​​ We use cookies to enhance your experience on our site. By continuing to use the site you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy & Cookies.​

 
Archaeopress logo
Archaeopress Publishing Ltd, Summertown Pavilion, 18-24 Middle Way, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7LG, England
tel +44 (0) 1865 311914 fax +44 (0) 1865 512231   email: info@archaeopress.com
Monthly AP Alert - join our mailing list today Archaeopress on Facebook Archaeopress on Twitter Archaeopress on Linked In Archaeopress Blog
Home  
|
  Browse by Subject  
|
  Browse by Series  
|
  Catalogues  
|
  Join Our Mailing List  
|
  Visit Our Blog  
|
  Login (Private Customers)  
|
  Login (Institutional Subscriptions)  
|
  View Basket

Search

title, author, ISBN, keyword

Browse for books in the following languages

ARCHAEOPRESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ACCESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ARCHAEOPRESS JOURNALS
DISTRIBUTED
PUBLISHERS
DIGITAL EDITIONS
OPEN ACCESS PLATFORM
Ordering Information
About Us
Publish With Us
Standing Orders
Trade Sales
Contact Us
Request Review Copy
NEW: ArcheoFOSS XIV 2020: Open Software, Hardware, Processes, Data and Formats in Archaeological Research edited by Julian Bogdani, Riccardo Montalbano and Paolo Rosati. Paperback; 174x245mm; 204pp; Illustrated in colour throughout. Papers in Italian and English. Print RRP: £38.00. 796 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271248. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271255. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Please note this title has been released online first to launch alongside the latest conference. Print copies can be ordered and will be despatched as soon as stock arrives (in approx 2-3 weeks)

ArcheoFOSS XIV 2020: Open software, hardware, processes, data and formats in archaeological research collects the proceedings of the fourteenth ArcheoFOSS international conference, held online due to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. The book gathers seventeen papers on three principal topics, the main sessions of the conference: use and application of free/libre and open-source (FLOS) tools in archaeology; creation, use and promotion of open data and open formats in archaeology; and development and customization of FLOS software and hardware solutions for cultural heritage. Forty-one scholars of very diverse age, academic affiliation and geographic location, but all actively involved in the promotion of FLOS culture, open data and open science in digital archaeology and humanities, contribute. The volume is completed by a critical analysis of the contribution of these important annual meetings to the scientific and cultural activity of the ArcheoFOSS community. The opportunity offered by the pandemic-related difficulties to widen the geographical scope of the conference has been further boosted by the decision to adopt the English language for most of the papers, with the hope that this will extend the work of the ArcheoFOSS community far beyond the Italian national borders.

About the Editors
Julian Bogdani is an assistant professor at Sapienza University of Rome, where he teaches Digital Archaeology and Digital Humanities. The main focus of his research is the theoretical and practical issues related to the application of Computer Science to the archaeological and historical domain. He is the developer of Bradypus, a cloud-based database for archaeology. He directs the archaeological mission of Sapienza at Çuka e Ajtoit, a Hellenistic, Roman and Late Antique site in Albania. ;

Riccardo Montalbano is an archaeologist, specialist in ancient topography. He is currently GIS expert and Data Manager at Parco Archeologico di Ercolano (Naples) and Adjunct Professor at the University Uninettuno. As GIS expert, he is involved in several fi eld projects in Italy and abroad, and he is a member of the core team of the SITAR Project (Superintendency of Rome) and a research fellow of MAGOH Project (University of Pisa). ;

Paolo Rosati received his PhD in 2016 from L’Aquila University for research on the economic sustainability of software in archaeology and the development of FLOSS methods in Humanities (philology, archaeology, history, topography). Today he is a researcher at the Sapienza University of Rome as part of the ERC project PAThs (http:// paths.uniroma1.it).
Epigraphy in the Digital Age Opportunities and Challenges in the Recording, Analysis and Dissemination of Inscriptions edited by Isabel Velázquez Soriano and David Espinosa Espinosa. Paperback; 205x290mm; 258 pages; 123 figures, 15 tables (colour throughout). 762 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699876. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699883. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £42.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Epigraphy in the Digital Age: Opportunities and Challenges in the Recording, Analysis and Dissemination of Inscriptions originates from the International Conference El patrimonio epigráfico en la era digital: Documentación, análisis y socialización (Madrid, 20–21 June 2019), organized by the Complutense University of Madrid and the University of Santiago de Compostela. Taking the results of the conference as a starting point, the book presents epigraphic research using digital and computational tools, bringing together and comparing the outcomes of both well-established projects and newer ones, so as to establish a comprehensive view according to the most innovative trends in investigation. 21 contributions have been gathered together, involving 38 scholars, which address issues related to open-access databases, SfM Photogrammetry and Digital Image Modelling applied to textual restoration, EpiDoc (TEI-XML edition), and Linked Open Data. In this manner, the book offers a dialogue based on very different perspectives and previous experiences to generate common research questions, methodologies, practical solutions, and significant results. The outcome is intended more a starting point and platform for future research than as a definitive point of arrival in terms of so-called ‘digital epigraphy’.

About the Editors
Isabel Velázquez Soriano is Professor of Latin Philology in the Department of Classical Philology at the Complutense University of Madrid. She is the principal Investigator of the Research Group ‘Textos epigráficos antiguos de la Península Ibérica y el Mediterráneo griego’ (TEAPIMeG no. 930750) at the Complutense University of Madrid, Director of the Epigraphic Archive of Hispania, and editor of Hispania Epigraphica series at the same university. Isabel Velázquez Soriano is a specialist in the study of epigraphic and literary texts from Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages. ;

David Espinosa Espinosa has a PhD in Ancient History from the Complutense University of Madrid. A Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Santiago de Compostela and the University of Vienna, he is now Lecturer in Ancient History at the University of Oviedo. His research focuses on the granting of Latin rights in the western Roman provinces, the Roman civil wars during the Republic, and Roman epigraphy. Director of the digital epigraphic corpus Epigraphica 3.0, he has among his book publications Plinio y los ‘oppida de antiguo Lacio’. El proceso de difusión del Latium en Hispania Citerior (2014).
Big Data and Archaeology Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 15, Session III-1 edited by François Djindjian and Paola Moscati. Paperback; 205x290mm; 106 pages; 33 figures, 1 table (colour throughout). Papers in English and French. 761 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697216. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697223. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Big Data and Archaeology presents the papers from two sessions of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018): Session III-1 (CA): ‘Big data, databases and archaeology’, and Session III-1 (T): ‘New advances in theoretical archaeology’. The advent of Big Data is a recent and debated issue in Digital Archaeology. Historiographic context and current developments are illustrated in this volume, as well as comprehensive examples of a multidisciplinary and integrative approach to the recording, management and exploitation of excavation data and documents produced over a long period of archaeological research. In addition, specific attention is paid to neoprocessual archaeology, as a new platform aimed at renewing the theoretical framework of archaeology after thirty years of post-modernism, and to the refinement of the concept of archaeological cultures, combining processual, contextual and empirical approaches.

About the Editors
François Djindjian is ancien professeur at the University of Paris I Pantheon Sorbonne (chair of archaeological methods and theory) and associate member of the CNRS UMR 7041. He is President of the International Union for Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sciences (UISPP), member of the executive committee of the International Council for Philosophy and Human Sciences (CIPSH) of Unesco, and delegate member of the International Academic Union (UAI).

Paola Moscati is research director at the Institute of Heritage Science of the National Research Council of Italy. As an archaeologist, specialised in computer applications in archaeology, she is Vice President of the UISPP Commission IV, editor in chief of the international journal ‘Archeologia e Calcolatori’ and scientific coordinator of the international project ‘The Virtual Museum of Archaeological Computing’, jointly promoted with the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei.
Fores et Fenestrae: A Computational Study of Doors and Windows in Roman Domestic Space by Lucia Michielin. Paperback; 205x290mm; 296 pages; 146 figures, 39 tables, 52 renders. 749 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 82. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696172. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696189. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Fores et Fenestrae aims to analyse Roman doors and windows and their role as an essential part of daily life. They are the structures that connect not only rooms but also houses themselves to the outside world. They relate to privacy, security, and light in domestic spaces. Until very recently, the role of doors and windows in shaping the life and structure of Roman private dwellings has been greatly underestimated. The reason for this lies primarily in the difficulties linked to their study. The low level of preservation of walls and the widespread use of perishable and recyclable materials hinder in many cases a correct assessment of these structures. To achieve greater understanding, the author followed a computational approach. The two cores of the research are the analysis of the database and the observation of results based on new 3D models. 1855 doors and windows were surveyed across eight towns of Roman imperial Italy. The information collected has been organised in a database comprised of nine tables and mined through statistical analyses. Three 3D models of different dwelling types have been generated simulating natural materials and light conditions to observe the role of doors and windows in context.

The work is subdivided into three sections. The first explains the study’s methodology and analyses previous scholarship on the topic, highlighting how the issue of doors and windows has often be ignored or only superficially considered. The second section collects typologies of complementary sources to better comprehend the results of the statistical analyses and to integrate the 3D models; literary, epigraphic, and visual sources are considered. To these are added the analysis of the archaeological sources. The third part constitutes the core of the analysis. It is composed of two chapters, the fi rst of which provides a detailed overview of the statistical analyses produced from the sample collected. The latter chapter investigates the results of the renders and analyses views and natural light in the Roman house.

About the Author
Lucia Michielin holds an MSc in Geotechnologies for Archaeology (Università degli Studi di Siena) and an MA in Classical Archaeology (Università degli Studi di Padova). In 2019 she obtained a PhD at Edinburgh University. She has previously worked in commercial archaeology and has been involved in many surveys and cultural heritage projects in Italy and Croatia, in cooperation with UK, US, and Italian universities and research centres. She currently holds the post of Digital Skills Training Manager at Edinburgh University.
Architecture militaire du Deccan: Une réponse défensive face à la guerre moderne Deccan Military Architecture: A response to early modern warfare by Nicolas Morelle. Paperback; 203x276mm; 428pp; 168 figures. French text with English introduction and conclusion. 124 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697445. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697452. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Architecture militaire du Deccan focuses on the Deccan region in central India between the medieval and modern period, a period at the interface between local Indian culture and the Persian world, followed by relations with the colonial enterprise European in Asia. This period was marked by many conflicts, but also by an inventive adaptation of new military technologies in response to new forms of modern warfare in India, with the arrival of artillery.

Using the most recent investigative techniques, such as photogrammetry and 3D modeling, this volume presents a wealth of new data. The author’s meticulous approach encompasses the study of urban maps, architectural plans and detailed descriptions of walls, bastions, moats, towers, gates, horsemen, granaries, hydraulic éléments, and more.

Through the study of four representative fortified sites, the author synthesizes the evolution of the military architecture of the Deccan.

One can only hope that this volume will inspire other scholars to work on other Indian fortified sites, not limited to the Deccan. Thus, a more complete understanding of the phases of evolution of Indian military architecture can emerge.

About the Author
Nicolas Morelle is an archaeologist, specialising in India (associated researcher of LA3M CNRS in France). After studies on crusaders fortifications and influences between East and West in terms of building techniques and military Architecture, he studied technical interactions in Indian fortifications as part of his PhD thesis on the evolution of Military Architecture in the four Deccan forts. In this context, he collaborated with many Indian and international institutions.

French description: L’extraordinaire conservatoire de fortifications que constitue l’Inde centrale enrichit la connaissance de l’architecture militaire de la période moderne. Les spécificités indiennes en matière de défense constituent un apport non négligeable sur le développement original des organes défensifs du Deccan.

En utilisant les techniques d’investigation les plus récentes, telles que la photogrammétrie et la modélisation 3D, Nicolas Morelle découvre une richesse de données jusqu’alors inconnues. Il présente ainsi une approche méticuleuse à travers des cartes urbaines, des plans d’architecture et des descriptions détaillées de murs, bastions, douves, tours, portes, cavaliers, greniers, éléments hydrauliques, …

Dans ce volume, Nicolas Morelle se concentre sur la région du Deccan dans le centre de l’Inde entre la période médiévale et moderne, période à l’interface entre la culture indienne locale et le monde persan, suivi des relations avec l’entreprise coloniale européenne en Asie. Cette période a été marquée par de nombreux conflits, mais aussi par une adaptation inventive, de nouvelles technologies militaires en réponse aux nouvelles formes de guerre moderne en Inde, avec l’arrivée de l’artillerie.

A travers l’étude de quatre sites fortifiés représentatifs, l’auteur élabore une synthèse de l’évolution de l’architecture militaire du Deccan.

On ne peut qu’espérer que le présent volume inspirera d’autres chercheurs à travailler sur d’autres sites fortifiés indiens, sans se limiter au Deccan. Ainsi, une compréhension plus complète des phases d’évolution de l’architecture militaire indienne pourra émerger.

Tiré d’une recherche doctorale récente, cet ouvrage est en français. Plusieurs parties sont traduites en anglais, dont la synthèse, afin d’améliorer sa diffusion vers le public international.

Nicolas Morelle est archéologue, spécialiste de l’Inde (chercheur associé du LA3M CNRS en France). Après des études sur les fortifications des croisades et les influences entre Orient et Occident dans l’architecture militaire, il a étudié les interactions techniques dans les fortifications indiennes dans le cadre de sa thèse de doctorat sur
Un sistema per la gestione dell’affidabilità e dell’interpretazione dei dati archeologici Percezione e potenzialità degli small finds: il caso studio di Festòs e Haghia Triada by Marianna Figuera. Paperback; 148x210mm; 165pp; 32 figures. Italian text with English abstract. RRP: £30.00. 8 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696639. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696646. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Un sistema per la gestione dell’affidabilità e dell’interpretazione dei dati archeologici aims to identify the methodological problems associated with digitalized management of archaeological data and to introduce viable solutions that embrace interpretative aspects and the reliability concept. The work develops into a prototype system that manages the data regarding what are referred to as small finds dating back to the palatial periods from the Cretan sites of Phaistos and Ayia Triada which have been studied by the Italian Archaeological Mission since the early 20th century. The analysis of the data highlighted the value of this system and its ability to adapt to the needs of the archaeologist. It provides tools capable of assisting and implementing the interpretation of archaeological data well outside the findings and sites specific to this project for the management of other categories of archaeological finds and of any context. The book can furnish practical and theoretical contributions capable of feeding the methodological debate inherent in issues such as the treatment of sources, legacy data, reuse, the management of uncertainty, and of the rational and intuitive variables inherent in archaeological work, as well as the assessment of the reliability of an interpretative event.

Marianna Figuera is an archaeologist with a Doctorate in Cultural Heritage Studies. Currently a research fellow at the University of Catania, her research focuses on the perception of small finds, metallurgy in Minoan Crete, and the management, integrity, and reliability of digitalized archaeological data. She has been part of the Italian Archaeological Mission at Phaistos and Ayia Triada since 2010.

Reviews
'I would recommend that anyone trying to construct a relational database for an archaeological project read this small book.'—David B. Small, The Classical Review
CAA2016: Oceans of Data Proceedings of the 44th Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology edited by Mieko Matsumoto and Espen Uleberg. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+562 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (228 plates in colour). 495 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917302. £95.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917319. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

CAA2016: Oceans of Data gives an up-to-date overview of the field of archaeology and informatics. It presents ground-breaking technologies and best practice from various archaeological and computer science disciplines. The articles in this volume are based on the foremost presentations from the 44th Computer Applications in Archaeology Conference 2016, held in Oslo. The theme of CAA2016 was ‘Exploring Oceans of Data’, alluding to one of the greatest challenges in this field: the use and reuse of large datasets that result both from digitalisation and digital documentation of excavations and surveys.

The volume contains 50 peer-reviewed and highest-ranked papers that are divided in eight parts, including an introduction and seven chapters. The introduction sets the stage with Oceans of Data (C.-E. Ore) and Theorising the Digital (S. Perry and J. S.Taylor), discussing the current status of overall CAA research. These two papers present the current developments, challenges, and potential that lies ahead from different perspectives. Ore points to the importance of common authority systems and ontologies. Common conceptual data models will ease curation and secure long-term reusability. Perry and Taylor address the need to bring together theoretical and digital archaeology. In the following chapters, different topics are presented under the headings Ontologies and Standards, Field and Laboratory Data Recording and Analysis, Archaeological Information Systems, GIS and Spatial Analysis, 3D and Visualisation, Complex Systems Simulation, and Teaching Archaeology in the Digital Age.

About the Editors
Mieko Matsumoto is a member of the scientific staff at the Museum of Cultural History, the University of Oslo. With an education and research background from Japan, Norway, and Poland, she is an archaeologist with a wide knowledge of international lithic technology. Her research specialty focuses on the European Palaeolithic and the Norwegian Stone Age. She is a long-standing member of CAA International and CAA-Norway, with numerous publications on ICT and archaeology.

Espen Uleberg is the coordinator of the Digital Documentation Section at the Museum of Cultural History, the University of Oslo. With an education and research background from Germany and Norway, he is an archaeologist working with digitising museum collections since the early 1990s. He has international experience and knowledge over the use of field GIS and databases. He was chair of the organising committee of CAA2016, and is a long-standing member of CAA International and CAA-Norway, with numerous publications on ICT and archaeology.
Digital Imaging of Artefacts: Developments in Methods and Aims edited by Kate Kelley and Rachel K. L. Wood. Paperback; 203x276mm; 190 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (80 plates in colour). 65 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690255. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690262. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume brings together new lines of research across a range of disciplines from participants in a workshop held at Wolfson College, Oxford, on 23rd May 2017. In light of rapid technological developments in digital imaging, the aim in gathering these contributions together is to inform specialist and general readers about some of the ways in which imaging technologies are transforming the study and presentation of archaeological and cultural artefacts. The periods, materials, geography, and research questions under discussion therefore are varied, but the contributions are united in shared interests surrounding the aims of these techniques for imaging objects: what advantages do they offer, whether in research or museum contexts, what limitations are still faced, and how can technological development encourage new types of research and public engagement?

About the Editors
Dr KATE KELLEY received her Doctorate of Philosophy in Assyriology from the University of Oxford in 2018 and is a specialist in the socio-economic history of early Mesopotamia. She is a Research and Teaching Fellow at the University of British Columbia (2018–19), and formerly a Research Associate at the Oriental Institute, Oxford for the project Seals and Their Impressions in the Ancient Near East (2016–17). Kate has been working for the Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative since 2012, including digitizing cuneiform tablets in the Louvre, the National Museum of Scotland, and the Yale Babylonian Collection.

Dr RACHEL K. L. WOOD is Lecturer in Classical Archaeology at Corpus Christi College, Oxford and a Junior Research Fellow at Wolfson College, specialising in the art and archaeology of ancient Iran. In her previous position as a postdoctoral researcher with the British Museum and University of Oxford project Empires of Faith, she was an assistant curator of the Ashmolean Museum’s exhibition Imagining the Divine: art and the rise of world religions (October 2017–February 2018).
Visualizing cityscapes of Classical antiquity: from early modern reconstruction drawings to digital 3D models With a case study from the ancient town of Koroneia in Boeotia, Greece by Chiara Piccoli. Paperback; 203x276mm; xiv+314 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (100 colour plates). 53 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918897. £59.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918903. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The amount of 3D modelling applications in archaeology has increased enormously over the last decade. 3D recording techniques allow researchers to quickly and accurately document archaeological evidence, and 3D reconstructions have created new possibilities to communicate the results to a larger public. In this latter case, however, numerous scholars have expressed their concern regarding the ethics of such digital representations, since they give prominence to a crystallized image of the past and do not account for the complexity of the archaeological record. The study presented here aims to make a practical contribution to a new understanding and use of 3D reconstructions, namely as ‘laboratories’ to test hypotheses and visualize, evaluate and discuss alternative interpretations.

In order to do so, an analysis of visual reconstructions of the early and late modern period is presented first, followed by a discussion of current applications of 3D digital reconstructions, with a special focus on cityscapes. Lastly, a practical implementation of a research-driven, intellectually transparent and GIS-based 3D reconstruction is proposed for the urban site of Koroneia, in Boeotia, Central Greece. Specifically, the methodology developed in this work uses tools that are employed in geo-design and modern urban planning in an innovative way, integrating GIS with a rule-based modelling approach. With a strong focus on the automation and iteration of the reconstruction process, our 3D visualization provides an intuitive insight into hidden relationships and associations among data, and allows the creation and evaluation of alternative reconstruction hypotheses.

About the Author
CHIARA PICCOLI is an Italian archaeologist currently employed as a staff member of the Digital Archaeology Research group at the Faculty of Archaeology in Leiden, The Netherlands. Her expertise lies in the applications of 3D modelling techniques and 2D-3D GIS to visualize and analyse archaeological evidence. Her research interests include urban studies, visual studies, and the exploitation of digital tools and new technologies for documentation, visualization, analysis and dissemination. She has participated in several excavations and surveys in Italy, Greece and Morocco. Chiara holds a BA in Cultural Heritage (University of Trento), an MA in Greek and Roman Archaeology (University of Siena) and an MA in Book and Digital Media Studies (Leiden University). She received the Tiele-Stichting Thesis Prize 2011 for the best MA dissertation in the field of Book History in the Netherlands.
From the Archaeological Record to Virtual Reconstruction The Application of Information Technologies at an Iron Age Fortified Settlement (San Chuis Hillfort, Allande, Asturias, Spain) by Juana Molina Salido. x+190 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (126 colour plates). 425 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918750. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918767. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

From the Archaeological Record to Virtual Reconstruction describes the use of New Information Technologies (IT) for the analyses and interpretation of archaeological record of the San Chuis Hillfort (San Martín de Beduledo, Allande, Asturias, Spain). The data gathered during the eight excavation campaigns conducted by Francisco Jordá Cerdá in the sixties and eighties of the 20th century was mechanised and digitalised. Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) of the hillfort was performed, followed by a creation of spatial analysis through the establishment of relations between the elements of the archaeological record. At the end, having studied and investigated the site’s urban evolution throughout its occupation period (890 cal. BP – 530 cal. AD), a virtual reconstruction of the hillfort in its different settlement phases, presenting various evolution scenarios is presented.

In the process a work methodology and a set of computer applications adapted for each step of this research have been established, such as the system for the insertion of records in a database, for planimetry drawings, hillfort virtualisation, and others.

About the Author Juana Molina Salido obtained a PhD in prehistory and archaeology. She has a long experience as an archaeologist, specialising in the application of New Information Technologies in the development of archaeological work, both in the field and in the cabinet. In addition, she is a technical specialist in heritage virtualisation. She is currently collaborating on several research projects at the UNED, the Middle Palaeolithic site of Jarama VI and on the hillfort that is the subject of this book.
CAA2015. Keep The Revolution Going Proceedings of the 43rd Annual Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology edited by Stefano Campana, Roberto Scopigno, Gabriella Carpentiero and Marianna Cirillo. 2 vols, 1160 pages, illustrated throughout in black & white with 3 colour pages (Open Access edition colour throughout). 229 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784913373. £129.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913380. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume brings together all the successful peer-reviewed papers submitted for the proceedings of the 43rd conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology that took place in Siena (Italy) from March 31st to April 2nd 2015.

Altogether, within the four days of the conference 280 papers were presented in 48 sections divided into ten macro topics, 113 posters, 7 roundtables and 12 workshops. That number, in itself, has prompted a thought or two. Above all it says that CAA is very much alive and kicking, that it is in robust good health, and that it remains a wholly relevant force in the scientific community, fully engaged with the questions of the day, and a continuing focal point for the profession. All of that speaks well for the motto of CAA 2015: KEEP THE REVOLUTION GOING.

Although the significance of the motto is obvious, it is worth some thoughts. Few would deny that in the past 30 years or so, digital technologies have profoundly revolutionised archaeology – in the office and laboratory, in the field and in the classroom. The progressive introduction of digital techniques in the archaeological process has of course led to a general increase in efficiency. But perhaps more importantly it has provided a spur to the discussion of methodology and through that has strongly influenced not only the way we go about things but also the outcomes that we have been able to achieve.

The pioneering phase in the application of digital techniques in archaeological research has clearly been fruitful and today computer applications such as GIS, databases, remote sensing and spatial analysis as well as virtual and cyber archaeology are deeply embedded within our universities. This is all good, of course, but we must not assume that the task has been completed. An intrinsic revolutionary instinct towards technological development has been awakened. But it will only survive by virtue of the results that it brings about. Or using the words of our Chairman Prof Gary Lock: ‘Computers not only change the way we do things, but more importantly they change the way we think about what we do and why we do it’. The general thrust of this statement can be summed up and reinforced by recalling a quote from the philosopher Don Ihde, who has argued we should never forget that all technologies should be regarded as ‘cultural instruments’, which as well as strategies and methodologies implemented in our researches are also ‘non-neutral’.

So KEEP THE REVOLUTION GOING! is a motto that lays stress on the need to maintain innovation in archaeology through technological advances. But innovation must have at its root the fostering of critical thought and the framing of new archaeological questions. So there is much work still to be done, and fresh challenges to be faced in the months, years and decades ahead. -from the introduction by Stefano Campana and Roberto Scopigno
Off the Beaten Track. Epigraphy at the Borders Proceedings of 6th EAGLE International Event (24-25 September 2015, Bari, Italy) edited by Antonio E. Felle and Anita Rocco. vi+154 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 222 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784913229. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913236. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume contains the papers presented during the Meeting ‘Off the Beaten Track – Epigraphy at the Borders’, the sixth in a series of international events planned by the EAGLE, Europeana network of Ancient Greek and Latin Epigraphy international consortium.

The Meeting was held on 24–25 September 2015, with the support of the Department of Classics and Late Antiquity Studies at the University of Bari Aldo Moro (Italy).

During the event, the EAGLE Portal (http://www.eagle-network.eu) was officially launched and presented to the public for the first time. The event was intended to address the issues which arise in digitizing inscriptions characterised by ‘unusual’ features in comparison with the epigraphic norm. Here are collected contributions from several ongoing digital projects raising questions and proposing solutions regarding encoding inscriptions – from the Archaic period to the Middle Ages and beyond, even in languages other than Greek and Latin – which do not fall within those labelled as standard.

The projects involved are the following: ILA – Iscrizioni Latine Arcaiche; The Ancient Graffiti Project; DASI – Digital Archive for the Study of pre-Islamic Arabian Inscriptions; EDB – Epigraphic Database Bari; EDV – Epigraphic Database Vernacular Inscriptions; AshLi – Ashmolean Latin Inscriptions Project.

Reviews:

'...the projects presented in the volume, though very diverse in terms of chronology, geography and focus, share numerous challenges. Some of them are still works in progress and have not yet been launched, others already have a long web presence but nonetheless need to overcome new encoding hurdles. Precisely because of this, the volume will be of interest to digital epigraphists everywhere, also outside the beaten tracks of the Graeco Latin world.' – Ortal-Paz Saar, Utrecht University (Bryn Mawr Classical Review, 2016 View online.)
The Three Dimensions of Archaeology Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September, Burgos, Spain). Volume 7/Sessions A4b and A12 edited by Hans Kamermans, Wieke de Neef, Chiara Piccoli, Axel G. Posluschny and Roberto Scopigno. viii+150 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912932. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912949. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume brings together presentations from two sessions organized for the XVII World UISPP Conference that was held from 1-7 September 2014 in Burgos (Spain). The sessions are: The scientific value of 3D archaeology, organised by Hans Kamermans, Chiara Piccoli and Roberto Scopigno, and Detecting the Landscape(s) – Remote Sensing Techniques from Research to Heritage Management, organised by Axel Posluschny and Wieke de Neef. The common thread amongst the papers presented here is the application of digital recording techniques to enhance the documentation and analysis of the spatial component intrinsically present in archaeological data. For a long time the capturing of the third dimension, the depth, the height or z-coordinate, was problematic. Traditionally, excavation plans and sections were documented in two dimensions. Objects were also recorded in two dimensions, often from different angles. Remote sensing images like aerial photographs were represented as flat surfaces. Although depth could be visualized with techniques such as stereoscopes, analysis of relief was troublesome. All this changed at the end of the last century with the introduction of computer based digitization technologies, 3D software, and digital near-surface sampling devices. The spatial properties of the multi-scale archaeological dataset can now be accurately recorded, analysed and presented. Relationships between artefacts can be clarified by visualizing the records in a three dimensional space, computer-based simulations can be made to test hypotheses on the past use of space, remote sensing techniques help in detecting previously hidden features of landscapes, thus shedding light on bygone land uses.
3D Delineation: A modernisation of drawing methodology for field archaeology by Justin J.L. Kimball. 78 pages; illustrated throughout in full colour throughout. 9 2016 Access Archaeology . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784913052. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913069. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

A recent trend concerning archaeological research has focused on producing a real-time methodology for 3D digital models as archaeological documentation within the excavation setting. While such methodologies have now firmly been established, what remains is to examine how 3D models can be integrated more fully alongside other forms of archaeological documentation. This work explored one avenue by developing a method that combines the interpretative power of traditional archaeological drawings and the realistic visualisation capacity of 3D digital models. An experiment was initiated during archaeological excavations at Uppåkra, Sweden where photographic data was captured to produce 3D digital models through Photoscan. These models were geospatially located within ESRI’s 3D GIS ArcScene where shapefile editing tools were used to draw overtop of their surfaces in three-dimensions. All drawings closely followed the single context method of drawing, were allotted context numbers, and given descriptive geodatabase attributes. This methodology resulted in the further integration of 3D models alongside other forms of archaeological documentation. The drawings increased the communicative powers of archaeological interpretation by enabling the information to be disseminated in a 3D environment alongside other formats of data that would have otherwise been disconnected in 2D space. Finally, the database attributes permitted the drawings complete integration within the geodatabase, thereby making them available for query and other analytical procedures. Archaeological information is three-dimensional; therefore, archaeologists must begin to approach documentation bearing this in mind. This technique has demonstrated that 3D models are a fluidic form of documentation allowing for accurate preservation of archaeology while enabling new forms of data to be derived all within a limited amount of time. Archaeologists must begin to affect change towards embracing 3D models and their associated applications as a standard tool within the excavator’s toolbox.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Arqueología y Tecnologías de Información Espacial Una perspectiva ibero-americana edited by Alfredo Maximiano Y Enrique Cerrillo-Cuenca. vi+279 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English Abstracts. Access Archaeology . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784913182. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911539. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Papers from the First Iberoamerican Conference on Spatial Archaeology held in 2013 at the University of Cantabria, Spain. The subjects include theoretical contexts of spatial archaeology, relationship between archaeological and ethnographical research, micro-site studies and the interpretation of the environment from archaeo-historical contextualization.

This book is also available to buy in paperback priced £42.00.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

CAA2014. 21st Century Archaeology Concepts, methods and tools. Proceedings of the 42nd Annual Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology edited by F. Giligny, F. Djindjian, L. Costa, P. Moscati and S. Robert. vi+649 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 146 2015. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784911003. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911010. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume brings together a selection of papers proposed for the Proceedings of the 42nd Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology conference (CAA), hosted at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University from 22nd to 25th April 2014. The program was divided into different themes and this structure has been maintained in the arrangement of articles in the various chapters of this book. Chapter headings include: Historiography; Field and Laboratory Data Recording; Ontologies and Standards; Internet and Archaeology; Archaeological Information Systems; GIS and Spatial Analysis; Mathematics and Statistics in Archaeology; 3D Archaeology and Virtual Archaeology; Multi-Agent Systems and Complex System Modelling.
end of results