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NEW: The Romano-British Villa and Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Eccles, Kent A Summary of the Excavations by Alex Detsicas with a Consideration of the Archaeological, Historical and Linguistic Context by Nick Stoodley and Stephen R Cosh with contributions by Jillian Hawkins and Courtnay Konshuh. Paperback; 205x290mm; 276 pages; 132 figures, 22 tables (colour throughout). 790 . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695878. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695885. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Romano-British Villa and Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Eccles, Kent presents a study of the central and lower Medway valley during the 1st millennium AD. It takes as its focus the Eccles Roman villa and Anglo-Saxon cemetery, excavated between 1962–1976 and directed by Alec Detsicas. An account of this important villa throughout its long history is outlined, and a re-assessment of the architectural evidence which Detsicas presented, with fresh interpretations, is provided. In the middle of the 7th century, a large Anglo-Saxon cemetery was established south of the villa. It started as a typical ‘Final Phase’ cemetery but continued into the late Saxon period. The evidence from the cemetery is presented as a site report, with a burial catalogue, a discussion of the grave goods and a study of the wider aspects of mortuary practice. The monograph also includes a chapter on some fragmentary Iron Age evidence and a discussion of an Anglo-Saxon timber building and its relationship to the cemetery. The evidence from the villa and Anglo-Saxon cemetery is discussed within the context of the Medway valley, which highlights the important contribution that Eccles makes to archaeological knowledge. The significance of the area is further investigated by studies devoted to the pre-English place-names of the valley and the documentary evidence of the area during the Anglo-Saxon period. The volume concludes with a general discussion, which draws together all the strands of evidence and evaluates the significance of the Medway valley during the 1st millennium AD.

About the Authors
Nick Stoodley was awarded his PhD from the University of Reading and is currently an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Winchester. His research interests concern the archaeology of early Anglo-Saxon England, with a particular interest in the region of Wessex. He has published monographs on Anglo-Saxon cemeteries and contributed papers on aspects of the period’s mortuary ritual to edited volumes. He is the lead archaeologist for the community-based Meon Valley Archaeology and Heritage Group, which is currently investigating settlement patterns in this Hampshire valley. ;

Stephen R. Cosh is an archaeological writer and illustrator specialising on the Roman period. He is the co-author of the four-volume corpus of Romano-British mosaics and has written numerous articles and specialist reports. He was awarded the degree of D Litt from the University of Reading in 2006.

Jillian Hawkins was awarded her PhD from the University of Winchester and is a place-name specialist.

Courtnay Konshuh is a lecturer at the University of Calgary and was awarded her PhD from the University of Winchester.
NEW (REPRINT AND OPEN ACCESS): The Roman Cemetery at Lankhills Pre-Roman and Roman Winchester. Part II by Giles Clarke. Hardback; 215x276 pages; 614pp. 777 2021 Winchester Studies 3. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270081. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270098. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Winchester Studies 3.ii: Outside the north gate of Venta Belgarum, Roman Winchester, a great cemetery stretched for 500 yards along the road to Cirencester. Excavations at Lankhills from 1967 to 1972 uncovered 451 graves, many elaborately furnished, at the northern limits of this cemetery, and dating from the fourth century A.D. This book, the second in a two-part study of Venta Belgarum, which forms the third volume of Winchester Studies, describes the excavations of these burials and analyses in detail both the graves and their contents. There are detailed studies and important re-assessments of many categories of object, but it is the information about late Roman burial, religion, and society which is of special interest.

This is a reprint of the volume originally published in 1979 (Oxford, ISBN 9780198131779). The reprint is based on scans of the original publication, with minor changes to present folding or pull-out sections on standard folio pages. A brief introduction to the reprint is provided by the author, Giles Clarke.

Reviews of the 1979 edition:
This meticulous and detailed work is of major importance for the study of Roman burial practices and their relevance for our knowledge of Roman religion. No such comprehensive study has appeared elsewhere … a model of what such a work should be.Prof. J.C. Mann, British Book News (1980) ;

The excavation and report on the Lankhills cemetery is something of a landmark. It is a lesson to Roman archaeologists about what they have been missing through neglect of their cemetery sites, and also a lesson to every-one engaged in cemetery site studies, whatever their period, in how to analyse and present their evidence to maximum advantage. This model publication will be an indispensable work of reference for many years to come.Dr Sonia Hawkes, Times Literary Supplement (1980) ;

… auch ein Musterbeispiel für die gesamte spätantike provinzialrömische Archäologie.’ [‘… also a model example for the whole of provincial Roman archaeology in the late Roman period.Prof. Jochen Garbsch, Bayerische Vorgeschichtsblätter (1981)

FORTHCOMING: Architectures néolithiques de l’île d’Yeu (Vendée) edited by Audrey Blanchard, Serge Cassen and Jean-Noël Guyodo. Paperback; 205x290mm; 294pp; 196 figures, 29 tables (colour throughout). Print RRP: £52.00. 798 2021. ISBN 9781789695793. Book contents pageBuy Now

Architectures néolithiques de l’île d’Yeu (Vendée) gathers documentation, unpublished material and the principal results of studies, prospections, excavations and surveys carried out on domestic settlements, funeral monuments, quarries and symbolic sites. Situated off the Atlantic coast of the Vendée (France), the Isle of Yeu has been occupied since Prehistory. Domestic, industrial, funerary or symbolic sites dating from the Neolithic are numerous. Their state of conservation is exceptional, with much of the stone-built architecture preserved above ground. This is notably so for the walled enclosures of the fourth millennium BC, which have been the subject of several research programs since 2010.

The initial chapters propose an inventory of the mineral resources as well as the main forms of exploitation, supply strategies and uses of stones. The main part of the volume is dedicated to the excavation of the two principal walled enclosures dating from the late Neolithic, the Pointe de la Tranche and Ker Daniaud. The emphasis is on the architecture of these promontory forts that directly open to the Ocean but whose occupation seems not to have been permanent. Finally, the surveys (plan, photogrammetry, microtopography) and the digital modelling of the megalithic burials of the Tabernaudes, the Plauche a Puare and the Petits Fradets allow a three-dimensional reconstruction of Neolithic funerary architectures. For the rocks marked by cupules, the current concentration of which is one of the most important (more than 120 sites), a first analysis of the corpus of signs is proposed, although their dating remains uncertain.

This contribution allows us to open a window on the material and imaginary worlds of one population from the end of Prehistory, through the analysis of their testimonies and expressions, physical and symbolic, revealing a people settled - and not trapped - in a restricted territory beaten by the winds and surrounded by the waves. Audrey Blanchard obtained her doctorate from the University of Rennes 1, and is an associate member of UMR 6566, CReAAH (LARA laboratory). A specialist in lithic and ceramic production, her research focuses mainly on coastal and island settlements and Neolithic domestic architecture ;

Serge Cassen obtained his doctorate in Anthropology, Ethnology and Prehistory in 1986 from the University of Paris-Sorbonne under the supervision of G. Bailloud, his thesis focusing on Neolithic societies of the 4th millennium BC between Loire and Gironde. Upon joining the CNRS in 1991, he devoted himself to the study of the funerary and other megalithic monuments of western France, in particular through their ancient engravings and through their social valorisation. ;

Jean-Noël Guyodo is Lecturer in Prehistory at the University of Nantes and director of the LARA laboratory (UMR6566 CReAAH). A specialist in lithic technology and stone architecture, he has directed numerous excavations on Neolithic settlement sites in western France. His research focuses more broadly on the first agro-pastoral societies on the Atlantic coast of Europe.

en français
Au large des côtes atlantiques vendéennes (France), l’île d’Yeu est un territoire occupé depuis la Préhistoire. Les sites à vocations domestiques, artisanales, funéraires ou encore symboliques datés du Néolithique sont nombreux. Leur état de conservation est exceptionnel car les architectures bâties en pierre sont préservées en élévation pour beaucoup d’entre eux. C’est le cas, par exemple, sur les habitats du IVème millénaire avant J.-C., qui ont fait l’objet de plusieurs programmes de recherche depuis 2010.

Cet ouvrage regroupe la documentation, les informations inédites et les principaux résultats des études, prospections, fouilles et relevés réalisés sur les habitats, les monuments funéraires, les carrières et les sites symboliques. Les premiers travaux t
FORTHCOMING (OPEN ACCESS): The People of Early Winchester by Caroline M. Stuckert. Hardback; 215x276mm; 528pp; extensively illustrated with photographs, line drawings, maps, and charts. Print RRP: £80.00 (eBook to be Open Access). 782 2021 Winchester Studies 9. ISBN 9781803270142. Buy Now

Winchester Studies 9.i: The People of Early Winchester traces the lives, health, and diseases of Winchester's inhabitants as seen in their skeletal remains from the mid-third century to the mid-sixteenth century, a period of over 1,300 years. Although the populations of other British urban areas, York and London in particular, have been studied over an extended period, this volume is unique in providing a continuous chronological window, rather than a series of isolated studies. It is particularly notable for the large sample of Anglo-Saxon burials dated to the 8th - 10th centuries, which provide a bridge between the earlier Romano-British material and the later medieval samples.

This study includes information on demography, physical characteristics, dental health, disease, and trauma collected from over 2,000 skeletons excavated from the Roman Cemetery at Lankhills and the Anglo-Saxon and medieval cemeteries of the Old and New Minster and Winchester Cathedral, as well as other Early Anglo-Saxon sites in neighbouring areas of Hampshire. The study establishes the underlying continuity of the population in spite of massive culture change between the Roman and Early Saxon periods, and delineates the increasing tendency to rounder skulls seen in the medieval period, a trend which is found in continental Europe at the same time. There were also significant differences through time in disease patterns and trauma. Leprosy, for example, is found only in post-Roman skeletons, while decapitations are seen only in Roman skeletons. Weapons injuries are confined to Anglo-Saxon and medieval individuals, although broken bones were common during the Roman period.

This is a new edition of the volume originally published in 2017 (Oxford, ISBN 9780198131700). The new edition will appear online first, with a printed edition to follow in the future.

About the Author:
Caroline M. Stuckert (Connie) holds a B. A. in history from Bryn Mawr College, and an M. A. in physical anthropology and Ph. D. in archaeology and physical anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania. She has taught at Muhlenberg College and the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests centre on the British Isles from the Iron Age through medieval periods, and she has conducted research and participated in excavations in both England and Ireland. In addition, she has enjoyed a 25-year career as a consultant and senior museum executive. A native Philadelphian, Connie has spent extended periods in Britain, and currently lives in the Philadelphia suburbs.

Reviews of the 2017 edition:
Just one of an incredibly comprehensive series examining the history of Winchester, this book uncovers the story of the city's occupants from AD 250 to 1540, as told by their skeletal remains.Emma Watts-Plumpkin, Current Archaeology ;

This volume is a valuable contribution to long-term population history. The production and illustration standards are high, and Caroline Stuckert should be congratulated for finally bringing all of this important research to publication ...Sam Lucy, Antiquity

Table of Contents:
List of illustrations ;
List of tables ;
List of abbreviations ;
List of references ;

Part 1 IntroductionMartin Biddle and Birthe Kjølbye-Biddle ;
1:Introduction ;
2:Concept ;
3:The origin, growth, and completion of this study ;
4:The outcome: a summary ;

Part 2 Romano-British Populations from Lankhills and other cemeteries in WinchesterCaroline M. Stuckert ;
1:Introduction ;
2:Demography ;
3:Physical characteristics ;
4:Dentition ;
5:Pathology ;
La necropoli romana di Melano (Canton Ticino – Svizzera) by Christiane M. A. De Micheli Schulthess. Paperback; 203x276mm; 118 pages; 20 colour figures, 6 black & white figures, 12 black & white plates. Italian text. 140 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699784. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699791. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Roman necropolis of Melano (Canton Ticino, Switzerland), excavated in 1957 and 1979, is one of the few from this period discovered in the Sottoceneri region, where the findings are mostly isolated burials or those in small groups. It consists of 26 cremation and inhumation tombs and stands out for its variety of types and the materials used in their construction. Cremation burials, the most numerous, range from the simplest, single-chamber burials, up to double-chamber and multiple cinerary niches. Inhumation tombs, generally belonging to children or adolescents, have yielded clues as to the use of wooden boxes as coffins or the placement of the body on a cot or stretcher. The grave goods include all the main material classes of the Roman period typical of the region, together with finds that bear the imprint of a centre that developed along the shores of Lake Ceresio and activities related to it, such as fishing. The stratigraphy of the necropolis and the grave goods indicate continuous use from the 1st to the 3rd century AD.

About the Author
Christiane M. A. De Micheli Schulthess graduated in 1990 from the University of Zurich, majoring in Classical Archaeology, Egyptology and Ancient History. In 2001, she completed her PhD thesis, ‘Aspects of Roman Pottery in Canton Ticino (Switzerland)’, at the University of Nottingham (UK). She has pursued various studies in Classical and medieval archaeology, focusing in particular on Roman pottery and since 2000 has taken part in the excavation of the multi-period site of Tremona-Castello.

in italiano
La necropoli romana di Melano (Canton Ticino – Svizzera), scavata nel 1957 e nel 1979, costituisce a tutt’oggi una delle poche di quest’epoca scoperte nel Sottoceneri dove i rinvenimenti sono invece perlopiù sepolture isolate o riunite in piccoli gruppi. È costituita da 26 tombe fra cremazioni e inumazioni e si distingue per la loro varietà a livello tipologico e per i materiali impiegati nella loro costruzione. Fra le sepolture a cremazione, le più numerose, vi sono quelle più semplici, a vano singolo, fino a quelle a doppia camera e a loculo cinerario multiplo. Le tombe a inumazione, generalmente pertinenti a bambini o adolescenti, hanno restituito indizi riguardo all’uso di deporre il corpo in cassa lignea o su un lettino o barella. Nei corredi funerari sono presenti tutte le principali classi materiali d’epoca romana tipiche della regione unitamente a reperti che recano l’impronta di un centro sviluppatosi lungo le rive del lago Ceresio e dedito a particolari attività ad esso collegate, come la pesca. La stratigrafia verticale della necropoli e gli oggetti di corredo ne indicano un uso continuato dal I al III sec. d.C.

Christiane M. A. De Micheli Schulthess si è laureata nel 1990 all’Università di Zurigo, specializzandosi in Archeologia classica, Egittologia e Storia antica. Nel 2001 ha completato la sua tesi di dottorato Aspetti della ceramica romana nel Canton Ticino (Svizzera) presso l’Università di Nottingham (GB). Ha svolto diversi studi di archeologia classica, in particolare sulla ceramica romana, e medievale. Dal 2000 partecipa agli scavi archeologici del sito multiperiodico di Tremona-Castello.
Die Gräber von Bat und Al-Ayn und das Gebäude II in Bat by Stephanie Döpper. DOI: 10.32028/9781789699494. Hardback; 210x297mm; 394pp; 357 figures, 256 tables, 21 plates (colour throughout). Print RRP: £80.00. 741 2021 Arabia Orientalis: Studien zur Archäologie Ostarabiens 2. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699494. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699500. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Early Bronze Age in third-millennium-BC Eastern Arabia was a period of fundamental change, which is apparent in the development of social complexity, the exploitation of new resources and the emergence of new modes of life. Hallmarks of this period include monumental structures, so-called towers, and stone-built circular tombs.

The second volume of the series Arabia Orientalis is dedicated to the archaeological investigation of the Early Bronze Age necropolises of the UNESCO world heritage sites Bat and Al-Ayn in the Sultanate of Oman, as well as the monumental tower structure Building II at Bat. It encompasses detailed reports on the architecture and stratigraphy, as well as the find assemblages from the excavated buildings, including pottery and small finds, along with anthropological as well as anthracological studies. The publication presents insights into changing burial customs, as well as the function of the monumental tower structures. Three out of the four excavated Hafit- and Umm an-Nar-period tombs in the necropolises featured evidence for reuse at later times, especially during the Samad period, where new inhumations were placed into the Bronze Age tombs. The early Umm an-Nar tower Building II is surrounded by a large ditch system that might have served as protection against flooding from the nearby wadi.

About the Author
Stephanie Döpper is a postdoctoral researcher at Goethe University Frankfurt with an interest in mobile and sedentary communities of the Bronze Age in Eastern Arabia, as well as the reuse of prehistoric tombs and early modern mud-brick villages in the region. To facilitate public engagement with archaeological sites, she co-developed the ArchaeoTrail app for self-guided smartphone tours at archaeological sites.

German Description
Die frühe Bronzezeit im dritten Jahrtausend v. Chr. in Südostarabien ist eine Zeit grundlegender Veränderungen, die sich in der Entwicklung sozialer Komplexität, der Ausbeutung neuer Ressourcen und dem Aufkommen neuer Lebensformen zeigt. Kennzeichen dieser Epoche sind monumentale Bauwerke, sogenannte Türme, und aus Stein gebaute runde Gräber.

Der zweite Band der Reihe Arabia Orientalis widmet sich der archäologischen Untersuchung der frühbronzezeitlichen Nekropolen der UNESCO-Welterbestätten Bat und Al-Ayn im Sultanat Oman sowie dem monumentalen Turm Gebäude II in Bat. Er umfasst ausführliche Abhandlungen zur Architektur und Stratigraphie sowie zu den Fundeassemblagen aus den ausgegrabenen Bauwerken, darunter Keramik-, Kleinfunde-, anthropologische sowie anthrakologische Untersuchungen. Die Publikation präsentiert Einblicke in sich verändernde Bestattungssitten und die Funktion des monumentalen Turms. Drei der vier ausgegrabenen Hafit- und Umm an-Nar-zeitlichen Gräber in den Nekropolen belegen spätere Nachnutzungen, vor allem in der Samad-Zeit, in der neue Bestattungen in die bronzezeitlichen Gräber eingebracht wurden. Das Gebäude II aus der frühen Umm an-Nar-Zeit ist von einer großen Grabenanlage umgeben, die möglicherweise als Schutz vor Überschwemmungen des nahen Wadis diente.

Stephanie Döpper ist wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt und beschäftigt sich mit mobilen und sesshaften Gesellschaften der Bronzezeit in Südostarabien sowie der Nachnutzung prähistorischer Gräber und frühneuzeitlicher Lehmziegeldörfer in dieser Region. Um der Öffentlichkeit den Zugang zu archäologischen Stätten zu erleichtern, hat sie die ArchaeoTrail-App für selbstgeführte Smartphone-Touren an archäologischen Stätten mitentwickelt.
A Monumental Hellenistic Funerary Ensemble at Callatis on the Western Black Sea The Documaci Tumulus: Volume I edited by Valeriu Sîrbu, Maria-Magdalena Ștefan and Dan Ștefan. Paperback; 205x290mm; 342 pages; 191 figures, 20 tables. 757 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694369. £52.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694376. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

A Monumental Hellenistic Funerary Ensemble at Callatis on the Western Black Sea presents one of the most spectacular early Hellenistic funerary monuments, recently excavated on the western Black Sea coast by a Romanian-Bulgarian-Polish interdisciplinary research team. Documaci Tumulus, covering a painted tomb, and marked by a monumental statue, was built at the threshold of the 4th to 3rd centuries BC in the cemetery of the Greek City of Callatis. The sophisticated construction techniques and the remains of commemorative rituals attest to the dynamic political arena of the Diadochi wars in the Black Sea area and offer a glimpse into a complex and interconnected world of Hellenistic architects and artists. The monument will fuel discussions about the mechanisms of ritualised identity expression in mixed cultural environments, functioning under the pressure of political change, or about community membership, symbolic discourse and ancestors— all reflected in ‘le jeu des miroirs’ of the funerary practices.



About the editors
Valeriu Sîrbu is a senior archaeologist of the second Iron Age with more than forty years of experience. His main contributions are in the archaeology of ritual, magic, human and animal sacrifices, and sacred places and fortifications in Pre-Roman Dacia. ;

Maria-Magdalena Ștefan is an archaeologist dealing with tumuli graves in the Lower Danube area, Hellenistic tomb architecture and decoration, multi-cultural interactions in border zones and ancient identities. ;

Dan Ștefan is an archaeologist and geophysicist and an experienced analyst of archaeological landscapes with non-invasive methods, including LiDAR and aerial prospection. He has worked at more than one hundred archaeological sites in Romania, the Republic of Moldavia, Bulgaria and Greece.
Les pratiques funéraires en Gaule lyonnaise de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle by András Márton. Paperback; 205x290mm; 482 pages; 299 figures; 379 maps (black & white throughout). French text. 752 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 81. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698077. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698084. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Les pratiques funéraires en Gaule lyonnaise de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle aims to provide an overview of Roman burial practices in the Gallia Lugdunensis province during the Early Roman Empire.

Among the different approaches proposed by R. Reece for the study of Roman cemeteries, this work focuses on grave treatment and grave furnishing. The funerary practices are thus apprehended through the study of the structure of the tombs and the selection and treatment of the grave goods and human remains. The main objective was to propose a synthesis of the published finds which could serve as a basis for future research.

The analysis consists of a documentary review of the published data (presented in the catalogue and numerous tables) as complete as possible, accompanied by a detailed analysis of the latest information available to highlight trends regarding the entire province, and the peculiarities seen at a regional level. Many graphics and maps support this analysis.

Many general trends, common to the western provinces of the Roman Empire, were detected, but also many particularities linked to the regional nature of the funerary practices and the economic and social situation of the communities. Some of these particularities reflect more profound cultural differences due to the unequal penetration of Mediterranean funerary practices into the territory of the province. They reflect the somewhat 'artificial' formation of the Gallia Lugdunensis, which incorporated tribes belonging to different cultural spheres (sharing particularities with Aquitania and the Belgic Gaul or more exposed to the Mediterranean influences).

About the Author
András Márton was born in Budapest. He studied at the Eötvös Lorand University where he obtained two master degrees, one in History and another in Archaeology specializing in Roman provincial and Classical archaeology. After graduation, he worked at the Hungarian National Museum and the Museum of Fine Arts in Budapest. He defended his thesis summa cum laude at the Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest under the direction of Professor Patrick Galliou. He lives in France and is involved in research programs at the Louvre and the Museum of Fine Arts of Lyon. He has published many scientific papers and co-authored several books. His research interests are pottery studies and ancient funerary practices.

En français
Les pratiques funéraires en Gaule lyonnaise de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle, qui est la publication non remaniée d’une partie de la thèse de doctorat de l’auteur soutenue, avec félicitations, à l’Université de Bretagne occidentale (Brest, France) en 2013, vise à donner un aperçu des pratiques funéraires romaines dans la Gaule Lyonnaise au cours du Haut-Empire. Parmi les diffff érentes approches de l’étude des nécropoles romaines, ce travail se concentre sur les tombes et le traitement du mobilier. Les pratiques funéraires sont ainsi appréhendées à travers l’étude de la structure des tombes, de la sélection et du traitement du mobilier funéraire et des restes humains. L’objectif principal est de proposer une synthèse des résultats publiés qui puisse servir de base aux recherches futures. L’analyse consiste en une reprise documentaire (présentée dans le catalogue et les nombreux tableaux) aussi complète que possible des données publiées, accompagnée d’une analyse détaillée des informations aujourd’hui disponibles afifi n de mettre en évidence les tendances concernant l’ensemble de la province, mais aussi les particularités que l’on peut distinguer au niveau régional. L’analyse est soutenue par de nombreux graphiques et cartes. Bien sûr, des tendances générales, communes aux provinces occidentales de l’Empire romain, peuvent être détectées, mais des particularités liées aux spécififi cités régionales et à la situation économique et sociale
Burials and Society in Late Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age Ireland by Cormac McSparron. DOI: 10.32028/9781789696318. Paperback; 205x290mm; 176 pages; 76 figures, 27 tables. 630 2020 Queen's University Belfast Irish Archaeological Monograph Series 1. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696318. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696325. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Burials and Society in Late Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age Ireland describes and analyses the increasing complexity of later Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age burial in Ireland, using burial complexity as a proxy for increasing social complexity, and as a tool for examining social structure. The book commences with a discussion of theoretical approaches to the study of burials in both anthropology and archaeology and continues with a summary of the archaeological and environmental background to the Irish Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age. Then a set of criteria for identifying different types of social organisation is proposed, before an in-depth examination of the radiocarbon chronology of Irish Single Burials, which leads to a multifaceted statistical analysis of the Single Burial Tradition burial utilising descriptive and multivariate statistical approaches. A chronological model of the Irish Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age is then presented which provides the basis for a discussion of increasing burial and social complexity in Ireland over this period, proposing an evolution from an egalitarian society in the later Chalcolithic Period through to a prestige goods chiefdom emerging around 1900 BC. It is suggested that the decline of copper production at Ross Island, Co. Cork after 2000 BC may have led to a ‘copper crisis’ which would have been a profoundly disrupting event, destroying the influence of copper miners and shifting power to copper workers, and those who controlled them. This would have provided a stimulus towards the centralisation of power and the emergence of a ranked social hierarchy. The effects of this ‘copper crisis’ would have been felt in Britain also, where much Ross Island copper was consumed and may have led to similar developments, with the emergence of the Wessex Culture a similar response in Britain to the same stimulus.

Online Appendices: DOI: 10.32028/9781789696318-appendices

About the Author
Cormac McSparron studied Archaeology and Modern History at Queen’s University Belfast, graduating with a BA in 1989. He was awarded an MPhil in 2008 and a PhD in 2018. Since 2002, he has worked at the Centre for Archaeological Fieldwork at Queen’s and has directed and published a large number of important excavations in Northern Ireland.

The Queen’s University Belfast Irish Archaeological Monograph series
The Queen’s University Belfast Irish Archaeological Monograph series is designed as a publication venue for excavation reports, proceedings volumes and postgraduate theses relating to all aspects of Irish archaeology from the first settlers of the Mesolithic through to the twentieth century. The volumes encompass a range of approaches from fieldwork through to specialist artefact studies, and the application of scientific techniques to the study of the past. Submissions are welcome that showcase the diversity of archaeological research being undertaken across the island and among the Irish diaspora.

Reviews:
'This book is a rich source of data, with every possible aspect of burials being analysed, supported by extensive distribution maps, tables, and graphs. This means that it makes a significant contribution to our understanding of prehistoric Ireland and will be essential reading for anyone studying that period, but it is not a book for the casual reader.'Dr Duncan Berryman (2021): Ulster Archaeological Society Newsletter
Going Underground: The Meanings of Death and Burial for Minority Groups in Israel by Talia Shay. Paperback; 156x234mm; 106 pages; 16 colour figures, 3 tables. 715 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696196. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696202. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £20.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Going Underground: The Meanings of Death and Burial for Minority Groups in Israel is about the attitudes towards death and burial in contemporary society. It provides information on the attitudes of several minority groups living in Israel today, including four communities of Russian Jews, an ultra-religious Jewish community and a Palestinian-Christian community. ‘Going Underground’ has a double meaning: it refers to the actions taken by archaeologists to inquire about the past and present and involves digging and recording. Second, it considers the challenges and protests launched by the groups of immigrants and minorities mentioned in the book, against state-control over death.

About the Author
Talia Shay has a PhD in archaeology from Tel Aviv University and MA degrees from UCLA and UNAM, Mexico. Her research encompasses both early and contemporary periods. She has published articles on art, urban space, general archaeology, and death and burial in several international journals and has co-edited ‘The Limitation of Archaeological Knowledge’. During her academic career, her primary affiliation was with the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology.
Doors, Entrances and Beyond... Various Aspects of Entrances and Doors of the Tombs in the Memphite Necropoleis during the Old Kingdom by Leo Roeten. Paperback; 205x290mm; 202 pages; 169 figures, 11 tables (black & white throughout). 714 2021 Archaeopress Egyptology 33. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698718. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698725. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Doors are more than a physical means to close off an entrance or an exit; doors can also indicate that a boundary between two worlds has been crossed. This is above all the case for the door into the chapel. Such a door constitutes a barrier between the world of the living and the world where the living and the dead can coexist, while, inside the chapel, the false door acts as a barrier between the world of the living and that of the dead. Taking into account both physical and non-physical aspects of the door, Doors, Entrances and Beyond... proposes that porticos, false doors, niches and mastaba chapel entrances are interconnected in their function as a barrier between two worlds, of which the entrance into the chapel is the most important. The different elements of the entrance have a signalling, identifying, inviting and in some cases a warning function, but once inside the entrance itself, the decoration of its corridor walls adds a guiding and an explanatory function to it. The main themes there are the tomb owner standing or seated with or without members of the family, and subsidiary figures. Over the course of time, decreasing tomb dimensions correlate with the decreasing size of the chosen decoration themes. At the same time, both on the walls of the corridor and the false door, a change of decoration themes took place which can be explained through the changing mode of supply of the k3 of the deceased.

About the Author
Leo Roeten obtained a Masters degree in biochemistry and plant physiology at the University of Amsterdam in 1972, which was followed by a career in this field, after which he completed a PhD in Egyptology at the University of Leiden in 2011. From then on he has been active as an independent researcher specializing in the Old Kingdom tombs of the Memphite necropoleis. This research has led to a number of articles and three books: The decoration of the cult chapel walls of the Old Kingdom at Giza (2014), Chronological developments in the Old Kingdom tombs in the necropoleis of Giza, Saqqara and Abusir (2016), and Loaves, beds, plants and Osiris (2018).
Die Bestattungsgruben in Bat by Conrad Schmidt, with contributions by Stefan Giese und Christian Hübner and Steve Zäuner. Hardback; 210x297mm; 374pp; 250 figures; 187 tables (97 pages of colour). German text. 680 2020 Arabia Orientalis: Studien zur Archäologie Ostarabiens 1. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697391. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697858. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Volume 1 of the series Arabia Orientalis presents the first comprehensive study of two Umm an-Nar (2700—2000 BC) burial pits from the UNESCO World Heritage site Bat in the Sultanate of Oman. They were excavated between 2010 and 2012 by the University of Tübingen. Each burial pit represents one of the largest closed finds of the Early Bronze Age in the region. Finds largely include beads and other items of personal adornment, as well as pottery and human bones. Detailed typologies of all objects are the basis for in-depth statistical analyses of the different categories of finds and the reconstruction of burial customs at Bat. Furthermore, imports and imitations from other regions including the Indus Valley, Iran, and Mesopotamia illuminate Bat’s foreign relations and integration into the interregional exchange and communication system. The interpretation of the unearthed human remains conducted by Steve Zauner offer, not only the number of individuals, sex, and age of the deceased, but also insights into lifestyle, diseases, and stress of the people in the past.

German description
Die Umm an-Nar-Zeit (2700–2000 v. Chr.) auf der östlichen Arabischen Halbinsel gilt als Periode tiefgreifender Veränderungen in der ökonomischen und sozialen Organisation der Gesellschaft sowie der Ausbeutung von Ressourcen. Einer der größten und bedeutendsten Fundplätze dieser Zeit im Sultanat Oman ist der seit 1988 auf der Welterbeliste der UNESCO stehende Fundort Bat in der Provinz Al-Dhahirah. Von 2010 bis 2015 führte die Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen ein Projekt zur Erforschung der Entwicklung der beiden Nekropolen von Bat und Al-Ayn sowie der Siedlung von Al-Zebah durch. Im Mittelpunkt der Untersuchungen stand die Frage nach den Gründen und Ursachen des sozioökonomischen Umbruchs im 3. Jahrtausend v. Chr. und wie sich dieser in den Lebensverhältnissen der damaligen Bevölkerung widerspiegelt.

Die vorliegende Publikation stellt den ersten Band der Endberichte des Forschungsprojekts des Instituts für die Kulturen des Alten Orients der Universität Tübingen in Bat, Al-Zebah und Al- Ayn dar. Das Werk beinhaltet die vollständige Auswertung der beiden Umm an-Nar-zeitlichen Bestattungsgruben A-Inst. 0006 und A-Inst. 0025 in Bat einschließlich anthropologischer Analysen und einer geophysikalischen Prospektion in der Nekropole von Bat. Beide Gruben zählen zu den größten jemals im Oman untersuchten geschlossenen Fundkontexten der frühen Bronzezeit. Zur Publikation gehört ein online unter https://tinyurl. com/9781789697391-der-fundekatalog publizierter Katalog, der sämtliche Einzelnachweise zu den Funden aus den beiden Bestattungsgruben enthält.
Human Transgression – Divine Retribution A Study of Religious Transgressions and Punishments in Greek Cultic Regulation and Lydian-Phrygian Propitiatory Inscriptions (‘Confession Inscriptions’) by Aslak Rostad. Paperback; 175x245; 252 pages. 629 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695250. £39.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695267. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £39.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Human Transgression – Divine Retribution analyses pagan concepts of religious transgressions, how they should be regarded and punished, as expressed in Greek cultic regulations from the 5th century BC to the 3rd century AD. Also considered are the so-called propitiatory inscriptions (often referred to as ‘confession inscriptions’) from the 1st to the 3rd century AD Lydia and Phrygia, in light of ‘cultic morality’, an ideal code of behaviour intended to make places, occasions, and worshippers suitable for ritual. This code is on the one hand associated with ‘purity’ (hagneia) and removal of pollution (miasma) caused by deaths, births and sexuality, and on the other with the protection of sacred property. This study seeks to explain the emphasis of divine punishments in the Lydian and Phrygian inscriptions, while rare in most Greek cultic regulations, as part of a continuum within pagan religion rather than as a result of an absolute division between Greek and Oriental religion.

About the Author
Aslak Rostad (born 1972) holds a PhD in Ancient Greek and is Associate Professor of Classics at Norwegian University of Technology and Science (NTNU), Trondheim.
The Maltese Archipelago at the Dawn of History Reassessment of the 1909 and 1959 Excavations at Qlejgħa tal-Baħrija and Other Essays edited by Davide Tanasi and David Cardona. Paperback; 205x290mm; 188 pages; 192 figures, 27 tables (77 pages of colour). 667 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694932. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694949. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Maltese Archipelago at the Dawn of History. Reassessment of the 1909 and 1959 excavations at Qlejgħa tal-Baħrija and other essays is a collection of essays focusing on the reassessment of the multifaceted evidence which emerged by excavations carried out in 1909 and 1959 in the settlement of Bahrija, a key site for the understanding of the later stages of Maltese prehistory before the beginning of the Phoenician colonial period. The two excavations, largely unpublished, produced a large quantity of ceramic, stone and metal artefacts together with skeletal remains. The reappraisal of the material will shed light on critical moments of central Mediterranean prehistory. Main topics such as the Aegean-Sicily-Malta trade network, mass migration movements from the Balkans towards the Central Mediterranean and the colonial dynamics of the Phoenicians operating in the West are addressed in the light of new data and with the support of an array of archaeometric analyses.

About the Editors
Davide Tanasi is an expert of Mediterranean prehistory and archaeology of ancient Sicily and Malta, in which fields is has published several papers and monographic volumes such as: D. Tanasi, N. Vella (eds), Site, artefacts, landscape: prehistoric Borġ in-Nadur, Malta, Monza: Polimetrica 2011; D. Tanasi, N. Vella (eds) The late prehistory of Malta: essays on Borġ in-Nadur and other sites, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2015. ;

David Cardona is Senior Curator of Phoenician, Roman and Medieval sites with the governmental agency Heritage Malta. He is a specialist of Roman and Late Roman archaeology and in this field he is about to publish a comprehensive work on Malta entitled Roman buildings and their architecture in Malta. His research interests include landscape archaeology, archaeology of technology and architecture.

Reviews
'Like every good piece of research, this volume answers questions and raises new ones. It also offers a space to revisit conclusions and voice dissent where needed. The collaborative nature of the work is particularly welcome and it is hoped that this standard will be adopted across all archaeological research on the islands. This is the beginning of a new era for Bronze Age studies on the Maltese Islands.'—Isabelle Vella Gregory, Malta Archaeological Review, 2021, Issue 12
The Archaeological Survey of Sudanese Nubia, 1963-69: The Pharaonic Sites edited by David N. Edwards. Hardback; 205x290mm; 468 pages; 812 figures, 2 tables (16 plates in colour). 652 2020 Sudan Archaeological Research Society Publication 23. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696493. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696509. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Of the Nubian Archaeological Campaigns responding to the construction of the Aswan High Dam, the survey and excavations carried out within Sudanese Nubia represent the most substantial achievement of the larger enterprise. Many components of the larger project of the UNESCO – Sudan Antiquities Service Survey have been published, in addition to the reports of a number of other major projects assigned separate concessions within the region. However, the results of one major element, the Archaeological Survey of Sudanese Nubia (ASSN) between the Second Cataract and the Dal Cataract remain largely unpublished. This volume, focusing on the pharaonic sites, is the first of a series which aims to bring to publication the records of the ASSN. These records represent a major body of data relating to a region largely now lost to flooding. This is also a region of very considerable importance for understanding the archaeology and history of Nubia more generally, not least in relation to the still often poorly understood relationships between Lower Nubia to the north and the surviving areas of Middle and Upper Nubia, to the south.

The ASSN project fieldwork was undertaken over six years between 1963 and 1969, investigating c.130km of the river valley between Gemai, at the south end of the Second Cataract, and Dal.

Reviews
'The Archaeological Survey of Sudanese Nubia, 1963–69: The Pharaonic Sites is a remarkable resource for the archaeology of Sudan, and Africa more broadly. It fills a geographical gap in our knowledge of Nubia during the “Pharaonic” period, which will certainly contribute to current research revisiting datasets produced by previous surveys and excavations.'—Rennan Lemos, African Archaeological Review, Volume 38, 2021
On the Origins of the Cartouche and Encircling Symbolism in Old Kingdom Pyramids by David Ian Lightbody. DOI: 10.32028/9781789696578; Paperback; 203x276mm; 100 pages; 47 figures. 118 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696578. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696585. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

On the Origins of the Cartouche and Encircling Symbolism in Old Kingdom Pyramids is a treatise on the subject of encircling symbolism in pharaonic monumental tomb architecture. The study focuses on the Early Dynastic Period and the Old Kingdom of ancient Egypt; from the first dynasty through the sixth. During that time, encircling symbolism was developed most significantly and became most influential. The cartouche also became the principal symbol of the pharaoh for the first time. This work demonstrates how the development of the cartouche was closely related to the monumental encircling symbolism incorporated into the architectural designs of the Old Kingdom pyramids. By employing a new architectural style, the pyramid, and a new iconographic symbol, the cartouche, the pharaoh sought to elevate his status above that of the members of his powerful court. These iconic new emblems emphasized and protected the pharaoh in life, and were retained in the afterlife. By studying the available evidence, the new and meaningful link between the two artistic media; iconographic and architectural, is catalogued, understood, and traced out through time.

Table of Contents
David Ian Lightbody, PhD., BEng (Hons), is an archaeologist with a special interest in the origins of architectural and scientific principles, most notably in the ancient Egyptian and Greek cultures. In 2016 he founded the Journal of Ancient Egyptian Architecture (JAEA) with co-editor Franck Monnier. He has published several journal articles, a monograph, and most recently, the Great Pyramid Haynes Operations Manual (2,590 B.C. onwards).
Pre and Protohistoric Stone Architectures: Comparisons of the Social and Technical Contexts Associated to Their Building Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 1, Session XXXII-3 edited by Florian Cousseau and Luc Laporte. Paperback; 205x290mm; 206 pages; 98 figures, 2 tables (colour throughout). Full parallel text in English and French. Print RRP: £38.00. 638 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695458. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695465. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Set-up a Standing Order to save 20% on XVIII UISPP World Congress proceedings volumes or save even more by pre-ordering the full set at a special low bundle price. Click here to see full offer details.

Pre and Protohistoric Stone Architectures: Comparisons of the Social and Technical Contexts Associated to Their Building presents the papers from Session XXXII-3 of the XVIII UISPP Congress (Paris, 4-9 June 2018). This session took place within the commission concerned with the European Neolithic. While most of the presentations fell within that chronological period and were concerned with the Atlantic coast and the Mediterranean basin, wider geographical and chronological comparisons were also included. This volume aims to break the usual limits on the fields of study and to deconstruct some preconceived ideas. New methods developed over the past ten years bring out new possibilities regarding the study of such monuments, and the conference proceedings open up unexpected and promising perspectives. This volume is a parallel text edition in English and French.

About the Editors
Florian Cousseau is a Post-Doctoral Research Associate at the University of Geneva (Switzerland). His work focuses on megalithic architecture in Western Europe for which he has developed a new methodology. He has adapted building archaeology methodology to study pre-protohistoric elevations. As a result he has updated the data of famous sites in northwestern France such as Barnenez, Guennoc and Carn.

Luc Laporte is Research Director at CNRS (France). He is a specialist in the Neolithic period in Europe, and on the subject of megaliths in general. He has published widely on the megaliths of western France, Western Europe, and Africa, for the Neolithic and Protohistoric periods.
Excavation, Analysis and Interpretation of Early Bronze Age Barrows at Guiting Power, Gloucestershire by Alistair Marshall. Paperback; 205x290mm; 290 pages. 620 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693591. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693607. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Excavation, Analysis and Interpretation of an Early Bronze Age Round Barrow at Guiting Power, Gloucestershire covers the full excavation, analysis and interpretation of two early Bronze Age round barrows at Guiting Power in the Cotswolds, a region where investigation and protection of such sites have been extremely poor, with many barrows unnecessarily lost to erosion, and with most existing excavation partial, and of low quality. One monument, Guiting Power 1, typical of many others in the region in terms of general form, was investigated to assess how far surviving evidence could be used to indicate original structure, as a basis for discussion of function as a funerary and ritual site.

The project is paired with the full excavation of a larger round barrow, of similar date, nearby, at Guiting Power 3 in the valley below. Both sites have been considered within their local environment and as part of the general pattern of settlement. The monuments have also provided data for a programme of experimental investigation of prehistoric cremation.

Discovery of a post ring with well-preserved basal structures, sealed under an early bronze age round barrow at Guiting Power 3, enables detailed analysis of its structure, associations, and place in the sequence. This review of a sample of other post rings from southern and western Britain places the example from Guiting Power within its archaeological context.

About the Author
Alistair Marshall has a formal background in archaeology and the natural sciences, general interests in European prehistory, and is currently developing various projects including: application of remote sensing, from broader study of landscapes to detailed interpretation of ritual monuments with related experimental work; structural analysis of megalithic sites, with especial reference to interpretation of axial alignment; investigation of broader aspects of tribal economies during the later Iron Age in Britain and Northwestern Europe.

Reviews
'Round barrows are one of the most common and widely-scattered classes of prehistoric monuments in the Cotswolds, yet very few have been excavated over the last century or so and only a handful have been examined to modern standards. This lacuna makes the present volume especially welcome as we have here detailed reports on open-area excavations at two sites: Guiting Power 1 and 3. As well as pre-excavation surveys and full descriptions of the recorded stratigraphic sequences, there is also a good selection of specialist studies and a wealth of contextual information.'—Timothy Darvill, Bristol & Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, April 2021
The Hypocephalus: An Ancient Egyptian Funerary Amulet by Tamás Mekis. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+356 pages; 95 figures, 36 plates. 586 2019 Archaeopress Egyptology 25. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693331. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693348. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The hypocephalus is an element of Late Period and Ptolemaic funerary equipment – an amuletic disc placed under the head of mummies. Its shape emulates the sun’s disc, and its form is planar, although it occasionally has a concave shape (in such cases, it protects the head as a funerary cap). The earliest known example can be dated to the 4th century BC and the latest to the 2nd/1st century BC. The Hypocephalus: an Ancient Egyptian Funerary Amulet analyses both the written records and iconography of these objects. So far, 158 examples are known; several, unfortunately, from old descriptions only. The relatively low number shows that the object was not a widespread item of funerary equipment. Only priest and priestly families used them, those of Amon in Thebes, of Min in Akhmim, and the ones of Ptah in Memphis. Among the examples, no two are identical. In some details, every piece is an individualized creation. Ancient Egyptian theologians certainly interpreted hypocephali as the iris of the wedjat-eye, amidst which travels the sun-god in his hidden, mysterious and tremendous form(s). The hypocephalus can be considered as the sun-disk itself. It radiates light and energy towards the head of the deceased, who again becomes a living being, feeling him/herself as ‘one with the Earth’ through this energy. The texts and the iconography derive principally from the supplementary chapters of the Book of the Dead. Some discs directly cite the text of spell 162 which furnishes the mythological background of the invention of the disc by the Great Cow, who protected her son Re by creating the disc at his death.

About the Author
Tamás Mekis graduated from the Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest in 2007 with a degree in Egyptology. In 2013 he defended his PhD dissertation with summa cum laude. In quest of hypocephalus amulets he spent his traineeship in Brussels at the Royal Museums of Art and History in 2008 and in Paris at the Louvre Museum in 2010. He conducted extended researches at the Egyptian Museum of Cairo in 2007-9 and 2014-15, where, together with the curators of the museum, he found a rare hypocepalus of the prophet-registrar of Min-Horus-Isis Djed-hor/Wesirwer in situ, under the head of his undisturbed mummy. Tamás is an independent researcher.
Mortuary Variability and Social Diversity in Ancient Greece Studies on Ancient Greek Death and Burial edited by Nikolas Dimakis and Tamara M. Dijkstra. Paperback; 205x290mm; ii+196 pages; illustrated throughout (includes 60 colour pages). 603 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694420. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694437. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Even though, at death, identity and social status may undergo major changes, by studying funerary customs we can greatly gain in the understanding of a community’s social structure, distribution of wealth and property, and the degree of flexibility or divisiveness in the apportionment of power. With its great regional diversity and variety of community forms and networks, ancient Greece offers a unique context for exploring, through the burial evidence, how communities developed. Mortuary Variability and Social Diversity in Ancient Greece brings together early career scholars working on funerary customs in Greece from the Early Iron Age to the Roman period. Papers present various thematic and interdisciplinary analysis in which funerary contexts provide insights on individuals, social groups and communities. Themes discussed include issues of territoriality, the reconstruction of social roles of particular groups of people, and the impact that major historical events may have had on the way individuals or specific groups of individuals treated their dead.

About the Editors
Nikolas Dimakis is a postdoctoral research fellow in Classical Archaeology at the University of Athens. He specialises in the funerary archaeology of Classical to Roman Greece and examines the interplay of emotions, ritual and identity in the burial context. His research interests also include childhood and gender archaeology, the archaeology of religion and ritual, and terracotta lamps. Nikolas has coordinated and participated in international meetings and in many archaeological projects in Attica, the Peloponnese, Thrace and the Dodecanese.

Tamara M. Dijkstra is a researcher at the Department of Greek Archaeology at the University of Groningen. She specialises in the funerary archaeology and epigraphy of Classical to Roman Greece and examines the relation between mortuary practices, social structure, and social identities. She also studies Hellenistic domestic archaeology within the Halos Archaeological Project.
Farmsteads and Funerary Sites: The M1 Junction 12 Improvements and the A5–M1 Link Road, Central Bedfordshire Archaeological investigations prior to construction, 2011 & 2015–16 by Jim Brown. Hardback; 205x290mm; xxiv+596 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £120.00). 556 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692600. £120.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692617. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

With major contributions by Paul Blinkhorn, Dana Challinor, Andy Chapman, Chris Chinnock, Joanne Clawley, Olly Dindol, Claire Finn, Val Fryer, Rebecca Gordon, Tora Hylton, Sarah Inskip, James Ladocha, Phil Mills, Stephen Morris and Jane Timby.

MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) undertook extensive excavations during the construction of two separate, but adjacent road schemes, some 4.5km apart near Houghton Regis and Toddington, in south Central Bedfordshire. Taken as a whole, the excavations provide a detailed multi-period dataset for regional and national comparison.

The first evidence for occupation occurred in the middle/late Bronze Age comprising pits and clusters of postholes, including four-post and six-post structures. Two pit alignments, more than 2km apart, also indicate that land divisions were being established, and in the late Bronze Age/early Iron Age a significant new settlement emerged in the valley bottom. Parts of a further contemporary earlier-middle Iron Age settlement lay at the top of the valley but neither settlement extended into the Roman period. In the late Iron Age or early Roman period three or four new settlements emerged with occupation continuing into the late Roman period in at least one of these. Of particular interest was the recovery of two significant Aylesford-Swarling type cemeteries as well as a third cemetery which largely comprised unurned burials, including some busta, but with few accompanying grave goods.

In the late 7th-century a small probable Christian conversion open-ground inhumation cemetery was established with burials accompanied by a range of objects, including a rare work box, knives, brooches, chatelaine keys and a spearhead. Parts of three medieval settlements were uncovered including one with a potters' working area.
Les pratiques funéraires en Pannonie de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle by András Márton. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+528 pages; 322 figures, 382 maps. French text. 588 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 62. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693355. £70.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693362. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £70.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Les pratiques funéraires en Pannonie de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle aims to give an overview of Roman burial practices in Pannonia during the Early Roman period. Among the different approaches proposed by R. Reece for the study of Roman cemeteries, this work focuses on the grave treatment and grave furnishing. The funerary practices are thus apprehended through the study of tomb structure, the selection and treatment of grave goods and human remains.

The book proposes a synthesis of the published finds to serve as a base for future research. The analysis consists of a documentary review (presented in the catalogue and numerous tables) as complete as possible from the published data, accompanied by a detailed analysis of the information available today to highlight the trends regarding the entire province but also the peculiarities that can be distinguished at the regional level. The analysis is supported by many graphics and maps. Many general trends, common to the western provinces of the Roman Empire, were detected but also many particularities linked to the economic and social situation of the communities, the different components of the population of Pannonia and the political and military history of the province.

About the Author
András Márton was born in Budapest. He holds masters degrees in History, and Archaeology (specializing in Roman provincial and Classical archaeology) from the Eötvös Lorand University, Budapest and a PhD from the Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest. He currently lives in France and is involved with research programmes at the Louvre and the Museum of Fine Arts, Lyon. His research interests are pottery studies and ancient funerary practices.

French Description:
Cette étude vise à donner une présentation des pratiques funéraires romaines en Pannonie durant le Haut-Empire. Parmi les différentes approches pour l’étude des cimetières romains, ce travail porte sur le traitement des tombes et leur mobilier. Les pratiques funéraires sont ainsi appréhendées à travers l'étude de la structure des tombeaux, la sélection et le traitement des mobiliers funéraires et des restes humains. L'objectif principal est de proposer une synthèse des découvertes publiées pouvant servir de base aux recherches à venir. L’analyse consiste en une revue documentaire (présentée dans le catalogue et détaillée au sein des tableaux) aussi complète que possible des données publiées, accompagnée d’une analyse détaillée des informations aujourd’hui disponibles, afin de mettre en évidence les tendances concernant toute la province, mais aussi les particularités régionales et locales. L'analyse est accompagnée par de nombreux graphiques et des cartes. Bien sûr, des tendances générales, communes aux provinces occidentales de l'Empire romain, ont pu être détectées, mais également de nombreuses particularités liées à la situation économique et sociale des communautés, aux différents groupes de population en Pannonie et à l'histoire politique et militaire de la province.

András Márton a étudié à l'Université Eötvös Lóránd à Budapest où il a obtenu deux diplômes de Master, l'un en Histoire et l'autre en Archéologie (spécialisé en Archéologie des provinces romaines et en Archéologie classique). Après avoir obtenu son diplôme, il a travaillé au Musée national hongrois puis au Musée des Beaux-Arts de Budapest. Il a soutenu sa thèse intitulée « Le rituel funéraire en Pannonie de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle en comparaison avec les provinces occidentales » summa cum laude à l'Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest. Il vit actuellement en France et participe aux programmes de recherche du musée du Louvre et du musée des Beaux-Arts de Lyon. Il a réalisé de nombreux articles scientifiques et a contribué en tant que co-auteur à plusieurs ouvrages. Ses recherches portent sur la production de la céramique et des
Les restes humains badegouliens de la Grotte du Placard Cannibalisme et guerre il y a 20,000 ans by Bruno Boulestin and Dominique Henry-Gambier. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+138 pages; 47 figures, 14 tables (56 pages of colour). 579 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693690. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693706. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Placard is a major Upper Palaeolithic site in France, known from as early as the middle of the nineteenth century. Paradoxically, owing to the antiquity of the poorly-documented early excavations, dozens of thousands of remains that were uncovered then are either unpublished to this day, or have only been the subjects of limited and often obsolete studies. This is the case in particular for the human remains, for which, until recently, the cultural attribution was moreover still under debate. Dating makes it clear they belong to various periods, yet most of them form a homogeneous group remarkable by traces of a specific treatment. Thanks to radiocarbon dating and to data from further excavations carried out some thirty years ago, this group can be dated from the Badegoulian period.

The writers present in this book a detailed study of the Badegoulian human remains. On the basis of quantification and bone modification analyses, they describe and identify the treatments of the dead. Whereas the general treatment pertains to the practice of cannibalism, more specific ones, focused on the head, can be explained by the crafting of trophies. On the whole, these treatments can be interpreted in a consistent manner by one or several episodes of armed conflicts, begging the question of the possible existence of warfare during the Upper Palaeolithic. Thus, despite the antiquity of the discovery, the Badegoulian human bones from le Placard still constitute a unique assemblage that contributes greatly to our knowledge of the behaviours of hunter-gatherer populations in European prehistory.

About the Authors
Bruno Boulestin and Dominique Henry-Gambier are anthropologists at the University of Bordeaux (France), members of the research unit ‘De la Préhistoire à l’Actuel : Culture, Environnement, Anthropologie’ (PACEA, UMR 5199 of the CNRS). They are working on practices surrounding death in ancient societies, from both archaeological, bioarchaeological and socio-anthropological data. B. Boulestin’s work deals more specifically with bone modifications and the treatments of corpses. D. Henry-Gambier is a former Research Director at France's National Scientific Research Centre (CNRS) and is a specialist of Upper Palaeolithic populations.

French Description:
Connu depuis le milieu du 19e siècle, le site du Placard est un site majeur du Paléolithique supérieur français. Paradoxalement, en raison de l’ancienneté des premières fouilles, mal documentées, les dizaines de milliers de vestiges qui y ont été découverts sont pour la plupart inédits ou n’ont fait l’objet que d’études ponctuelles et souvent obsolètes. C’est le cas en particulier des restes humains, dont l’attribution culturelle était par ailleurs jusqu’à récemment discutée. Leur datation montre qu’ils appartiennent à plusieurs époques, mais la plus grande partie d’entre eux constitue un lot homogène qui se distingue par les traces d’un traitement spécifique. Grâce au radiocarbone et aux données provenant de nouvelles fouilles menées il y a une trentaine d’années, ce lot peut être daté du Badegoulien.

Les auteurs livrent ici l’étude détaillée de ces restes humains badegouliens. À partir de l’analyse quantitative et de celle des modifications osseuses, ils décrivent et identifient les traitements des morts. L’un, général, renvoie à la pratique du cannibalisme, tandis que d’autres, particuliers à la tête, peuvent s’expliquer par la fabrication de trophées. Globalement, ces traitements peuvent être interprétés de façon cohérente par un ou plusieurs épisodes de conflits armés, ce qui conduit à s’interroger sur la possible existence de la guerre au Paléolithique supérieur. Ainsi, malgré l’ancienneté de leur découverte, les restes humains badegouliens du Placard forment un ensemble exceptionnel qui apporte une contribution importante à notre connaissance des comportements des populations de chasseurs-cueilleurs de la Préhistoire europé
The Tekenu and Ancient Egyptian Funerary Ritual by Glennise West. Paperback; 205x290mm; 300pp; 362 figures (colour and black & white), 1 table. 539 2019 Archaeopress Egyptology 23. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691825. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691832. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

What is the Tekenu? What was its function? What are its origins? These are questions upon which Egyptologists have long pondered. However, Egyptologists, until now, have avoided any major work on the topic. Previous treatments of the Tekenu largely adopt a selective approach focusing on a specific form. Rarely has the Tekenu been examined profoundly in all of its forms or contexts with its possible origins commented upon merely in passing. The aim of The Tekenu and Ancient Egyptian Funerary Ritual is to provide a provocative examination and interpretation of the Tekenu in an endeavour to proffer plausible answers hitherto eluding scholars. Attested from the Fifth Dynasty until, and including the Saite Period, the Tekenu is a puzzling icon which is depicted within the funerary scenes in the tombs of some ancient Egyptian nobles. In this work four distinct types of Tekenu are identified and classified and then a Corpus Catalogue is formed. The Tekenu is appraised within the context of the wall scene. Two tombs are dealt with in greater detail.

About the Author
Glennise West graduated from the University of Sydney and taught English and History at secondary school level. Later she followed her lifelong interest in ancient Egypt obtaining MA and PhD from Macquarie University, Sydney. The topic of this book was the subject of her PhD dissertation. She lives in Sydney.

Reviews
'The great worth of this volume is that it gathers all the sources for the tekenu in one place and presents them with copious illustrations, many of them in colour. The catalogue is certainly the longest and most-detailed part of the book and will be of considerable use to anyone who is interested in Egyptian funerals and their representation on tomb walls.'—Christian Knoblauch, Journal of the American Research Center in Egypt, Volume 56, 2020
Megaliths of the Vera Island in the Southern Urals by Stanislav Grigoriev and Yulia Vasina . Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+284 pages; 223 figures; 34 tables (110 pages in colour). 559 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692426. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692433. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Megaliths of the Vera Island in the Southern Urals presents the results of the study of the largest megalithic complex in the Urals, located on Vera Island. The complex is represented by three chambered megaliths and sanctuaries dated to the Eneolithic period (mid-4th - 3rd millennium BC). The book discusses the features of the architecture and building technologies, their astronomical orientation, chronology, religious context, and explores their relation to social organisation and the possible migration of peoples. Small finds – especially the ceramic assemblages – are presented. The authors discuss problems associated with the origin of megaliths, the approaches of European researchers and the possibilities of applying these approaches to the Ural megaliths. Against the background of the lack of agriculture – in contrast to Europe – there was no demographic basis in the Urals for the emergence and existence of the megalithic phenomenon.

In addition to the megalithic complex, there are many unexplored objects on the island, the purpose of which remain, as yet, unclear. Ancient settlements of the same period have also been discovered on the island. The complex on Vera Island is unique precisely due to the combination of objects with so many different functions found within a relatively small area (6 ha).

About the Authors
Stanislav Grigoriev graduated from Chelyabinsk University in 1982. He began his scientific career at the same university, and since 1989 has been working at the Institute of History and Archaeology, Ural Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences. He studied ancient metallurgy and the Bronze Age, and for many years participated in the excavations of such famous settlements as Sintashta and Arkaim. Since 2004, he has headed the research project of the megalithic complex on the Vera Island. His books Ancient Indo-Europeans, Metallurgical Production in Northern Eurasia in the Bronze Age and Holy Lalish are published in English.

Julia Vasina graduated from Chelyabinsk Pedagogical University, Faculty of History. Since 2003, she has led archaeological expeditions studying archaeological sites in the Urals. She is a leading expert in archaeology of the Ural cities and is the author of 38 works on archaeology, the history of the Urals and cultural studies. In 2004-2007, she was one of the leaders of the archaeological team on Vera Island. Based on this research, the island obtained the status of an object of cultural heritage. In 2014-2015, she was the scientific leader of the project for the restoration of the megalithic monuments of Vera Island.
Current Research in Egyptology 2018 Proceedings of the Nineteenth Annual Symposium, Czech Institute of Egyptology, Faculty of Arts, Charles University, Prague, 25–28 June 2018 edited by Marie Peterková Hlouchová, Dana Belohoubková, Jirí Honzl, Vera Nováková. Paperback; 203x276mm; x+252 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (104 colour pages). 88 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692143. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692150. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Current Research in Egyptology 2018 is a collection of papers and posters presented at the nineteenth symposium of the prestigious international student conference, held at the Faculty of Arts, Charles University in Prague on 25th–28th June 2018. The Prague conference was attended by more than 100 people from various countries and institutions. The range of topics discussed was wide, covering all periods of ancient Egyptian and Nubian history and various topics concerning their society, religious life, material culture and archaeological excavations. The event also included six keynote lectures by experts from the Czech Institute of Egyptology, the FA CU (Prof. Mgr. Miroslav Bárta, Dr., Doc. PhDr. Hana Vymazalová, Ph.D., Doc. PhDr. Jana Mynářová, Ph.D., Prof. PhDr. Ladislav Bareš, CSc., and PhDr. Filip Coppens, Ph.D.) and the University of Vienna (Ao. Univ.-Prof. Dr. Peter-Christian Jánosi). The Egyptological meeting was enriched with a visit to the Karolinum, historical buildings of Charles University.
Early Neolithic, Iron Age and Roman settlement at Monksmoor Farm, Daventry, Northamptonshire by Tracy Preece. Paperback; viii+82 pages; 53 figures, 27 tables (36 plates presented in full colour). 544 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692105. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692112. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Includes contributions from Rob Atkins, Andy Chapman, Mary Ellen Crothers, Val Fryer, Rebecca Gordon, Tora Hylton, Rob Perrin and Yvonne Wolframm-Murray; illustrations by Olly Dindol and Rob Reed.

MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) has undertaken archaeological work at Monksmoor Farm on the north-eastern edge of Daventry in six different areas. The earliest archaeological features lay in Area 6 at the southern end of the development area, where two pits were radiocarbon dated to the early Neolithic. They contained a moderate assemblage of worked flints along with sherds of early Neolithic pottery. In the middle Iron Age a settlement was established in the same location comprising a roundhouse and several enclosures.

Two other contemporary settlements are thought to have originated in the late Iron Age/ early 1st century BC and were identified in Areas 1 and 2 between c0.2km and 0.5km apart and 500m to the north of Area 6. Area 1 contained evidence for a cluster of eight roundhouses with associated enclosures clearly showing sequential activity, while in Area 2, a large ditched enclosure defined as a Wootton Hill type, within which another roundhouse was present. It is possible that the Wootton Hill type enclosure in particular may have a slighter earlier origin than the limited pottery assemblage suggests. Sparse early Roman features were also found in Areas 3, 4 and 5.

This settlement continued in use through the later 1st to 2nd century AD. During the early Roman period the settlement in Area 6 was greatly expanded with large rectilinear ditched enclosures along with smaller enclosures and paddocks being established on either side of a routeway indicating movement of livestock was important.
Wari Women from Huarmey Bioarchaeological Interpretation of Human Remains from the Wari Elite Mausoleum at Castillo de Huarmey, Peru by Wiesław Więckowski. Paperback; 175x245; vi+152 pages; 56 figures (37 plates in colour). 535 2019 Archaeopress Pre-Columbian Archaeology 11. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691849. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691856. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Excavations at the Castillo de Huarmey archaeological site brought to light the first intact burial of female high-elite members of the Wari culture. It was found beneath a large adobe mausoleum, a landmark and focal point of the lower Huarmey Valley. Abundant grave goods, among which were precious metal artefacts, luxurious pottery, beautifully decorated bone and wooden objects, as well as spinning and weaving utensils, leave no doubt about the social status of individuals buried within the main chamber. The very unique character of the find was additionally emphasized by the fact that all of the buried individuals were women, accompanied by two grave guardians, and the remains of ancestors. This book presents the results of bioarchaeological analyses performed to date, and focuses on reconstructing the funeral rite and social status of the deceased. About the Author
WIESŁAW WIĘCKOWSKI (born 1974) is a graduate of the Institute of Archaeology, University of Warsaw. He has also studied at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem where he specialized in bioarchaeology and funeral archaeology. He has worked on many sites, including Ashkelon, Gesher, Tel Zahara in Israel, Achaia Klaus in Greece, Churajon, and Maucallacta in Peru, both as archaeologist and bioarchaeologist. Since 2010, he has been a member of the Polish-Peruvian research team, led by Miłosz Giersz, that in 2013 discovered the first completely preserved burial of the highest elites of the Wari culture at the site Castillo de Huarmey. He is currently professor at the Department of Bioarchaeology of the University of Warsaw.
Execution by Styrax in Ancient Thasos by Anagnostis P. Agelarakis. Paperback; 203x276mm; vi+42 pages; 33 figures, 5 graphs (27 plates presented in full colour). 86 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692129. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692136. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Searching through interdisciplinary research to recover echoes of the human condition ingrained as they may be in the skeletal record of the ancients, there have been few cases in the forty year experience of the author which in defiance to the relentless passage of Chrόnos and even the chthonic potency of the waters of Léthe to dissolve all strings relating to Mnenosỳne could offer compelling evidentiary data, critical for generating meaningful interpretive answers as a nexus to life pathways and experiences in antiquity, reflective of dynamics and circumstances, that were not always possible to be recorded or spoken of by the attendants of Cléo. And yet in rare cases, millennia later, ostensibly through the works of Láchesis, a synergy between the fields of Archaeological Anthropology and Bioarchaeology may offer a unique portal whereby the dictum mortui vivos docent may be reiterated.

Sharing in the objectives of an ongoing archaeo-anthropological endeavor, aiming to better decipher and elucidate facets of the human condition while carrying out funerary archaeological research of Hellenistic to Roman periods family graves at the extensive ancient necropolis of Thasos, the most northern Aegean island, this essay addresses a case of unique forensic / bioarchaeological interest involving an older male individual, a member of one of the clusters of burials, who had been placed as a single interment in a most conspicuous limestone cyst grave of the Hellenistic period.

While odontological, cranio-infracranial skeleto-anatomic manifestations and palaeopathologies revealed a detailed rostrum on aspects of his developmental growth, of acquired and degenerative somatic changes, reflective of his life experiences which involved long term most active participations in physically demanding yet specialized activities, a staggering ‘through and through’ sternal trauma of astonishing preservation, provided for a distinct opportunity to conduct a unique cross-disciplinary investigation on the nature of the weapon reconstructed in bronze, the archaeometry on the trajectory and factors of speed and force at the deliverance of the strike, along with the diagnostic assessments of the thoracic tissues pierced consecutively and their moribund consequences.

A review of historical references on the implementation of capital punishment either through the decision of a dicastic or ephetic court, and/or execution carried out as a result of outlawry are evaluated in relevance to funerary practices as these pertained to the interment of the Thasian male within the context of the burial ground, offering in retrospect assessments on the probable cause of his violent death.

About the Author
ANAGNOSTIS P. AGELARAKIS is Professor of Anthropology at Adelphi University in New York. He studied Classical Archaeology and European Ethnology as an undergraduate, and as graduate Environmental Studies at Lund University and Lund Polytechnic Institute in Sweden. He holds a M. Phil. and Ph.D. (1989) in Anthropology from Columbia University, New York.

In the earlier years of his career, he carried out field and/or lab archaeo-anthropological research projects focusing on the organizational abilities, capacities, and adaptations of the human condition during the Holocene in SE and SW Asia, the Middle East, the American Northeast, and the Caribbean.

The central area of his research remains however the Eastern Mediterranean with emphasis on the ancient world of the Greeks, at the cross roads and sea routes between Africa, Asia, and Europe. Under the domains of Anthropological Archaeology, Funerary Archaeology, Bio-Archaeology and Forensics he studies the biological profiles, the demographic dynamics, and palaeopathological records of human skeletal populations from prehistoric periods to the late medieval era. Based on the skeletal record, he i
Macedonia – Alexandria: Monumental Funerary Complexes of the Late Classical and Hellenistic Age by Dorota Gorzelany. Paperback; 175x245mm; iv+236 pages; 76 Figures (44 full colour, 32 monochrome). 517 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691368. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691375. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The type of monumental tomb that developed in Macedonia in the late Classical period was undoubtedly the most impressive of all the Greek funerary complexes. It was a burial chamber with a vestibule, built of stone blocks, vaulted and furnished with an architectural facade, concealed under a large tumulus rising above the ground. The concept of the Macedonian sepulcher, which the Macedonians and Greeks settling in Alexandria ad Aegyptum, the city founded by Alexander the Great on the Egyptian coast, brought with them, influenced the structural form of the underground tombs that were developed in the new city. ‘Macedonia–Alexandria’ explores the scope of this influence, comparing in synthetic form the structural elements of the cist graves, chamber and rock-cut tombs of Macedonia with the Alexandrian hypogea, while taking into account the different geographical factors that conditioned them. This is followed by a presentation of the facade and interior decoration, and a discussion of the themes of wall painting inside the tombs and a characteristic of the surviving tomb furnishings.

The Macedonian tomb reflects in its form Greek eschatological beliefs ingrained in the mystery religions and the social ideology of the Macedonian kingdom. The assimilation of these beliefs is seen in the architectural arrangements, the vestibule and chamber plan, the facade (in Macedonia) or courtyard (in Alexandria), the structural and architectural interior decoration, and the furniture found in the chamber. These elements refer to palace architecture and determine the symbolic function of the tomb. The cult of the dead aspect is emphasized by wall painting iconography, the form of burial and the nature of the grave goods accompanying the deceased. In Alexandria, the role of rituals celebrated in the family tombs is attested by the declining size of burial chambers in favour of the vestibules and by the introduction of an open courtyard as well as the presence of altars. With regard to the ideology behind the Alexandrian complexes, the author explores the issue of the coexistence and the popularity of Egyptian beliefs adopted into Alexandrian sepulchral art, emphasizing the differences in the perception of the role of the tomb in the Macedonian and Egyptian consciousness.

About the Author
DOROTA GORZELANY studied Mediterranean Archaeology at the Jagiellonian University, Krakow, where she received her PhD in 2005. Since 1999 she has been a keeper of the ancient art collection in the Princes Czartoryski Museum (National Museum in Krakow) and a curator of the Gallery of Ancient Art. Since 2005 she has taught Ancient Art at the Pontifical University of John Paul II and since 2018 at the University of Silesia. She is a member of ICOM-Poland and Commission on the Archaeology of the Mediterranean Countries in the Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences (PAU). Her research focusses on Greek and Roman iconography and the history of the museum collection.