodicals, he is an active author, draughtsman and cartographer. ;

Khaled A. Douglas, PhD from Tübingen University in 1998, he is now Associate Professor at the Department of Archaeology of Sultan Qaboos University, Oman, and the Hashemite University, Jordan. Interested in the Bronze and Iron Age archaeology of south-east Arabia and southern Levant, he directed and co-directed several excavations in Oman and Jordan. ;

Bernhard Pracejus, PhD (Adelaide University), Habilitation, (Free University Berlin), Associate Professor (Sultan Qaboos University, Oman). His research concentrated on economic geology (modern VMS deposits, precious opal, coltan, uranium, clays), geochemistry, and more recently on metal recycling from mine wastes and the examination of ancient copper slags in Oman. ;

Mohammed Ali K. Al-Belushi, MA from the University of Liverpool and a PhD from the University of Birmingham, UK, is now Associate Professor at the Archaeology Department of the Sultan Qaboos University, Oman. He is also a former Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Oman Studies. ;

Ali Tigani ElMahi, PhD from the University of Bergen, Norway, focuses his research interests on archaeology and statistics, anthropology, animal osteology and behaviour, ecology, wildlife, and zoogeography. ElMahi has an intensive field experience in Sudan, Norway, and Oman, where he has conducted several archaeological and ethnoarchaeological studies.
FORTHCOMING: Use of Space and Domestic Areas: Functional Organisation and Social Strategies Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 18, Session XXXII-1 edited by Luc Jallot and Alessandro Peinetti. Paperback; 205x290mm; 150 pages; 73 figures, 4 tables (colour throughout). Papers in English, abstracts in French and English. Print RRP: £30.00. 793 2021. ISBN 9781803271361. Book contents pageBuy Now

Use of Space and Domestic Areas: Functional Organisation and Social Strategies presents the papers from Session XXXII-1 of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). The organization of inhabited space is the direct expression of the deep integration of societies with their cultural and natural environment. According to the distribution and the patterning of activities, the organization of human communities and the role of their actors can be brought to light. The various contributions in this volume show the progress of research in terms of understanding the use of space on different scales, from the household to the village, focusing on Neolithic and Bronze Age contexts. Each of the contributions shows the diversity of issues concerning the interpretation of the living spaces, and the diversity of approaches carried out to answer them.

About the Editors
Luc Jallot, archaeologist, is Maître de conférences at the University Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3 (UMR 5140 « Archéologie des Sociétés méditerranéennes »). His researches focus on settlement organisation and dynamics, on material culture, on anthropomorphic art and on the relationship between societies and environment at the end of the Neolithic in Southern France. Since the end of the 1990s he has been involved in several research projects on Neolithic earthen architecture. He has also worked in Eastern Africa and, more recently, on Neolithic and Copper Age contexts in Morocco. ;

Alessandro Peinetti, geoarchaeologist, PhD (University Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, UMR 5140 « Archéologie des Sociétés méditerranéennes », Università di Bologna) is an independent researcher. His researches focus on the formation processes of the archaeological record, on the built environment, on earthen architecture and on the organisation of settlements and activity areas documented by the analysis of soils and archeological sediments through micromorphology. He is especially involved in research into Neolithic and Bronze Age villages in Italy and Southern France.
FORTHCOMING: Koukounaries I: Mycenaean Pottery from Selected Contexts by Robert B. Koehl with a contribution by Richard Jones. Paperback; 205x290mm; 416pp; 8 figures, 5 tables, 16 colour plates, 158 black & white plates. 789 2021. ISBN 9781789698749. Buy Now

The excavations on the Koukounaries Hill, Paros, Greece, conducted under the direction of Demetrius U. Schilardi for the Archaeological Society at Athens from 1976 to 1992, revealed a 12th century B.C.E. Mycenaean building, an Iron Age settlement, and an Archaic sanctuary. Koukounaries I: Mycenaean Pottery from Selected Contexts presents the pottery from five areas inside the building: three large storerooms, the main east-west corridor, and a small shrine, as well as the pottery from a limited reoccupation after the building’s fire destruction and abandonment. The ceramics from the main occupation phase comprise the largest and best-preserved domestic assemblage from the 12th century B.C.E. in the Cyclades and offer important evidence for the continuation of Mycenaean culture after the destruction of the mainland palatial citadels. The small deposits of pottery from the reoccupation phase, provide important stratigraphic evidence for defining the Late Helladic IIIC ceramic sequence. The volume also considers the function of the individual spaces within the building, based largely on the patterns of shape distributions and quantities, with the statistics for each context presented in a series of appendices. Other issues area also explored, including the evidence for itinerant potters, the trade in antique vases, and the place of origin of the settlers who founded and inhabited the Mycenaean building on the summit of the Koukounaries Hill.

About the Author
Robert B. Koehl, Emeritus Professor of Archaeology and former Chair of the Department of Classical and Oriental Studies, Hunter College, City University of New York, and director of the New York Aegean Bronze Age Colloquium from 1999-2018, received his BA in Classics from Pomona College in 1974 and his PhD in Classical Archaeology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1982. A specialist in Minoan and Mycenaean culture, Koehl has participated on excavations in Israel at Tell Gezer, and in Greece, at the Koukounaries Hill on Paros, the Mycenaean citadel at Gla, and on Crete at Kommos and Pseira. Since 2000, he has been the staff specialist in Aegean culture for the excavations at Tell Atchana (ancient Alalakh), Turkey. The author of Sarepta III. The Imported Bronze and Iron Age Wares from Area II, X (1985) and Aegean Bronze Age Rhyta (2006), and the editor of Amilla: The Quest for Excellence (2013), and Studies in Aegean Art and Culture (2016), Koehl has also written extensively on Aegean art and iconography, Minoan ‘rites of passage’, Aegean and Near Eastern zoomorphic vessels, and Minoan and Mycenaean interconnections with the Levant.
FORTHCOMING: Environment and Agriculture of Early Winchester edited by Martin Biddle, Jane Renfrew and Patrick Ottaway. Hardback; 215x276 pages; 430pp. Print RRP: £75.00. 783 2021 Winchester Studies 10. ISBN 9781803270661. Buy Now

Winchester Studies 10: This wide-ranging study uses historical and archaeological evidence to consider humanity's interactions with the environment, fashioning agricultural, gardening and horticultural regimes over a millennium and a half. The discussions of archaeological finds of seeds from discarded rubbish including animal fodder and bedding show the wide range of wild species present, as well as cultivated and gathered plants in the diet of inhabitants and livestock. Pollen analyses, and studies of wood, mosses, and beetles, alongside a look at the local natural environment, and comparison with medieval written records give us a tantalizing picture of early Winchester. The earliest record is by Ælfric of Eynsham in his 11th-century Nomina Herbarum. From medieval records come hints of gardens within the city walls, and considerable detail about agriculture and horticulture, and produce brought into the city. Wild fruit and nuts were also being gathered from the countryside for the town’s markets and mills. At St Giles’ Fair exotic imported spices and fruits were also sold. All these sources of evidence are brought together to reveal more fully the roles of agriculture and the environment in the development Winchester.

Table of Contents (provisional):
Preface ;

Part 1: Introduction and Environment ;
1. Introduction – Martin Biddle, Jane M. Renfrew with a contribution by Patrick Ottaway ;
2. The Natural Environment of the Winchester Region – Jane M. Renfrew and Patrick Ottaway ;

Part 2: The Written Evidence ;
3. Aelfric's Nomina Herbarum and the Plant Remains from Anglo-Saxon Winchester – Debby Banham ;
4. Agriculture and the Use of Plants in Medieval Winchester: the Documentary Evidence – Derek J. Keene ;
5. Gardens in Medieval and Later Winchester: the Castle, Wolvesey Palace and Eastgate House – Beatrice Clayre and Martin Biddle ;
6. Field Crops and their Cultivation in Hampshire, 1200-1350, in the Light of Documentary Evidence – Jan Z. Titow ;

Part 3: The Archaeological Evidence ;
7. Pollen Analysis of Archaeological Deposits in Winchester – Erwin Isenberg and Jane M. Renfrew ;
8. The Identification and Utilization of Wood in Early Winchester – Suzanne Keene ;
9. The Roman Plant Remains – Peter Murphy ;
10. The Plant Economy and Vegetation of Anglo-Saxon Winchester – Michael Monk ;
11. Plant Remains and Agriculture in Norman and Later Medieval Winchester – Francis J. Green ;
12. Roman and Post-Roman Moss from Lower Brook Street Moss – Dorian Williams and Jane M. Renfrew ;
13. Insect Fauna from Lower Brook Street – Peter J. Osborne ;

14. Conclusion – Patrick Ottaway
Iron Age and Roman Settlement at Highflyer Farm, Ely, Cambridgeshire by James Fairclough. Paperback; 205x290mm; 154 pages; 91 figures, 28 tables (colour throughout). 765 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698428. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698435. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Iron Age and Roman settlement at Highflyer Farm, Ely, Cambridgeshire presents the results of archaeological work carried out by MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) at Highflyer Farm in 2018. Remains dating from the Neolithic to the post-medieval period were recorded, with most of the activity occurring between the early Iron Age and late Roman periods. Excavations in 2000 at Prickwillow Road, undertaken directly to the south of Highflyer Farm, had recorded the southern extent of this Iron Age to Roman settlement.

Two features, a pit and a posthole, were dated to the late Neolithic to early Bronze Age. In the 5th to 4th centuries BC a small open early Iron Age settlement was established and was at the lower end of the settlement hierarchy, perhaps occupied by a single family or a seasonal group. In the middle Iron Age, there was a well-planned linear settlement split into three main sections, which consisted of a similar large rounded enclosure at its northern and southern extent, both probably domestic. A complex sub-rectangular arrangement of enclosures and boundaries lay within the centre, a roughly equal distance apart from the circular enclosures. In the late Iron Age and then the early Roman periods, a significant reorganisation of the site occurred with successive enclosures and rectilinear field systems established.

In the middle Roman period, the settlement was reorganised around three routeways with two distinct areas of linked paddocks and compartmentalised enclosures. There were three probable different separate areas of domestic activity, including a rectangular posthole structure centrally located in the main enclosure system. It is possible that there was significant export and trade of livestock occurring from this relatively wealthy settlement with cattle dominating. The routeway system continued into the later Roman period though the number of enclosures reduced. On balance, it is more likely the Roman settlement finished in the late 4th century, but an early 5th-century date should not be ruled out. Post-Roman activity was sparser, with a single sunken feature building identified as well as a waterhole and a few other features dated to the 5th and/or 6th century.

Includes contributions by Sander Aerts, Rob Atkins, Paul Blinkhorn, Andy Chapman, Chris Chinnock, Nina Crummy, Mary Ellen Crothers, Rebecca Gordon, Tora Hylton, Sarah Percival, Adam Sutton and Yvonne Wolframm-Murray.

Illustrations by Sofia Turk.

About the Author
James Fairclough is a Project Officer with MOLA Northampton, where he has worked since 2014, leading numerous sites, including the Saxon cemetery at Great Ryburgh and areas on the A14 infrastructure project. Between joining MOLA and graduating with a degree and Masters from the University of Manchester in 2012, he worked for Archaeological Solutions on sites across East Anglia. As well as working in the commercial field, James continues to help supervise research projects in the Vale of Pickering in North Yorkshire, targeting preserved Mesolithic sites. This work has been in conjunction with a number of universities and has included sites such as Star Carr and No Name Hill.
Die Gräber von Bat und Al-Ayn und das Gebäude II in Bat by Stephanie Döpper. DOI: 10.32028/9781789699494. Hardback; 210x297mm; 394pp; 357 figures, 256 tables, 21 plates (colour throughout). Print RRP: £80.00. 741 2021 Arabia Orientalis: Studien zur Archäologie Ostarabiens 2. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699494. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699500. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Early Bronze Age in third-millennium-BC Eastern Arabia was a period of fundamental change, which is apparent in the development of social complexity, the exploitation of new resources and the emergence of new modes of life. Hallmarks of this period include monumental structures, so-called towers, and stone-built circular tombs.

The second volume of the series Arabia Orientalis is dedicated to the archaeological investigation of the Early Bronze Age necropolises of the UNESCO world heritage sites Bat and Al-Ayn in the Sultanate of Oman, as well as the monumental tower structure Building II at Bat. It encompasses detailed reports on the architecture and stratigraphy, as well as the find assemblages from the excavated buildings, including pottery and small finds, along with anthropological as well as anthracological studies. The publication presents insights into changing burial customs, as well as the function of the monumental tower structures. Three out of the four excavated Hafit- and Umm an-Nar-period tombs in the necropolises featured evidence for reuse at later times, especially during the Samad period, where new inhumations were placed into the Bronze Age tombs. The early Umm an-Nar tower Building II is surrounded by a large ditch system that might have served as protection against flooding from the nearby wadi.

About the Author
Stephanie Döpper is a postdoctoral researcher at Goethe University Frankfurt with an interest in mobile and sedentary communities of the Bronze Age in Eastern Arabia, as well as the reuse of prehistoric tombs and early modern mud-brick villages in the region. To facilitate public engagement with archaeological sites, she co-developed the ArchaeoTrail app for self-guided smartphone tours at archaeological sites.

German Description
Die frühe Bronzezeit im dritten Jahrtausend v. Chr. in Südostarabien ist eine Zeit grundlegender Veränderungen, die sich in der Entwicklung sozialer Komplexität, der Ausbeutung neuer Ressourcen und dem Aufkommen neuer Lebensformen zeigt. Kennzeichen dieser Epoche sind monumentale Bauwerke, sogenannte Türme, und aus Stein gebaute runde Gräber.

Der zweite Band der Reihe Arabia Orientalis widmet sich der archäologischen Untersuchung der frühbronzezeitlichen Nekropolen der UNESCO-Welterbestätten Bat und Al-Ayn im Sultanat Oman sowie dem monumentalen Turm Gebäude II in Bat. Er umfasst ausführliche Abhandlungen zur Architektur und Stratigraphie sowie zu den Fundeassemblagen aus den ausgegrabenen Bauwerken, darunter Keramik-, Kleinfunde-, anthropologische sowie anthrakologische Untersuchungen. Die Publikation präsentiert Einblicke in sich verändernde Bestattungssitten und die Funktion des monumentalen Turms. Drei der vier ausgegrabenen Hafit- und Umm an-Nar-zeitlichen Gräber in den Nekropolen belegen spätere Nachnutzungen, vor allem in der Samad-Zeit, in der neue Bestattungen in die bronzezeitlichen Gräber eingebracht wurden. Das Gebäude II aus der frühen Umm an-Nar-Zeit ist von einer großen Grabenanlage umgeben, die möglicherweise als Schutz vor Überschwemmungen des nahen Wadis diente.

Stephanie Döpper ist wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt und beschäftigt sich mit mobilen und sesshaften Gesellschaften der Bronzezeit in Südostarabien sowie der Nachnutzung prähistorischer Gräber und frühneuzeitlicher Lehmziegeldörfer in dieser Region. Um der Öffentlichkeit den Zugang zu archäologischen Stätten zu erleichtern, hat sie die ArchaeoTrail-App für selbstgeführte Smartphone-Touren an archäologischen Stätten mitentwickelt.
Orientation of Prehistoric Monuments in Britain: A Reassessment by Alistair Marshall. Paperback; 203x276mm; 704pp; 2 printed figures, extensive online image archive. 756 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697056. £85.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697063. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £85.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Orientation of Prehistoric Monuments in Britain: A Reassessment views the type of major axial alignment seen at many megalithic ritual and funerary monuments of Neolithic to Bronze Age date in Britain and Ireland, not in terms of more abstract astronomical concerns, but rather as an expression of repeated seasonal propitiation, basically solar, involving community, agrarian economy, and the ancestors in a combined attempt to mitigate variable environmental conditions. The analysis is supported by over 800 images, open-source, for unrestricted use, and available digitally.

About the Author
Alistair Marshall has a formal background in archaeology and the natural sciences, general interests in European prehistory, and is currently developing various projects including: application of remote sensing, from broader study of landscapes to detailed interpretation of ritual monuments with related experimental work; structural analysis of megalithic sites, with especial reference to interpretation of axial alignment; investigation of broader aspects of tribal economies during the later Iron Age in Britain and Northwestern Europe.
The Archaeology of ‘Underdog Sites’ in the Douro Valley From Prehistory to the Modern Age edited by Santiago Sánchez de la Parra-Pérez, Sonia Díaz-Navarro, Javier Fernández-Lozano and Javier Jiménez Gadea. Paperback; 203x276mm; 390 pages; colour illustrations throughout. Papers in English and Spanish. 139 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699890. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699906. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Archaeology of ‘Underdog Sites’ in the Douro Valley brings together the best presentations from the eighth and ninth meetings of Archaeology of the Douro Valley, held in Ávila and Astorga (Spain), respectively in 2018 and 2019. However, instead of a simple collection of articles, the aim of this publication is to show the importance of projects that have been left in the background despite obtaining interesting archaeological data about the occupation of this valley and its evolution. Moreover, we must take into account that many of these projects support new activity in a rural territory that is increasingly neglected politically and economically. Hence the use of the term ‘underdog’, defined as a person or group of people with less power or money than the rest of society. Overall, the volume provides a general and interdisciplinary view of the different types of occupation in the territory of the Douro Valley. The chapters are divided into four sections, three of them chronological: Prehistory and Protohistory; Antiquity and Late Antiquity; and the medieval and modern ages. The last section is thematic and includes diachronic studies, museology, and the archaeology of mining. Therefore, the present volume is a medium to showcase the latest research carried out in this important territory and to contribute to knowledge of its history, updating the archaeological state of the art in the valley and presenting results that may be used in the most diverse types of comparative studies.

About the Editors
Santiago Sánchez de la Parra-Pérez is a pre-doctoral researcher at the University of Salamanca (Junta de Castilla y León and European Social Fund). His main research focuses on Latin epigraphy in Hispania. ;

Sonia Díaz-Navarro is a pre-doctoral researcher at the University of Valladolid (Junta de Castilla y León and European Social Fund). Her research is based on the osteoarchaeological study of the peninsular populations of recent prehistory (Neolithic-Bronze Age). ;

Javier Fernández-Lozano is assistant professor at the University of León. His main lines of research are the archaeology of mining and the study of the geological processes responsible for the formation of mountains in the Iberian Peninsula, using techniques based on 3D laser, spectral analysis and gravimetry. ;

Javier Jiménez Gadea is director of the Museum of Avila. He specialises in the Middle Ages, Islam and heritage management.

En español
Esta monografía reúne las mejores contribuciones presentadas en las VIII y IX Jornadas de Arqueología del Valle del Duero, celebradas en Ávila y Astorga en 2018 y 2019, respectivamente. Más allá de constituir una recopilación de artículos, el objetivo de esta obra es poner de manifiesto la importancia de proyectos arqueológicos que han sido relegados a un segundo plano, a pesar de arrojar interesantes resultados sobre la ocupación del Valle del Duero y su evolución y constituir un recurso de dinamización de un territorio, eminentemente rural, cada vez más abandonado. A ello se debe que el título de este monográfico empleé el término ‘underdog’, definido como una persona o un grupo de personas con menos poder o dinero que el resto de la sociedad.

A lo largo de la obra el lector encontrará una visión general e interdisciplinar de los diferentes modos de ocupación y explotación del territorio en torno al valle del Duero. Los capítulos están estructurados en cuatro secciones: tres de corte cronológico –Prehistoria y Protohistoria, Antigüedad y Antigüedad Tardía y Épocas medieval y moderna– y una temática –Varia– que recoge trabajos de corte diacrónico, museológico o sobre la Arqueología de la minería.

Santiago Sánchez de la Parra-Pérez trabaja actualmente como investigador predoctoral en la Universidad de Salamanca (Junta de Castilla y León y Fondo Social Europeo). Su investigac
Burials and Society in Late Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age Ireland by Cormac McSparron. DOI: 10.32028/9781789696318. Paperback; 205x290mm; 176 pages; 76 figures, 27 tables. 630 2020 Queen's University Belfast Irish Archaeological Monograph Series 1. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696318. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696325. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Burials and Society in Late Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age Ireland describes and analyses the increasing complexity of later Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age burial in Ireland, using burial complexity as a proxy for increasing social complexity, and as a tool for examining social structure. The book commences with a discussion of theoretical approaches to the study of burials in both anthropology and archaeology and continues with a summary of the archaeological and environmental background to the Irish Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age. Then a set of criteria for identifying different types of social organisation is proposed, before an in-depth examination of the radiocarbon chronology of Irish Single Burials, which leads to a multifaceted statistical analysis of the Single Burial Tradition burial utilising descriptive and multivariate statistical approaches. A chronological model of the Irish Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age is then presented which provides the basis for a discussion of increasing burial and social complexity in Ireland over this period, proposing an evolution from an egalitarian society in the later Chalcolithic Period through to a prestige goods chiefdom emerging around 1900 BC. It is suggested that the decline of copper production at Ross Island, Co. Cork after 2000 BC may have led to a ‘copper crisis’ which would have been a profoundly disrupting event, destroying the influence of copper miners and shifting power to copper workers, and those who controlled them. This would have provided a stimulus towards the centralisation of power and the emergence of a ranked social hierarchy. The effects of this ‘copper crisis’ would have been felt in Britain also, where much Ross Island copper was consumed and may have led to similar developments, with the emergence of the Wessex Culture a similar response in Britain to the same stimulus.

Online Appendices: DOI: 10.32028/9781789696318-appendices

About the Author
Cormac McSparron studied Archaeology and Modern History at Queen’s University Belfast, graduating with a BA in 1989. He was awarded an MPhil in 2008 and a PhD in 2018. Since 2002, he has worked at the Centre for Archaeological Fieldwork at Queen’s and has directed and published a large number of important excavations in Northern Ireland.

The Queen’s University Belfast Irish Archaeological Monograph series
The Queen’s University Belfast Irish Archaeological Monograph series is designed as a publication venue for excavation reports, proceedings volumes and postgraduate theses relating to all aspects of Irish archaeology from the first settlers of the Mesolithic through to the twentieth century. The volumes encompass a range of approaches from fieldwork through to specialist artefact studies, and the application of scientific techniques to the study of the past. Submissions are welcome that showcase the diversity of archaeological research being undertaken across the island and among the Irish diaspora.

Reviews:
'This book is a rich source of data, with every possible aspect of burials being analysed, supported by extensive distribution maps, tables, and graphs. This means that it makes a significant contribution to our understanding of prehistoric Ireland and will be essential reading for anyone studying that period, but it is not a book for the casual reader.'Dr Duncan Berryman (2021): Ulster Archaeological Society Newsletter
Vincenzo La Rosa (1941- 2014): Un archeologo tra Sicilia e Egeo edited by Lucia Arcifa and Pietro Militello. Paperback; 150x210mm; 172 pages; 36 figures. Italian text. Italian text. 9 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698176. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698183. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Vincenzo La Rosa (1941- 2014) Un archeologo tra Sicilia e Egeo collects the contributions of the Study Day Una lezione per il futuro. Vincenzo La Rosa (1941-2014) organised in 2015 by the University of Catania in collaboration with ISVNA, to re-examine the scientific figure of Vincenzo La Rosa, professor of Aegean Civilisations at the University of Catania, director of the excavations at Haghia Triada and Festòs in Crete, and the excavations at Milena in Sicily. Scholars and students demonstrate the contribution that Vincenzo La Rosa has made to our knowledge of the prehistory of Crete, Sicily and the Aegean, and to the application of a long-term perspective linking the ancient and modern worlds, emerges in his long career as a university lecturer, director of the Centre for the Study of Greek Archaeology at the C.N.R. in Catania, deputy director of the Italian Archaeological School in Athens (1993-1999) and director of the Centre of Cretan Archaeology (1998-2011).

About the Editors
Lucia Arcifa is professor of Medieval Archaeology at the University of Catania and director of the archaeological excavations in Rocchicella and Milena, in Sicily. Her interests focus on Byzantine and Islamic Mediterranean and on the relation between Sicily, Byzantium, Ifrīqiya in the Early Middle Age. ;

Pietro Militello is professor of Aegean civilisation at the University of Catania and director of the Mission of Phaistos in Crete. He is also directing excavations in Sicily. His interests focus on II millennium Crete and on the relation between the Aegean and Sicily in prehistory.

Italian Description
Vincenzo La Rosa (1941- 2014) Un archeologo tra Sicilia e Egeo raccoglie i contributi della Giornata di Studio Una lezione per il futuro. Vincenzo La Rosa (1941-2014) organizzata nel 2015 dall’Università di Catania in collaborazione con l’ISVNA, per riesaminare la figura scientifico di Vincenzo La Rosa, professore ordinario di Civiltà Egee presso l’Università di Catania, e direttore degli scavi di Haghia Triada e Festòs a Creta, e degli scavi di Milena in Sicilia. Attraverso i contributi di studiosi ed allievi emerge il contributo che Vincenzo La Rosa ha apportato alla conoscenza della preistoria di Creta, della Sicilia e dell’Egeo, ed alla applicazione di una prospettiva di lunga durata che collegava il mondo antico a quello moderno, nella sua lunga carriera di docente universitario, direttore del Centro di studi sull’Archeologia greca del C.N.R. di Catania, vicedirettore della Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Atene (1993-1999) e Direttore del Centro di Archeologia Cretese (1998-2011).
Barāqish/Yathill (Yemen) 1986-2007 Excavations of Temple B and related research and restoration / Extramural excavations in Area C and overview studies edited by Sabina Antonini and Francesco G. Fedele. DOI: 10.32028/9781789694703. Paperback; 205x290mm; 2 volumes: 398pp & 546pp; 700 figures, tables and plates. Contributions in English, Italian, and French. Chapter abstracts in English and Arabic. 732 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694703. £98.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694710. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The walled town of Barāqish in interior Yemen – ancient Yathill of the Sabaeans and Minaeans – was for Alessandro de Maigret (1943-2011) ‘one of the archaeological marvels not just of Yemen, but of the entire Near East’. Established as an oasis settlement in the semi-desert depression of the Jawf, it became in the 1st millennium BCE a thriving caravan station on the ‘incense’ route and a famed place of worship, controlled by rich rulers and merchants. Topography and trade made it a crucible of South Arabian and foreign traditions, and on several occasions, it was a border town disputed between rival powers. A sustained archaeological effort to investigate the site and area began in 1986 by the Italian Archaeological Mission, led by de Maigret, and developed in two phases. In 1989-1992 the temple of the patron god was excavated, while between 2003-2007 a range of new excavations were undertaken, including a second temple, a sounding, a dissection of the tell's edge outside the Minaean wall, and a cemetery.

Presented across two volumes, Volume 1: Excavations of Temple B and related research and restoration is particularly devoted to the temple of god ʿAthtar dhu-Qabḍ (Temple B), dated to the second half of the 1st millennium BCE. Six chapters fully illustrate its excavation, architecture, restoration, findings, inscriptions, and dating. The contribution of this work and monument to regional history transcends its local significance. The report is framed by ten chapters detailing the historiography of research on Barāqish, the initial surveys carried out in 1986-1987, the architecture and restoration of Temple A together with the extramural excavation at the adjacent curtain wall, the cultic equipment, and radiocarbon datings. The nine contributors are leading scholars in the above fields and include recognized experts in South Arabian archaeology.

The core of Volume 2: Extramural excavations in Area C and overview studies is a final report on Area C, an exploratory dissection through the western edge of the Barāqish mound outside the curtain wall, and a unique operation for Yemen until now. Eight chapters detail the excavation, stratigraphy, and geoarchaeology (from about 800 BCE to the present), in addition to radiocarbon chronology, cultural finds, animal and plant remains, economy, major historical events, and unique evidence for trade. Four further chapters offer a glimpse of settlement archaeology for Sabaean Yathill and the survey of a religious centre to the west, together with a first typology of Minaean pottery and an epigraphic and political-historical overview for Barāqish and the Jawf. The contributors are recognized experts in South Arabian archaeology.

About the Editors
Sabina Antonini heads the Italian Archaeological Mission to Yemen c/o Monumenta Orientalia (Rome). Since 1984 she has taken part in archaeological surveys and excavations of prehistoric sites in Khawlān al-Ṭiyāl and Ramlat al-Sabʿatayn and of South Arabian sites, including Yalā, Tamnaʿ, Ḥayd ibn ʿAqīl, and Barāqish. She is a specialist in South Arabian archaeology and history of art. Her contribution, ‘The Italian Archaeological Mission at Šibām al-Ġirās, Yemen’, has appeared in Festschrift in honour of Professor Mikhail Piotrovsky (2019). ;

Francesco G. Fedele has been Professor of Anthropology and Prehistoric ecology at the Università di Napoli ‘Federico II’, Naples, until retirement in 2011. As a member of the Italian Archaeological Mission to Yemen since 1984 he has conducted excavations in Khawlān al- Ṭiyāl and at Barāqish, with a particular focus on site geoarchaeology and archaeofaunas. His recent publications include ‘New data on domestic and wild camels in Sabaean and Minaean Yemen’ in Archaeozoology of the Near East 9 (2017).
The First Thousand Years of Glass-Making in the Ancient Near East Compositional Analyses of Late Bronze and Iron Age Glasses by Wendy Reade. Paperback; 205x290mm; 274 pages; 204 figures, 72 tables. 731 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697032. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697049. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Glass-Making in the Ancient Near East explores glass composition and production from the mid-second to mid-first millennia BC, essentially the first thousand years of glass-making. Multi-element analyses of 132 glasses from Pella in Jordan, and Nuzi and Nimrud in Iraq (ancient Mesopotamia), produce new and important data that provide insights into the earliest glass production. A novel method for data interpretation and presentation has been developed and used to characterise the glass types and to investigate questions of composition, raw materials, regional differences and similarities, and changes through time from the earliest consistent glass manufacture as represented at 16th century BC Pella, which is compared with Late Bronze Age Nuzi, to the Iron Age at both Pella and Nimrud. These compositional data are compared with available glass compositional data from the widespread regions of the Levant, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Iran and France, uncovering fascinating connections that, when placed in the archaeological context, reveal much about glass production, raw material sources, and distribution of finished and raw glasses. Technological innovations, including the introduction of natron-fluxed glasses, early decolouring with antimony, and the use of Egyptian cobalt colourant in Near Eastern glasses, are explored as part of this unique investigation of the critical developments in sophisticated and complex glass-making that laid the foundations for the establishment of large-scale production in the ensuing Hellenistic and Roman periods.

About the Author
Wendy Reade has obtained a Postgraduate Diploma in Ancient Documentary Studies from Macquarie University and a PhD in Archaeological Science from the University of Sydney in 2009. She is an Honorary Associate in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Sydney, where she lectured in Archaeology and Archaeological Science from 1999 to 2015. She has worked as an archaeologist and conservator on excavations in Jordan, Egypt, Bahrain, United Arab Emirates, Syria, Greece, the Republic of North Macedonia, Myanmar and Australia.
Classification of Lithic Artefacts from the British Late Glacial and Holocene Periods by Torben Bjarke Ballin. Paperback; 205x290mm; 100 pages; 128 figures. 730 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698695. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698701. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

A system for the hierarchical Classification of Lithic Artefacts from the British Late Glacial and Holocene Periods is offered in this book. It is hoped that it may find use as a guide book for archaeology students, museum staff, non-specialist archaeologists, local archaeology groups and lay enthusiasts. To allow the individual categories of lithic objects to be classified and characterised in detail, it was necessary to first define a number of descriptive terms, which forms the first part of this guide. The main part of the book is the lithic classification section, which offers definitions of the individual formal debitage, core and tool types. The basic questions asked are: what defines Object X as a tool and not a piece of debitage or a core; what defines a microlith as a microlith and not a knife or a piercer; and what defines a specific implement as a scalene triangle and not an isosceles one? As shown in the book, there are disagreements within the lithics community as to the specific definition of some types, demonstrating the need for all lithics reports to define which typological framework they are based on.

The eBook edition of this publication is available in Open Access, supported by Historic Environment Scotland.

About the Author
After having worked as an archaeological specialist and Project Manager in Denmark, the Faroe Islands and Norway, Torben Ballin relocated to Scotland in 1998. Since then, he has worked as an independent lithics specialist in Scotland, England, Northern Ireland and Ireland, representing the consultancy Lithic Research. Torben’s special interests have been lithic terminology and typology, lithic technology, chronological frameworks, raw material studies, intra-site spatial analyses, prehistoric territories and exchange networks, and Scotland’s Late Upper Palaeolithic and Early Mesolithic industries. His interest in lithic terminology and typology led to the production and publication of a number of works on general lithic typology within and outwith Britain.
Contribution of Ceramic Technological Approaches to the Anthropology and Archaeology of Pre- and Protohistoric Societies Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 12 Session IV-3 edited by François Giligny, Ekaterina Dolbunova, Louise Gomart, Alexandre Livingstone Smith and Sophie Méry. Paperback; 205x290mm; 112 pages; 44 figures, 3 tables. 5 papers in French, 2 in English. 729 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697094. £27.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697100. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The reconstruction of the technical systems of ceramic production and of its ‘chaîne opératoire’ is a means of exploring certain social structures in time and space. For many years, methodological procedures based on multidisciplinarity have made it possible to analyse both materials and methods of fabrication for this purpose. Session IV-3 organised at the 18th Congress of the UISPP in 2018 aimed to highlight the contribution of technological approaches to ceramics, both in archaeology and in ethnology, to the analysis of pre- and protohistoric societies. The case studies focus on the Neolithic and the European Bronze Age, but also on the megalithism of our era in Senegal.

Apport des approaches technologiques de la céramique à l’anthropologie et à l’archéologie des sociétés pré et protohistoriques
La reconstitution des systèmes techniques et des chaînes opératoires de production céramique est un moyen qui permet d’explorer certaines structures sociales dans le temps et l’espace. Depuis de nombreuses années, des procédures méthodologiques basées sur la pluridisciplinarité permettent d’analyser tant les matériaux que les méthodes de façonnage à cette fin. La session IV-3 organisée lors du 18e Congrès de l’UISPP en 2018 avait pour but de mettre en évidence l’apport des approches technologiques de la céramique, tant en archéologie qu’en ethnologie des techniques à l’analyse des sociétés pré et protohistoriques. Les études de cas portent essentiellement sur le Néolithique et l’âge du Bronze européen, mais aussi sur le mégalithisme de notre ère au Sénégal.
Neolithic and Bronze Age Studies in Europe: From Material Culture to Territories Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 13 Session I-4 edited by Marie Besse and François Giligny. Paperback; 205x290mm; 104 pages; 37 figures, 13 tables. 728 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697193. £27.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697209. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Neolithic and Bronze Age Studies in Europe: from material culture to territories presents eight papers from the 2018 UISPP Congress. Topics include the neolithisation process in the Iberian Peninsula; faunal exploitation in early Neolithic Italy; the economic and symbolic role of animals in eastern Germany; Copper Age human remains in central Italy; animal figurines; spatula-idols; territories and schematic art in the Iberian Neolithic; and finally Bronze age hoards at a European scale. The diversity of the papers reflects contemporary approaches and questions in those periods.

About the Editors
Marie Besse is Professor of Prehistoric Archaeology at the University of Geneva and is Director of the Laboratory of Prehistoric Archaeology and Anthropology at the same university. ;

François Giligny is Professor of Archaeological Methodology at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University.
Between the 3rd and 2nd Millennia BC: Exploring Cultural Diversity and Change in Late Prehistoric Communities by Susana Soares Lopes and Sérgio Alexandre Gomes. DOI: 10.32028/9781789699227. Paperback; 205x290mm; 156 pages; 64 figures, 13 tables (colour throughout). 727 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699227. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699234. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Between the 3rd and 2nd Millennia BC: Exploring Cultural Diversity and Change in Late Prehistoric Communities is a collection of studies on the cultural reconfigurations that occurred in western Europe between the 3rd and 2nd millennia BC. It brings together seven texts focusing on the evidence from the West of the Iberian Peninsula, and one on the South of England. The texts have their origin in a landmark meeting held at the University of Coimbra in November 2018, where scholars explored the grand narratives explaining the differences between what are traditionally considered Chalcolithic (or Late Neolithic) and Bronze Age communities. The contributions look at key aspects of these grand narratives through regional perspectives, asking the following questions: is there clear data to support the idea of an intensification of social complexity towards the emergence of the Bronze Age chiefdoms? What is the role of monumental architecture within this process? How do we best discuss the different levels of architectural visibility during this period? How can we interpret collective and individual burials in relation to the emergence of individual/territorial powers? In answering these questions, the papers explore regional diversity and argue that regional specificities resist a general interpretation of the historical process at stake. In light of this resistance, the book emphasizes that cultural singularities only become visible through contextual, medium, or low-scale approaches. The recognition of singularities challenges grand narratives, but also carries the potential to expand our understanding of the changes that occurred during this key moment of Late Prehistory. The book thus offers readers the opportunity to think about the diversity of archaeological evidence in combination with an exploration of the available range of approaches and narratives. The critical intertwining of multiple points of view is necessary, because it gets us closer to how elusive the cultural differences of prehistoric communities can be. This elusive dimension is precisely what can force us to constantly rethink what we see and what questions we ask.

About the Editors
Susana Soares Lopes is a researcher at CEAACP – University of Coimbra (Portugal). She is a retired full professor in archaeology at the University of Porto (Portugal), where she taught from 1975 to 2013. Her research, focusing on the Late Prehistory of the Iberian Peninsula, has explored archaeological sites in northern Portugal by integrating a variety of theoretical orientations. She uses this plurality to promote and discuss different perspectives on Prehistory.

Sérgio Alexandre Gomes is a researcher at CEAACP - University of Coimbra (Portugal). His main interests lie in the history of archaeology, archaeological methods and theories, as well as the study of the Late Prehistory of the Iberian Peninsula, with a focus on the archaeology of wall enclosures and pit sites.
White Castle: The Evaluation of an Upstanding Prehistoric Enclosure in East Lothian by David Connolly, Murray Cook and Hana Kdolska. Paperback; 203x276mm; 108 pages; 42 figures, 8 tables (colour throughout). 134 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699302. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699319. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

White Castle: The evaluation of an upstanding prehistoric enclosure in East Lothian describes the results of a four year research programme of archaeological works between 2010 and 2013, at the later prehistoric enclosure of White Castle, East Lothian, carried out under the auspices of the Rampart Scotland project. The site is a Scheduled Monument, but, despite being subject of mapping and survey for some 200 years, it has never been examined by excavation prior to the Rampart Scotland project’s interventions. White Castle was the first of the series of comparable sites to be excavated in the Lammermuir area. The programme of archaeological evaluation and sequence of radiometric dates furnished evidence for four major phases of activity at White Castle – with the main enclosure period dating to the second half of the first millennium BC. The excavations demonstrated a clear sequence of enclosure development over time, whereby the design and visual impact often appeared to be more important than defence alone. White Castle’s location on the main route through the Lammermuirs with surrounding upland pasture is also highly suggestive to its function and it seems probable that the site’s economy was concerned primarily with controlling access to grazing. The final phase of the prehistoric enclosure appears to combine two key factors: impressing visitors and stock control. While maintenance of White Castle’s enclosure system was abandoned in the closing centuries BC, it is unlikely that the area was deserted and there is also limited evidence for two later phases of activity on site around the Medieval and Early Modern Periods.

About the Authors:
David Connolly MCIfA, FSA Scot has had a long career in archaeology since 1981. Being one of the pioneers of buildings archaeology, land survey and a qualified drone pilot, he is always at the forefront of developing new techniques of archaeological recording. He is also the creator of the successful Archaeology Skills Passport scheme. Since 1999, David devotes his time to running British Archaeological Jobs Resource (BAJR) and its fieldwork arm, CHC Heritage, participating in varied worldwide commercial and research/training projects, including Rampart Scotland. ;

Dr Murray Cook, MA Hons, MCIfA FSA Scot is Stirling Council’s Archaeologist, an Honorary Research Fellow at Stirling University, as well as teaching a course on Stirling at Forth Valley College. As co-director of Rampart Scotland, he also runs regular training digs and is the author of three popular books on Stirling: The Anvil of Scottish History, Digging into Stirling’s Past and Bannockburn and Stirling Bridge: Exploring Scotland’s Two Greatest Battles. ;

Hana Kdolska MA, MSc is a graduate of the University of Edinburgh, gaining practical experience working as a field archaeologist for a number of large commercial units in the UK. As part of Rampart Scotland’s team, she has supervised multiple research excavations across Scotland. Since 2015 she has participated and run archaeological projects in the UK and the Emirate of Ras al-Khaimah (UAE). In 2020, she joined BAJR and CHC Heritage as a co-director.
Liburnians and Illyrian Lembs: Iron Age Ships of the Eastern Adriatic by Luka Boršić, Danijel Džino and Irena Radić Rossi. Paperback; 175x245mm; 226 pages; 35 figures, 2 tables, 4 maps (colour throughout). 720 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699159. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699166. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Liburnians and Illyrian Lembs: Iron Age Ships of the Eastern Adriatic explores the origins of two types of ancient ship which appear in the written sources connected with the protohistoric eastern Adriatic area: the ‘Liburnian’ (liburna or liburnica) and the southern Adriatic (Illyrian) ‘lemb’. The relative abundance of written sources suggests that both ships played significant roles in ancient times, especially the Liburnian, which became the main type of light warship in early Roman imperial fleets and ultimately evolved into a generic name for warships in the Roman Imperial period and Late Antiquity. The book provides an extensive overview of written, iconographic and archaeological evidence on eastern Adriatic shipbuilding traditions before the Roman conquest in the late first century BC / early first century AD, questioning the existing scholarly assumption that the liburna and lemb were closely related, or even that they represent two sub-types of the same ship. The analysis shows that identification of the Liburnian liburna and Illyrian lemb as more or less the same ship originates from the stereotypical and essentially wrong assumption in older scholarship that the prehistoric indigenous population of the eastern Adriatic shared the same culture and, roughly, the same identities. The main point made in the book is that two different terms, liburna and lemb, were used in the sources depicting these as two different kinds of ship, rather than being interchangeable terms depicting the same ship type.

About the Authors Luka Boršić obtained his first PhD degree in philosophy with emphasis on classical languages and his second PhD degree in the history of philosophy. His main areas of research are ancient philosophy, Renaissance philosophy and the birth of modern science, as well as gender philosophy. He is currently Director, and Senior Research Fellow of the Institute of Philosophy in Zagreb. In 2019 he was a Fulbright Scholar at Columbia University in New York, during which period he completed his contribution to this book. His main approach to the history of ideas and history of philosophy is hermeneutics, the endeavour to understand multifaceted layers of historical texts. ;

Danijel Džino is Senior Lecturer in the Department of History and Archaeology at Macquarie University, Sydney. His books include: Illyricum in the Roman Politics 229 BC – AD 68 (CUP, 2010), Becoming Slav, Becoming Croat: Identity Transformation in Post-Roman and Early Medieval Dalmatia (Brill, 2010), From Justinian to Branimir: The Making of the Middle Ages in Dalmatia (Routledge, 2021); he is co-author of Rimski ratovi u Iliriku: Povijesni antinarativ (Zagreb, 2013). Džino is also co-editor of the volumes: Byzantium, its Neighbors and its Cultures (Australian Association for Byzantine Studies, 2014) and Migration, Integration and Connectivity on the Southeastern Frontier of the Carolingian Empire (Brill, 2018). ;

Irena Radić Rossi graduated from the Department of Archaeology of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences of the University of Zagreb. In 2004 she became Senior Conservator, the highest rank in the Cultural Heritage Conservation Service. In 2009 she moved to the University of Zadar, where she is currently employed as Associate Professor. She is an associated researcher of the Centre Camille Jullian (Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS), an adjunct professor at the Nautical Archaeology Program of the Texas A&M University, and an affiliated scholar of the Institute of Nautical Archaeology. Her main research interests focus on the technological development of Adriatic shipbuilding and seafaring.
From Mine to User: Production and Procurement Systems of Siliceous Rocks in the European Neolithic and Bronze Age Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 10 Session XXXIII-1&2 edited by Françoise Bostyn, François Giligny and Peter Topping. Paperback; 205x290mm; 150 pages; 71 figures, 7 tables (colour throughout). 718 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697117. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697124. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

From Mine to User: Production and Procurement Systems of Siliceous Rocks in the European Neolithic and Bronze Age presents the papers from Session XXXIII of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). 23 authors contribute nine papers from Parts 1 and 2 of the Session. The first session ‘Siliceous rocks: procurement and distribution systems’ was aimed at analysing one of the central research issues related to mining, i.e. the production systems and the diffusion of mining products. The impact of extraction on the environment, group mobility and the numbers involved in the exploitation phase were considered; mining products were also examined with a view to identifying local and imported/exported products and the underlying social organization relating to the different fields of activity. The second session ‘Flint mines and chipping floors from prehistory to the beginning of the nineteenth century’ focused on knapping activities. The significance of the identification of knapping workshops in the immediate vicinity of mine shafts and of their presence in villages as well as in intermediary places between the two was considered in the analysis of chaîne opératoire sequences. The potential of product quality and artefact distribution to contribute to the understanding of the social organisation of the communities being studied was also examined.
About the Editors
Françoise Bostyn is currently Professor at the University of Paris 1-Panthéon-Sorbonne. She specialises in the European Neolithic and works particularly on lithic industries, from the characterisation of resources and procurement systems, especially from flint mines, to the abandonment of tools within domestic settlements. Through technological and typological approaches, the questions of the organization of production at different scales, the structure of supply and exchange networks, and the emergence of craft specialists are explored from an evolutionary perspective, from the arrival of the first farmers in France until the emergence of the first hierarchical societies. ;

François Giligny has been Professor of Archaeological Methodology at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University since 2009. Experienced in preventive archaeology, he conducts research and excavations in the Paris basin. He has created and since 2016 has been co-director of two professional master’s degree courses at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne: Master of Archaeology ‘Archaeological Engineering’ and Master in Heritage and Museums ‘Archaeological Heritage Mediation and Valorisation’. François is Scientific Director of the magazine « Les Nouvelles de l’archéologie » and is engaged in two UISPP Commissions for which he organised the 18th Congress in 2018 in Paris. His research topics include the European Neolithic, ceramic technology, archaeological methodology, digital heritage and digital archaeology. ;

Peter Topping is a Visiting Fellow at Newcastle University. His expertise lies in the analysis of multiperiod landscapes, and his main research interest is the European Neolithic period. Formerly employed by RCHME and English Heritage, he has worked on Neolithic flint mines, causewayed enclosures and the Stonehenge landscape, amongst many others types of site. He has also participated in fieldwork led by the US National Park Service in Ohio and Minnesota, and is currently directing a project on prehistoric quarries in the Northumberland Cheviots, alongside researching European Neolithic mines and quarries for a Prehistoric Society research monograph.
Excavations at Stanground South, Peterborough Prehistoric, Roman and Post-Medieval Settlement along the Margins of the Fens by William A Boismier, Edmund Taylor and Yvonne Wolframm-Murray. Paperback; 205x290mm; 314 pages; 120 figures, 91 tables. 716 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698442. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698459. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

MOLA (formerly Northamptonshire Archaeology) undertook archaeological excavations at Stanground South between September 2007 and November 2009 on behalf of Persimmon Homes (East Midlands) Ltd and in accordance with a programme of works designed and overseen by CgMs Heritage. The site is situated on the south-eastern outskirts of Peterborough, on glacial tills overlooking along the Fen edge. The works comprised five areas of set-piece excavation and a series of strip map and record areas, targeted on areas of archaeological potential identified by previous evaluation works. In total, an area of 70ha was subject to archaeological mitigation.

The excavations recorded archaeological remains dating from the Bronze Age to the medieval period. The earliest features comprised four burnt mounds dating to the early Bronze Age, one of which was associated with two superimposed buildings and a small group of up to six cremations. In the middle Bronze Age there was a substantial unenclosed cemetery (urnfield) comprising 78 cremations (as well as a further possible three outlying cremations to the urnfield). In the late Bronze Age/early Iron Age a substantial droveway, up to 65m wide, was constructed leading northwards from the Fen edge to higher ground. A series of post-built roundhouses were later constructed within the confines of the droveway.

In the middle Iron Age, the droveway was partitioned to form a series of enclosures, within one of which a settlement was established adjacent to the Fen edge. This included roundhouses and a number of two-post and four-post structures.

In the later Iron Age, an enclosed settlement had developed to the north-west. This comprised several roundhouses within a substantial rectangular enclosure, which was open at its southern end. It appears that this began as an unenclosed site, which was later enclosed. Removal of cattle horn for working may have been occurring.

In the Roman period (2nd and late 4th centuries AD) a series of small enclosures were constructed on the eastern side of the later Iron Age enclosed settlement. These contained structures and features apparently associated with rural industry, which may have also exported surplus to market. Industries including the processing of hide, late Roman cheese making (with seven presses recovered), late Roman pottery production and some metalworking.

The economy of the site from the later Bronze Age onwards was focussed on pastoralism, with limited evidence for grain cultivation. During the Roman period, this seems to have specialised further towards dairy farming. The environment of the site seems to have undergone little change from the later Bronze Age, being largely open with areas of woodland and wetter areas. Peat growth during the Iron Age resulted in the covering of some of the Bronze Age features.

During the medieval period, large portions of the site were given over to open field cultivation, evidenced by the remains of ridge and furrow cultivation. The area was partitioned in the post-medieval period by the construction of a series of drainage ditches, which form the basis of the current field pattern.

About the Authors
William A Boismier’s professional background includes four university degrees and extensive fieldwork experience across Eastern and Southern England with archaeological remains ranging in date from the Palaeolithic to the medieval and postmedieval periods. He has published reports and other work in monographs, journals and other peer-reviewed outlets and has written a number of ‘grey literature’ reports, project designs and period summaries. He currently works as an archaeological consultant. ;

Edmund Taylor is a Project Manager for the York Archaeological Trust. He gained his degree in Archaeology from the University of Bradford in 2000 and soon after joined Northamptonshire Archaeology (now Mola Northampton)
Le four de Sévrier et autres fours et fourneaux d’argile aux âges des métaux en Europe occidentale by Jean Coulon. Paperback; 205x290mm; 248 pages; 181 figures, 25 tables. French text. 710 2021 Laboratoire d’archéologie préhistorique UNIGE . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698619. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698626 . Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Sevrier kiln, discovered in 1974 on a submerged island in Lake Annecy in the Haute-Savoie region of France, is a headline find of alpine archeology. Almost fifty years later, it continues to provoke debate. This study looks back at the history of an artefact considered in turn as one of the earliest Western pottery kilns, as an enigmatic stove for domestic use, and as a technological link in the Final Bronze Age which would herald the professionalization of pottery, hitherto a purely domestic industry, seasonal and self-sufficient.

It takes the form of a multidisciplinary investigation where archaeological, ethnoarchaeological and experimental approaches are brought together to consider the contradictory hypotheses, broaden the focus and put forward new perspectives.

In particular the study focuses on technological history, and on the changing social structure of Bronze Age communities, which contributed to the advent of proto-artisans specialising in pottery production, a few centuries later.

About the Author
Jean Coulon, archaeologist, teacher, and artist, was born in Annecy in 1952 and is a member of the Laboratory of Prehistoric Archaeology and Anthropology of Geneva. The practical experience acquired during a long practice of ceramics led him naturally to take an interest in this famous discovery from the Alpine lake-dwellings.

French Description
Le four de Sévrier, découvert en 1974 sur un haut fond immergé du lac d’Annecy, est un objet phare de l’archéologie alpine. Près d’une cinquantaine d’années plus tard, il continue de se dérober à l’interprétation des spécialistes. Cette étude revient sur l’histoire d’un artefact considéré tour à tour comme le princeps des fours de potier occidentaux, comme un énigmatique fourneau à usage domestique, comme un maillon technologique de l’âge du bronze fi nal qui annoncerait la professionnalisation de la poterie, activité jusqu’alors familiale, saisonnière et autarcique.

Ce nouveau regard sur cet objet de référence, prend la forme d’une enquête pluridisci-plinaire ou les volets archéométrique, ethnoarchéologique et expérimental accueillent et passent au crible les hypothèses contradictoires, élargissent les problématique s et posent de nouvelles perspectives.

Il interroge par le prisme de l’histoire des techniques, les infl exions dans l’organisation sociale des communautés de l’âge du Bronze. Celles, en particulier, qui favoriseront, quelques siècles plus tard, l’avènement de proto artisans, spécialisés dans les activités de transformation de l’argile.

Jean Coulon, archéologue, enseignant, artiste, né à Annecy en 1952, est titulaire d’un Master en Arts Plastiques de l’Université de St Etienne, d’un doctorat en Langue, Histoire et Civilisation des mondes anciens de l’Université Lyon Lumière 2, membre du Laboratoire d’Archéologie Préhistorique et Anthropologie de Genève. Son parcours est riche d’une grande diversité d’expériences. Celles acquises au cours d’une longue pratique de la céramique l’ont amené tout naturellement à s’intéresser à cet objet célèbre des palafi ttes alpins.
Mobility and Exchange across Borders: Exploring Social Processes in Europe during the First Millennium BCE – Theoretical and Methodological Approaches Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 9, Sessions XXXIV-4 and XXXIV-5 edited by Veronica Cicolani. Paperback; 205x290mm; 144 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in English and French. 707 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697292. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697308. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Mobility and Exchange across Borders presents the proceedings of Sessions XXXIVIV and XXXIV-V of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). Over the last few decades, the study of cultural interactions in the Iron Age has been considerably renewed thanks to the application of new methods and tools, opening the way to new research perspectives. The papers provide different examples from various archaeological contexts and regions while applying new methodologies able to highlight the diversity of cultural transfers. Their purpose is to stimulate a debate on human interactions and cultural transfers in order to open up new analytical perspectives on this topic and to critically examine the markers and approaches traditionally used to identify human and object mobility during the first millennium BC. Through the different approaches and perspectives presented herein, this volume aims to contribute to the renewal of the scientific debate on mobility and interactions as important drivers of societal change and to stimulate future research and debate.

About the editor
Veronica Cicolani is a permanent researcher at the CNRS French Institute, AOrOc UMR8546 CNRS-PSL and member of editorial team of Etudes Celtiques. Archaeologist specialist of European protohistory, and of the history of museum collections, her research focuses on technological and cultural interactions between the Italic and Celtic worlds and on Italic craft practices. Since 2005, she has been a scientific collaborator of the National Museum of Saint-Germain-en-Laye (MAN), where she also co-curated the Golasecca French exhibition (2009-2010). She has been involved in international research programmes on Celtic-Italic interactions (DFG Die sitzbanck of Hochdorf, ANR Caecina) and led a French-Italian research program on Ligurian bronze craft production (Labex Archimede 2015-2016). During the past few years, she has been exploring new inter-disciplinary approaches to the study of cultural and technological interactions between the Italic and Celtic worlds.
Bronze Age Tell Communities in Context: An Exploration into Culture, Society, and the Study of European Prehistory. Part 2 Practice – The Social, Space, and Materiality by Tobias L. Kienlin. Paperback; 210x297mm; 250 pages; 169 figures (colour throughout). 697 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697506. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697513. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Practice – The Social, Space, and Materiality forms the second part of Bronze Age Tell Communities in Context: An exploration into culture, society, and the study of European prehistory. It studies Bronze Age tells and our approaches towards an understanding of this fascinating way of life, drawing on the material remains of long-term architectural stability and references back to ancestral place. While the first volume challenged Neo-Diffusionist models of the influence of Mediterranean palatial centres on the development of tell communities in the Carpathians and an attendant focus on social stratification, the second part sets out an alternative theoretical approach, which foregrounds architecture and the social use of space. Unlike the reductionist macro perspective of mainstream social modelling, inspired by aspects of practice theory outlined in this book, the account given seeks to allow for what is truly remarkable about these sites, and what we can infer from them about the way of life they once framed and enabled. The stability seen on tells, and their apparent lack of change on a macro scale, are specific features of the social field, in a given region and for a specific period of time. Both stability and change are contingent upon specific historical contexts, including traditional practices, their material setting and human intentionality. They are not an inherent, given property of this or that ‘type’ of society or social structure. For our tells, it is argued here, underneath the specific manifestation of sociality maintained, we clearly do see social practices and corresponding material arrangements being negotiated and adjusted. Echoing the argument laid out in the first part of this study, it is suggested that archaeology should take an interest in such processes on the micro scale, rather than succumb to the temptation of neat macro history and great narratives existing aloof from the material remains of past lives.

About the Author
Tobias L. Kienlin is professor of Prehistoric Archaeology at the University of Cologne, Germany. His research interests include the European Neolithic, Copper and Bronze Ages, settlement archaeology, archaeological theory, social archaeology, material culture studies and archaeometallurgy. Current projects include BORBAS (Borsod Region Bronze Age Settlement) on Early Bronze Age tell sites in north-eastern Hungary and the Toboliu project in north-western Romania.