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NEW: Arqueología de la arquitectura en el oppidum oretano de El Cerro de las Cabezas (Valdepeñas, Ciudad Real): los bastiones de la puerta S by Jorge del Reguero González. Paperback; 203x276mm; 94pp; 48 figures (colour throughout). Spanish text. 145 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271088. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271095. Institutional Price £9.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Arqueología de la arquitectura en el oppidum oretano de El Cerro de las Cabezas focuses on the two bastions that make up the south gate of the Iberian oppidum of Cerro de las Cabezas (Valdepeñas, Ciudad Real). It comprises two defensive constructions whose internal space fulfilled a socioeconomic function related to the storage of cereal. Primarily archaeoarchitectural, supported by the digitisation and study of the photographic archive of the excavation, the research aims to analyse the construction techniques and materials of both structures, define their successive construction phases within the historical process of the settlement and to evaluate the architectural ensemble within a spatial area of enormous importance within the urban framework. All this allows us to understand the continuous changes and transformations that this space suffered between the 5th and 3rd centuries BC to defend Punic influence and presence in this Iberian oppidum.

About the Author
Jorge del Reguero González holds a degree in history and a masters in Archaeology and Heritage from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM). He has participated in several annual research projects at the Iberian oppidum of El Cerro de las Cabezas (Valdepeñas, Ciudad Real), supported by non-invasive archaeological actions (geophysical surveys) and analysis of construction techniques through the archaeology of architecture. He has also participated in excavations at the Tartessian site of Casas del Turuñuelo (Guareña, Badajoz) and the eastern necropolis of the Spanish-Roman site of Baelo Claudia (Bolonia, Cádiz).

en español
Se aborda en el presente trabajo un estudio arquitectónico sobre los dos bastiones que configuran la puerta sur del oppidum ibérico de El Cerro de las Cabezas (Valdepeñas, Ciudad Real). Se trata de dos construcciones defensivas cuyo espacio interno cumplió con una función socioeconómica relacionada con el almacenamiento de cereal. A través de este trabajo de investigación, de carácter arqueoarquitectónico, apoyado en la digitalización y reestudio del archivo fotográfico del proceso de excavación, se pretende analizar las técnicas y los materiales constructivos de ambas construcciones, definir sus sucesivas fases constructivas dentro el proceso histórico del asentamiento y valorar el conjunto arquitectónico en un área espacial de enorme importancia dentro del entramado urbano. Todo ello nos permitirá conocer los continuos cambios y transformaciones que sufrió este espacio, entre los siglos V y III a.C., para defender, seguidamente, la influencia y presencia púnica en este oppidum ibérico.

Jorge del Reguero González es graduado en Historia por la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM) y Máster en Arqueología y Patrimonio por la citada universidad. Ha participado en varios proyectos de investigación, de carácter anual, para el estudio urbano y territorial del oppidum ibérico de El Cerro de las Cabezas (Valdepeñas, Ciudad Real), apoyado en actuaciones arqueológicas no invasivas (prospecciones geofísicas) y análisis de las técnicas constructivas mediante una lectura propia de la arqueología de la arquitectura. Ha colaborado en las excavaciones en el yacimiento tartésico de Casas del Turuñuelo (Guareña, Badajoz) o la necrópolis oriental del yacimiento hispanorromano de Baelo Claudia (Bolonia, Cádiz).
NEW: Assessing Iron Age Marsh-Forts With Reference to the Stratigraphy and Palaeoenvironment Surrounding The Berth, North Shropshire by Shelagh Norton. Paperback; 205x290mm; 234 pages; 113 figures, 20 tables (colour throughout). 758 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698633. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698640. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Iron Age marsh-forts are large, monumental structures located in low-lying waterscapes. Although they share chronological and architectural similarities with their hillfort counterparts, their locations suggest that they may have played a specific and alternative role in Iron Age society. Despite the availability of a rich palaeoenvironmental archive at many sites, little is known about these enigmatic structures, and until recently, the only acknowledged candidate was the unusual, dual-enclosure monument at Sutton Common, near Doncaster.

Assessing Iron Age Marsh-Forts considers marsh-forts as a separate phenomenon within Iron Age society through an understanding of their landscape context and palaeoenvironmental development. At the national level, a range of Iron Age wetland monuments has been compared to Sutton Common to generate a gazetteer of potential marsh-forts. At the local level, a multi-disciplinary case-study is presented of the Berth marsh-fort in North Shropshire, incorporating GIS-based landscape modelling and multi-proxy palaeoenvironmental analysis (plant macrofossils, beetles and pollen).

The results of both the gazetteer and the Berth case-study challenge the view that marsh-forts are simply a topographical phenomenon. These substantial Iron Age monuments appear to have been deliberately constructed to control areas of marginal wetland and may have played an important role in the ritual landscape.

About the Author
Shelagh Norton (BA, MPhil, PhD) specialises in the reconstruction of macro-and micro-palaeolandscapes, and in particular, the interpretation of plant macrofossil and coleopteran remains from wetland contexts. Her research is based on the practical application of archaeological principles in a real-world context both in the UK and New Zealand, where she worked as a Regional Archaeologist for Heritage New Zealand. Her publications include The Archaeological and Palaeoenvironmental Potential of the Weald Moors, Shropshire (Transactions of the Shropshire Archaeological and Historical Society, 2016). She is an active member of the Hillfort Studies Group (University of Oxford), Worcestershire Archaeological Society and Worcestershire Archive Services.

Table of Contents
Summary ;
Chapter 1: Assessing Iron Age marsh-forts - an introduction ;
Chapter 2: The British Iron Age, hillforts and marsh-forts - Literature Review ;
Chapter 3: Methodology and Resources ;
Chapter 4: Marsh-forts in a landscape context ;
Chapter 5: North Shropshire’s marsh-forts ;
Chapter 6: The Berth – a marsh-fort in its landscape context ;
Chapter 7: The Berth – stratigraphic sequencing and radiocarbon dating ;
Chapter 8: The Berth – Palaeoenvironmental Reconstruction ;
Chapter 9: Assessing Iron Age marsh-forts – Discussion and Conclusions ;
Bibliography ;
Appendix 1 – Radiocarbon dates ;
Appendix 2 – Samples weights and volumes ;
Appendix 3 – Full species lists
FORTHCOMING: Architectures néolithiques de l’île d’Yeu (Vendée) edited by Audrey Blanchard, Serge Cassen and Jean-Noël Guyodo. Paperback; 205x290mm; 294pp; 196 figures, 29 tables (colour throughout). Print RRP: £52.00. 798 2021. ISBN 9781789695793. Book contents pageBuy Now

Architectures néolithiques de l’île d’Yeu (Vendée) gathers documentation, unpublished material and the principal results of studies, prospections, excavations and surveys carried out on domestic settlements, funeral monuments, quarries and symbolic sites. Situated off the Atlantic coast of the Vendée (France), the Isle of Yeu has been occupied since Prehistory. Domestic, industrial, funerary or symbolic sites dating from the Neolithic are numerous. Their state of conservation is exceptional, with much of the stone-built architecture preserved above ground. This is notably so for the walled enclosures of the fourth millennium BC, which have been the subject of several research programs since 2010.

The initial chapters propose an inventory of the mineral resources as well as the main forms of exploitation, supply strategies and uses of stones. The main part of the volume is dedicated to the excavation of the two principal walled enclosures dating from the late Neolithic, the Pointe de la Tranche and Ker Daniaud. The emphasis is on the architecture of these promontory forts that directly open to the Ocean but whose occupation seems not to have been permanent. Finally, the surveys (plan, photogrammetry, microtopography) and the digital modelling of the megalithic burials of the Tabernaudes, the Plauche a Puare and the Petits Fradets allow a three-dimensional reconstruction of Neolithic funerary architectures. For the rocks marked by cupules, the current concentration of which is one of the most important (more than 120 sites), a first analysis of the corpus of signs is proposed, although their dating remains uncertain.

This contribution allows us to open a window on the material and imaginary worlds of one population from the end of Prehistory, through the analysis of their testimonies and expressions, physical and symbolic, revealing a people settled - and not trapped - in a restricted territory beaten by the winds and surrounded by the waves. Audrey Blanchard obtained her doctorate from the University of Rennes 1, and is an associate member of UMR 6566, CReAAH (LARA laboratory). A specialist in lithic and ceramic production, her research focuses mainly on coastal and island settlements and Neolithic domestic architecture ;

Serge Cassen obtained his doctorate in Anthropology, Ethnology and Prehistory in 1986 from the University of Paris-Sorbonne under the supervision of G. Bailloud, his thesis focusing on Neolithic societies of the 4th millennium BC between Loire and Gironde. Upon joining the CNRS in 1991, he devoted himself to the study of the funerary and other megalithic monuments of western France, in particular through their ancient engravings and through their social valorisation. ;

Jean-Noël Guyodo is Lecturer in Prehistory at the University of Nantes and director of the LARA laboratory (UMR6566 CReAAH). A specialist in lithic technology and stone architecture, he has directed numerous excavations on Neolithic settlement sites in western France. His research focuses more broadly on the first agro-pastoral societies on the Atlantic coast of Europe.

en français
Au large des côtes atlantiques vendéennes (France), l’île d’Yeu est un territoire occupé depuis la Préhistoire. Les sites à vocations domestiques, artisanales, funéraires ou encore symboliques datés du Néolithique sont nombreux. Leur état de conservation est exceptionnel car les architectures bâties en pierre sont préservées en élévation pour beaucoup d’entre eux. C’est le cas, par exemple, sur les habitats du IVème millénaire avant J.-C., qui ont fait l’objet de plusieurs programmes de recherche depuis 2010.

Cet ouvrage regroupe la documentation, les informations inédites et les principaux résultats des études, prospections, fouilles et relevés réalisés sur les habitats, les monuments funéraires, les carrières et les sites symboliques. Les premiers travaux t
Frontiers of the Roman Empire: The Roman Frontier in Egypt Frontières de l’empire romain : la frontière romaine en Égypte by David J. Breeze and Michel Reddé. Paperback; 185x248mm; 96pp; 150 figures (colour throughout). Full text in English and French. Print RRP: £14.99. 745 2021 Frontiers of the Roman Empire (FRE) . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699456. £14.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699463. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The frontiers of the Roman empire together form the largest monument of one of the world’s greatest states. They stretch for some 7,500km through 20 countries which encircle the Mediterranean Sea. The remains of these frontiers have been studied by visitors and later by archaeologists for several centuries. Many of the inscriptions and sculpture, weapons, pottery and artefacts created and used by the soldiers and civilians who lived on the frontier can be seen in museums. Equally evocative of the lost might of Rome are the physical remains of the frontiers themselves. The aim of this series of books is not only to inform the interested visitor about the history of the frontiers but to act as a guidebook as well.

The Roman military remains of Egypt are remarkable in their variety and in their state of preservation. They deserve to be better known. They include forts, quarries under the authority of the army and whose materials were used in the monumental buildings of Rome, as well as the roads which crossed the desert landscape and brought the Mediterranean into con¬tact with the Indian Ocean. It is hoped that each reader of this book will enjoy learning more about the remarkable Roman inheritance of Egypt.

The full text is presented side-by-side dual-language in English and French.

About the Authors
Professor David J. Breeze has published several books on Roman frontiers and the Roman army. He is a former chairman of the International Congress of Roman Frontier Studies and led the team which successfully nominated the Antonine Wall as a World Heritage Site. ;

Michel Reddé is a professor emeritus at the School for Advanced Studies at the Paris Sciences et Lettres University. He has directed or collaborated on several archaeological sites in Egypt and in France (Alésia). He has been director of the European project on studying north-east Roman Gaul.

French Description
Prises ensemble, les frontières de l’Empire romain constituent le monument le plus important de ce qui fut l’un des plus grands États du monde. Elles s’étendent sur environ 7.500 km à travers une ving-taine de pays autour de la Méditerranée. Depuis plusieurs siècles, les vestiges de ces frontières ont fait l’objet d’études par des curieux puis plus tardivement par des archéologues. Bon nombre des inscriptions, sculptures, armes, poteries et autres objets créés et utilisés par les militaires et les civils qui peuplaient ces frontières sont visibles dans les musées. Mais les vestiges physiques de ses frontières sont tout aussi évocateurs de la puissance que fut Rome. La présente séries de livres est conçue non seulement pour informer le visiteur curieux de l’histoire des frontières mais également pour servir de guide sur le terrain.

Les vestiges militaires romains en Égypte sont remarquables tant par leur diversité que par leur état de conservation : ils méritent d’être mieux connus. On y dénombre des forts, des carrières exploitées sous l’autorité des militaires et dont les matériaux ont servi aux constructions monumentales de Rome, ainsi que des pistes qui traversent des paysages désertiques et mettaient la Méditerranée en relation avec l’Océan Indien. Nous espérons que le lecteur prendra plaisir à en apprendre davantage sur l’étonnant héritage romain en Égypte.

Le Professeur David J. Breeze a publié plusieurs livres sur les frontières et l’armée romaines. Il est ancien président du Congrès International d’Études sur les Frontières Romaines et il a dirigé l’équipe qui a réussi à faire inscrire le mur d’Antonin au patrimoine Mondial. ;

Michel Reddé est professeur (ém.) à l’École pratique des Hautes Études/Université de Paris Sciences et Lettres. Il a dirigé ou collaboré à de nombreux chantiers archéologiques en Égypte et en France (Alésia). Il a été directeur du projet ERC Rurland.
Barāqish/Yathill (Yemen) 1986-2007 Excavations of Temple B and related research and restoration / Extramural excavations in Area C and overview studies edited by Sabina Antonini and Francesco G. Fedele. DOI: 10.32028/9781789694703. Paperback; 205x290mm; 2 volumes: 398pp & 546pp; 700 figures, tables and plates. Contributions in English, Italian, and French. Chapter abstracts in English and Arabic. 732 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694703. £98.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694710. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The walled town of Barāqish in interior Yemen – ancient Yathill of the Sabaeans and Minaeans – was for Alessandro de Maigret (1943-2011) ‘one of the archaeological marvels not just of Yemen, but of the entire Near East’. Established as an oasis settlement in the semi-desert depression of the Jawf, it became in the 1st millennium BCE a thriving caravan station on the ‘incense’ route and a famed place of worship, controlled by rich rulers and merchants. Topography and trade made it a crucible of South Arabian and foreign traditions, and on several occasions, it was a border town disputed between rival powers. A sustained archaeological effort to investigate the site and area began in 1986 by the Italian Archaeological Mission, led by de Maigret, and developed in two phases. In 1989-1992 the temple of the patron god was excavated, while between 2003-2007 a range of new excavations were undertaken, including a second temple, a sounding, a dissection of the tell's edge outside the Minaean wall, and a cemetery.

Presented across two volumes, Volume 1: Excavations of Temple B and related research and restoration is particularly devoted to the temple of god ʿAthtar dhu-Qabḍ (Temple B), dated to the second half of the 1st millennium BCE. Six chapters fully illustrate its excavation, architecture, restoration, findings, inscriptions, and dating. The contribution of this work and monument to regional history transcends its local significance. The report is framed by ten chapters detailing the historiography of research on Barāqish, the initial surveys carried out in 1986-1987, the architecture and restoration of Temple A together with the extramural excavation at the adjacent curtain wall, the cultic equipment, and radiocarbon datings. The nine contributors are leading scholars in the above fields and include recognized experts in South Arabian archaeology.

The core of Volume 2: Extramural excavations in Area C and overview studies is a final report on Area C, an exploratory dissection through the western edge of the Barāqish mound outside the curtain wall, and a unique operation for Yemen until now. Eight chapters detail the excavation, stratigraphy, and geoarchaeology (from about 800 BCE to the present), in addition to radiocarbon chronology, cultural finds, animal and plant remains, economy, major historical events, and unique evidence for trade. Four further chapters offer a glimpse of settlement archaeology for Sabaean Yathill and the survey of a religious centre to the west, together with a first typology of Minaean pottery and an epigraphic and political-historical overview for Barāqish and the Jawf. The contributors are recognized experts in South Arabian archaeology.

About the Editors
Sabina Antonini heads the Italian Archaeological Mission to Yemen c/o Monumenta Orientalia (Rome). Since 1984 she has taken part in archaeological surveys and excavations of prehistoric sites in Khawlān al-Ṭiyāl and Ramlat al-Sabʿatayn and of South Arabian sites, including Yalā, Tamnaʿ, Ḥayd ibn ʿAqīl, and Barāqish. She is a specialist in South Arabian archaeology and history of art. Her contribution, ‘The Italian Archaeological Mission at Šibām al-Ġirās, Yemen’, has appeared in Festschrift in honour of Professor Mikhail Piotrovsky (2019). ;

Francesco G. Fedele has been Professor of Anthropology and Prehistoric ecology at the Università di Napoli ‘Federico II’, Naples, until retirement in 2011. As a member of the Italian Archaeological Mission to Yemen since 1984 he has conducted excavations in Khawlān al- Ṭiyāl and at Barāqish, with a particular focus on site geoarchaeology and archaeofaunas. His recent publications include ‘New data on domestic and wild camels in Sabaean and Minaean Yemen’ in Archaeozoology of the Near East 9 (2017).
From Edessa to Urfa: The Fortification of the Citadel by Cristina Tonghini. Paperback; 205x290mm; 270 pages; 190 figures, 6 tables, 39 plates (colour throughout). 725 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697568. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697575. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

From Edessa to Urfa: the Fortification of the Citadel is the outcome of an archaeological research project focused on a specific monumental area in the city of Urfa: its citadel. Urfa is better known to the general reader by its ancient name, Edessa. Three seasons of fieldwork were carried out (2014-2016), concentrating on the study of the evidence preserved above ground and employing the methods of stratigraphic analysis to identify the building sequence of the citadel and to characterise the various building phases. Transformation of the relative sequence into absolute chronology depended primarily on inscriptions in situ, but also on typological elements (masonry type, decorative elements, specific architectural forms). Data from the written sources also contributed relevant information regarding the development of the fortification works and the establishment of an absolute sequence.

About the Author
Cristina Tonghini (PhD, SOAS, London) is an archaeologist specialising in the Arab world during the Islamic period. Her publications concern the Islamic pottery production of the Levant, the fortified architecture of the Eastern Mediterranean and, more recently, landscape archaeology in Iraq. She teaches Islamic Archaeology at the Università Ca’ Foscari of Venice.
White Castle: The Evaluation of an Upstanding Prehistoric Enclosure in East Lothian by David Connolly, Murray Cook and Hana Kdolska. Paperback; 203x276mm; 108 pages; 42 figures, 8 tables (colour throughout). 134 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699302. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699319. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

White Castle: The evaluation of an upstanding prehistoric enclosure in East Lothian describes the results of a four year research programme of archaeological works between 2010 and 2013, at the later prehistoric enclosure of White Castle, East Lothian, carried out under the auspices of the Rampart Scotland project. The site is a Scheduled Monument, but, despite being subject of mapping and survey for some 200 years, it has never been examined by excavation prior to the Rampart Scotland project’s interventions. White Castle was the first of the series of comparable sites to be excavated in the Lammermuir area. The programme of archaeological evaluation and sequence of radiometric dates furnished evidence for four major phases of activity at White Castle – with the main enclosure period dating to the second half of the first millennium BC. The excavations demonstrated a clear sequence of enclosure development over time, whereby the design and visual impact often appeared to be more important than defence alone. White Castle’s location on the main route through the Lammermuirs with surrounding upland pasture is also highly suggestive to its function and it seems probable that the site’s economy was concerned primarily with controlling access to grazing. The final phase of the prehistoric enclosure appears to combine two key factors: impressing visitors and stock control. While maintenance of White Castle’s enclosure system was abandoned in the closing centuries BC, it is unlikely that the area was deserted and there is also limited evidence for two later phases of activity on site around the Medieval and Early Modern Periods.

About the Authors:
David Connolly MCIfA, FSA Scot has had a long career in archaeology since 1981. Being one of the pioneers of buildings archaeology, land survey and a qualified drone pilot, he is always at the forefront of developing new techniques of archaeological recording. He is also the creator of the successful Archaeology Skills Passport scheme. Since 1999, David devotes his time to running British Archaeological Jobs Resource (BAJR) and its fieldwork arm, CHC Heritage, participating in varied worldwide commercial and research/training projects, including Rampart Scotland. ;

Dr Murray Cook, MA Hons, MCIfA FSA Scot is Stirling Council’s Archaeologist, an Honorary Research Fellow at Stirling University, as well as teaching a course on Stirling at Forth Valley College. As co-director of Rampart Scotland, he also runs regular training digs and is the author of three popular books on Stirling: The Anvil of Scottish History, Digging into Stirling’s Past and Bannockburn and Stirling Bridge: Exploring Scotland’s Two Greatest Battles. ;

Hana Kdolska MA, MSc is a graduate of the University of Edinburgh, gaining practical experience working as a field archaeologist for a number of large commercial units in the UK. As part of Rampart Scotland’s team, she has supervised multiple research excavations across Scotland. Since 2015 she has participated and run archaeological projects in the UK and the Emirate of Ras al-Khaimah (UAE). In 2020, she joined BAJR and CHC Heritage as a co-director.
Garranes: An Early Medieval Royal Site in South-West Ireland by William O’Brien and Nick Hogan. DOI: 10.32028/9781789699197. Hardback; 205x290mm; 402 pages; 376 figures, colour throughout. 722 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699197. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699203. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Ringforts were an important part of the rural settlement landscape of early medieval Ireland (AD 400–1100). While most of those circular enclosures were farmsteads, a small number had special significance as centres of political power and elite residence, also associated with specialized crafts. One such ‘royal site’ was Garranes in the mid-Cork region of south-west Ireland. In 1937, archaeological excavation of a large trivallate ringfort provided evidence of high-status residence during the fifth and sixth centuries AD. The site had workshops for the production of bronze ornaments, with glass and enamel working as well as indications of farming. Pottery and glass vessels imported from the Mediterranean world and Atlantic France were also discovered. That trade with the Late Roman world is significant to understanding the introduction of Christianity and literacy in southern Ireland at that time.

This monograph presents the results of an interdisciplinary project conducted 2011–18, where archaeological survey and excavation, supported by various specialist studies, examined this historic landscape. Garranes is a special place where archaeology, history and legend combine to uncover a minor royal site of the early medieval period. The central ringfort has been identified as Rath Raithleann, the seat of the petty kingdom of Uí Echach Muman, recalled in bardic poetry of the later medieval period. Those poems attribute its foundation to Corc, a King of Munster in the fifth century AD, and link the site closely to Cian, son-in-law of Brian Bóruma, and one of the heroes of Clontarf (AD 1014). This study provides new evidence to connect the location of Rath Raithleann to high-status occupation at Garranes during the fifth and sixth centuries, and explores its legendary associations in later periods.

Includes contributions from Michelle Comber, Ian Doyle, Lenore Fischer, Kevin Kearney, Susan Lyons, Tim Mighall and Douglas Borthwick, Margaret Mannion, Ignacio Montero-Ruiz and Mercedes Murillo-Barroso, Róisín Nic Cnáimhín, Cian Ó Cionnfhaolaidh, James O’Driscoll, Edward O’Riordain, and Orla-Peach Power.

About the Authors
William O'Brien is Professor of Archaeology in University College Cork, Ireland. His research interests include the Chalcolithic and Bronze Age in Ireland, early mining and metallurgy in Atlantic Europe, upland archaeology, the study of hillforts and monumentality in the later prehistoric period. He has a particular interest in the prehistory of south-west Ireland, where he has conducted numerous research excavations. ;

Nick Hogan is a graduate of National University of Ireland Galway, where he completed a BA degree in Archaeology and a MA in Landscape Archaeology. In 2008, he was appointed Technical Officer for the Department of Archaeology in University College Cork, where he is responsible for teaching and support in the areas of archaeological fieldwork and computing. He is an experienced field archaeologist with a range of skills in excavation, land survey and geophysics.

Reviews
'This is an important publication that makes a signficant contribution to our understanding not only of this early medieval landscape but also of early medieval studies as a whole.'—Archaeology Ireland, Volume 35, Number 2, June 2021

'All told, this volume is handsomely published by Archaeopress with excellent figures, and also benefits from being freely accessible as an Open Access publication. Securing a hard copy while it is available, however, is advisable, as this is destined to be an indispensable landmark for the wider field. This truly seminal publication demonstrates the enduring value of long-term, landscape-scale field projects, which one may hope will become a regular feature of the research landscape for early medieval Ireland.'—Patrick Gleeson, Journal of Irish Archaeology, Volume XXX (2021)
Daily Life in Ancient Egyptian Personal Correspondence by Susan Thorpe. Paperback; 156x234mm; 136 pages. 713 2021 Archaeopress Egyptology 32. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695076. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695083. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £20.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Representations and inscriptions on tomb and temple walls and individual stelae have provided considerable knowledge of ancient Egyptian daily life, religious custom and military achievements. However, as visual or eulogistic textual evidence they are unable to provide the insight into the people themselves, their personalities and the events and issues they were concerned with, insight which can be found in personal correspondence. Daily Life in Ancient Egyptian Personal Correspondence addresses a selection of letters from the Old Kingdom up to and including the Twenty-first Dynasty. Under the topic headings of problems and issues, daily life, religious matters, military and police matters, it will show the insight they provide regarding aspects of belief, relationships, custom and behaviour, evidencing the distinctiveness of the data such personal correspondence can provide as a primary source of daily life in ancient Egypt – the extra dimension.

About the Author
Susan Thorpe moved to New Zealand from the UK in 1976. In 2003 she enrolled at the University of Auckland and graduated in 2008, majoring in Ancient History. Specialising in Egyptology, she achieved BA Honours (First Class) in 2009 and Masters (First class) in 2010. The topic for her PhD, which she commenced in 2011, was ‘Social Aspects found in Ancient Egyptian Personal Correspondence’. She graduated in 2016. Since then, she has held the position of Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Auckland. She has attended and presented at conferences in Europe, the UK, Australia and New Zealand and had her work accepted for publication in conference proceedings and journals. This publication is the result of further research into the topic of ancient Egyptian personal letters.

Reviews
This is a fascinating read that really brings ancient Egyptian people to life - from the standard-bearer Maiseti threatening a man with death while also asking him to provide more rope, to the horrified Khay sent a jar of fat instead of honey. Highly recommended to anyone with an interest in Egyptology, with plenty of background notes and references to keep the academics happy.
Sarah Griffiths, Ancient Egypt, Volume 22, Number 1

In one letter a man demands his maidservant be returned, while in another a brother complains that his sister doesn’t write to him. Each provide a unique snapshot of what it was to live in the shadow of the pyramids. This work yields a fascinating glimpse of what it was to be a part of this long-vanished world.—Dianna Wray, AramcoWorld, Vol. 72, No. 5
Life, Death and Rubbish Disposal in Roman Norton, North Yorkshire by Janet Phillips and Pete Wilson. Paperback; 205x290mm; 296 pages; 209 figures, 54 tables (colour throughout). 712 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 77. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698381. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698398. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Life, Death and Rubbish Disposal in Roman Norton, North Yorkshire: Excavations at Brooklyn House 2015-16 reports on excavations in advance of the development of a site in Norton-on-Derwent, North Yorkshire close to the line of the main Roman road running from the crossing point of the River Derwent near Malton Roman fort to York (Eboracum). The Brooklyn House site provided much information on aspects of the poorly understood ‘small town’ of Delgovicia. The area came to be used for apparently widely-dispersed burials in the mid-3rd century AD. Among these was the bustumtype burial of a soldier, or former soldier, which produced a well-preserved assemblage of military equipment and incorporated some ‘non-standard’ features. In addition, evidence was found for a possible mausoleum. During the late third and fourth centuries the burial activity was succeeded by occupation in the form of substantial stone-founded, or in some cases possibly stone-built buildings fronting onto the Roman road which was the main approach road to the town from the south. These structures could have been related in some way to the Norton Roman pottery industry, the core area of which was located to the east of the site, although no evidence from them suggested this. Following the fairly short-lived occupation, much of the site was used for the disposal of large quantities of rubbish and structural debris that presumably originated from locations closer to or beyond the river crossing, including possibly the Roman fort. The Roman pottery assemblage incorporated in excess of 21,000 sherds and adds considerably to our knowledge of pottery use and production in Roman Malton/Norton. Similarly, the substantial and well-preserved Roman-period finds assemblage provides insights, not only into the bustum burial but also wider aspects of life in Delgovicia. Within the assemblage, there were some unusual and rarely found individual items such as a pair of iron-working tongs, a two-link snaffle bit and a bone needle case, as well as a wide range of other material including military equipment, jewellery, styli and a possible scroll holder. The medieval and later pottery from the site provides a baseline for work on assemblages recovered from Malton/Norton in the future.

About the contributors
Having started in archaeology as a volunteer on the Mary Rose in 1982 John Buglass formed his own company, JB Archaeology Ltd, in 2004. During his career John has worked on a wide range of sites from complex urban ones in London through to rural sites scattered across North Yorkshire. He has also excavated foreshore and submerged remains including 30 historic wrecks as well as having excavated on the Studley Royal/Fountains Abbey World Heritage Site. JB Archaeology has undertaken all of the archaeological works for the Brooklyn House development since the initial desk-based assessment in 2014. John has a BSc (Hons) Biology and an MA Archaeological Science. ;

After earning her MA in Medieval History and Archaeology from St. Andrews University, Janet Phillips began work as an archaeologist in 2007. While working, she gaining a further MA in Archaeology and Heritage from Leicester University. From 2011 Janet worked as a Project Officer on a range of multi-period sites. During that time she ran both phases of the Brooklyn House fieldwork and also developed an interest in finds work becoming a Post Excavation Supervisor in 2018. ;

Pete Wilson worked for English Heritage/Historic England for many years, including as Head of Research Policy (Roman Archaeology), and is now an Independent Consultant. A graduate of Birmingham University, he obtained a PhD from the University of Bradford for a thesis on Roman North Yorkshire. He has published widely on Roman topics including major monographs on Cataractonium (Catterick) (2002) and reports and papers on various subjects
Experiencing the Frontier and the Frontier of Experience: Barbarian perspectives and Roman strategies to deal with new threats edited by Alexander Rubel and Hans-Ulrich Voß. DOI: 10.32028/9781789696813. Paperback; 205x290mm; 244 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 699 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 76. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696813. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696820. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Experiencing the Frontier and the Frontier of Experience deals with the Roman Empire’s responses to the threats which were caused by the new geostrategic situation brought on by the crisis of the 3rd century AD, induced by the ‘barbarians’ who – often already part of Roman military structures as mercenaries and auxiliaries – became a veritable menace for the Empire. Rome adopted different strategies: they oscillated between inclusion, warfare and other means of exerting influence. The contributions to this volume explore the archaeological evidence for Roman practice and especially the varying strategies of power and influence in the central regions on the one hand, and the south-eastern parts of the European ‘Barbaricum’ on the other. They show how ‘Divide et impera’ functioned as practical policy based on alliances, as well as consequent warfare, and diplomatic initiatives, which are traceable by prestige-goods and subsidia treasures found in the Barbaricum. The comparison of Roman imports in different parts of Iron-Age Europe can help understand better a complex process of shifting power and influence in an emerging new Europe, which transformed the Empire towards medieval ‘Herrschaft’ and social structure.

About the Editors
Alexander Rubel holds a PhD in Ancient history and a second one in German literature. He was appointed a senior research fellow at the Archaeological Institute of the Romanian Academy and associated professor at Cuza University in Iasi. Since 2011 he has been the director of the Institute of Archaeology in Iasi. ;

Hans-Ulrich Voß (Voss) is a Scientific Assistant at the Romano-Germanic Commission (RGK) of the German Archaeological Institut (DAI) at Frankfurt am Main.

Table of Contents
Preface ;
Beyond the Fringes of Empire: New Approaches concerning Roman Influence and Power in the Barbaricum. An introduction – Alexander Rubel and Hans-Ulrich Voß ;
Roman limes in military campaigns of the Barbarians – Krzysztof Narloch ;
Archaeological footprints of a superpower in hostile territory. Recent research on the traces of Roman military activities in the barbarian region north of the Middle Danube – Claus-Michael Hüssen, Balázs Komoróczy, Ján Rajtár, Marek Vlach ;
Friend or Foe? The political relations between inhabitants of the Upper Tisza region and the Roman Empire at the end of the 2nd and the 3rd century AD, in the light of archaeological and historical sources – Jan Bulas ;
The Limes Germanicus Trade and the Roman Army – Dan-Alexandru Suharoschi, Iulia Dumitrache, Roxana-Gabriela Curca ;
Barbarian brooches in Roman context. Analysis of the finds from the frontier marketplace at Porolissum (Romania) – Coriolan Horațiu Opreanu, Sorin Cociș, Vlad-Andrei Lăzărescu ;
Luxury tableware? Terra sigillata in the coastal region of the northern Netherlands – Annet Nieuwhof (Open Access) ;
Septentrional Encounters – Another Revisit to Roman Vessels in Scandinavian sites – Tove Hjørungdal ;
Westerholt ‘An der Mühle’- A Roman Iron Age Site on the North Sea Coast. A preliminary report – Jan F. Kegler ;
Beyond Hadrian’s Wall: Considerations on the Massive Terrets – Luisa Di Pastena ;
Pierced Roman coins from the ‘Free Dacians’ settlement of Roșiori (Municipality of Dulcești, Neamț County, Romania) – Lucian Munteanu, George Dan-Hânceanu ;
Mars on the River Uecker in Western Pomerania – a further indication of a Roman policy of ‘divide et impera’ in Germania? – Jens-Peter Schmidt and Hans-Ulrich Voß ;
South-eastern Transylvania during the Late Roman Period (3rd-4th centuries AD) – József Puskás ;
Roman type forts in th
On the Borders of World-Systems: Contact Zones in Ancient and Modern Times by Yervand Margaryan. Paperback; 156x230mm; 148pp; 32 figures. 599 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693416. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693423. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

On the Borders of World-Systems: Contact Zones in Ancient and Modern Times draws on a diverse set of disciplines to explore historical, archaeological, and political interpretations of world-systems theory and geocivilizational analysis. The monograph has a prospective character, the main goal of which is the solution of a major problem – the study of worldwide practice, oriented towards the problems of the modern social world as a system. The principal focus is on the borderland - limes, which has been perceived variously as an impenetrable cordon, and as an open, interactive environment. In this locus of inter-world encounters, different civilizations developed, and an exchange of goods and ideas took place. Macrosociological issues of ancient and modern history are analyzed through five case studies of the Taurus-Caucasus region and its role as a contact zone in different periods.

About the Author Yervand Margaryan, Head of the Department of World History and Foreign Regional Studies of the Russian-Armenian University at Yerevan and Leading Researcher at the Institute of History, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia, is a leading historian from the Republic of Armenia. His research focuses on the Ancient World, particularly problems of Classical period social relations, religion (Mithraism), identity and world-systems theory.
Lost Worlds of Ancient and Modern Greece Gilbert Bagnani: The Adventures of a Young Italo-Canadian Archaeologist in Greece, 1921-1924 by D. J. Ian Begg. Hardback; 380pp; 14 figures; 5 maps. 604 2020 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694529. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694536. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

By day, young Gilbert Bagnani studied archaeology in Greece, but by night he socialised with the elite of Athenian society. Secretly writing for the Morning Post in London, he witnessed both antebellum Athens in 1921 and the catastrophic collapse of Christian civilisation in western Anatolia in 1922. While there have been many accounts by refugees of the disastrous flight from Smyrna, few have been written from the perspective of the west side of the Aegean. The flood of a million refugees to Greece brought in its wake a military coup in Athens, the exile of the Greek royal family and the execution or imprisonment of politicians, whom Gilbert knew.

Gilbert’s weekly letters to his mother in Rome reveal his Odyssey-like adventures on a voyage of discovery through the origins of western civilisation. As an archaeologist in Greece, he travelled through time seeing history repeat itself: Minoan Knossos, Byzantine Constantinople and Ottoman Smyrna were all violently destroyed, but the survivors escaped to the new worlds of Mycenaean Greece, Renaissance Venice and modern Greece.

At Smyrna in the twentieth century, history was written not only by the victors but was also recorded by the victims. At the same time, however, the twentieth century itself was so filled with reports of ethnic cleansings on such a scale that the reports brutalized the humanity of the supposedly civilized people reading about them, and the tragedy of Smyrna disappeared from public awareness between the cataclysmic upheavals of the First and Second World Wars.

About the Author
Ian Begg studied archaeology in Greece at the America School of Classical Studies in Athens. For this book, the author retraced Gilbert Bagnani's footsteps around Greece, the Aegean, Turkey and Libya. He has not only participated in excavations in Sicily, Greece, Crete and Egypt but also initiated a survey on the island of Karpathos especially for the chapter in this volume.

Reviews
Gilbert Bagnani, the subject of Ian Begg’s book, was unknown to me, and I am glad to have made his acquaintance. The book covers the period 1921-1924. Gilbert comes across as a fascinating character, who encountered the Levant at a critical time for both the Greece of Eleftherios Venizelos and the Turkey of Mustapha Kemal Atatürk. He was bilingual in Italian (from his father) and English (from his mother): an archaeologist but always more than that. He knew and was helped by the excellent William Miller, which led to his contributing incisive articles about the politics of Greece and the Levant to the Morning Post in London. As a member of the Italian School of Archaeology in Athens he travelled around Greece and the islands and found himself in Asia Minor at a critical phase of the Greek occupation and Kemal’s war of independence. All this and much more is described in Gilbert’s letters to his mother. His grasp of local and international politics was impressive. He and Begg paint sparkling pen pictures of personalities such as Bosdari, the Italian ambassador during the Great War, and later Governor of the Dodecanese, Prince Demidoff the Russian ambassador, Harold Lamb the British Consul at Smyrna and family, Greek personalities such as Stratos, Kalapothakis, Karapanos, and colleagues at the Italian School. Gilbert emerges as clever, sometimes arrogant, fascinated by people especially from high society, and with a weakness for royalty. Begg does him justice in a well sourced book. This is a lively account of a formidable personality, scholar and archaeologist in the making. The black and white photographs by Gilbert himself are excellent. – Sir Michael Llewellyn Smith, British Ambassador to Greece 1996 – 1999 ;

Gilbert Bagnani, of Italian and Canadian extraction, arrived in Greece at the age of 21, already well-connected through his parents’ social and professional circles. He was ostensibly studying
Architecture militaire du Deccan: Une réponse défensive face à la guerre moderne Deccan Military Architecture: A response to early modern warfare by Nicolas Morelle. Paperback; 203x276mm; 428pp; 168 figures. French text with English introduction and conclusion. 124 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697445. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697452. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Architecture militaire du Deccan focuses on the Deccan region in central India between the medieval and modern period, a period at the interface between local Indian culture and the Persian world, followed by relations with the colonial enterprise European in Asia. This period was marked by many conflicts, but also by an inventive adaptation of new military technologies in response to new forms of modern warfare in India, with the arrival of artillery.

Using the most recent investigative techniques, such as photogrammetry and 3D modeling, this volume presents a wealth of new data. The author’s meticulous approach encompasses the study of urban maps, architectural plans and detailed descriptions of walls, bastions, moats, towers, gates, horsemen, granaries, hydraulic éléments, and more.

Through the study of four representative fortified sites, the author synthesizes the evolution of the military architecture of the Deccan.

One can only hope that this volume will inspire other scholars to work on other Indian fortified sites, not limited to the Deccan. Thus, a more complete understanding of the phases of evolution of Indian military architecture can emerge.

About the Author
Nicolas Morelle is an archaeologist, specialising in India (associated researcher of LA3M CNRS in France). After studies on crusaders fortifications and influences between East and West in terms of building techniques and military Architecture, he studied technical interactions in Indian fortifications as part of his PhD thesis on the evolution of Military Architecture in the four Deccan forts. In this context, he collaborated with many Indian and international institutions.

French description: L’extraordinaire conservatoire de fortifications que constitue l’Inde centrale enrichit la connaissance de l’architecture militaire de la période moderne. Les spécificités indiennes en matière de défense constituent un apport non négligeable sur le développement original des organes défensifs du Deccan.

En utilisant les techniques d’investigation les plus récentes, telles que la photogrammétrie et la modélisation 3D, Nicolas Morelle découvre une richesse de données jusqu’alors inconnues. Il présente ainsi une approche méticuleuse à travers des cartes urbaines, des plans d’architecture et des descriptions détaillées de murs, bastions, douves, tours, portes, cavaliers, greniers, éléments hydrauliques, …

Dans ce volume, Nicolas Morelle se concentre sur la région du Deccan dans le centre de l’Inde entre la période médiévale et moderne, période à l’interface entre la culture indienne locale et le monde persan, suivi des relations avec l’entreprise coloniale européenne en Asie. Cette période a été marquée par de nombreux conflits, mais aussi par une adaptation inventive, de nouvelles technologies militaires en réponse aux nouvelles formes de guerre moderne en Inde, avec l’arrivée de l’artillerie.

A travers l’étude de quatre sites fortifiés représentatifs, l’auteur élabore une synthèse de l’évolution de l’architecture militaire du Deccan.

On ne peut qu’espérer que le présent volume inspirera d’autres chercheurs à travailler sur d’autres sites fortifiés indiens, sans se limiter au Deccan. Ainsi, une compréhension plus complète des phases d’évolution de l’architecture militaire indienne pourra émerger.

Tiré d’une recherche doctorale récente, cet ouvrage est en français. Plusieurs parties sont traduites en anglais, dont la synthèse, afin d’améliorer sa diffusion vers le public international.

Nicolas Morelle est archéologue, spécialiste de l’Inde (chercheur associé du LA3M CNRS en France). Après des études sur les fortifications des croisades et les influences entre Orient et Occident dans l’architecture militaire, il a étudié les interactions techniques dans les fortifications indiennes dans le cadre de sa thèse de doctorat sur
A Biography of Power: Research and Excavations at the Iron Age 'oppidum' of Bagendon, Gloucestershire (1979-2017) by Tom Moore. Paperback; 205x290mm; 626 pages, illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 621 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695342. £85.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695359. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume explores the changing nature of power and identity from the Iron Age to Roman period in Britain. Presenting detailed excavation results and integrating a range of comprehensive specialist studies, A Biography of Power provides fresh insights into the origins and nature of one of the lesser-known, but perhaps most significant, Late Iron Age oppida in Britain: Bagendon in Gloucestershire.

Combining the results of a large-scale geophysical survey, with analysis of both historic and new excavations, this volume reassesses Iron Age occupation at Bagendon, revealing evidence for diverse artisanal activities and complex regional exchange networks that saw livestock, and people, travelling to Bagendon from west of the Severn. The results of excavation of two morphologically unusual, banjo-like enclosures, and of one of the previously unexamined dykes, has revealed that the Bagendon oppidum had earlier origins and more complex roles than previously envisaged. The volume also provides new insights into the nature of the Iron Age and Roman landscape in which Bagendon was situated. Detailing the discovery of two, previously unknown, Roman villas at Bagendon, this research also demonstrates the continued significance of this landscape in the early Roman province.

This volume redefines Bagendon as a landscape of power, which offers important insights into the changing nature of societies from the Middle Iron Age to Roman period. It calls for a radical reassessment of how we define oppida complexes and their socio-political importance at the turn of the 1st millennium BC.

Contains contributions from Sophia Adams, Michael J. Allen, Sam Bithell, Loïc Boscher, Cameron Clegg, G.B. Dannell, Lorne Elliott, Elizabeth Foulds, Freddie Foulds, Christopher Green, Derek Hamilton, Colin Haselgrove, Yvonne Inall, Tina Jakob, Mandy Jay, Sally Kellett, Robert Kenyon, Mark Landon, Marcos Martinón-Torres, Edward McSloy, Janet Montgomery, J.A. Morley-Stone, Geoff Nowell, Charlotte O’Brien, Chris Ottley, Cynthia Poole, Richard Reece, Harry Robson, Ruth Shaffrey, John Shepherd, Jane Timby, Dirk Visser, D.F. Williams, Steven Willis.

About the Editor
Tom Moore is an Associate Professor of Archaeology at Durham University. His research focuses on the western European Iron Age and approaches to cultural landscape management. He has published widely on Iron Age social organisation and conducted major field projects at Late Iron Age oppida in Britain and France, including at Bibracte, Burgundy. He is co-author of the textbook: Archaeology: an introduction.

Reviews
'...the excavation results and then the wider discussions are synergetic and demonstrate that the Bagendon project's methodology of a landscape approach is a powerful tool in developing an understanding of the change and continuity that underlies the mechanisms of power and place in the dynamic socio-political landscape of the Late Iron Age and Early Roman interlude. This is a major personal and academic achievement for Tom Moore and for the many organisations who enabled the individual stages of the work through the 'mosaic' funding.'—Tim Copeland, Bristol & Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, March 2021
Domi militiaeque: Militär- und andere Altertümer Festschrift für Hannsjörg Ubl zum 85. Geburtstag edited by Günther E. Thüry. 150 figures; 4 tables; 4 plates (86 colour pages). Papers in German (3 in English). 644 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 68. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695328. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695335. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is in honour of the Austrian scholar Prof. Dr Hannsjörg Ubl. It contains a tabula gratulatoria, a bibliography and 24 contributions covering a wide range of topics. The focus being Greek and Roman, the volume includes papers about the Langobards, renaissance replicas of classical sculpture, and the archaeology of World War I. The 'classical' papers deal with Greek and Roman art and art looting; dogs in Greek and Roman warfare; Roman looking-glasses; erotic inscriptions of Gaulish spindle whorls; military equipment and dress accessories; Roman military history and the non-military archaeology of Raetia, Noricum and Pannonia.

Günther E. Thüry is a lecturer at the Department of Classical Studies at Salzburg University, specialising in Roman cultural history, archaeobiology, epigraphy and numismatics. His bibliography includes some 300 publications, including books on ancient coinage, Greek and Roman environmental history, Roman diet and Roman eroticism.

German Description
Dem österreichischen Archäologen Prof. Dr. Hannsjörg Ubl ist diese Festschrift gewidmet. Sie umfasst eine tabula gratulatoria, die Bibliographie des Jubilars und 24 Beiträge, die sich mit einem weiten Spektrum von Themen beschäftigen. Während ihr Schwerpunkt auf der griechischrömischen Antike liegt, widmen sich Aufsätze von Michael P. Speidel auch den Langobarden, von Kurt Gschwantler renaissancezeitlichen Nachbildungen griechisch-römischer Skulpturfunde und von Rupert Gietl und Reinfrid Vergeiner der Archäologie des Ersten Weltkriegs. Die Arbeiten zur klassischen Antike behandeln Themen der griechischen und römischen Kunst (Claudia Lang- Auinger, Erwin Pochmarski); den Kunstraub im Altertum (Ernst Künzl); den Einsatz von Hunden im Krieg (Heidelinde Autengruber-Thüry); römische Spiegel (Lawrence Okamura); erotische Inschriften auf gallischen Spinnwirteln (Günther E. Thüry); militärische Ausrüstungs- und Bekleidungsgegenstände (Thomas Fischer, Christian Koepfer, José Remesal Rodríguez, Bernd Steidl, Paula Zsidi); die römische Militärgeschichte (Martin Mosser, Bernhard Palme, Michael A. Speidel, Zsolt Visy, Ekkehard Weber); und die zivile Kultur der Provinzen Rätien, Noricum und Pannonien (Gerald Grabherr, Renate Miglbauer, Beatrix Petznek, Peter Scherrer, Gerhard Waldherr und Magdalena Waser).

Günther E. Thüry ist Lehrbeauftragter am Fachbereich Altertumswissenschaften der Universität Salzburg. Er arbeitet vor allem über Themen der römischen Kulturgeschichte, Archäobiologie, Epigraphik und Numismatik. Zu seinen ca. 300 Veröffentlichungen zählen Bücher über antike Münzkunde, griechische und römische Umweltgeschichte, römische Ernährung und römische Erotik.
Old Oswestry Hillfort and its Landscape: Ancient Past, Uncertain Future edited by Tim Malim and George Nash. Paperback; 205x290mm; 254 pages; 117 figures, 34 plates, 5 tables. 637 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696110. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696127. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Old Oswestry is considered to be one of England's most precious archaeological jewels, described by Sir Cyril Fox in the 1930s as 'the outstanding work of the Early Iron Age type on the Marches of Wales', and its design is unique amongst hillforts in the UK. Located on the edge of the Shropshire Plain and just a kilometre north of the market town of Oswestry, the hillfort (and its hinterland landscape) can trace activity through artefactual evidence back at least 5000 years, with the last 3000 years evident as earthworks. The reader will notice that little in the way of archaeological investigation has occurred within the hillfort, and indeed, more excavation took place when its internal space became a training ground for trench warfare during World War I than through any academic endeavour.

Old Oswestry Hillfort and its Landscape: Ancient Past, Uncertain Future, organised into 14 well-crafted chapters, charts the archaeology, folklore, heritage and landscape development of one of England's most enigmatic monuments, from the Iron Age, through its inclusion as part of an early medieval boundary between England and Wales, to its role during World War I when, between 1915 and 1918, over 4000 troops (including Oswestry's own great war poet Wilfrid Owen), were being trained at any one time for the Western Front.

This book also discusses in detail the recent threats to the monument's special landscape from insensitive development and its alternative potential to act as a heritage gateway for the recreational and economic benefit of Oswestry and surrounding communities.

About the Editors
Tim Malim is a graduate of the Institute of archaeology, London, and has worked in many parts of the UK and abroad as an archaeologist during a 40-year career. After working for Cambridge University and English Heritage as part of the Fenland Survey in the 1980s, he set up and directed the Archaeological Field Unit of Cambridgeshire County Council in the 1990s and was a course director at Cambridge University’s extra-mural department, Madingley Hall. Currently, he is head of the heritage team at SLR Consulting, a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London and Chairman of the Federation of Archaeological Managers and Employers. He has excavated a wide range of sites, and his main research interests include British prehistory and the Anglo-Saxons, with specialist knowledge of the fens, wetland archaeology and its preservation, ancient routeways, and Anglo-Saxon dykes. He has published eight books and over 50 other articles, and is a resident of Oswestry, having moved to Shropshire in 2002.

George Nash is an Associate Professor at Geosciences Centre of Coimbra University ITM (Earth and Memory Institute), Polytechnic Institute of Tomar (IPT), Portugal, as well as working for SLR Consulting, an environmental planning consultancy based in the UK. His academic specialisms include the study of prehistoric and contemporary art, prehistoric architecture, mortuary practices, and buildings. In 2014 he was part of a successful HLF bid to excavate two sections of the practice trenching at Walney Island, Cumbria. For SLR Consulting, George has undertaken a number of projects for BAE Systems and the MoD including building assessments at six former Royal Ordnance Factories, the World War II Tank Factory at Manston Road, Leeds, and more recently, at former RAF Abingdon (now the British Army’s Dalton Barracks, west of Oxford). Since 2012, George has been an active member of the protest group HOOOH and has made an extensive study of the practice trenches in and around the hillfort.

Reviews
'Articles about the region and other forts (in one the intervisiblity of sites is mapped impressively onto tribal boundaries), Old Oswestry's setting, links to Arthurian myths, tribal identity in the Roman-contact era and more, should encourage further research and local affection,
The Antonine Wall: Papers in Honour of Professor Lawrence Keppie edited by David J. Breeze and William S. Hanson. Paperback; 206x255mm; 494 pages; 166 figures; 15 tables (exp. RRP £30.00). 613 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 64. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694505. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694512. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Antonine Wall, the Roman frontier in Scotland, was the most northerly frontier of the Roman Empire for a generation from AD 142. It is a World Heritage Site and Scotland’s largest ancient monument. Today, it cuts across the densely populated central belt between Forth and Clyde.

In this volume, nearly 40 archaeologists, historians and heritage managers present their researches on the Antonine Wall in recognition of the work of Lawrence Keppie, formerly Professor of Roman History and Archaeology at the Hunterian Museum, Glasgow University, who spent much of his academic career recording and studying the Wall. The 32 papers cover a wide variety of aspects, embracing the environmental and prehistoric background to the Wall, its structure, planning and construction, military deployment on its line, associated artefacts and inscriptions, the logistics of its supply, as well as new insights into the study of its history. Due attention is paid to the people of the Wall, not just the officers and soldiers, but their womenfolk and children.

Important aspects of the book are new developments in the recording, interpretation and presentation of the Antonine Wall to today's visitors. Considerable use is also made of modern scientific techniques, from pollen, soil and spectrographic analysis to geophysical survey and airborne laser scanning. In short, the papers embody present-day cutting edge research on, and summarise the most up-to-date understanding of, Rome's shortest-lived frontier.

The editors, Professors Bill Hanson and David Breeze, who themselves contribute several papers to the volume, have both excavated sites on, and written books about, the Antonine Wall.

Table of Contents
List of Figures ;
List of Tables ;
List of Contributors ;
Abbreviations ;
1. Lawrence Keppie: an appreciation – David J. Breeze and William S. Hanson ;
2. The Antonine Wall: the current state of knowledge – William S. Hanson and David J. Breeze ;
3. The Landscape at the time of construction of the Antonine Wall – Mairi H. Davies ;
4. The Impact of the Antonine Wall on Iron Age Society – Lesley Macinnes ;
5. Pre-Antonine coins from the Antonine Wall – Richard J Brickstock ;
6. Planning the Antonine wall: an archaeometric reassesment of installation spacing – Nick Hannon, Lyn Wilson, Darrell J Rohl ;
7. The curious incident of the structure at Bar Hill and its implications – Rebecca H Jones ;
8. Monuments on the margins of Empire: the Antonine Wall sculptures – Louisa Campbell ;
9. Building an image: soldiers’ labour and the Antonine Wall Distance Slabs – Iain M. Ferris ;
10. New perspectives on the structure of the Antonine Wall – Tanja Romankiewicz, Karen Milek, Chris Beckett, Ben Russell and J. Riley Snyder ;
11. Wing-walls and waterworks. On the planning and purpose of the Antonine Wall – Erik Graafstal ;
12. The importance of fieldwalking: the discovery of three fortlets on the Antonine Wall – James J. Walker ;
13. The Roman temporary camp and fortlet at Summerston, Strathclyde – Gordon S. Maxwell and William S. Hanson ;
14. Thinking small: fortlet evolution on the Upper German Limes, Hadrian’s Wall, the Antonine Wall and Raetian Limes – Matthew Symonds ;
15. The Roman fort and fortlet at Castlehill on the Antonine Wall: the geophysical, LiDAR and early map evidence – William S. Hanson and Richard E. Jones ;
16. ‘... one of the most remarkable traces of Roman art ... in the vicinity of the Antonine Wall.’ A forgotten funerary urn of Egyptian travertine from Camelon, and related stone vessels from Castlecary – Fraser Hunter ;
17. The Kirkintilloch hoard revisited – J.D. Bateson ;
18. The external supply of pottery and cereals to Antoni
Late Prehistoric Fortifications in Europe: Defensive, Symbolic and Territorial Aspects from the Chalcolithic to the Iron Age Proceedings of the International Colloquium ‘FortMetalAges’, Guimarães, Portugal edited by Davide Delfino, Fernando Coimbra, Gonçalo P. C. Cruz and Daniela Cardoso. Paperback; 205x290mm; 256 pages; 93 figures; 5 tables; 2 maps (colour throughout). 617 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692549. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692556. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Late Prehistoric Fortifications in Europe: Defensive, Symbolic and Territorial Aspects from the Chalcolithic to the Iron Age presents the contributions to the International Colloquium ‘FortMetalAges’ (10th–12th November 2017, Guimarães, Portugal), The Colloquium was organised by the Scientific Commission ‘Metal Ages in Europe’ of the International Union of Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sciences (UISPP/ IUSPP) and by the Martin Sarmento Society of Guimarães. Nineteen papers discuss different interpretive ideas for defensive structures whose construction had necessitated large investment, present new case studies, and conduct comparative analysis between different regions and chronological periods from the Chalcolithic to the Iron Age.

About the Editors
Davide Delfino obtained his PhD from the University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro. He is a Bronze Age specialist at the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities, Visiting Professor at the Polytechnic Institute of Tomar (UNESCO Chair in Humanity and Cultural Integrated Landscape Management), and an internal researcher of the Geosciences Centre (University of Coimbra). In 2015 Davide was appointed secretary of the UISPP/IUPPS Scientific Commission ‘Metal Ages in Europe’. ;

Fernando A. Coimbra holds a PhD in Prehistory and Archaeology (University of Salamanca ‘Extraordinary Prize’). Fernando is Visiting Professor at the Polytechnic Institute of Tomar, and internal researcher of the Geosciences Centre (University of Coimbra), Portugal, where he completed post-doctoral research on the Bronze and Iron Age rock art of the Tagus Valley. He is a member of several research projects in Portugal, Italy, Malta and Greece. ;

Gonçalo P. C. Cruz graduated in History and Archaeology at the University of Minho (Braga, Portugal) and is a staff archaeologist at the Martins Sarmento Society, Guimarães. His work involves the research and management of the archaeological sites under the administration of the Society, namely the Citânia de Briteiros and Castro de Sabroso, as well as the functioning and activity in different nuclei of the Martins Sarmento Museum. ;

Daniela Cardoso graduated in Landscape Archaeology at the Polytechnic Institute of Tomar, held an Erasmus award in Italy at the University of Ferrara in 2000, and completed in 2002 her Master of Advanced Studies degree at the Institute of Human Palaeontology, Paris. In 2015 she obtained her PhD in ‘Quaternário, Materiais e Culturas’ at the University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Portugal. She is currently Senior Museum Technician at the Martins Sarmento Society.
Eastern Roman Mounted Archers and Extraordinary Medico-Surgical Interventions at Paliokastro in Thasos Island during the ProtoByzantine Period The Historical and Medical History Records and the Archaeo-Anthropological Evidence by Anagnostis P. Agelarakis. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+50 pages; 28 figures, 1 table (colour throughout). 111 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696011. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696028. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Procopius’ History of the Wars, and the Strategikon offer important aspects of Eastern Roman military tactical changes adopted against their enemies that brought the mounted archer-lancer to domineer in the synthesis of the army, along with concise descriptions of their training, panoply, and effectiveness in the battlefield during the later ProtoByzantine period. Yet, evidence in the archaeo-anthropological records of these highly specialized military members has remained elusive.

A recent archaeological discovery at the strategically positioned, upland, site of Paliokastro in Thasos island, Greece, and the subsequent study of the human skeletal remains interred in four monumental funerary contexts, in a dedicated naiskos building, provide for the first time through the archaeological record of the region a unique insight of the mounted archers and their female kin during the turbulent ProtoByzantine period. The interdisciplinary study of the anthropological materials focusing on skeletal developmental, acquired skeleto-muscular manifestations and skeleto-anatomical changes recovered valuable evidentiary data on aspects of their in vivo long-term training and preparation, traumatisms and pathologies along with extraordinary traces of cranial and infra-cranial surgical interventions and medical regimens by the hands of a most experienced surgeon.

In conjunction with the archaeological and anthropological evidence, historical and medical history records are integrated aiming toward a nexus with the human dynamics that transpired at Paliokastro within the context of the catastrophic consequences of the ‘barbarian’ invasions in the Aegean Thraco-Macedonia, and the ravages afforded by the Justinian plague during the later component of the ProtoByzantine period.

About the Author
Anagnostis P. Agelarakis is Professor of Anthropology in the Department of History at Adelphi University in New York. He studied Classical Archaeology and European Ethnology as an undergraduate, and as graduate Environmental Studies at Lund University and Lund Polytechnic Institute in Sweden. He holds a M. Phil. and Ph.D. (1989) in Anthropology from Columbia University, New York.
Conflict Landscapes: An Archaeology of the International Brigades in the Spanish Civil War by Salvatore Garfi. Paperback; 205x290mm; 156 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 530 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691344. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691351. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is an archaeological exploration of a conflict landscape encountered by the volunteers of the International Brigades in the Spanish Civil War of 1936-39. A great deal is known about the Brigades in terms of inter-world war geopolitics, their history and make-up, but less is known about the materiality of the landscapes in which they lived, fought, and died.

The Spanish Civil War was a relatively static conflict. As in the First World War, it consisted of entrenched Republican government lines facing similarly entrenched Nationalist (rebel) lines, and these ran north to south across Spain. Fighting was intermittent, so the front line soldiers had to settle in, and make what was an attritional war-scape, a place to live in and survive. This research examines one such war-scape as a place of ‘settlement’, where soldiers lived their daily lives as well as confronting the rigours of war – and these were the volunteers of the International Brigades, both foreign and Spanish, who occupied a section of lines southeast of Zaragoza in Aragón in 1937 and 1938.

This research draws, not only on the techniques of landscape archaeology, but also on the writings of international volunteers in Spain – in particular, George Orwell – and it incorporates historical photography as a uniquely analytical, archaeological resource.

About the Author
Salvatore Garfi has been a professional archaeologist since 1974, working on a range of projects from the prehistoric to the contemporary. Besides working in Britain, he has worked in Egypt, Southern Arabia, and elsewhere in the Middle East. Since 2010, he has specialised in the archaeology of modern conflict, and his doctoral research was on the late 20th Century conflict in Western Sahara. He was a post-doctoral Leverhulme Fellow in the School of Cultures, Languages and Area Studies, University of Nottingham (2015-2018), and co-founder of the International Brigades Archaeological Project (IBAP), which ran from 2014 to 2015.

Reviews
'Salvatore Garfi's book is one of the most compelling accounts by far of a bloody 20th-century conflict. It provides the reader with an all-important historic context to the war, and records the archaeology associated with the trench positions of the International Brigades and Republican forces, where both civilians and combatants bore the brunt of the evils of civil war.' — George Nash, Current World Archaeology #99, January 2020

'This is an expert, informative, and often intriguing investigation of a historically recent battle-zone landscape by an archaeologist whose innovatory approach deploys photographs, maps, and historical (and literary) background context to make a powerful contribution to modern conflict archaeology.' — Nicholas Saunders, Military History Matters, Issue 116 (June/July 2020)

'Garfi’s volume is novel and challenges the traditional presentation of war as a grand narrative, exploring instead the harsh and visceral experience of a war lived on the battlefield.' — Claire Nesbitt, Antiquity 2020 Vol. 94

'... this volume is an essential contribution to archaeology studies of the Spanish Civil War... Garfi’s application of nonintrusive archaeological survey techniques is praiseworthy, and the multiplicity of the sources used, beyond the fieldwork, makes this volume pertinent for anyone interested in the history of the Spanish conflict of 1936–1939.'—Luis Antonio Ruiz Casero, Historical Archaeology, Volume 54, 2020
Yellow Beach 2 after 75 Years The Archaeology of a WWII Invasion Beach on Saipan and its Historic Context in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands by Boyd Dixon, Brenda Tenorio, Cherie Walth and Kathy Mowrer with contributions by Isla Nelson and Robert Jones. Paperback; 203x276mm; x+128 pages; 88 figures, 10 tables (50 colour pages). 92 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692587. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692594. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

After 75 years, this story presents archaeological evidence, archival records, and respected elders’ accounts from WWII and the most catastrophic period in Pacific Basin history, and then into modern times on Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. On June 15, 1944, Afetna Point was called ‘Yellow Beach 2’ by the U.S. Marines and Army infantry braving Japanese resistance to establish a beachhead before capturing As Lito airfield the following days. The beachhead then served as a resupply landing for the next two weeks or more as U.S. forces slowly cleared the island of enemy strongpoints, and removed wounded Americans and battle weary civilians to off-shore medical treatment. At the end of the battle Chamorro, Carolinian, Okinawan, and Korean residents were relocated into stockades for their separation from Japanese soldiers until liberation on July 4, 1946. American military and eventual civilian administration of the San Antonio area transformed the agrarian landscape into a busy corridor of residential, industrial, and then tourist development. Once again in the 21st century, competition for regional tourism and investment makes Saipan a nexus of geopolitical intrigue and economic speculation where the past is not forgotten.

About the Authors
Boyd Dixon is Senior Archaeologist for the Cardno GS office in Guam and the CNMI. With over 40 years of archaeological experience in North America, Latin America, Western Europe, and the Pacific Basin, his interests are equally varied. They embrace prehistoric and historic patterns of settlement, subsistence, interaction, power, and conflict. Boyd holds a BA from the University of Alabama, with MA and PhD in Anthropology from the University of Connecticut. He has also been a research associate in the Micronesian Area Research Center at the University of Guam.

Brenda Y. Tenorio has played a role in shaping US/CNMI relations, has worked with, represented and advised leadership in the CNMI executive and legislative branches of government in negotiations with the U.S. and in the process developed public policy on a variety of issues locally. Over the years, Ms. Tenorio has also provided research/consulting services for proposed multi-million dollar private development projects and a number of firms in the gaming, construction and energy fields. As staff for CNMI Covenant negotiators, Ms. Tenorio worked on issues ranging from the labor and immigration to bonds and financial assistance packages to the CNMI. As a CNMI Covenant negotiator Ms. Tenorio addressed CNMI concerns over citizenship by birth and ownership of submerged land. Ms. Tenorio has a Bachelor’s Degree in History and Philosophy from Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Cherie Walth is a Project Manager, Principal Investigator, and Bioarchaeologist for SWCA Environmental Consultant’s Albuquerque Office. Cherie has worked in such diverse regions as the Rocky Mountains, the U.S. Southwest, the Pacific West, Micronesia, and North Africa. Her experience is in all levels of prehistoric and historic archaeological investigations and includes human and non-human osteological analysis (bioarchaeology). In her 30+ years of experience in cultural resource management, the analysis of human remains has remained her passion. Cherie has an M.A. in Anthropology from the University of Colorado and her thesis reported on human remains from her fieldwork in Tunisia, North Africa.

Kathy Mowrer is an Archaeologist and Bioarchaeologist for SWCA Environmental Consultant’s Albuquerque Office. Kathy has 20 years of archaeological experience in the U. S. Southwest, Pacific Coast, Plains, and CNMI, Saipan. She has been the consulting osteologist for Crow Canyon Archaeological Center in Cortez, Colorado for 13 years. Kathy’s experience includes prehistoric and historic data recovery, survey, and research. Kathy holds a B.A .from Fort Lewis College with a major in Anthropol
Hillforts: Britain, Ireland and the Nearer Continent Papers from the Atlas of Hillforts of Britain and Ireland Conference, June 2017 edited by Gary Lock and Ian Ralston. Paperback; 205x290mm; 250pp; 145 figures, 7 tables. 548 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692266. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692273. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Funded by the AHRC, the Atlas of Hillforts of Britain and Ireland project (2012-2016) involved a team drawn from the Universities of Oxford, Edinburgh and Cork which was responsible for compiling a massive database, now freely available online at https://hillforts.arch.ox.ac, on hillforts in Britain and Ireland. This was underpinned by a major desk-based re-assessment of accessible records. These twelve studies, presented at the end of that exercise to a conference in Edinburgh, and contributed by team members and colleagues, outline the background to and development of the project (Gary Lock) and offer a preliminary assessment of the online digital Atlas (John Pouncett) as well as presenting initial research studies using Atlas data. The volume is profusely illustrated with over 140 figures, including many new maps.

Ian Ralston provides a historical assessment of key stages in the enumeration and mapping of these important monuments on both sides of the Irish Sea. The hill- and promontory forts of England, Wales and the Isle of Man are assessed by Ian Brown and those of Ireland by James O’Driscoll, Alan Hawkes and William O’Brien. Stratford Halliday’s study of the Scottish evidence focuses on the impact of the application of the Atlas criteria to the records of forts in that country. Simon Maddison deploys Percolation Analysis as an example of the potential re-use of the Atlas data in analysing new distributions; Jessica Murray presents a GIS-based approach to hillfort settings and configurations.

Syntheses on insular Early Historic fortified settlements in northern Britain and Ireland, by James O’Driscoll and Gordon Noble, and on hillforts in areas of the nearer Continent are included. The latter comprise an overview by Sophie Krausz on Iron Age fortifications in France and a consideration of the south German records of hillforts and oppida by Axel Posluschny, while Fernando Rodriguez del Cueto tackles the north-western Spanish evidence.

About the Editors
GARY LOCK is Emeritus Professor of Archaeology, University of Oxford. He gained his first degree in Archaeology at the University of Leicester and then took his PhD based on post-excavation work at Danebury hillfort. His interest in the Iron Age and particularly hillforts and their landscapes resulted in thirty years teaching and researching at Oxford in both the School of Archaeology and the Continuing Education Department. Gary co-directed the Hillforts of the Ridgeway project which involved the excavation and publication of three hillforts: Uffington Castle; Segsbury Camp and Alfred’s Castle. Thereafter research at Marcham/Frilford, a large Iron Age ritual complex and Romano-British temple, necessitated eleven years of fieldwork. Post-excavation work on this community archaeology project is ongoing. Gary has also worked on hillfort projects in the Najera Valley, La Rioja (Spain) and the Sangro Valley (Italy). In recent years Gary has excavated a hillfort in North Wales, Moel-y-Gaer, Bodfari, which is currently being written up. He is a longstanding member of the Hillfort Study Group and was co-PI of the Atlas of Hillforts of Britain and Ireland project. Gary’s other major interest is the use of computers in archaeology, especially GIS on which he has published extensively. He has recently retired as Chair of the Computer Applications in Archaeology international conference.

IAN RALSTON’s doctorate was on the Iron Age enclosed sites of Limousin, France, following on from undergraduate studies in Stuart Piggott’s department at Edinburgh. For eleven years he was on the staff of the University of Aberdeen before transferring to Edinburgh in 1985, where he was appointed to a personal chair there in 1998 and as Abercromby Professor of Archaeology in 2012. Over his career he has primarily worked on various aspects of the prehistoric and early historic archaeology of eastern Scotland, including excavations at two promontory
Hadrian’s Wall: A study in archaeological exploration and interpretation by David J. Breeze. Paperback; 175x245mm; vi+190 pages; 125 figures, 4 tables (79 plates in colour). 543 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691672. £19.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691689. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £19.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The lectures on which this publication is based were delivered as the Rhind Lectures to the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland in May 2019. The annual Rhind Lectures commemorate Alexander Henry Rhind (1833-1863), a Fellow of the Society renowned for his excavations (finds from which are now in the National Museum of Scotland) and publications. The 2019 lectures were generously sponsored by AOC Archaeology Group.

The first two lectures – chapters in this book – provide the historiographical background to our present understanding of Hadrian’s Wall. They start with John Collingwood Bruce, the leading authority on the Wall, from 1848 until his death in 1892, who gave the Rhind lectures in 1883 and whose influence continues to this day. Research on the Wall in the field and in the study from 1892 to the present day are covered in the second lecture. The third and fourth lectures consider the purpose(s) and operation of Hadrian’s Wall from the first plan drawn up soon after Hadrian became emperor in 117 through to the final days of its existence as a frontier shortly after 400. Five distinct ‘plans’ for the Wall are promulgated. The fifth lecture examines the impact of the frontier on the people living in its shadow and beyond. The last lecture reviews the processes which have brought us to an understanding of Hadrian’s Wall and considers the value of research strategies, with some suggestions for the way forward. The chapters in this book reflect closely the lectures themselves with the main change being the addition of references.

About the Author
DAVID J. BREEZE has been a trustee of the Senhouse Museum Trust since its inception in 1985 and chair of the trust since 2013. He has served as President of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society and as Chairman of the International Congress of Roman Frontier. He was Chief Inspector of Ancient Monuments for Scotland from 1989 to 2005, and subsequently led the team which successfully nominated the Antonine Wall as a World Heritage Site in 2008. David has excavated on both Hadrian’s Wall and the Antonine Wall and written several books on these frontiers, on frontiers elsewhere in the Roman Empire and on the Roman army.
La defensa de la ciudad de Valencia 1936-1939 Una arqueología de la Guerra Civil Española by José Peinado Cucarella. Paperback; 203x276mm; 236 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (51 colour pages). Spanish text. 87 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692020. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692037. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This publication presents the defense of the city of Valencia during the years 1936-1939 under two premises; whether Valencia was strategically bombed and which were the targets. The second premise is whether the city was efficiently organized to protect its civilians.

The methodological proposal is based on the use of the classical parameters of the archaeological intervention, with the possibility of elaborating catalogs of goods, thematic, temporary, etc. Those derived in tools for urban planning, archaeological charts, and other documents.

It also carries out a comparative analysis of the current legislative framework at national and regional level (Murcia, Valencia and Catalonia). A classification is made of the elements that make up the different heritages and their main characteristics.

It Analyzes the documentation from 1936 to 1939 collected in the different archives: the Municipal of Valencia, the Diputación, the Historical Military of Ávila, the Intermediate Military of Valencia, the Military Library "Center of Cultures", the Hemeroteca Municipal and The Library of the City of Valencia.

All this is done through extensive prospecting and GPS, with planimetric surveys of the localized remains and the digitalization of the entire planimetry of the time. A planimetric map of all shelters in the city is elaborated and the village of Puig. Moreover, a glossary of military terminology is added with the purpose of helping the reader, in addition to a daily list of the bombings that the city suffered during the years 1937 to 1939.

Esta publicación nos muestra la defensa de la ciudad de Valencia durante los años de 1936-1939 bajo dos premisas; una que es saber cuales fueron los más sensibles y bombardeados y si responden a la idea de un bombardeo estratégico. La segunda premisa es si la ciudad dispuso de una organización eficiente para proteger a su población civil. La propuesta metodológica se basa en la utilización de los parámetros clásicos de la intervención arqueológica, con la posibilidad de elaborar catálogos de bienes, temáticos, temporales, etc... que puedan derivar en herramientas para el planeamiento urbanístico, en cartas arqueológicas, y demás documentos.

En ella también se realiza una análisis comparativo del marco legislativo actual tanto a nivel nacional como autonómico (Murcia, Valencia y Cataluña). Se realiza una clasificación de los elementos que conforman los distintos patrimonios y sus principales características con el fin de disponer de una base teórica donde situar los restos arqueológicos y documentales localizados, distinguiendo su naturaleza en activa (militar) centros de Resistencias, Defensa de Costa y aeródromos, y por otra la pasiva (civil) como los refugios.

Se han analizado la documentación referente a 1936 a 1939, recogida en los diferentes archivos, el Municipal de Valencia, el de la Diputación, el Histórico Militar de Ávila, el Militar Intermedio de Valencia, La Biblioteca Militar ‘Centro de Culturas’, la Hemeroteca Municipal y La Biblioteca Valenciana.

Todo ello se realiza mediante la prospección extensiva y mediante GPS, con levantamientos planimétricos de los restos localizados y la digitalización de toda la planimetría de la época. Se establece como unidad gestora de la documentación el GvSIG, un software libre, que permite combinar datos geográficos, bases de datos con datos vectoriales y raster. Y se elabora una cartoteca planimétrica de todos los refugios conocidos en la ciudad de Valencia, y de los elementos más esenciales de la defensa activa del municipio del Puig. Así como un glosario de terminología militar con el objeto que ayude al lector y un listado diario de los bombardeos que sufrió la ciudad durante los años 1937 a 1939.

About the Author
JOSÉ PEINADO is a PHD in archaeology in the University of Valencia and with a degree in History and an extensive experience i
Egil’s Saga: Traditional evidence for Brúnanburh compared to Literary, Historic and Archaeological Analyses by John R. Kirby. Paperback; 203x276mm; 58 pages; 12 figures (9 in colour). (Print RRP £22.00). 74 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691092. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691108. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Regarded as the secondary source advocated by some scholars for this battle around Brúnanburh in AD 937, Egil’s Saga Skalla-Grímssonar (collated c. AD 1242-3) becomes problematical when compared with literary, historic and archaeological evidence. Thus, this argument places the saga in a rather awkward position.

In addressing the general veracity of this saga, allegedly ‘written’ by Snorri Sturluson in 1240/1 we must draw a comparison to distinguish reality from fiction. For this article highlights not only the questionable traditions of Egil fighting at Brúnanburh but whether Snorri’s interpretation was motivated by self-interest. More importantly, could other people have gathered together Snorri’s notes and produced Egil’s Saga? Doubts arise as to its authenticity as many scholars have previously expressed the differing literary anomalies within the narrative. Was the saga written by more than one person? Was it embellished by Snorri or others? Where did the Brúnanburh traditions come from? Is it accurate enough to be used as a historic source – a factual reference? The author suggests this approach may identify the incongruities within this saga demonstrating a correct analysis.
Identifying Brúnanburh: ón dyngesmere – the sea of noise by John R. Kirby. Paperback; 203x276mm; 44 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (13 colour plates). 73 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691078. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691085. Download Full PDF   Buy Now

Scholars each have their own rationale as to the ‘site’ of this momentous battle. Their thirst for recognition has created diverse arguments, some flooding the media, others proposing to the point of acrimony that they have this ‘site’. The ‘conundrum’ is whether any identification of the ‘site’ is correct for all, apart from the circumspect, have taken assorted place-names similar to Brúnanburh as their starting point.

The author chose to disregard the place-name approach and look at the topographic references in the manuscript. The first references were maritime then latterly landscape leading to field-names which have a more stable base than the constantly changing place-names. He found inconsistences in various positions held by some scholars to that of historical record about Brúnanburh.

One major stumbling block was the phrase “ón dingesmere” which has created controversy, some scholars totally dismissing it but the ‘sea of noise’ appears to have some scientific foundation. Obviously it had some special significance to the Anglo-Saxon’s and their Christian allies and may well have been a kenning. Importantly, ‘who were these allies?’

The challenge for the author was to unearth the correct locale of these historic events. As an archaeologist he decided to interpret the topographic phrases in the manuscript evidence as material culture. The results were surprising.
Roman Amphorae in Neuss: Augustan to Julio-Claudian Contexts by Horacio González Cesteros and Piero Berni Millet. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+136 pages; 7 tables, 49 figures (5 plates in colour). 482 2018 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 12. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690521. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690538. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The occupation of the territories on both sides of the Rhine was an enormous logistical challenge for the Roman military administration. In the last two decades of the first century BC, several territories were conquered or partially occupied by the Roman legions, establishing a large number of military camps around the Rhine and its important eastern tributaries. Most of these camps were occupied for short periods, depending on the march of the legions and the course of military events. In a location with good natural defences and communications with the Belgian hinterland, Neuss was one of the earliest points on the Rhine where the Roman military was positioned. The area was occupied—with some intervals—from 16 BC onwards by different legions as well as smaller units.

This book provides an in-depth study of one of the most important archaeological artefacts for understanding the military supply along the German frontier: the amphorae. Deliveries arrived at the different military camps established in the intersection between Erf and Rhine from 16 BC until the Claudian principate. The study of this material is essential not only for understanding Neuss, but for further understanding of the whole Rhine and the logistics of the Roman army and its supply from very distant areas.

About the Authors
Horacio González Cesteros has a doctorate from the University of Tarragona and the Catalan Archaeological Institute. He is part of the research staff of the Austrian Archaeological Institute. His research areas are commercial and agrarian economy and social studies of the late Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods. He has published several articles and edited books mainly focussing on amphora studies. He has been part of and has directed several projects in Spain, Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, Croatia, Greece and Turkey, collaborating with many different research institutions.

Piero Berni Milet has a doctorate from the University of Barcelona. He is linked to the research unit of the LabEx Archimède of the University of Montpellier. His research areas are social and economic studies in classical antiquity using the so-called Instrumentum Domesticum Inscriptum as the preferred tool. He has published many articles and books mainly focussing on aspects of the ownership systems and land exploitation patterns; production and consumption of food; economic interdependence between producer territories and consumer markets; and social promotion of individuals and families by trading within the Roman social structure. He has worked in many different projects in Spain, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Croatia, as part of different teams and collaborating with different research institutions.

Reviews
'…they briefly tackle a very important issue: the logistics of Roman territories on the Rhine and the contribution of Neuss material to the economic and social development of the northwestern provinces of the Roman empire.'—Kostas Filis, American Journal of Archaeology, September 2020
The Function of the Roman Army in Southern Arabia Petraea by Mariana Castro. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+216 pages; 34 figures + illustrated site catalogue (48 plates in colour). 477 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 48. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919528. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919535. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Over the last decades, discussions about the functions of the Roman army in frontier areas have contributed to a complex understanding of the military and its interactions with local geographies and peoples throughout the Empire. Nevertheless, in the region of Arabia, there is still little consensus about the purpose of the Roman military presence, its fluctuating functions, or the role of hundreds of fortified buildings scattered across the landscape. So far, these questions have remained unanswered due to a lack of excavation data and the scarcity of ancient accounts directly involving the military in Arabia Petraea. This study aims to provide a fresh perspective on these issues by employing a landscape approach, paralleling it with the ancient sources which describe the roles of the Roman military in the East. Using a variety of digital resources to contextually map and model the ancient system of fortifications, settlements, and trade routes, we can now better understand the evolving and diverse functions of the Roman army in Arabia from the creation of the province to the end of the Byzantine period.

About the Author
Mariana Castro received a BA in Archaeology and Asian Studies (Honors) from Brigham Young University, where she focused on Classical and Chinese history, languages, and archaeology. During her master’s degree at the University of Oxford—which she attended as an Ertegun Scholar—Mariana enriched her knowledge of the Hellenistic and Roman periods and engaged more directly with the fields of landscape and frontier archaeology, geographical information systems, and site management and protection. Currently she is a PhD candidate at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University. Mariana has participated in numerous archaeological field projects in Europe, the Middle East, and Central Asia, most directly concerning long-distance trade and exchange.
Die Bleifunde der römisch-republikanischen Anlage von Sanisera, Menorca Archäologische und archäometrische Analyse by Regine Müller. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+248 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (54 plates in colour). 462 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 46. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919887. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919894. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume includes the archaeological and archaeometrical analysis of the lead finds from the Roman Republican military fort of Sanisera in northern Minorca. The fort was built after the Roman conquest of the island in 123 BC and abandoned during the last third of the 1st century BC. By correlating typological-archaeological and scientific methods, the site’s unusual large number of lead objects/artefacts are examined within their find context and reviewed for superregional connections to contemporary sites within the Mediterranean. Furthermore, based upon the results of the find analyses as well as the examination of written sources, the site’s embedding within the historical context of the development of the late Roman Republic and early Imperial times is presented, especially in respect to the conquest of the Mediterranean and the consolidation of the Roman authority there.

Die vorliegende Arbeit umfasst die archäologische und archäometrische Analyse der Bleifunde der römisch-republikanischen Militäranlage von Sanisera im Norden Menorcas. Die Anlage entstand nach 123 v. Chr. in Folge der Eroberungen der Baleareninseln und wurde spätestens im letzten Drittel des 1. Jh. v. Chr. aufgegeben. Anhand der Korrelation typologisch-archäologischer und naturwissenschaftlicher Methoden wird hier die ungewöhnlich hohe Anzahl von Bleifunden aus der Anlage innerhalb ihres Fundkontextes analysiert und auf überregionale Verbindungen zu kontemporären Fundorten im Mittelmeerraum überprüft. Darüber hinaus erfolgt - basierend auf den Ergebnissen der Fundanalyse sowie der Auswertung von Schriftquellen - die Einbindung der Anlage in den historischen Kontext der späten römischen Republik und frühen Kaiserzeit, besonders im Zusammenhang mit der Eroberung des Mittelmeerraums und der Konsolidierung der römischen Vorherrschaft dort.

About the Author
REGINE MÜLLER studied Early- and Prehistorical Archaeology, Medieval History and Philosophy at the Justus-Liebig-University in Giessen. Her Magister thesis encompassed the archaeological analyses of the early medieval graveyard of Sindelsdorf, district of Weilheim-Schongau. The author participated at the excavations of the Roman military fort in Sanisera, Menorca for several years. Resulting from this, the study of the site’s lead objects within the frame of a PhD thesis at the Goethe-University in Frankfurt was undertaken. She still researches isotope analyses of lead slingshots and has been working for several years now as an archaeologist in Germany.

REGINE MÜLLER hat an der Justus-Liebig-Universität in Gießen Vor- und Frühgeschichte, Mittlere Geschichte und Philosophie studiert. Ihre Magisterarbeit behandelte die archäologische Analyse des frühmittelalterlichen Gräberfeldes von Sindelsdorf, Kr. Weilheim-Schongau. Aus der mehrjährigen Grabungstätigkeit in der römischen Militäranlage von Sanisera im Norden Menorcas ging die vorliegende Untersuchung zu deren Bleifunden im Rahmen einer Dissertation an der Goethe-Universität-Frankfurt hervor. Die Studien zur Bleiisotopenanalyse, vornehmlich von Schleuderbleien, setzte sie auch im Anschluss an die Dissertation weiter fort. Seit mehreren Jahren ist sie in Deutschland als Archäologin tätig.