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NEW: Religious Practice and Cultural Construction of Animal Worship in Egypt from the Early Dynastic to the New Kingdom Ritual Forms, Material Display, Historical Development by Angelo Colonna. Paperback; 205x290mm; 242pp; 33 figures, 23 tables (5 pages of colour). 788 2021 Archaeopress Egyptology 36. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698213. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698220. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Religious Practice and Cultural Construction of Animal Worship in Egypt from the Early Dynastic to the New Kingdom presents an articulated historical interpretation of Egyptian ‘animal worship’ – intended as a segment of religious practice focused on the mobilisation of selected animals within strategically designed ritual contexts – from the Early Dynastic to the New Kingdom, and offers a new understanding of its chronological development through a fresh review of pertinent archaeological and textual data. The goal is twofold: (1) to re-conceptualise the notion of ‘animal worship’ on firm theoretical and material bases, reassessing its heuristic value as a tool for analysis; (2) to demonstrate, accordingly, that ‘animal worship’ did not represent a late degeneration of traditional religion, socially (popular cult) and thematically (animal mummies and burials) restricted, but a complex domain of religious practice with a longer history and a larger variety of configurations than usually assumed.

About the Author Angelo Colonna is Research Fellow in Egyptology at Sapienza University of Rome, where he graduated in 2010 and completed his PhD in 2014. In 2017 he was Academic Visitor at the Oriental Institute – Oxford University. His research on animal worship has been awarded by the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei (2016) and the Istituto Italiano per la Storia Antica (2017).
NEW (REPRINT AND OPEN ACCESS): The Roman Cemetery at Lankhills Pre-Roman and Roman Winchester. Part II by Giles Clarke. Hardback; 215x276 pages; 614pp. 777 2021 Winchester Studies 3. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270081. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270098. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Winchester Studies 3.ii: Outside the north gate of Venta Belgarum, Roman Winchester, a great cemetery stretched for 500 yards along the road to Cirencester. Excavations at Lankhills from 1967 to 1972 uncovered 451 graves, many elaborately furnished, at the northern limits of this cemetery, and dating from the fourth century A.D. This book, the second in a two-part study of Venta Belgarum, which forms the third volume of Winchester Studies, describes the excavations of these burials and analyses in detail both the graves and their contents. There are detailed studies and important re-assessments of many categories of object, but it is the information about late Roman burial, religion, and society which is of special interest.

This is a reprint of the volume originally published in 1979 (Oxford, ISBN 9780198131779). The reprint is based on scans of the original publication, with minor changes to present folding or pull-out sections on standard folio pages. A brief introduction to the reprint is provided by the author, Giles Clarke.

Reviews of the 1979 edition:
This meticulous and detailed work is of major importance for the study of Roman burial practices and their relevance for our knowledge of Roman religion. No such comprehensive study has appeared elsewhere … a model of what such a work should be.Prof. J.C. Mann, British Book News (1980) ;

The excavation and report on the Lankhills cemetery is something of a landmark. It is a lesson to Roman archaeologists about what they have been missing through neglect of their cemetery sites, and also a lesson to every-one engaged in cemetery site studies, whatever their period, in how to analyse and present their evidence to maximum advantage. This model publication will be an indispensable work of reference for many years to come.Dr Sonia Hawkes, Times Literary Supplement (1980) ;

… auch ein Musterbeispiel für die gesamte spätantike provinzialrömische Archäologie.’ [‘… also a model example for the whole of provincial Roman archaeology in the late Roman period.Prof. Jochen Garbsch, Bayerische Vorgeschichtsblätter (1981)

FORTHCOMING: The Sun Temple of Niuserra at Abu Ghurab Ten Years of Archaeological Research edited by Massimiliano Nuzzolo. Paperback; 205x290mm. Price: TBC.. 804 2021 Archaeopress Egyptology 37. ISBN 9781789695717. Buy Now

The Sun Temple of Niuserra at Abu Ghurab presents a decade of research at one of the most significant and unique royal monuments of Ancient Egypt. First discovered by Ludwig Borchardt in 1898, the temple is located in the northernmost part of the Abusir plateau and is the only one out of the six sanctuaries known from the historical sources that is still visible and reasonably well preserved. Since 2010, an Italian archaeological mission has been re-excavating this unparalleled architectural complex of Fifth Dynasty Egypt (25th century BCE). In this book the main results of the last 10 years of work are presented, including: an overall architectural reassessment of the temple and its main components; a catalogue of the archaeological evidence available on the ground (some of which was entirely unpublished); new methodologies of documentation and management of the dataset; analysis of the material culture that emerged during the present field-work; and a study of the sun temple’s religious and physical landscape.

About the Editor
Massimiliano Nuzzolo is Assistant Professor of Egyptology at the Institute of Mediterranean and Oriental Cultures, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, where, since 2020, he has directed the Sun Temples Project: Religious spaces, ideological patterns and social dynamics of constructing the sacred landscape in Third Millennium BC Egypt. Since 2010 he has been Co-Director of the archaeological expedition to the sun temple of Niuserra at Abu Ghurab, Egypt, together with Prof. Rosanna Pirelli and Dr. Andrea D’Andrea, from L'Orientale University of Naples, Italy.
FORTHCOMING (REPRINT AND OPEN ACCESS): The Cult of St Swithun The Anglo-Saxon Minsters of Winchester: Part II by Michael Lapidge. Hardback; 215x276 pages; 860pp. Print RRP: £115.00 (eBook to be Open Access). 778 2021 Winchester Studies 4. ISBN 9781803270203. Buy Now

Winchester Studies 4.ii: St Swithun was an obscure ninth-century bishop of Winchester about whom little was, and is, known. But following the translation of his relics from a conspicuous tomb into the Old Minster, Winchester, on 15 July 971, the massive rebuilding of the cathedral, and a vigorous publicity campaign by Bishop Æthelwold (963-84), St Swithun became one of the most popular and important English saints, whose cult was widespread not only in England but also in Ireland, Scandinavia, and France. The present volume includes new and full editions of all the relevant texts—hagiographical, liturgical, and historical—in Latin, Old English, and Middle English, many of which have never been published before: these illuminate the origins and development of St Swithun’s cult. No dossier of an important English saint has been published on this scale until now: the wealth of this volume sheds new light not only on St Swithun himself, but also on the times during which his cult was at the peak of its popularity.

This is a reprint of the volume originally published in 2003 (Oxford, ISBN 9780198131830). The reprint is based on scans of the original publication, with minor changes to present folding or pull-out sections on standard folio pages.

About the Author
Michael Lapidge, FBA is a scholar in the field of Medieval Latin literature, particularly that composed in Anglo-Saxon England during the period 600–1100 AD; he is an emeritus Fellow of Clare College, Cambridge and Fellow of the British Academy, and winner of the 2009 Sir Israel Gollancz Prize.

Reviews of the 2003 edition:
This lavish and beautifully produced volume assembles, edits, translates and meticulously classifies the texts relating to the cult of Swithun … a monument to the erudition, both wide and deep, of its author … the product of 30 years’ work.Dr Catherine Cubitt, The Church Times (14 May 2004) ;

... a breathtaking achievement … the product of scholarship of the very highest order … self evidently so comprehensive, informative, authoritative, and instructive … also accessible and worthwhile. It will be a most distinguished addition to the Winchester Studies Series.Prof. Simon Keynes: pre-publication report (2001) ;

Nous n’avons qu’un regret … que ce volume [WS 4.ii], superbement édité dans les Winchester Studies, n’ait été publié dans nos Acta Sanctorum …Fr. Robert Godding SJ, Analecta Bollandiana (2004)
Ramla: City of Muslim Palestine, 715-1917 Studies in History, Archaeology and Architecture edited by Andrew Petersen and Denys Pringle. Paperback; 205x290mm; 332 pages; 320 figures, 8 tables (black & white throughout). 754 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697766. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697773. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Ramla presents a comprehensive overview of the history, archaeology and architecture of the city of Ramla from the time of its foundation as the capital of Umayyad Palestine around 715 until the end of Ottoman rule in 1917. It begins with a historical outline covering in turn the early Islamic (Robert Hoyland), Crusader (Peter Edbury), Ayyubid-Mamluk (Donald S. Richards) and Ottoman periods (Matthew Elliot). In the archaeological section, Gideon Avni’s synthesis of the results of excavations on the early Islamic city is followed by discussions of the Umayyad-period aqueduct (Amir Gorzalczany) and the historical interpretation of First World War aerial photographs (Benjamin Z. Kedar). Architectural studies include a complete corpus of the surviving Muslim buildings (Andrew Petersen), a reassessment of the remains of the White Mosque (Michael H. Burgoyne), an account of the Christian buildings (Denys Pringle), and an analysis of late Ottoman alterations to the Great Mosque (Katia Cytryn-Silverman). The final section on numismatics and epigraphy includes chapters on the coinage of Umayyad Ramla (Nikolaus Schindel), the Arabic inscriptions (Mehmet Tütüncü) and late medieval Christian pilgrims’ graffiti (Denys Pringle). The volume concludes with three appendices, including a hitherto unpublished report on the White Mosque (1919–20) by K.A.C. Creswell, a gazetteer of settlements in the Crusader lordships of Ramla, Lydda and Mirabel, and the endowment deed for a house dated 1713 (Maher Abu-Munshar).

About the Editors
Andrew Petersen is Professor and Director of Research in Islamic Archaeology at the University of Wales Trinity Saint David. He is currently directing excavations at the eighteenth-century site of Ruwayda in northern Qatar. He has published many articles and several books on Islamic archaeology, including Bones of Contention: Muslim Shrines In Palestine (2018), The Medieval and Ottoman Hajj Route in Jordan; an Archaeological and Historical Study (2012), The Archaeology of Towns in Muslim Palestine (2005), Gazetteer of Medieval and Ottoman Buildings in Muslim Palestine (2001) and A Dictionary of Islamic Architecture (1998). ;

Denys Pringle is Emeritus Professor in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. In addition to his four-volume corpus, The Churches of the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem (1993–2009), his recent publications include a volume of translated texts, Pilgrimage to Jerusalem and the Holy Land, 1187–1291 (2012), and a volume of collected studies, Churches, Castles and Landscape in the Frankish East (2013). His detailed historical and archaeological study of the town walls of Byzantine, early Islamic and Crusader Ascalon has recently appeared in Ashkelon 8 (2019).

Table of Contents
List of Figures ;
Notes on Contributors ;
Preface ;
Chapter 1: Early Islamic Ramla (715-1099) – Robert Hoyland ;
Chapter 2: The Crusader Town and Lordship of Ramla (1099–1268) – Peter Edbury ;
Chapter 3: Ramla in the Ayyubid and Mamluk Periods (1187–1516) – D. S. Richards ;
Chapter 4: Ramla in the Ottoman Period (1516–1917) – Matthew Elliot ;
Chapter 5: Excavations in Ramla, 1990–2018: Reconstructing the Early Islamic City – Gideon Avni ;
Chapter 6: The Gezer Aqueduct to Umayyad Ramla – Amir Gorzalczany ;
Chapter 7: World War I Aerial Photographs of Ramla – Benjamin Z. Kedar ;
Chapter 8: Muslim Buildings – Andrew Petersen ;
Chapter 9: The White Mosque – Michael H. Burgoyne ;
Chapter 10: The Christian Buildings of Ramla – Denys Pringle ;
Chapter 11: The West Door of the Great (al-ʿUmarī) Mosque of Ramla and its Late Ottoman Transformation – Katia Cytryn-Silverman ;
Chap
Banquets, Rations et Offrandes Alimentaires au Proche-Orient ancien 10,000 ans d’histoire alimentaire révélée by Daniel Bonneterre. Paperback; 175x245mm; 410 pages; 40 figures, 5 maps (34 pages in colour). 751 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699746. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699753. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Banquets, Rations et Offrandes alimentaires au Proche-Orient ancien investigates the essential question of food consumption in the ancient Near East, in particular between the 4th and 1st millennium BC. Thanks to archaeological discoveries and to abundant textual documentation, historians are well equipped to reconstruct the food supply of the cities of Mesopotamia and have a better idea of the variety of products available, a far greater range than might be imagined. The analysis of the treatment of ingredients also reveals techniques unsuspected in pre-industrial times. The codification of culinary recipes developed for the use of temples also reflects a high stage of development. Religious rituals were based on a structured code of food consumption, of which prohibitions and taboos are only one facet. The book presents some aspects of everyday life in a new light. First and foremost, the banquet is seen as a critical institution in shaping urban behaviour. The representation of feasts and banquets in temples and palaces are classic themes of ancient art and literature. Understanding the importance of the meal as a rite of social cohesion, furthermore, allows us to better envision events that would unfold centuries later.

About the Author
Daniel Bonneterre is a specialist in ancient history and an Associate Professor at the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières. He gained his doctorate in languages and civilizations of the Ancient Near East from Johns Hopkins University. He has taught in the United States and Canada and has conducted archaeological research in France, Italy, Syria, and Israel. His publications focus on the relationships (or discrepancies) between textual sources and anthropological realities.

En français
L’ouvrage se propose de présenter la question essentielle de la consommation alimentaire dans le Proche-Orient ancien, notamment entre le IVe et le Ier millénaire av. J.-C. Grâce aux découvertes archéologiques et surtout grâce à une abondante documentation textuelle, les historiens disposent aujourd’hui de sources fiables décrivant les approvisionnements des cités de Mésopotamie. Ainsi voit-on mieux la variété des produits disponibles, celle-ci était largement plus grande que ce que l’on pouvait imaginer il y a peu. La transformation des ingrédients fait aussi apparaître des techniques insoupçonnées à une époque préindustrielle. La codification en recettes culinaires élaborées pour l’usage des temples reflète également un haut développement. Les rituels religieux s’appuyaient sur un code alimentaire structuré, dont les interdits et les tabous ne forment que l’une des facettes. Certains aspects de la vie quotidienne sont présentés sous un jour nouveau. Au premier chef le banquet qui est envisagé comme une véritable institution modelant des comportements urbains. De fait, la représentation des festins et des banquets dans les temples et les palais constituent des thèmes classiques de l’art et de la littérature antique. Comprendre l’importance du repas comme rite de cohésion sociale permet incidemment de mieux envisager des événements qui se dérouleront des siècles plus tard.

Daniel Bonneterre est spécialiste de l’histoire antique et docteur en langues et civilisations du Proche-Orient ancien (Ph D). Il a enseigné aux États-Unis ainsi qu’au Canada, et a mené des recherches archéologiques (France, Italie, Syrie, Israël). Ses publications portent sur les rapports entre sources textuelles et réalités anthropologiques.
Roots of Reform: Contextual Interpretation of Church Fittings in Norfolk During the English Reformation by Jason Robert Ladick. Paperback; 205x290mm; 182pp; 17 black & white figures, 21 tables, 62 colour plates. 746 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697667. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697674. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Roots of Reform provides a thorough examination of the impact of the English Reformation through a detailed analysis of medieval and early modern church fittings surviving at parish churches located throughout the county of Norfolk in England. By utilizing an archaeological approach along with the written record, a deeper and more nuanced understanding of public worship reveals the theological imperatives of the reformers and conformers. This study compiled data from both rural and urban parish churches which provides a regional approach to engaging the issues of visuality, space and identity. Church fittings were selected based on their liturgical function and propensity to feature decorative iconography. This includes baptismal fonts, screens, wall paintings, and sculptures. Through an extensive analysis of church fittings, this research is the first to suggest that the Bible-centric component to Protestant theology provided the framework which contributed to the success of the Reformation. The religious identity of England was transformed as visual continuity enabled an entire generation to continue their religious experience in a traditional context despite the moderate alteration to liturgy and comprehensive transformation of doctrine. This criterion eased the transition, as liturgical continuity and selective iconoclasm forged a new physical religious environment that retained enough elements to satiate traditionalist. Furthermore, an assessment of post-Reformation innovations reveals the use of vernacular Biblical text as a preferred mode of decoration, with an increase in the use of secular heraldry and commemoration directly on church fittings.

Jason Robert Ladick is an independent researcher and public library administrator in Long Island, NY. Ladick recently completed his PhD and MA in Historical Archaeology from the University of Leicester and MS in Library and Information Science from Long Island University. His research interests lie in the late medieval/early modern period and historical archaeology, with a particular interest in the archaeology of standing buildings and the transformation of religious architecture in the period following the 16th-century Protestant Reformation.
Santuari e spazi confessionali nell’Italia tardoantica by Alessandro Luciano. Paperback; 205x290mm; 274 pages; 274 black & white figures. Italian text. 742 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697544. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697551. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The cult of relics, encouraged by, among others, the emperor Constantine, Pope Damasus and the bishops Ambrose of Milan and Paulinus of Nola, led to the transformation of the Late Antique Italian landscape, and of suburban areas in particular. The process of gradual enhancement of the martyrs' tombs led to the creation of extensive sanctuaries, generally composed of funerary and cultic buildings, as well as service structures, pilgrims' lodgings and monasteries. The most important sanctuaries, such as those of Saints Peter in the Vatican, Paul on the Ostiense, Erasmus in Formia, Alexander in Nomentum, Felix in Cimitile, Gennaro in Naples, Felix in Venosa, Marcianus in Syracuse, and the Apostles in Concordia Sagittaria, became so popular that they justified Jerome's phrase: movetur urbs sedibus suis et currit ad martyrum tumulos. Between the 5th and 6th century, sanctuaries spread also in rural areas, usually along important roads, as documented by the site of San Canzian d'Isonzo. Analysing hypogeal and subdial contexts, Santuari e spazi confessionali nell’Italia tardoantica outlines the evolution of loca sancta, in a process that led the venerated tombs to become first memoriae, then places of worship and finally articulated sanctuaries. For the first time, the contexts of Rome are organically compared with those of the rest of Italy.

About the Author
Alessandro Luciano works at the National Archaeological Museum of Naples and has a PhD in the Science of Antiquity. His main scientific interests lie in the transition between Antiquity and the Middle Ages. He has published dozens of articles in specialist and popular journals and presented the results of his research at national and international conferences. He has published several books, including further academic studies alongside works of historical fiction.

Italian Description
Il culto delle reliquie, incentivato tra gli altri dall’imperatore Costantino, da papa Damaso e dai vescovi Ambrogio di Milano e Paolino di Nola, ha determinato la trasformazione del paesaggio italiano tardoantico, delle aree suburbane in particolare. Il processo di graduale valorizzazione delle tombe martiriali, infatti, condusse alla nascita di estesi santuari, generalmente composti da edifi ci funerari e cultuali, oltre che da strutture di servizio, alloggi per pellegrini e monasteri. I santuari più importanti, come quelli dei santi Pietro in Vaticano, Paolo sull’Ostiense, Erasmo a Formia, Alessandro a Nomentum, Felice a Cimitile, Gennaro a Napoli, Felice a Venosa, Marciano a Siracusa, nonché degli Apostoli a Concordia Sagittaria, divennero così popolari da giustifi care la locuzione di Girolamo: movetur urbs sedibus suis et currit ad martyrum tumulos. Tra V e VI secolo i santuari si diff usero anche in aree rurali, di solito lungo importanti percorsi viari, come documenta il sito di San Canzian d’Isonzo. Analizzando contesti ipogei e subdiali, il volume delinea l’evoluzione degli spazi santifi cati da reliquie, in un processo che portò le tombe venerate a divenire dapprima memoriae, quindi luoghi di culto e infi ne articolati santuari. Per la prima volta nella storia degli studi, i contesti di Roma sono messi organicamente a confronto con quelli del resto d’Italia.

Alessandro Luciano, nato nel 1980, lavora al Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli ed è dottore
Barāqish/Yathill (Yemen) 1986-2007 Excavations of Temple B and related research and restoration / Extramural excavations in Area C and overview studies edited by Sabina Antonini and Francesco G. Fedele. DOI: 10.32028/9781789694703. Paperback; 205x290mm; 2 volumes: 398pp & 546pp; 700 figures, tables and plates. Contributions in English, Italian, and French. Chapter abstracts in English and Arabic. 732 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694703. £98.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694710. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The walled town of Barāqish in interior Yemen – ancient Yathill of the Sabaeans and Minaeans – was for Alessandro de Maigret (1943-2011) ‘one of the archaeological marvels not just of Yemen, but of the entire Near East’. Established as an oasis settlement in the semi-desert depression of the Jawf, it became in the 1st millennium BCE a thriving caravan station on the ‘incense’ route and a famed place of worship, controlled by rich rulers and merchants. Topography and trade made it a crucible of South Arabian and foreign traditions, and on several occasions, it was a border town disputed between rival powers. A sustained archaeological effort to investigate the site and area began in 1986 by the Italian Archaeological Mission, led by de Maigret, and developed in two phases. In 1989-1992 the temple of the patron god was excavated, while between 2003-2007 a range of new excavations were undertaken, including a second temple, a sounding, a dissection of the tell's edge outside the Minaean wall, and a cemetery.

Presented across two volumes, Volume 1: Excavations of Temple B and related research and restoration is particularly devoted to the temple of god ʿAthtar dhu-Qabḍ (Temple B), dated to the second half of the 1st millennium BCE. Six chapters fully illustrate its excavation, architecture, restoration, findings, inscriptions, and dating. The contribution of this work and monument to regional history transcends its local significance. The report is framed by ten chapters detailing the historiography of research on Barāqish, the initial surveys carried out in 1986-1987, the architecture and restoration of Temple A together with the extramural excavation at the adjacent curtain wall, the cultic equipment, and radiocarbon datings. The nine contributors are leading scholars in the above fields and include recognized experts in South Arabian archaeology.

The core of Volume 2: Extramural excavations in Area C and overview studies is a final report on Area C, an exploratory dissection through the western edge of the Barāqish mound outside the curtain wall, and a unique operation for Yemen until now. Eight chapters detail the excavation, stratigraphy, and geoarchaeology (from about 800 BCE to the present), in addition to radiocarbon chronology, cultural finds, animal and plant remains, economy, major historical events, and unique evidence for trade. Four further chapters offer a glimpse of settlement archaeology for Sabaean Yathill and the survey of a religious centre to the west, together with a first typology of Minaean pottery and an epigraphic and political-historical overview for Barāqish and the Jawf. The contributors are recognized experts in South Arabian archaeology.

About the Editors
Sabina Antonini heads the Italian Archaeological Mission to Yemen c/o Monumenta Orientalia (Rome). Since 1984 she has taken part in archaeological surveys and excavations of prehistoric sites in Khawlān al-Ṭiyāl and Ramlat al-Sabʿatayn and of South Arabian sites, including Yalā, Tamnaʿ, Ḥayd ibn ʿAqīl, and Barāqish. She is a specialist in South Arabian archaeology and history of art. Her contribution, ‘The Italian Archaeological Mission at Šibām al-Ġirās, Yemen’, has appeared in Festschrift in honour of Professor Mikhail Piotrovsky (2019). ;

Francesco G. Fedele has been Professor of Anthropology and Prehistoric ecology at the Università di Napoli ‘Federico II’, Naples, until retirement in 2011. As a member of the Italian Archaeological Mission to Yemen since 1984 he has conducted excavations in Khawlān al- Ṭiyāl and at Barāqish, with a particular focus on site geoarchaeology and archaeofaunas. His recent publications include ‘New data on domestic and wild camels in Sabaean and Minaean Yemen’ in Archaeozoology of the Near East 9 (2017).
Ex Asia et Syria: Oriental Religions in the Roman Central Balkans by Nadežda Gavrilović Vitas. Paperback; 205x290mm; 266 pages; 40 figures, 7 maps, illustrated catalogue (colour throughout). 721 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 78. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699135. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699142. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £42.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Ex Asia Minor et Syria: Religions in the Roman Central Balkans investigates the cults of Asia Minor and Syrian origin in the Roman provinces of the Central Balkans. The author presents, analyzes and interprets all hitherto known epigraphical and archaeological material which attests to the presence of Asia Minor and Syrian cults in that region, a subject which is yet to be the object of a serious scholarly study. Thus the book both reviews previously known monuments and artefacts, many of which are now missing or are destroyed, and adds new finds, exploring their social and geographical context from all possible angles, and focusing on the thoughts and beliefs of the dedicants and devotees of the particular cult in question. New conclusions are presented in a scientific framework, taking account of the latest theoretical developments.

About the Author
Nadežda Gavrilović Vitas obtained her PhD in archaeology from the University of Belgrade. She has worked at the Institute of Archaeology in Belgrade since 1999, mainly focusing on Roman religion, epigraphy, settlements and necropolises. She is the director of the archaeological projects and excavations ‘Mediana – the residence of Constantine the Great’ and ‘Building with octagon in Niš Fortress’ in Niš.

Reviews
The volume is immaculately researched and annotated, with numerous illustrations that otherwise would be very hard to access. A work of importance for archeologists, art historians, Balkanists and anyone interested in the spread and evolution of the pagan cults of the Roman Empire.—Caroline Stone, AramcoWorld, July 2021
Doors, Entrances and Beyond... Various Aspects of Entrances and Doors of the Tombs in the Memphite Necropoleis during the Old Kingdom by Leo Roeten. Paperback; 205x290mm; 202 pages; 169 figures, 11 tables (black & white throughout). 714 2021 Archaeopress Egyptology 33. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698718. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698725. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Doors are more than a physical means to close off an entrance or an exit; doors can also indicate that a boundary between two worlds has been crossed. This is above all the case for the door into the chapel. Such a door constitutes a barrier between the world of the living and the world where the living and the dead can coexist, while, inside the chapel, the false door acts as a barrier between the world of the living and that of the dead. Taking into account both physical and non-physical aspects of the door, Doors, Entrances and Beyond... proposes that porticos, false doors, niches and mastaba chapel entrances are interconnected in their function as a barrier between two worlds, of which the entrance into the chapel is the most important. The different elements of the entrance have a signalling, identifying, inviting and in some cases a warning function, but once inside the entrance itself, the decoration of its corridor walls adds a guiding and an explanatory function to it. The main themes there are the tomb owner standing or seated with or without members of the family, and subsidiary figures. Over the course of time, decreasing tomb dimensions correlate with the decreasing size of the chosen decoration themes. At the same time, both on the walls of the corridor and the false door, a change of decoration themes took place which can be explained through the changing mode of supply of the k3 of the deceased.

About the Author
Leo Roeten obtained a Masters degree in biochemistry and plant physiology at the University of Amsterdam in 1972, which was followed by a career in this field, after which he completed a PhD in Egyptology at the University of Leiden in 2011. From then on he has been active as an independent researcher specializing in the Old Kingdom tombs of the Memphite necropoleis. This research has led to a number of articles and three books: The decoration of the cult chapel walls of the Old Kingdom at Giza (2014), Chronological developments in the Old Kingdom tombs in the necropoleis of Giza, Saqqara and Abusir (2016), and Loaves, beds, plants and Osiris (2018).
Daily Life in Ancient Egyptian Personal Correspondence by Susan Thorpe. Paperback; 156x234mm; 136 pages. 713 2021 Archaeopress Egyptology 32. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695076. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695083. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £20.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Representations and inscriptions on tomb and temple walls and individual stelae have provided considerable knowledge of ancient Egyptian daily life, religious custom and military achievements. However, as visual or eulogistic textual evidence they are unable to provide the insight into the people themselves, their personalities and the events and issues they were concerned with, insight which can be found in personal correspondence. Daily Life in Ancient Egyptian Personal Correspondence addresses a selection of letters from the Old Kingdom up to and including the Twenty-first Dynasty. Under the topic headings of problems and issues, daily life, religious matters, military and police matters, it will show the insight they provide regarding aspects of belief, relationships, custom and behaviour, evidencing the distinctiveness of the data such personal correspondence can provide as a primary source of daily life in ancient Egypt – the extra dimension.

About the Author
Susan Thorpe moved to New Zealand from the UK in 1976. In 2003 she enrolled at the University of Auckland and graduated in 2008, majoring in Ancient History. Specialising in Egyptology, she achieved BA Honours (First Class) in 2009 and Masters (First class) in 2010. The topic for her PhD, which she commenced in 2011, was ‘Social Aspects found in Ancient Egyptian Personal Correspondence’. She graduated in 2016. Since then, she has held the position of Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Auckland. She has attended and presented at conferences in Europe, the UK, Australia and New Zealand and had her work accepted for publication in conference proceedings and journals. This publication is the result of further research into the topic of ancient Egyptian personal letters.

Reviews
This is a fascinating read that really brings ancient Egyptian people to life - from the standard-bearer Maiseti threatening a man with death while also asking him to provide more rope, to the horrified Khay sent a jar of fat instead of honey. Highly recommended to anyone with an interest in Egyptology, with plenty of background notes and references to keep the academics happy.
Sarah Griffiths, Ancient Egypt, Volume 22, Number 1

In one letter a man demands his maidservant be returned, while in another a brother complains that his sister doesn’t write to him. Each provide a unique snapshot of what it was to live in the shadow of the pyramids. This work yields a fascinating glimpse of what it was to be a part of this long-vanished world.—Dianna Wray, AramcoWorld, Vol. 72, No. 5
Discurso, espacio y poder en las religions antiguas edited by Rafael A. Barroso-Romero and José Ángel Castillo Lozano. Paperback; 203x276mm; 212 pages; 12 figures, 1 table; Spanish text. 132 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698848. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698855. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Discurso, espacio y poder en las religiones antiguas aims to reflect on how the wielders of power, be they religious, social or political, shape the discourses that justify their power within the framework of a society or a specific group, and how space participates in these discourses. Intellectuals, aristocrats, holy men or even the dead all needed to shape a discourse that would allow them to justify their hierarchies, whether they were internal or common to all of society, to reach a social consensus and to sustain them over time. The forms in which power used religion to express itself were quite diverse, such as ritual violence, martyrdom, sacrifice, or even divine trickery. Sometimes certain spaces became places whose political and religious control brought about conflicts, whose resolution was found through the legitimisation generated by the complex theological discourse, which reinforced the extraordinary qualities of the gods to reaffirm their authority, or through the cohesive value of the rites. This volume analyses these questions through fourteen works by sixteen researchers from different institutions. It includes studies carried out with materials from a wide range of sources: epigraphy, the archaeological record, and literary sources.

About the Editors
Rafael A. Barroso-Romero is a doctoral researcher at the Max-Weber-Kolleg, Universität Erfürt and at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, where he lectures as a member of the Department of Ancient History. He is currently developing his doctoral research on materiality, spatiality, and the body in unusual burials in the Roman West. ;

José Ángel Castillo Lozano completed his Doctorate in History at the Universidad de Murcia. He is currently a High School teacher. His area of specialisation lies in the world of Late Antiquity, on which he has published around fifteen papers.

Spanish Description
Discurso, espacio y poder en las religiones antiguas pretende reflexionar acerca de cómo el poder da forma a los discursos que lo justifican en el marco de una sociedad o de un grupo concreto y cómo el espacio participa de aquellos. Intelectuales, aristócratas, hombres santos o incluso los difuntos, todos ellos necesitaron configurar un discurso que permitiera justificar sus jerarquías −ya fueran internas o comunes a toda la sociedad− consensuarlas socialmente y sustentarlas en el tiempo. Las formas en las que el poder utilizaba a la religión para expresarse fueron muy diversas, como la violencia ritual, el martirio, el sacrificio, o incluso el engaño divino. A veces, determinados espacios se convirtieron en lugares cuyo control político y religioso generaba conflictos, cuya solución se encontró en la legitimación generada por el complejo discurso teológico, que refuerza las cualidades extraordinarias de los dioses para reafirmar su autoridad, o por el valor cohesivo de los ritos. Este volumen analiza tales cuestiones a través de catorce trabajos de dieciséis investigadores procedentes de diversos centros. Recoge investigaciones realizadas con materiales de muy diversa procedencia: la epigrafía, el registro arqueológico o las fuentes literarias.

Rafael A. Barroso-Romero es Graduado en Historia (UCO) y Máster en Ciencias de las Religiones (UCM). Actualmente es investigador predoctoral en el Max-Weber-Kolleg (IGS “Resonant Self- World Relations in Ancient and Modern Socio-Religious Practices”) de la Universität Erfürt y al mismo tiempo en la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, donde imparte docencia como miembro del Departamento de Prehistoria, Historia Antigua y Arqueología. ;

José A. Castillo-Lozano (1991) es graduado en Historia en la Universidad de Murcia. En la actualidad es profesor de secundaria (funcionario de carrera) y doctor en historia. Su ámbito de especialización radica en el mundo de la Antigüedad Tardía del cual ha publicado un
Deposit of Amphorae in the Quarter of St. Theodore, Pula by Alka Starac. Paperback; 205x290mm; 704 pages; 75 figures, 10 tables, 21 graphs plus appendices and illustrated catalogue (colour throughout). Print RRP: £95.00. 695 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 75. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698480. £95.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698497. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £95.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Deposit of Amphorae in the Quarter of St. Theodore, Pula examines a large group of amphorae which were placed in the quarter of St. Theodore in Pula during the construction of the terrace of the Roman temple complex and adjacent public thermae in the mid-1st century BC, in order to enable drainage and levelling of the slope. The total number of amphorae from deposits registered in the 2005-2007 excavations amounted to 2119, of which 1754 were extracted and thoroughly documented.

About the Author
Alka Starac has worked in the fields of Roman archaeology, epigraphy, history and economy since defending her PhD dissertation Roman rule in Histria and Liburnia’in 1996 at the University of Zagreb. She has published more than eighty scholarly papers in international archaeological publications, ten monographs (either as author or editor) and has worked on several archaeological exhibitions dealing with Roman Istria.
Environment and Religion in Ancient and Coptic Egypt: Sensing the Cosmos through the Eyes of the Divine Proceedings of the 1st Egyptological Conference of the Hellenic Institute of Egyptology, Co–Organized with the Writing & Scripts Centre of the Bibliotheca Alexandrina and the Institute of Coptic Studies (University of Alexandria), at the People’s University of Athens, under the High Auspices of His Eminence Mgr Damianos, Archbishop of Sinai. Athens: Wednesday 1st, Thursday 2nd & Friday 3rd February 2017 edited by Alicia Maravelia and Nadine Guilhou. Paperback; 210x297mm; 582 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour. 673 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 30. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696394. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696400 . £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Environment and Religion in Ancient and Coptic Egypt: Sensing the Cosmos through the Eyes of the Divine presents the proceedings of a conference held in Athens between 1st-3rd February 2017. The Hellenic Institute of Egyptology, in close collaboration with the Writing & Scripts Centre of Bibliotheca Alexandrina and the University of Alexandria, organized the conference concerning the ancient Egyptian religion, Coptic Christianity and Environment. Thus, the endeavour was to sense the Cosmos, through a virtual Einfahlung, as a manifestation of the Divine and the manifestations of the Divine in the environmental, cosmic and societal spheres. Egyptians were particularly pious and they considered their surroundings and the Universe itself as a creation and a direct immanence of the Divine, being also convinced that they were congenital parts of the Cosmos and adoring their divinities, who were also personifications of environmental and/or cosmic aspects and forces. There are many examples (epigraphic, textual, monumental, & c.) corroborating these relations and that ancient Egyptian piety was rooted on the bi-faceted texture of the ancient Egyptian religion, containing a solar and an astral component: the former was related to Rec, while the latter was related to Osiris. The conference took place with participations of a pleiade of Egyptologists, archaeologists, archaeoastronomers, theologians, historians and other scholars from more than 15 countries all over the world. In this unique volume are published most of the contributions of the delegates who sent their papers for peer-reviewing, enriching the bibliographic resources with original and interesting articles. This publication of more than 580 pages containing 34 fresh and original papers (plus 2 abstracts) on the ancient Egyptian religion, Environment and the Cosmos, fruitfully connects many interdisciplinary approaches and Egyptology, archaeology, archaeoastronomy, geography, botany, zoology, ornithology, theology and history.

About the Editors
Alicia Maravelia is Founder and President of the Hellenic Institute of Egyptology (2011). She is Professor of Egyptology at the People's University of Athens and Institute's Seminar. A member of the Editorial Board of several peer-reviewed journals, she is the Editor in Chief of the JHIE. She is Coordinator of the Athens Mummy Project. ;

Nadine Guilhou studied French Literature, History of Art & Archaeology in the University Paul-Valery, Montpellier, obtaining her PhD in Egyptology under Prof. Dr Fr. Daumas. She specializes in ritual and funerary texts from the OK to the PP and has published many books and papers concerning this topic.
Ricerche Archeologiche a Sant’Andrea di Loppio (Trento, Italia): L'Area della Chiesa by Barbara Maurina and Carlo Andrea Postinger. Paperback; 205x290mm; 316 pages; 366 figures; Italian text. 647 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695366. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695373. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Fifteen centuries ago, the island of Saint Andrew (Isola di Sant’Andrea), located in the basin of Lake Loppio, drained in 1956, was the seat of a fortified settlement, and in the Middle Ages a church dedicated to St. Andrew was built on its top. After sporadic discoveries beginning in the 19th century, in 1998 the Archaeology Department of the Rovereto Civic Museum began a research and study project on the site, comprising a series of summer excavation campaigns. The archaeological investigations, completed in 2017, have brought to light a multi-layered archaeological site with finds ranging from the prehistoric age to Late Antiquity, medieval times and even until the First World War. While the first volume (published in 2016) was about the results of the research concerning the 5th-7th century castrum, this second work takes into consideration the results of the archaeological research in the area of the church (Sectors C and C1).

Contains contributions by Milena Anesi, Maurizio Battisti, Cinzia Borchia, Roberto Cabella, Florence Caillaud, Sabrina Calzà, Claudio Capelli, Simone Cavalieri, Anna Maria Fioretti, Luca Gardumi, Stefano Marconi, Marco Morghen, Michele Piazza, Alberta Silvestri, Eleonora Tomasini, Fabiana Zandonai.

About the Authors:
Barbara Maurina is the Archaeological Conservator at the Rovereto Civic Museum Foundation. Since 1988 she has been part of archaeological campaigns in Italy and abroad, and from 1998 to 2017 she was the excavation leader at the site of Loppio-Sant’Andrea.

Carlo Andrea Postinger is a freelance medievalist who graduated in Medieval Archaeology from the University of Pisa in 1993. At the site of Loppio-Sant'Andrea, he assisted Barbara Maurina in the direction of the excavation of Sector C.

Italian Description:
L’isola di Sant’Andrea, situata nell’alveo del Lago di Loppio, prosciugato nel 1956, quindici secoli fa ospitò un insediamento fortificato e in epoca medievale, sulla sommità, una chiesa dedicata a Sant’Andrea. In seguito a segnalazioni e rinvenimenti sporadici susseguitisi fin dal XIX secolo, nel 1998 la Sezione Archeologica del Museo Civico di Rovereto avviò un progetto di ricerca e di studio del sito, concretizzatosi in una serie di campagne di scavo estive. Le indagini archeologiche, concluse nel 2017, hanno portato alla scoperta di un contesto archeologico pluristratificato, con testimonianze che vanno dalla preistoria all'epoca tardoantica, a quella medievale, per giungere fino alla Grande Guerra. Mentre il primo volume (pubblicato nel 2016) è stato dedicato ai risultati delle ricerche nel castrum di V-VII secolo, questo secondo volume prende in considerazione i risultati delle ricerche archeologiche condotte nell’area della chiesa (Settori C e C1).

Barbara Maurina è conservatrice per l’archeologia presso la Fondazione Museo Civico di Rovereto. Sin dal 1988 partecipa a campagne archeologiche in Italia e all’estero; nel 1998 ha iniziato gli scavi nel sito di Loppio – Sant’Andrea, conclusi nel 2017.

Carlo Andrea Postinger, laureato con tesi in archeologia medievale presso l'Università di Pisa nel 1993, da allora esercita la libera professione come medievista. Nel sito di Loppio-Sant'Andrea ha affiancato Barbara Maurina nella direzione dello scavo del Settore C.
The Archaeological Survey of Sudanese Nubia, 1963-69: The Pharaonic Sites edited by David N. Edwards. Hardback; 205x290mm; 468 pages; 812 figures, 2 tables (16 plates in colour). 652 2020 Sudan Archaeological Research Society Publication 23. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696493. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696509. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Of the Nubian Archaeological Campaigns responding to the construction of the Aswan High Dam, the survey and excavations carried out within Sudanese Nubia represent the most substantial achievement of the larger enterprise. Many components of the larger project of the UNESCO – Sudan Antiquities Service Survey have been published, in addition to the reports of a number of other major projects assigned separate concessions within the region. However, the results of one major element, the Archaeological Survey of Sudanese Nubia (ASSN) between the Second Cataract and the Dal Cataract remain largely unpublished. This volume, focusing on the pharaonic sites, is the first of a series which aims to bring to publication the records of the ASSN. These records represent a major body of data relating to a region largely now lost to flooding. This is also a region of very considerable importance for understanding the archaeology and history of Nubia more generally, not least in relation to the still often poorly understood relationships between Lower Nubia to the north and the surviving areas of Middle and Upper Nubia, to the south.

The ASSN project fieldwork was undertaken over six years between 1963 and 1969, investigating c.130km of the river valley between Gemai, at the south end of the Second Cataract, and Dal.

Reviews
'The Archaeological Survey of Sudanese Nubia, 1963–69: The Pharaonic Sites is a remarkable resource for the archaeology of Sudan, and Africa more broadly. It fills a geographical gap in our knowledge of Nubia during the “Pharaonic” period, which will certainly contribute to current research revisiting datasets produced by previous surveys and excavations.'—Rennan Lemos, African Archaeological Review, Volume 38, 2021
‘Blood Is Thicker Than Water’ – Non-Royal Consanguineous Marriage in Ancient Egypt An Exploration of Economic and Biological Outcomes by Joanne-Marie Robinson. Paperback; 175x245mm; 246 pages; 21 figures, 14 tables (11 colour pages). 646 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 29. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695434. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695441. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Discussions on consanguineous marriage within Egyptology usually focus on brother-sister marriages recorded in census returns from Roman Egypt, or royal sibling marriages amongst the ruling Ptolemies. However, no wide-ranging review exists of non-royal consanguineous marriage in ancient Egypt despite the economic and biological implications of such relationships. This is the first time that evidence for nonroyal consanguineous marriage in ancient Egypt has been collated from select sources spanning the Middle Kingdom to the Roman Period and a method created to investigate the potential economic and biological outcomes of these unions, particularly beyond the level of sibling and half-sibling unions. The working definition of consanguineous marriage used throughout this study is that used by clinical geneticists: unions contracted between cousins biologically related as second cousins or closer biological kin. This research argues that for some families, and under certain conditions, consanguineous marriage was a preferred economic strategy in terms of gifts given at marriage and in inheritance, and that families who married consanguineously may have received greater levels of intra-familial support without the expectation of reciprocity. Although there may have been adverse biological outcomes arising from congenital anomalies and genetic disorders in the offspring of consanguineous marriages, the research suggests that it is unlikely that these physical or cognitive disorders were distinguished from other medical disorders in the general health environment of ancient Egypt. The investigation focuses primarily on ancient Egyptian documentary and archaeological sources, including human remains, and is informed by research on consanguinity from a range of disciplines including anthropology, demography, economics and pathology.

About the Author
Joanne-Marie Robinson is a Visiting Scholar at the KNH Centre for Biomedical Egyptology at the University of Manchester. She has a research interest in non-royal consanguineous marriage in ancient Egypt and the Eastern Mediterranean, and the socio-cultural and religious factors that influence this choice of marriage partner. Her work also considers the potential biological outcomes of consanguineous marriage and investigates the reception to congenital physical and cognitive anomalies in ancient Egypt. This book presents the outcomes of a research project. The author holds a PhD in Egyptology and has worked as a lecturer, writer and advisor for television and radio programmes focusing on religion and history.
On the Origins of the Cartouche and Encircling Symbolism in Old Kingdom Pyramids by David Ian Lightbody. DOI: 10.32028/9781789696578; Paperback; 203x276mm; 100 pages; 47 figures. 118 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696578. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696585. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

On the Origins of the Cartouche and Encircling Symbolism in Old Kingdom Pyramids is a treatise on the subject of encircling symbolism in pharaonic monumental tomb architecture. The study focuses on the Early Dynastic Period and the Old Kingdom of ancient Egypt; from the first dynasty through the sixth. During that time, encircling symbolism was developed most significantly and became most influential. The cartouche also became the principal symbol of the pharaoh for the first time. This work demonstrates how the development of the cartouche was closely related to the monumental encircling symbolism incorporated into the architectural designs of the Old Kingdom pyramids. By employing a new architectural style, the pyramid, and a new iconographic symbol, the cartouche, the pharaoh sought to elevate his status above that of the members of his powerful court. These iconic new emblems emphasized and protected the pharaoh in life, and were retained in the afterlife. By studying the available evidence, the new and meaningful link between the two artistic media; iconographic and architectural, is catalogued, understood, and traced out through time.

Table of Contents
David Ian Lightbody, PhD., BEng (Hons), is an archaeologist with a special interest in the origins of architectural and scientific principles, most notably in the ancient Egyptian and Greek cultures. In 2016 he founded the Journal of Ancient Egyptian Architecture (JAEA) with co-editor Franck Monnier. He has published several journal articles, a monograph, and most recently, the Great Pyramid Haynes Operations Manual (2,590 B.C. onwards).
Megaliths and Geology: Megálitos e Geologia MEGA-TALKS 2: 19-20 November 2015 (Redondo, Portugal) edited by Rui Boaventura†, Rui Mataloto and André Pereira. Paperback; 203x276mm; 196pp; 114 figures, 10 tables. 117 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696417. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696424. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The MegaGeo project, under the direction of the late Rui Boaventura, aimed to analyse the raw material economy in the construction of megalithic tombs in multiple territories, showing the representation of several prehistoric communities that raised them and their relationship with the surrounding areas.

Following the meeting of the previous year, it was decided to hold Mega-Talks 2, which brought together national and international experts who have developed work related to Megalithism and Geology, in its various perspectives, from the funerary depositions to the raw material construction of the tombs, as indicators of mobility and interaction with the surrounding physical environment.

Megaliths and Geology: Megálitos e Geologia presents contributions from Mega-Talks 2, held in Redondo, Portugal, on 19-20 November 2015.

About the Editors
Rui Boaventura† (1971-2016) obtained a PhD in Prehistory from the School of Arts and Humanities (University of Lisbon) in 2010. As a Post-Doc researcher at UNIARQ (Center for Archaeology, University of Lisbon), in 2013 he headed the MEGAGEO Project: Moving megaliths in the Neolithic. He passed away in 2016, victim of a prolonged illness.

Rui Mataloto Pereira graduated from the School of Arts and Humanities (University of Lisbon) in 1997, before completing his Master’s degree at the same school in 2004. Over the past 15 years, he has directed studies on the Megalithism of the South slope of Serra d’Ossa.

André Pereira Pereira graduated in History, Archaeological Variant, from the School of Arts and Humanities (University of Lisbon) in 2003, and post-graduated in Science and Technology Management and Policies at Nova University (FCSH) in 2020. He currently works for UNIARQ (Centre for Archaeology, University of Lisbon), in Science Management in relation to archaeology.
Rome and Barbaricum: Contributions to the Archaeology and History of Interaction in European Protohistory edited by Roxana-Gabriela Curcă, Alexander Rubel, Robin P. Symonds and Hans-Ulrich Voß. Paperback; 175x245mm; 164 pages; 60 figures (29 colour pages). 641 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 67. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691030. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691047. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Rome and Barbaricum: Contributions to the archaeology and history of interaction in European protohistory asks the following questions: How did the ‘Barbarians’ influence Roman culture? What did ‘Roman-ness’ mean in the context of Empire? What did it mean to be Roman and/or ‘Barbarian’ in different contexts? The papers presented here explore the concepts of Romanisation and of Barbaricum from a multi-disciplinary and comparative standpoint, covering Germania, Dacia, Moesia Inferior, Hispania, and other regions of the Roman Empire. They deal with issues such as conceptual analysis of the term ‘barbarian’, military and administrative organization, inter-cultural and linguistic relations, numismatics, religion, economy, prosopographic investigations, constructing identities; and they present reflections on the theoretical framework for a new model of Romanisation.

About the Editors
Alexander Rubel served at the Goethe Institute and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) in Romania before being appointed Senior Research Fellow at the Archaeological Institute of the Romanian Academy and Associate Professor at the Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi. Since 2011 he has been the Director of the Institute of Archaeology in Iasi. His academic writings include cultural history and literary studies but focus mainly on ancient history and religion as well as on Roman archaeology. These are geographically centered on the fringes of the Empire and the ‘barbarian’ people who lived there.

Roxana-Gabriela Curcă is Assistant Professor at the Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Romania and Director of the Department for Long Distance Learning at the Faculty of History. Her academic papers focus on ancient bilingualism, the language of Greek and Latin inscriptions and onomastics. She has been a visiting professor at a number of universities: State University of New York at Buffalo, UCLA, University of West Alabama (USA); National University of La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, Santiago de Chile (Chile); Flinders University, Adelaide (Australia).

Hans-Ulrich Voß (Voss) is Scientific Assistant at the Romano-Germanic Commission (RGK) of the German Archaeological Institut (DAI) at Frankfurt am Main. He is responsible for the Iron Age, Roman and Migration Periods, and for editorial work. He is project coordinator of the ‘Corpus of Roman Finds in the European Barbaricum (CRFB)’. From 1985 to 1991 he was Scientific Assistant, at the Central Institute of Ancient History and Archaeology of the Academy of Sciences of the GDR, in the department of Pre- and Protohistory, at Berlin. He conducts research into the proto-history of Central Europe, and is a collaborator of the CRFB project.

Robin P. Symonds is a specialist in Roman ceramics and author of Rhenish Wares: Fine Dark Coloured Pottery from Gaul and Germany (1992). He was employed as a Roman pottery specialist for the Colchester Archaeological Trust (1981–1990), then for the Museum of London Archaeology Service (1991–2004) and thereafter in France at the Institut national de recherches archéologiques préventives (INRAP), based at Dijon. He retired from Inrap in 2015 and moved with his family to eastern Romania in 2017. He has reported on the ceramics from many different international sites, and has published numerous papers and reviews on aspects of Roman pottery research.
The Festivals of Opet, the Valley, and the New Year Their Socio-Religious Functions by Masashi Fukaya. Paperback; 205x290mm; 306 pages; 37 figures, 26 tables. Print RRP: £45.00. 636 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 28. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695953. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695960. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Festivals of Opet, the Valley, and the New Year: Their socio-religious functions compares the religious and social functions of these three Festivals, the first two of which were often regarded by the Egyptians as a pair; the New Year Festival stands out on account of its corpus of surviving material and importance. Until now, detailed study of the New Year Festival has only been carried out with reference to the Greco-Roman period; this study turns its attention to the New Kingdom. The book analyses the broad perspectives that encompass Egyptian religion and cult practices which provided the context not only for worship and prayer, but also for the formation of social identity and responsibility. The festivals are examined in the whole together with their settings in the religious and urban landscapes. The best example is New Kingdom Thebes where large temples and burial sites survive intact today with processional routes connecting some of them. Also presented are the abundant written sources providing deep insight into those feasts celebrated for Amun-Re, the king of the gods. The volume also includes a list of dated records which provides a concordance for the Egyptian calendars.

About the Author
Masashi Fukaya comes from the city Tokai to the south of Nagoya. After studying at the University of Tsukuba he completed his doctoral thesis at the University of Oxford in 2014. He has long focused on religious festivals where the general public would communicate with the god in various forms, and also been extending his interests to women, foreigners, and the socially weak. At present he teaches as a visiting researcher at Aichi Prefectural University, Japan.
I templi del Fayyum di epoca tolemaico-romana: tra fonti scritte e contesti archeologici Per una classificazione degli edifici sacri nell’Egitto tolemaico e romano by Ilaria Rossetti. Paperback; 205x290mm; 284 pages; 165 figures, 6 tables. Italian text. RRP: £45.00. 622 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 27. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694956. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694963. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

During the Ptolemaic period, Egyptian temples were divided into three ranks: first, second and third class. There was no trace of this classification of sacred buildings in the papyri of the Roman period when only the most important temples were classified by the epithet logima hiera. This work aims to understand the rules according to which Egyptian sacred buildings were classified and how these first, second and third-class temples were planned and arranged.

To do this, an integrated analysis of different kinds of sources was carried out: all the Graeco-Roman papyri and the inscriptions, which contain rank epithets, were examined and different archaeological data about the temples of the Fayyum region were investigated. Based on these sources, it was possible to put forward different hypotheses on the administration and architectural aspects of these sacred buildings.

About the Author
Ilaria Rossetti is currently an archaeology officer at the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities. She obtained a Master’s Degree cum laude and a post-graduate degree at the Bologna University in Egyptology. In 2015 she obtained a PhD at Siena University. From 2015-2017 she was junior researcher at Bologna University, where she was involved in numerous archaeological projects. Since 2012, she has been field-director of archaeological Mission at Bakchias coordinated by the two co-directors Prof. Enrico Giorgi (Bologna University) and Prof. Paola Buzi (Sapienza University of Rome).

Italian Description: La documentazione amministrativa di epoca tolemaica testimonia una divisione di tutti i complessi sacri dell’Egitto in primo, secondo e terzo rango. Questa classificazione sembra non aver lasciato traccia nei documenti di epoca romana, quando solo i templi principali sembrano essere considerati e indicati come logima hiera. A tuttora non sono ancora state definite né le ragioni e i criteri secondo cui gli edifici sacri furono suddivisi in classi, né se vi sia stato un riscontro di questa ripartizione nei dati archeologici. Nel I templi del Fayyum in epoca tolemaico-romana: Per una classificazione degli edifici sacri nell’Egitto tolemaico e romano aims si tenterà di rispondere a questi interrogativi mettendo a confronto e integrando dati desumibili sia dai documenti amministrativi sia dai contesti archeologici dei vari complessi templari della regione del Fayyum, alla quale è stata limitata questa seconda categoria di dati.

Ilaria Rossetti è attualmente funzionario archeologo presso il Mibact. Ha ottenuto la laurea con lode e il diploma di scuola di Specializzazione in Archeologia presso l'Università di Bologna. Nel 2015 ha conseguito il dottorato di ricerca presso la Scuola di Dottorato dell'Università di Siena. Dal 2015 al 2017 è stata assegnista di ricerca presso l'Università di Bologna, dove è stata coinvolta in numerosi progetti archeologici, come egittologa, archeologa e topografa. Dal 2012 è field-director della Missione archeologica a Bakchias coordinata dai due co-direttori Prof. Enrico Giorgi (Università di Bologna) e Prof. Paola Buzi (Università di Roma La Sapienza). Dal 2017 al 2018 è stata ricercatrice junior presso la Sapienza Università di Roma per il Progetto ERC -PAThs (P.I .: Paola Buzi), per il quale attualmente collabora. Ha pubblicato una monografia su uno dei templi di Bakchias, vari rapporti di scavo e diversi contributi.
The Hypocephalus: An Ancient Egyptian Funerary Amulet by Tamás Mekis. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+356 pages; 95 figures, 36 plates. 586 2019 Archaeopress Egyptology 25. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693331. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693348. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The hypocephalus is an element of Late Period and Ptolemaic funerary equipment – an amuletic disc placed under the head of mummies. Its shape emulates the sun’s disc, and its form is planar, although it occasionally has a concave shape (in such cases, it protects the head as a funerary cap). The earliest known example can be dated to the 4th century BC and the latest to the 2nd/1st century BC. The Hypocephalus: an Ancient Egyptian Funerary Amulet analyses both the written records and iconography of these objects. So far, 158 examples are known; several, unfortunately, from old descriptions only. The relatively low number shows that the object was not a widespread item of funerary equipment. Only priest and priestly families used them, those of Amon in Thebes, of Min in Akhmim, and the ones of Ptah in Memphis. Among the examples, no two are identical. In some details, every piece is an individualized creation. Ancient Egyptian theologians certainly interpreted hypocephali as the iris of the wedjat-eye, amidst which travels the sun-god in his hidden, mysterious and tremendous form(s). The hypocephalus can be considered as the sun-disk itself. It radiates light and energy towards the head of the deceased, who again becomes a living being, feeling him/herself as ‘one with the Earth’ through this energy. The texts and the iconography derive principally from the supplementary chapters of the Book of the Dead. Some discs directly cite the text of spell 162 which furnishes the mythological background of the invention of the disc by the Great Cow, who protected her son Re by creating the disc at his death.

About the Author
Tamás Mekis graduated from the Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest in 2007 with a degree in Egyptology. In 2013 he defended his PhD dissertation with summa cum laude. In quest of hypocephalus amulets he spent his traineeship in Brussels at the Royal Museums of Art and History in 2008 and in Paris at the Louvre Museum in 2010. He conducted extended researches at the Egyptian Museum of Cairo in 2007-9 and 2014-15, where, together with the curators of the museum, he found a rare hypocepalus of the prophet-registrar of Min-Horus-Isis Djed-hor/Wesirwer in situ, under the head of his undisturbed mummy. Tamás is an independent researcher.
Imágenes, lengua y creencias en Lusitania romana edited by Jorge Tomás García and Vanessa Del Prete. Paperback; 203x276mm; illustrated throughout (51 pages in colour). 94 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692945. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692952. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This publication considers the visual, linguistic and religious culture of the Roman province of Lusitania. Roman influence was especially notable in religion and artistic manifestations. It was in the cities where the Lusitanians acquired Roman civilization: they learned Latin, the Frankish language of the peninsula; they were introduced to the Roman administration and religion; and in the third century, when Rome converted to Christianity, so did the Lusitanians. The Latin language was imposed as the official language, functioning as a binding factor and communication between different peoples. Being a fairly large area and lacking a unified state that promoted a particular language in administration or education, different languages coexisted simultaneously in Hispania. The subjects continued to use their native languages, although official business was conducted in Latin or Greek. Indigenous religions persisted, although sacrifices were offered everywhere for the emperor and the gods of the Roman pantheon. Visual culture also reflected the hybrid character of provincial civilization. Images of a Roman style and subject matter circulated widely, and yet the craftsmen and consumers of the provinces maintained their own traditions, adopting Roman techniques and tastes as they pleased. The papers in this volume establish a broad and generous view of the relationship between images, languages and religious culture within Lusitanian society.

La presente publicación pretende suponer un acercamiento transversal y generoso a la cultura visual, lingüística y religiosa de la provincia romana de Lusitania. La influencia romana fue especialmente notable en la religión y en las manifestaciones artísticas. Las ciudades fueron una de las instituciones más importantes impuestas a Lusitania durante la ocupación romana. Fue en las ciudades donde los lusitanos adquirieron la civilización romana: aprendieron latín, la lengua franca de la península; fueron introducidos a la administración y religión romanas; y en el siglo III, cuando Roma se convirtió al cristianismo, también lo hicieron los lusitanos. La lengua latina se impuso como la lengua oficial, funcionando como factor vinculante y comunicación entre los diferentes pueblos. Al ser un área bastante grande, y al carecer de un estado unificado que promoviera un idioma determinado en la administración o la educación, en Hispania convivieron diferentes lenguas simultáneamente. Los sujetos siguieron usando sus idiomas nativos, aunque los negocios oficiales se realizaron en latín o griego. Las religiones indígenas persistieron, aunque los sacrificios se ofrecían en todas partes para el emperador y los dioses del panteón romano. La cultura visual también reflejó el carácter híbrido de la civilización provincial. Las imágenes del estilo y el mensaje romanos circulaban ampliamente y, sin embargo, los artesanos y los consumidores de las provincias mantenían sus propias tradiciones, adoptando las técnicas y los gustos romanos como les convenía. Este y otros problemas están recogidos en los capítulos de esta obra, que permite establecer una mirada amplia y generosa sobre la relación entre las imágenes, la lengua y la visión religiosa y cultural de la sociedad lusitana. Los autores de este volumen tratan así de entender este panorama tan complejo, utilizando con gran énfasis las imágenes y el lenguaje, fuentes de relevancia para acometer una visión transversal de la cultura y religión de Lusitania.

About the Editors
Jorge Tomás García PhD (Murcia, 2010) is Professor of Ancient Art at the Autonomous University of Madrid (Art History Department).

Vanessa Del Prete Mainer PhD (Madrid, 2016), is Chief Editor of the academic journal Gods and Men (interdisciplinary studies regarding the sciences of religions), launched in 2018.
Maritime-Related Cults in the Coastal Cities of Philistia during the Roman Period Legacy and Change by Simona Rodan. Paperback; 175x245mm; ii+212 pages; 40 figures (26 pages in colour). 571 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 60. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692563. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692570. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Maritime-Related Cults in the Coastal Cities of Philistia during the Roman Period questions the origins and the traditions of the cultic rites practised during Roman times along the southern shores of the Land of Israel. This area was known since biblical times as ‘Peleshet’ (Philistia), after the name of one of the Sea Peoples that had settled there at the beginning of the Iron Age. Philistia’s important cities Jaffa, Ashkelon, Gaza and Rafiah were culturally and religiously integrated into the Graeco-Roman world. At the same time, each city developed its own original and unique group of myths and cults that had their roots in earlier periods. Their emergence and formation were influenced by environmental conditions as well as by ethno-social structures and political circumstances. Philistia’s port cities served as crossroads for the routes connecting the main centres of culture and commerce in ancient times. Most of their cults were closely associated with the sea, and reflect the existential dependency of the inhabitants on the sea that supplied them with sustenance and livelihood and was regarded as a divine beneficent power. The myths also echo the lives of the sailors, their beliefs and fears derived from encountering the dangers of the sea: storms, floods, reefs and giant fish portrayed as monsters. The population of the cities was of mixed and varied ethnic and cultural origins. This was the result of the waves of conquests and migrations over the ages, yet each city was noted for its unique ethnic components. The book also deals with the political circumstances, which had a decisive impact on the formation of religious life and cultic rites in all four cities. It sheds new light to the understanding of the events and historical processes in the region.

About the Author
Simona Rodan is a historian whose field of research are the beliefs, customs and cultic practices in the ancient Mediterranean world, and their reflection in literature and art from the ancient period to the modern times. She holds a PhD in Maritime Civilizations from the University of Haifa. Rodan is the author of The Goddess of Luck, the City and the Sea: The Cult of Tyche and Fortuna in the Coastal Cities of Eretz Israel (2014) (in Hebrew) and Aegean Mercenaries in Light of the Bible: Clash of Cultures in the Story of David and Goliath (2015).
Listening to the Stones: Essays on Architecture and Function in Ancient Greek Sanctuaries in Honour of Richard Alan Tomlinson edited by Elena C. Partida and Barbara Schmidt-Dounas. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+264 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (45 pages in colour). 565 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690873. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690880. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Listening to the Stones: Essays on Architecture and Function in Ancient Greek Sanctuaries in Honour of Richard Alan Tomlinson deals with a range of topics that relate to the broad scope of Richard Tomlinson’s archaeological quests and echoes his own methodology in research. Innovative masonry modes, matters of style and orders, proportions and design principles, as well as the inter-regional connections which fostered the transmission of architectural traditions and technical know-how have been cardinal points in Tomlinson’s writings and lectures, as much as the Greek foundations on foreign soil, the forethought in planning, achievements in the field of engineering and the interaction between the secular, the sepulchral and the sacred premises in an ancient city. The conservative or progressive attitudes of a society usually leave an imprint on architectural creations. So, architecture is subject to evolution along with the developing societies. Its gradual changing signifies the building programs taken up by ancient communities. Within this frame, we better comprehend the function of public edifices, the remodeling of cult sites in accordance with historic circumstances, the role of politics in architecture. This book is a token of appreciation of a British professor of archaeology, who spread knowledge of the Greek civilization, manifesting the brilliant spirit of the versatile ancient Greek builders.

About the Editors
Elena C. Partida is research archaeologist at the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports, and adjunct professor at the University of Patras. She holds MA and PhD from the University of Birmingham. Trained by the Academic Staff Development Unit in ‘Teaching, assessing students and presentation skills’, she lectured on Classical archaeology at Birmingham University, as assistant to the head of the Department, Prof. R.A. Tomlinson. Elena attended seminars on Roman architecture at the Barber Institute of Fine Arts and the course ‘Interventions to monuments and historic settlements’ organised by the European Centre for the Precaution and Prognosis of Earthquakes. On the Acropolis of Athens E.P. was responsible for the documentation of architectural disiecta membra within the European project ‘Network of archaeological sites in Athens’. Appointed Curator of Antiquities at Delphi, E.P. carried out a study on the Delphi Museum Re-Exhibition (awarded with the Best Practices distinction), in parallel to studies on the restoration and consolidation of ancient monuments at Delphi; she also designed the installation of open-air exhibitions. As a curator of Patras Archaeological Museum, E.P. is in charge of interdisciplinary international collaborative projects involving cultural patrimony, new finds and new technologies.

Barbara Schmidt-Dounas studied classical archaeology, ancient history and prehistory at the Universities Johann Wolfgang von Goethe at Frankfurt/Main and Georg August at Göttingen in Germany. She was a scientific collaborator at the University Johann Wolfgang von Goethe in Frankfurt/Main – Germany within the project ‘Donations offered by Hellenistic Kings to Greek Cities and Sanctuaries’ which was funded by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) (1984-1986). Barbara was a lecturer and later an assistant and Associate Professor of Classical Archaeology at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki; in 2006 shewas appointed Professor of Classical Archaeology at the same University. Barbara is a member of the founding board of the Interdisciplinary Centre of Archaeological Studies ‘Manolis Andronikos’ (ΔΙ.ΚΕ.ΑΜ.) and a director of the Cast Museum of the Department of Archaeology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. Barbara is also a corresponding member of the German Archaeological Institute.

Reviews
'The book includes a diversity of topics that examine different aspects of architecture ide
The Tekenu and Ancient Egyptian Funerary Ritual by Glennise West. Paperback; 205x290mm; 300pp; 362 figures (colour and black & white), 1 table. 539 2019 Archaeopress Egyptology 23. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691825. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691832. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

What is the Tekenu? What was its function? What are its origins? These are questions upon which Egyptologists have long pondered. However, Egyptologists, until now, have avoided any major work on the topic. Previous treatments of the Tekenu largely adopt a selective approach focusing on a specific form. Rarely has the Tekenu been examined profoundly in all of its forms or contexts with its possible origins commented upon merely in passing. The aim of The Tekenu and Ancient Egyptian Funerary Ritual is to provide a provocative examination and interpretation of the Tekenu in an endeavour to proffer plausible answers hitherto eluding scholars. Attested from the Fifth Dynasty until, and including the Saite Period, the Tekenu is a puzzling icon which is depicted within the funerary scenes in the tombs of some ancient Egyptian nobles. In this work four distinct types of Tekenu are identified and classified and then a Corpus Catalogue is formed. The Tekenu is appraised within the context of the wall scene. Two tombs are dealt with in greater detail.

About the Author
Glennise West graduated from the University of Sydney and taught English and History at secondary school level. Later she followed her lifelong interest in ancient Egypt obtaining MA and PhD from Macquarie University, Sydney. The topic of this book was the subject of her PhD dissertation. She lives in Sydney.

Reviews
'The great worth of this volume is that it gathers all the sources for the tekenu in one place and presents them with copious illustrations, many of them in colour. The catalogue is certainly the longest and most-detailed part of the book and will be of considerable use to anyone who is interested in Egyptian funerals and their representation on tomb walls.'—Christian Knoblauch, Journal of the American Research Center in Egypt, Volume 56, 2020
The Lost Abbey of Eynsham by Steve Parrinder. Paperback; 175x245mm; 300pp; 298 illustrations. 554 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692501. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692518. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Lost Abbey of Eynsham will be of interest not just to local historians but to those with an interest in the development of monasticism and medieval art and architecture, particularly the Romanesque. Eynsham was one of the few religious foundations in England in continuous use from the late Saxon period to the Dissolution. Its first Benedictine Abbot was the internationally renowned scholar and teacher, Aelfric, and it was frequently visited by medieval kings given its close proximity to the royal hunting lodge of Woodstock. Hugh of Avalon, later canonised, was appointed Bishop of Lincoln at a royal council at Eynsham in 1186. Shortly afterwards the abbey achieved fame with the Vision of the Monk of Eynsham which is said to have influenced Dante. Its reputation was further enhanced when Eynsham acquired an important relic, the arm of St Andrew in 1240. In the later Middle Ages, the abbey went into decline and was beset by scandal. It surrendered to the Crown in 1538 and the huge structure was gradually demolished and pillaged for its building materials. Now, nothing remains in situ above ground. This book aims to rescue this important abbey from obscurity by summarising its history and examining the material remains of Eynsham Abbey, most of which have never been published before.

About the Author
Steve Parrinder read History at Kings College London before securing a PGCE and becoming a teacher in 1970. For 30 years he was at Richmond-upon-Thames College where he taught History and Archaeology and ended his professional career in 2007 as Programme Manager for Humanities. His MA in Medieval Studies was taken at Birkbeck College, London, in 1982 and his dissertation (unpublished) was on Romanesque Sculpture from Reading Abbey. He moved to Eynsham, Oxfordshire, at the end of 2012 where he is now an active member of the Eynsham History Group and has written a number of articles for the Eynsham Record. He is married with two daughters and three grandchildren.

Reviews
'This is a rather special book, and no mistake. Without ever losing sight of the core thread of the physical evidence, [the author has] managed to bring the whole story of the abbey to life, and make it so readable into the bargain. I particularly like the new material on the Post-Dissolution period.'—Alan Hardy, archaeologist, December 2019
Archéologie de la Bible hébraïque Culture scribale et Yahwismes by Christophe Lemardelé. Paperback; 175x245mm; iv+116 pages; 2 colour plates. 553 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692280. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692297. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £29.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Since the Renaissance, the question of how the Bible was written has been much debated. Documentary theory of the end of the 19th century identified "authors" and schools of writing, paving the way so that, a century later, a complex reality emerged, that of scribes modifying texts as they copied them. Thus, “The Bible” no longer appears as a controlled theological and historiographical project but as the empirical arrangement of heterogeneous texts linked together by an evolving religious ideology. While the great overall account of the first books is based on the election and migration of an entire people, the ideological foundations of Yahwism evoke rather a foreign god who, having reached Israelite territory, ultimately gained pre-eminence there.

This monotheistic ideology was above all an exclusivism that was to be reinforced from the time of the kings of Israel and Judah to the Judean revolts against Rome in the first centuries of our era. In our attempt to understand the nature and origin, as well as the evolution, of this specific form of monotheism, which made of a jealous god the only God, we have relied predominantly on the concept of the “two yahwisms”. This theory enables us to understand how a god allied with a people has also been a creative god of the universe and of all humanity.

Après la formidable avancée que fut la théorie documentaire à la fin du xixe siècle, identifiant des « auteurs » et des écoles de rédaction, un siècle plus tard, la théorie a laissé de plus en plus la place à un réel complexe, celui des scribes modifiant les textes à mesure qu’ils les copiaient. « La Bible » n’apparaît plus alors comme étant un projet théologique et historiographique maîtrisé mais comme l’agencement empirique de textes hétérogènes reliés entre eux par une idéologie religieuse évolutive. Si le grand récit d’ensemble des premiers livres se construit sur l’élection et la migration d’un peuple en son entier, les fondements idéologiques du yahwisme font plutôt état d’un dieu étranger qui serait parvenu jusqu’en terre israélite pour, à terme, s’y imposer.

Cette idéologie monothéiste fut surtout un exclusivisme qui se renforça de l’époque des rois d’Israël et de Juda jusqu’aux révoltes judéennes contre Rome aux premiers siècles de notre ère. Pour tenter de saisir la nature et l’origine, ainsi que l’évolution, de cette forme spécifique de monothéisme, qui a fait d’un dieu jaloux le seul Dieu, nous nous sommes appuyé avant tout sur le concept des « deux yahwismes ». Cette théorie permet en effet de comprendre comment un dieu faisant alliance avec un peuple en particulier a pu être également un dieu créateur de l’univers et de l’humanité entière.

About the Author
Christophe Lemardelé has a PhD in religious sciences (2007) and the title of “Élève titulaire de l’École biblique et archéologique française à Jerusalem” (2002-2003). He has directed seminars at the École Pratique des Hautes Études in Paris, from 2011 to 2016, and published Les cheveux du Nazir in 2016, as well as numerous articles in philology, exegesis and the history of religions.

Docteur en Sciences religieuses (2007), élève titulaire de l’École biblique et archéologique française à Jérusalem (2002-2003), l’auteur a été chargé de conférences à l’École pratique des hautes études à Paris, de 2011 à 2016, et a notamment publié Les cheveux du Nazir en 2016, ainsi que de nombreux articles philologiques, d’exégèse et d’histoire des religions. Docteur en Sciences religieuses (2007), élève titulaire de l’École biblique et archéologique française à Jérusalem (2002-2003), l’auteur a été chargé de conférences à l’École pratique des hautes études à Paris, de 2011 à 2016, et a notamment publié Les cheveux du Nazir en 2016, ainsi que de nombreux articles philologiques, d’exégèse et d’histoire des religions.