​​ We use cookies to enhance your experience on our site. By continuing to use the site you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy & Cookies.​

 
Archaeopress logo
Archaeopress Publishing Ltd, Summertown Pavilion, 18-24 Middle Way, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7LG, England
tel +44 (0) 1865 311914 fax +44 (0) 1865 512231   email: info@archaeopress.com
Monthly AP Alert - join our mailing list today Archaeopress on Facebook Archaeopress on Twitter Archaeopress on Linked In Archaeopress Blog
Home  
|
  Browse by Subject  
|
  Browse by Series  
|
  Catalogues  
|
  Join Our Mailing List  
|
  Visit Our Blog  
|
  Login (Private Customers)  
|
  Login (Institutional Subscriptions)  
|
  View Basket

Search

title, author, ISBN, keyword

Browse for books in the following languages

ARCHAEOPRESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ACCESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ARCHAEOPRESS JOURNALS
DISTRIBUTED
PUBLISHERS
DIGITAL EDITIONS
OPEN ACCESS PLATFORM
Ordering Information
About Us
Publish With Us
Standing Orders
Trade Sales
Contact Us
Request Review Copy
FORTHCOMING: The Sun Temple of Niuserra at Abu Ghurab Ten Years of Archaeological Research edited by Massimiliano Nuzzolo. Paperback; 205x290mm. Price: TBC.. 804 2021 Archaeopress Egyptology 37. ISBN 9781789695717. Buy Now

The Sun Temple of Niuserra at Abu Ghurab presents a decade of research at one of the most significant and unique royal monuments of Ancient Egypt. First discovered by Ludwig Borchardt in 1898, the temple is located in the northernmost part of the Abusir plateau and is the only one out of the six sanctuaries known from the historical sources that is still visible and reasonably well preserved. Since 2010, an Italian archaeological mission has been re-excavating this unparalleled architectural complex of Fifth Dynasty Egypt (25th century BCE). In this book the main results of the last 10 years of work are presented, including: an overall architectural reassessment of the temple and its main components; a catalogue of the archaeological evidence available on the ground (some of which was entirely unpublished); new methodologies of documentation and management of the dataset; analysis of the material culture that emerged during the present field-work; and a study of the sun temple’s religious and physical landscape.

About the Editor
Massimiliano Nuzzolo is Assistant Professor of Egyptology at the Institute of Mediterranean and Oriental Cultures, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, where, since 2020, he has directed the Sun Temples Project: Religious spaces, ideological patterns and social dynamics of constructing the sacred landscape in Third Millennium BC Egypt. Since 2010 he has been Co-Director of the archaeological expedition to the sun temple of Niuserra at Abu Ghurab, Egypt, together with Prof. Rosanna Pirelli and Dr. Andrea D’Andrea, from L'Orientale University of Naples, Italy.
FORTHCOMING: Hunde in der römischen Antike: Rassen/Typen - Zucht - Haltung und Verwendung by Heidelinde Autengruber-Thüry. Paperback; 205x290mm; 482 pages; 487 figures, 8 maps (colour throughout). German text. Print RRP: £70.00. 786 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 84. ISBN 9781789698367. Book contents pageBuy Now

Hunde in der römischen Antike: Rassen/Typen, Zucht, Haltung und Verwendung deals extensively with the living environment of the dog in Roman antiquity, based on literary and iconographic sources as well as archaeological and archaeozoological finds. The knowledge gained from this is documented by numerous images. Older research opinions, some of which have gone unchecked for more than a hundred years, are examined and—where necessary—corrected.

For the first time, a catalogue of the more than eighty dog breeds/types documented from antiquity is presented with their names, origins, appearance and the special characteristics of these animals. The ancient theories of dog breeding are compared with modern practices. A catalogue of the previously known dog names has been revised with around sixty new names added. The book examines how dogs were housed, what accessories were used and how the animals were fed. It sheds light on illnesses, medical treatment and the care of elderly dogs. A catalogue of epitaphs and extant canine tombstones gives an insight into the emotional world of grieving animal owners. Dogs not only served as guards, shepherds, hunters and lap dogs but also had other important roles such as sacred animals in temples or as waste disposers for sanitation. But they were also used corporeally: their fur was tanned, and their body parts were needed for magical rituals. In short, dogs played an important role in many areas of life, such that everyday life in the Classical world could not be imagined without them.

About the Author
Heidelinde Autengruber-Thüry completed her studies in history at the University of Vienna with a master's degree (with distinction) in 1999 and a doctorate in 2017. She acquired her specialist practical and theoretical knowledge in the field of cynology through many years of collaboration with the Irish Setter Club of Austria.

Auf Deutsch
Hunde in der römischen Antike beschäftigt sich umfassend mit dem Lebensumfeld des Hundes in der römischen Antike. Als Grundlagen dazu dienen die Quellen der griechisch-römischen Literatur, der Kunst und die archäologischen sowie archäozoologischen Funde. Durch zahlreiche Bilddarstellungen werden die daraus gewonnenen Erkenntnisse dokumentiert. Ältere Forschungsmeinungen, die zum Teil seit mehr als hundert Jahren ungeprüft übernommen und bis heute tradiert werden, werden überprüft und – wo nötig – richtiggestellt.

Erstmals wird ein Katalog der über achtzig aus der Antike belegten Hunderassen/-typen mit Namen, Herkunft, Aussehen und den speziellen Eigenschaften dieser Tiere vorgestellt. Der Wissensstand der Antike über Hundezucht wird mit den heutigen Standpunkten der modernen Hundezucht verglichen. Ein aus dem vorigen Jahrhundert stammender Katalog der bis dahin bekannten Hundenamen wurde adaptiert und konnte um circa sechzig neue Namen erweitert werden. Es wird untersucht, wie Hunde untergebracht wurden, welches Zubehör Verwendung fand und wie die Tiere ernährt wurden. Krankheiten, medizinische Behandlung und die fürsorgliche Pflege sehr alter Hunde zeigen weitere Aspekte der Hundehaltung. Eine Zusammenstellung der überlieferten Grabgedichte und erhaltenen Grabsteine für Hunde geben Einblicke in die Gefühlswelt der trauernden Tierbesitzer. Hunde dienten nicht nur als Wach-, Hirten-, Jagd- und Schoßhunde, sie hatten auch weitere wichtige Aufgaben wie zum Beispiel als heilbringende Tiere in Tempeln oder als Abfallentsorger für die Siedlungshygiene. Aber auch als Rohstofflieferanten wurden sie genützt, ihr Fell wurde gegerbt und ihre Körperteile wurden für magische Rituale benötigt. Kurz gefasst lässt sich sagen, dass Hunde in vielen Lebensbereichen des antiken Menschen eine wichtige Rolle spielten und sie aus dem täglichen Leben nicht wegzudenken waren.

Heidelinde Autengruber-Thüry legt hier die Druckfassung ihrer Dissertation vor. Sie hat ihr Studium der G
FORTHCOMING (REPRINT AND OPEN ACCESS): The Winchester Mint and Coins and Related Finds from the Excavations of 1961–71 edited by Martin Biddle. Hardback; 215x276mm; 768pp. Print RRP: £115.00 (eBook to be Open Access). 781 2021 Winchester Studies 8. ISBN 9781803270128. Buy Now

Winchester Studies 8: Edited by Martin Biddle with a catalogue of the known coins of the mint by Yvonne Harvey, this volume records and illustrates the minting of silver pennies in Winchester between the reigns of Alfred the Great and Henry III, a period of three and a half centuries. At the Mint, which was situated in the area of the High Street to the east of where the city’s cross now stands, at least 24 million silver pennies (possibly as many as 50 million) were struck. Five and a half thousand survive in museums and collections all over the world. These have been sought out and photographed (some 3200 coins in 6400 images detailing both sides), and minutely catalogued by Yvonne Harvey for this volume.

During the period from late in the reign of Alfred to the time of Henry III, dies for striking the coins were produced centrally under royal authority in the most sophisticated system of monetary control at the time in the western world. In this first account of a major English mint to have been made in forty years, a team of leading authorities have studied and analysed the use the Winchester moneyers made of the dies, and together with the size, weight, and the surviving number of coins from each pair of dies, have produced a detailed account of the varying fortunes of the mint over this period. Their results are critical for the economic history of England and the changing status of Winchester over this long period, and provide the richest available source for the history of the name of the city and the personal names of its citizens in the later Anglo-Saxon period.

FORTHCOMING (REPRINT AND OPEN ACCESS): Object and Economy in Medieval Winchester Artefacts from Medieval Winchester: Part II by Martin Biddle. Hardback; 2 vols; 215x276mm; 1,410pp. Print RRP: £195.00 (eBook to be Open Access). 780 2021 Winchester Studies 7. ISBN 9781803270227. Buy Now

Winchester Studies 7.ii: Over six thousand objects were recovered during the Winchester excavations of 1961 to 1971 – by far the most extensive corpus of stratified and datable medieval objects yet presented from a single city. Martin Biddle and the team of eighty-three contributors assembled by the Winchester Research Unit have used this material to investigate not only the industries and arts, but the economic, cultural, and social life of medieval Winchester. Their findings are being published in two parts: the first part, by Katherine Barclay, will deal with the pottery remains; and this second part in two volumes by Martin Biddle covers all the objects from the finest products of the Anglo-Saxon goldsmith’s skill to the iron tenter-hooks of the cloth industry. Martin Biddle’s study of the objects identifies change through time, and traces variation across the broad social scale – from cottage to palace – represented in the excavated sites. Using the objects as evidence for the economy of the medieval city, it also throws new light on some of the great questions of medieval industry and artistic production: amongst them the development of the textile industry, the origins of wire-drawing and the manufacture of pins, the beginnings of window-glass production, and the earliest glass painting. These objects are an essential part of the evidence for the development and changing character of the excavated sites to be published in forthcoming volumes of Winchester Studies on the Minsters. To ensure complete integration between the objects and the sites, every object in this volume is related to the context in which it was found and a concordance provides a detailed conspectus phase by phase of each of the twenty sites excavated between 1961-71, and of the objects found in each phase.

This is a reprint of the volume originally published in 1990 (Oxford, ISBN 9780198131755). The reprint is based on scans of the original publication, with minor changes to present folding or pull-out sections on standard folio pages.

Reviews of the 1990 edition:
The Sears Roebuck catalogue of medieval England … there is at present nothing so handsomely comprehensive, and tightly managed, from excavations of medieval town sites elsewhere. An exemplary work not only as a treasury of reference, but as an object lesson in procedure and the critical presentation of methodology.Prof. G.H. Martin, Journal of the Society of Archivists (1991) ;

[This] will be the work to which one will turn first when in search of information about many English Medieval manufactures and artefacts … These volumes are not only part of the record of about the most important medieval excavations undertaken in this century; they have an independent value as major works of reference.Prof. James Campbell, English Historical Review (1991)

FORTHCOMING (REPRINT AND OPEN ACCESS): Winchester in the Early Middle Ages An Edition and Discussion of The Winton Domesday edited by Martin Biddle. Hardback; 215x276 pages; 680pp. Print RRP: £96.00 (eBook to be Open Access). 775 2021 Winchester Studies 1. ISBN 9781803270166. Buy Now

Winchester Studies 1: London and Winchester were not described in the Domesday Book, but the royal properties in Winchester were surveyed for Henry I about 1110 and the whole city was surveyed for Bishop Henry of Blois in 1148. These two surveys survive in a single manuscript, known as the Winton Domesday, and constitute the earliest and by far the most detailed description of an English or European town of the early Middle Ages. In the period covered Winchester probably achieved the peak of its medieval prosperity. From the reign of Alfred to that of Henry II it was a town of the first rank, initially centre of Wessex, then the principal royal city of the Old English state, and finally `capital’ in some sense, but not the largest city, of the Norman Kingdom. This volume provides a full edition, translation, and analyses of the surveys and of the city they depict, drawing on the evidence derived from archaeological excavation and historical research in the city since 1961, on personal- and place-name evidence, and on the recent advances in Anglo-Saxon numismatics.

This is a reprint of the volume originally published in 1976 (Oxford, ISBN 9780198131694). The reprint is based on scans of the original publication, with minor changes to present folding or pull-out sections on standard folio pages.

Reviews of the 1976 edition:
This book opens the definitive record of one of the greatest triumphs in urban archaeology: a triumph due … to the masterly way in which the whole operation, spread over many years, has been conducted.Sir Walter Oakeshott, The Antiquaries Journal (1980) ;

It is roses, roses, all the way … forming in the, for once justified, words of the blurb, “an unparalleled account of one of the principal European cities of the eleventh and twelfth centuries”.Prof. R.A. Brown, Economic History Review (1977)
Les pratiques funéraires en Gaule lyonnaise de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle by András Márton. Paperback; 205x290mm; 482 pages; 299 figures; 379 maps (black & white throughout). French text. 752 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 81. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698077. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698084. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Les pratiques funéraires en Gaule lyonnaise de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle aims to provide an overview of Roman burial practices in the Gallia Lugdunensis province during the Early Roman Empire.

Among the different approaches proposed by R. Reece for the study of Roman cemeteries, this work focuses on grave treatment and grave furnishing. The funerary practices are thus apprehended through the study of the structure of the tombs and the selection and treatment of the grave goods and human remains. The main objective was to propose a synthesis of the published finds which could serve as a basis for future research.

The analysis consists of a documentary review of the published data (presented in the catalogue and numerous tables) as complete as possible, accompanied by a detailed analysis of the latest information available to highlight trends regarding the entire province, and the peculiarities seen at a regional level. Many graphics and maps support this analysis.

Many general trends, common to the western provinces of the Roman Empire, were detected, but also many particularities linked to the regional nature of the funerary practices and the economic and social situation of the communities. Some of these particularities reflect more profound cultural differences due to the unequal penetration of Mediterranean funerary practices into the territory of the province. They reflect the somewhat 'artificial' formation of the Gallia Lugdunensis, which incorporated tribes belonging to different cultural spheres (sharing particularities with Aquitania and the Belgic Gaul or more exposed to the Mediterranean influences).

About the Author
András Márton was born in Budapest. He studied at the Eötvös Lorand University where he obtained two master degrees, one in History and another in Archaeology specializing in Roman provincial and Classical archaeology. After graduation, he worked at the Hungarian National Museum and the Museum of Fine Arts in Budapest. He defended his thesis summa cum laude at the Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest under the direction of Professor Patrick Galliou. He lives in France and is involved in research programs at the Louvre and the Museum of Fine Arts of Lyon. He has published many scientific papers and co-authored several books. His research interests are pottery studies and ancient funerary practices.

En français
Les pratiques funéraires en Gaule lyonnaise de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle, qui est la publication non remaniée d’une partie de la thèse de doctorat de l’auteur soutenue, avec félicitations, à l’Université de Bretagne occidentale (Brest, France) en 2013, vise à donner un aperçu des pratiques funéraires romaines dans la Gaule Lyonnaise au cours du Haut-Empire. Parmi les diffff érentes approches de l’étude des nécropoles romaines, ce travail se concentre sur les tombes et le traitement du mobilier. Les pratiques funéraires sont ainsi appréhendées à travers l’étude de la structure des tombes, de la sélection et du traitement du mobilier funéraire et des restes humains. L’objectif principal est de proposer une synthèse des résultats publiés qui puisse servir de base aux recherches futures. L’analyse consiste en une reprise documentaire (présentée dans le catalogue et les nombreux tableaux) aussi complète que possible des données publiées, accompagnée d’une analyse détaillée des informations aujourd’hui disponibles afifi n de mettre en évidence les tendances concernant l’ensemble de la province, mais aussi les particularités que l’on peut distinguer au niveau régional. L’analyse est soutenue par de nombreux graphiques et cartes. Bien sûr, des tendances générales, communes aux provinces occidentales de l’Empire romain, peuvent être détectées, mais des particularités liées aux spécififi cités régionales et à la situation économique et sociale
Chios dicta est… et in Aegæo sita mari: Historical Archaeology and Heraldry on Chios by Ioanna N. Koukouni. Paperback; 205x290mm; 330 pages; 18 figures, 6 maps, 125 plates. 743 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697469. £54.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697476. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £54.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Historical Archaeology and Heraldry on Chios presents the results of research into the island’s medieval period, a terra incognita in the contemporary scholarly record. It is the first to be devoted to this topic in more than 100 years, following the publication of the seminal History of Chios by G. Zolotas in the 1920s. The book discusses the archaeology and history of Chios during the Byzantine and Genoese periods, focusing on Mount Amani, the region on the north-western part of the island. Harsh, remote, and poor, Mount Amani is nevertheless surprisingly rich in material for the landscape archaeologist and the student of historical topography, yet unknown in scholarly literature. Different types of evidence—both tangible and intangible—are used to discuss aspects of the local history and culture, from the evolution of the Byzantine settlement pattern, the rural economy, communications by land and sea and the chain of watchtowers, to the genealogy, the prosopography and the insignia of the local aristocracy, with many stone carvings illustrated for the first time.

About the Author
Ioanna N. Koukouni is a medieval archaeologist and expert in Cultural Heritage Digitisation, a graduate of the National & Kapodistrian University of Athens and the University of Birmingham. After holding a European research fellowship, she co-founded the Centro degli Studi sui Genovesi in Oltremare – NPO together with Professors Sandra Origone and Gabriella Airaldi, aiming to promote and disseminate research on the medieval Genoese network overseas.
The Statues at Rousham Park by Anne Schlee. Paperback; 250x280mm; 110 pages; 76 figures (colour throughout).ISBN 9780955892349. £19.99 (No VAT). Buy Now

Rousham and its landscape garden, located in rural Oxfordshire, is one of the few gardens of the first phase of English landscape design to have escaped alteration.

Informative and well-illustrated, The Statues at Rousham Park describes how the retired General James Dormer, who inherited Rousham in 1738, completed Charles Bridgeman’s garden design with the help of William Kent, but reserved for himself the choice of statues and their placement.

Taken together, the statues and busts, in both lead and stone, suggest an autobiographical portrait of Dormer.

Despite the gardens at Rousham being a popular local attraction, a site of pilgrimage to students of William Kent, and the backdrop to world-famous television drama including the BBC’s recent adaptation of Nancy Mitford’s The Pursuit of Love (2021), this is the first publication of its kind on its statues and their surrounding landscape.

Anne Schlee is a Booker Prize and Carnegie Medal shortlisted, and Guardian Prize winning, novelist whose work includes The Vandal (Macmillan 1980), Rhine Journey (1981) and The Time in Aderra (1996). She has judged a number of literary competitions including the Somerset Maugham Award, the David Higham Prize, and the Booker Prize. She was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in 2007.

Ex Asia et Syria: Oriental Religions in the Roman Central Balkans by Nadežda Gavrilović Vitas. Paperback; 205x290mm; 266 pages; 40 figures, 7 maps, illustrated catalogue (colour throughout). 721 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 78. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699135. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699142. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £42.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Ex Asia Minor et Syria: Religions in the Roman Central Balkans investigates the cults of Asia Minor and Syrian origin in the Roman provinces of the Central Balkans. The author presents, analyzes and interprets all hitherto known epigraphical and archaeological material which attests to the presence of Asia Minor and Syrian cults in that region, a subject which is yet to be the object of a serious scholarly study. Thus the book both reviews previously known monuments and artefacts, many of which are now missing or are destroyed, and adds new finds, exploring their social and geographical context from all possible angles, and focusing on the thoughts and beliefs of the dedicants and devotees of the particular cult in question. New conclusions are presented in a scientific framework, taking account of the latest theoretical developments.

About the Author
Nadežda Gavrilović Vitas obtained her PhD in archaeology from the University of Belgrade. She has worked at the Institute of Archaeology in Belgrade since 1999, mainly focusing on Roman religion, epigraphy, settlements and necropolises. She is the director of the archaeological projects and excavations ‘Mediana – the residence of Constantine the Great’ and ‘Building with octagon in Niš Fortress’ in Niš.

Reviews
The volume is immaculately researched and annotated, with numerous illustrations that otherwise would be very hard to access. A work of importance for archeologists, art historians, Balkanists and anyone interested in the spread and evolution of the pagan cults of the Roman Empire.—Caroline Stone, AramcoWorld, July 2021
The World of Disney: From Antiquarianism to Archaeology by David W. J. Gill. Paperback; 156x234mm; 154 pages; 44 figures. 700 2020 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698275. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698282. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Dr John Disney (1779-1857) was the benefactor of the first chair in archaeology at a British university. He also donated his major collection to the University of Cambridge. The sculptures continue to be displayed in the Fitzwilliam Museum.

The Disney family traced its origins back to the Norman invasion of England, and the family home was at Norton Disney in Lincolnshire. Disney’s father, the Reverend John Disney DD (1746-1816) left the Church of England to become a minister at the Unitarian Essex Street Chapel in London. A major sponsor of the chapel was Thomas Brand-Hollis of The Hyde, Essex, who bequeathed the house and his Grand Tour collection (formed with Thomas Hollis) on his death in 1804 to the Reverend John Disney. Disney inherited part of the classical collection of his uncle and father-in-law Lewis Disney-Ffytche, owner of the 18th century pleasure gardens, Le Désert de Retz, outside Paris. Disney’s brother-in-law was Sir William Hillary, founder of the RNLI. Disney was instrumental in the creation of the Chelmsford Museum through the Chelmsford Philosophical Society, and the formation of the Essex Archaeological Society.

About the Author
Professor David Gill is Honorary Professor in the Centre for Heritage at the University of Kent, and Academic Associate in the Centre for Archaeology and Heritage in the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures at the University of East Anglia (UEA). He is a Fellow of the RSA and the Society of Antiquaries. In 2012 he received the Outstanding Public Service Award from the Archaeological Institute of America for his research on cultural property.

Reviews
'This volume sits somewhat uncomfortably in a series devoted to Archaeological Lives. It concerns the family history of John Disney (1779–1857), who inherited a very important collection of antiquities, some of which he gave to Cambridge University, where he went on to found the premier chair of archaeology in Britain.'—Martin Henig, Journal of the History of Collections, June 2021
Deposit of Amphorae in the Quarter of St. Theodore, Pula by Alka Starac. Paperback; 205x290mm; 704 pages; 75 figures, 10 tables, 21 graphs plus appendices and illustrated catalogue (colour throughout). Print RRP: £95.00. 695 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 75. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698480. £95.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698497. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £95.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Deposit of Amphorae in the Quarter of St. Theodore, Pula examines a large group of amphorae which were placed in the quarter of St. Theodore in Pula during the construction of the terrace of the Roman temple complex and adjacent public thermae in the mid-1st century BC, in order to enable drainage and levelling of the slope. The total number of amphorae from deposits registered in the 2005-2007 excavations amounted to 2119, of which 1754 were extracted and thoroughly documented.

About the Author
Alka Starac has worked in the fields of Roman archaeology, epigraphy, history and economy since defending her PhD dissertation Roman rule in Histria and Liburnia’in 1996 at the University of Zagreb. She has published more than eighty scholarly papers in international archaeological publications, ten monographs (either as author or editor) and has worked on several archaeological exhibitions dealing with Roman Istria.
Invisible Connections: An Archaeometallurgical Analysis of the Bronze Age Metalwork from the Egyptian Museum of the University of Leipzig by Martin Odler and Jiří Kmošek. Paperback; 205x290mm; 200 pages; 176 figures, 15 tables (colour throughout). 692 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 31. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697407. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697414. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £44.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Egyptian Museum of the University of Leipzig has the largest university collection of ancient Egyptian artefacts in Germany. It includes important objects from the excavations of the most prolific excavator among the museum’s curators, Georg Steindorff, at the sites of Abusir, Aniba, and Giza, complemented by objects from Abydos, Thebes, and Kerma. The catalogue represents the results of an interdisciplinary project by Egyptologist and archaeologist Martin Odler, archaeometalurgist Jiří Kmošek and other participating researchers. A selection of 86 artefacts was analysed using a range of archaeometallurgical methods (X-ray fluorescence; metallography; neutron activation analysis; lead isotope analysis), providing a diachronic sample of Bronze Age Egyptian copper alloy metalwork from Dynasty 1 to Dynasty 19.

Besides currently popular focus on the ore provenance, the selection of the applied methods aimed also at the description of practical physical properties of the objects. The question of differences between full-size functional artefacts and models is addressed, as is the problem of 'imports' and their ethnic interpretation. The analyses brought many unexpected results to light, the most surprising being a bowl (ÄMUL 2162) made of arsenical copper high in nickel, which has parallels in Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age Anatolia, and was featured in an article in the Journal of Archaeological Science in 2018. The corpus presented here involves the largest analysed metalwork assemblage from the Nubian C-Group and the Egyptian New Kingdom, and it addresses the issue of the use of local Nubian ore sources versus the sources of copper from Cyprus and elsewhere.

About the Authors
Martin Odler defended his PhD thesis 'The social context of copper in ancient Egypt down to the end of Middle Kingdom' in 2020. In 2016, he published the monograph 'Old Kingdom Copper Tools and Model Tools', the first of its kind in Egyptology, with Archaeopress. In Abusir (Egypt), he led, together with Marie Peterková Hlouchová, an excavation of a new type of Egyptian tomb (AS 103) and of the latest known tomb of a transitional type from early Dynasty 4 (AS 104).

Jiří Kmošek is an archaeometallurgist, a PhD candidate at the Institute for Natural Sciences and Technology in the Arts, Academy of Fine Arts Vienna. He has analysed not only ancient Egyptian material but also Bronze Age metalwork from the Czech Republic.
Die Bestattungsgruben in Bat by Conrad Schmidt, with contributions by Stefan Giese und Christian Hübner and Steve Zäuner. Hardback; 210x297mm; 374pp; 250 figures; 187 tables (97 pages of colour). German text. 680 2020 Arabia Orientalis: Studien zur Archäologie Ostarabiens 1. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697391. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697858. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Volume 1 of the series Arabia Orientalis presents the first comprehensive study of two Umm an-Nar (2700—2000 BC) burial pits from the UNESCO World Heritage site Bat in the Sultanate of Oman. They were excavated between 2010 and 2012 by the University of Tübingen. Each burial pit represents one of the largest closed finds of the Early Bronze Age in the region. Finds largely include beads and other items of personal adornment, as well as pottery and human bones. Detailed typologies of all objects are the basis for in-depth statistical analyses of the different categories of finds and the reconstruction of burial customs at Bat. Furthermore, imports and imitations from other regions including the Indus Valley, Iran, and Mesopotamia illuminate Bat’s foreign relations and integration into the interregional exchange and communication system. The interpretation of the unearthed human remains conducted by Steve Zauner offer, not only the number of individuals, sex, and age of the deceased, but also insights into lifestyle, diseases, and stress of the people in the past.

German description
Die Umm an-Nar-Zeit (2700–2000 v. Chr.) auf der östlichen Arabischen Halbinsel gilt als Periode tiefgreifender Veränderungen in der ökonomischen und sozialen Organisation der Gesellschaft sowie der Ausbeutung von Ressourcen. Einer der größten und bedeutendsten Fundplätze dieser Zeit im Sultanat Oman ist der seit 1988 auf der Welterbeliste der UNESCO stehende Fundort Bat in der Provinz Al-Dhahirah. Von 2010 bis 2015 führte die Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen ein Projekt zur Erforschung der Entwicklung der beiden Nekropolen von Bat und Al-Ayn sowie der Siedlung von Al-Zebah durch. Im Mittelpunkt der Untersuchungen stand die Frage nach den Gründen und Ursachen des sozioökonomischen Umbruchs im 3. Jahrtausend v. Chr. und wie sich dieser in den Lebensverhältnissen der damaligen Bevölkerung widerspiegelt.

Die vorliegende Publikation stellt den ersten Band der Endberichte des Forschungsprojekts des Instituts für die Kulturen des Alten Orients der Universität Tübingen in Bat, Al-Zebah und Al- Ayn dar. Das Werk beinhaltet die vollständige Auswertung der beiden Umm an-Nar-zeitlichen Bestattungsgruben A-Inst. 0006 und A-Inst. 0025 in Bat einschließlich anthropologischer Analysen und einer geophysikalischen Prospektion in der Nekropole von Bat. Beide Gruben zählen zu den größten jemals im Oman untersuchten geschlossenen Fundkontexten der frühen Bronzezeit. Zur Publikation gehört ein online unter https://tinyurl. com/9781789697391-der-fundekatalog publizierter Katalog, der sämtliche Einzelnachweise zu den Funden aus den beiden Bestattungsgruben enthält.
A Latin Lexicon: An Illustrated Compendium of Latin Words and English Derivatives by Caroline K. Mackenzie. Illustrations by Amanda Short. Hardback; 156x234mm; 142 pages; colour design throughout, 20 full-colour illustrations. 677 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697629. £24.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697636. £19.99 (Exc. VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A charming compendium of Latin words and English derivatives, encompassing over 365 words required for Latin GCSE, one for each day of the year. Each Latin entry is accompanied by key notes on grammar, translations and some playful and memorable derivatives. A concise introduction and a glossary of Latin in common usage combine to make this a vade-mecum (essential companion) for all learners of Latin as well as cruciverbalists. The text is imaginatively punctuated by 20 full-colour illustrations by Amanda Short.

About the Author
Caroline K. Mackenzie read Classics at Pembroke College, Cambridge. After a legal career in London, she became Head of Classics at a school in Sevenoaks. In 2018 Caroline was awarded distinction in an MA in Classical Art and Archaeology at King’s College London. Caroline offers online private tutoring in Latin and Greek and runs online Classical reading groups for all ages and abilities. Caroline’s first book, Culture and Society at Lullingstone Roman Villa was published by Archaeopress in 2019.

Praise for This Volume:
Carpe verba! (Grasp the words!) A hugely fun and useful tool for Latin learners. I wish I’d had this book when I was learning Latin.’ – Caroline Lawrence, author of The Roman Mysteries. ;

‘The narrator of a recent French historical novel muses: 'My whole life I owe to Greek. If I hadn't known how to conjugate the aorist, where to put the stresses, how to recite -mi verbs, I would never have been able to escape my menial little existence. Declensions proved to be the instrument of my ascent'. Pari passu and mutatis mutandis, that surely is what every reader will say after reading, marking and inwardly digesting Caroline Mackenzie's brilliant Latin Compendium.’ – Professor Paul Cartledge, University of Cambridge. ;

‘A handsome and lively introduction to Latin through its core vocabulary and derivatives. Everyone should have a copy.’ – Dr Daisy Dunn, author of In the Shadow of Vesuvius. ;

‘This delightful, illustrated book will serve two purposes: the straightforward English derivatives will help students remember their Latin vocabulary, and the recondite ones will give a head start for the Scrabble board or cryptic crossword.’ – Dr John Taylor, author of Essential GCSE Latin. ;

‘Latin can be fun, who knew? A real must for anyone learning Latin or interested in language. I genuinely LOVE this book. It is a fantastic idea and looks absolutely beautiful.’ – Celia Rees, author and former English teacher. ;

‘Elegantly presented, entertaining, and educational.’ – Ruth Downie, author. ;

'The perfect book for anyone who, like me, wishes they had understood Latin at school. Why did our teachers tell us it is a "dead language", and not how useful it would be in real life?’ – Janie Hampton, author. ;

‘A thoroughly helpful volume, great for both reference and pleasure, ideal for both the crossword and the classroom.’ – Michelle Lovric, author.

‘This is a well-presented book, packed with information for teachers, students and anyone interested in language, and Latin in particular.’ – Mike Smith, Classics for All, November 2020
A Catalogue of the Sculpture Collection at Wilton House by Peter Stewart with new photography by Guido Petruccioli. Hardback with Dust Jacket; 229x305mm; 438 pages; 14 figures and 154 plates in full colour throughout. 661 2020. ISBN 9781789696554. £90.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Wilton House sculptures constituted one of the largest and most celebrated collections of ancient art in Europe. Originally comprising some 340 works, the collection was formed around the late 1710s and 1720s by Thomas Herbert, the eccentric 8th Earl of Pembroke, who stubbornly ‘re-baptized’ his busts and statues with names of his own choosing. His sources included the famous collection of Cardinal Mazarin, assembled in Paris in the 1640s and 1650s, and recent discoveries on the Via Appia outside Rome. Earl Thomas regarded the sculptures as ancient – some of them among the oldest works of art in existence – but in fact much of the collection is modern and represents the neglected talents of sixteenth-and seventeenth-century artists, restorers and copyists who were inspired by Greek and Roman sculpture.

About half of the original collection remains intact today, adorning the Gothic Cloisters that were built for it two centuries ago. After a long decline, accelerated by the impact of the Second World War, the sculptures have been rehabilitated in recent years. They include masterpieces of Roman and early modern art, which cast fresh light on Graeco-Roman antiquity, the classical tradition, and the history of collecting.

Illustrated with specially commissioned photographs, this catalogue offers the first comprehensive publication of the 8th Earl’s collection, including an inventory of works dispersed from Wilton. It re-presents his personal vision of the collection recorded in contemporary manuscripts. At the same time, it dismantles some of the myths about it which originated with the earl himself, and provides an authoritative archaeological and art-historical analysis of the artefacts.

About the Author
Peter Stewart is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. His research ranges across many aspects of Greek and Roman sculpture and the relationships between different artistic traditions. His previous publications include, Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008).

Guido Petruccioli is an Oxford University-trained classical archaeologist and professional photographer with specialist interests in Roman imperial portraiture and the documentation of ancient sculpture.

Reviews
'This volume on the marbles at Wilton House forms an impressive addition to the literature on the privately owned collections of antiquities in Britain.'—Clare Hornsby, Journal of the History of Collections
Le verre de Sabra al-Mansuriya - Kairouan, Tunisie - milieu Xe-milieu XIe siècle : Production et consommation: vaisselle - contenants - vitrages by Danièle Foy with a contribution by Ian Freestone; preface by Faouzi Mahfoudh. Paperback; 300 pages; 111 figures; French text with abstract in English and Arabic. 650 2020 Archaeology of the Maghreb 1. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696615. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696622. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Islamic glass and its craftsmanship in the Medieval period are known almost exclusively from Middle Eastern literature. The study of the structures of the workshop and the very rich glass assemblage from Sabra al-Mansuriya (Kairouan), the Fatimid capital founded in 947/948 and destroyed in 1057, proves that Ifriqiya followed the technological evolutions of glass craftsmanship.

An examination of the furnaces and the various artefacts discovered highlights the double vocation of a palatial factory: to produce glass and glazed ceramics. From this particular workshop, installed in the wing of a palace, we found everyday glassware as well as more luxurious types, some with very specific forms, others reproducing models known throughout the Islamic world. These productions are local and imported – distinguished through morphological and chemical analyzes – and form the basis of a first typology of glass used in Ifriqiya from the 10th to 11th century.

Architectural glass, partly made on site, is also abundant. The crown-glass of different colours, used whole or in small fragments, adorned the openwork panel walls with various carvings. The windows and their glass offered a rich polychrome and a complex decorative syntax, reflecting significant technical mastery and the desire to display economic and political power.

About the Author
Danièle Foy is Emeritus Research Director at CNRS, Centre Camille Jullian (Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, CCJ, Aix-en-Provence, France). Her work concerns crafts, trade and consumption of glass in Antiquity, the Middle Ages and the pre-industrial period in the Mediterranean area.

Le verre islamique et son artisanat à l’époque médiévale sont presque exclusivement connus par la documentation du Proche-Orient. L’étude des structures de l’atelier et du très riche mobilier en verre de Sabra al-Mansuriya (Kairouan), capitale fatimide fondée en 947/948 et détruite en 1057, prouve que l’Ifriqiya n’est pas resté en retrait de l’essor de l’artisanat verrier. L’examen des fours et des différents artefacts mis au jour met en évidence la double vocation d’une fabrique palatiale : produire du verre et de la céramique glaçurée. De cet atelier particulier, installé dans l’aile d’un palais, sortaient des verres communs et d’autres plus luxueux, certains de formes spécifiques, d’autres reproduisant des modèles connus dans l’ensemble du monde islamique. Ces productions locales et les importations, distinguées par l’étude morphologique et les analyses chimiques, forment la base d’une première typologie des verres utilisés dans l’Ifriqiya des Xe-XIe siècle.

Le verre architectural, en partie fabriqué sur place, est également abondant. Les cives de différentes couleurs, utilisées entières ou en menus fragments, garnissaient des claustras de plâtre très ajourés et aux découpes variées. Les fenêtres et leurs vitraux offraient une riche polychromie et une syntaxe décorative complexe, traduisant une grande maîtrise technique et la volonté d’exprimer un pouvoir économique et politique.

Danièle Foy est directrice de recherches émérite au CNRS, Centre Camille Jullian (Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, CCJ, Aix-en- Provence, France). Ses travaux concernent l’artisanat, le commerce et la consommation du verre dans l’Antiquité, le Moyen Age et la période pré-industrielle dans l’espace méditerranéen. Ses publications sur le verre islamique portent sur le mobilier de Fustat-Le Caire, Hadir et Damas en Syrie et Sharma au Yémen. En Tunisie, elle a principalement étudié le verre d’époque romaine provenant de Carthage, Pupput, Sidi Jdidi et Nabeul.
Die vermeintlich pergamenische Importkeramik in Ephesos Studien zur Typologie, Provenienz und Herstellungstechnik von so genannter Weißgrundiger Ware, Applikenkeramik und Pergamenischer Sigillata by Asuman Lätzer-Lasar. Paperback; 314 pages; 18 figures, 4 tables plus 64 plates (74 colour pages). German text. 643 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696097. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696103. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Die vermeintlich pergamenische Importkeramik in Ephesos is the first comparative study of three ceramic ware groups, namely Appliqué Ware, White-grounded ware and Pergamene Sigillata, which appear in Ephesos (on the Aegean coast of modern day Turkey) but, until now, were considered to be products made in and imported from Pergamon; one ware group was even named after the city. However, using intensive archaeometrical analysis tools, such as thin-section and microscopy, this study seeks to demonstrate that most of the ceramic objects were produced locally. Futhermore, the book presents stunning new data that showing the very differing technical knowledge among the ancient potters of Western Asia Minor. Emerging out of the archaeometrical analyses, the book provides a list of concrete parameters for the identification of provenance in the field. Furthermore, this study encompasses the first typochronology for the three ware groups, which allows future excavations in the wider region to set up a fine chronology of their contexts based on ceramic evidences.

Asuman Lätzer-Lasar is currently a research associate at the Max Weber Centre for Advanced Cultural and Social Studies at the University of Erfurt. At the same time, she is also a member of the DFG-Center for Advanced Studies ‘Religion and Urbanity. Reciprocal transformations’. Previously, she has been the Assistant Director of the International Center for Advanced Studies Morphomata at the University of Cologne, where she also graduated in Archaeology of the Roman Provinces, Classical Archaeology and Ancient Sinology. Her PhD-project was financed by the a.r.t.e.s. Graduate School of the University of Cologne.

German Description:
Mit Die vermeintlich pergamenische Importkeramik in Ephesos konnten vorherige Annahmen in der Forschungsgeschichte zu der Herkunft der drei Warengruppen namens Applikenkeramik, Weißgrundige Ware und Pergamenische Sigillata, die als Importe aus Pergamon gehalten wurden, anhand von archäometrischen Analysen widerlegt und als lokal gefertigte Produkte identifiziert werden. Neben der archäometrischen Provenienzbestimmung wurden neue Erkenntnisse über das technologische Wissen der antiken Töpfer und zur Arbeitsorganisation in Werkstätten präsentiert. Die Auflistung von Unterscheidungsparametern bei Fabricuntersuchungen, sowie die Typochronologie liefern eine Grundlage für zukünftige Auswertungen von Fundkontexten des westlichen Kleinasiens während des Hellenismus und der frühen Kaiserzeit.

Asuman Lätzer-Lasar ist wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin am Max-Weber-Kolleg für kultur- und sozialwissenschaftliche Studien der Universität Erfurt. Gleichzeitig ist sie Mitglied bei der DFGKollegforschungsgruppe „Religion und Urbanität: Wechselseitige Formierungen“ (FOR 2779). Zuvor war sie Geschäftsführerin beim Internationalen Kolleg Morphomata der Universität zu Köln. Sie studierte Provinzialrömische Archäologie, Klassische Archäologie und Ältere Sinologie an der Universität zu Köln und der Tamkang University in Danshui/Taiwan. Ihre Promotion wurde von der a.r.t.e.s. Graduiertenschule mit einem Vollstipendium finanziert.
Henry Hunter Calvert’s Collection of Amphora Stamps and that of Sidney Smith Saunders by Alan Johnston. Paperback; 175x245mm; 118 pages; illustrated catalogue, 5 plates. 634 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696431. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696448. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Henry Hunter Calvert died at his family house at Çannakale in 1880 a few months after escaping from the rioting in Alexandria where he was British consul. The consulate was sacked and his collections destroyed. He had however sent an annotated list of his Greek amphora stamps to the British Museum, presumably to Charles Newton, with whom he and his brother Frank had frequent correspondence. This list was forgotten until the present writer ‘found’ it in a box-file in the Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities (its title at the time). Henry Hunter Calvert’s Collection of Amphora Stamps and that of Sidney Smith Saunders publicly presents that material.

About the Author
Alan Johnston is Emeritus Reader in Classical Archaeology at University College London. He has published widely on Greek archaeology, notably ceramics and epigraphy, having contributed to excavation reports from Aigina, Antikythera, Gravisca, Kition, Kommos and Kythera. Recently he has been working at the British Museum with the Naukratis Project team and on a catalogue of amphora stamps in the collection, and this publication is an offshoot of that work.

Table of Contents
Introduction ;

Catalogue ;
Baetica ;
Brindisi ;
Thasos ;
Chios ;
Kos ;
Knidos ;
Rhodes ;
Pamphylia ;
Egypt ;

Comment ;
Kos and Knidos ;
Rhodes ;
Unprovenanced ;

Index of names ;
Rhodian seconday stamps ;

Symbols (Rhodian unless otherwise stated) ;

Plates ;

Bibliography
Engraved Gems and Propaganda in the Roman Republic and under Augustus by Paweł Gołyźniak. Hardback; 618 pages; fully illustrated catalogue containing 1,015 figures (in colour). 627 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 65. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695397. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695403. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Engraved Gems and Propaganda in the Roman Republic and under Augustus deals with small, but highly captivating and stimulating artwork – engraved gemstones. Although in antiquity intaglios and cameos had multiple applications (seals, jewellery or amulets), the images engraved upon them are snapshots of people's beliefs, ideologies, and everyday occupations. They cast light on the self-advertising and propaganda actions performed by Roman political leaders, especially Octavian/Augustus, their factions and other people engaged in the politics and social life of the past.

Gems can show both general trends (the specific showpieces like State Cameos) as well as the individual and private acts of being involved in politics and social affairs, mainly through a subtle display of political allegiances, since they were objects of strictly personal use. They enable us to analyse and learn about Roman propaganda and various social behaviours from a completely different angle than coins, sculpture or literature.

The miniaturism of ancient gems is in inverse proportion to their cultural significance. This book presents an evolutionary model of the use of engraved gems from self-presentation (3rd-2nd century BC) to personal branding and propaganda purposes in the Roman Republic and under Augustus (until 14 AD). The specific characteristics of engraved gems, their strictly private character and the whole array of devices appearing on them are examined in respect to their potential propagandistic value and usefulness in social life.

The wide scope of this analysis provides a comprehensive picture covering many aspects of Roman propaganda and a critical survey of the overinterpretations of this term in regard to the glyptic art. The aim is the incorporation of this class of archaeological artefacts into the well-established studies of Roman propaganda, as well as the Roman society in general, brought about by discussion of the interconnections with ancient literary sources as well as other categories of Roman art and craftsmanship, notably coins but also sculpture and relief.

About the Author
Paweł Gołyźniak works as a Research Fellow in the Institute of Archaeology, Jagiellonian University in Krakow. His research interests include engraved gems (ancient and neo-classical), Roman Republican and Augustan numismatics, history of antiquarianism, collecting and scholarship as well as 18th century drawings of intaglios and cameos and the legacy of antiquary and connoisseur Philipp von Stosch (1691-1757).

Reviews
'... this volume—splendidly produced at an extraordinarily low price for what it contains (and actually free to download in PDF format)—is a book of enduring worth. Gołyźniak deserves our gratitude for writing one of the best books on Roman gems to have been published for a very long time.'—Dr Martin Henig, The Journal of Gemmology, Volume 37, No. 3, 2020
An Illustrated Companion to Japanese Archaeology 2nd Edition edited by Werner Steinhaus, Simon Kaner, Megumi Jinno and Shinya Shoda. Paperback; 210x297mm; 352 pages; 209 figures, 248 plates (full colour throughout). 273 2016 Comparative and Global Perspectives on Japanese Archaeology 1. ISBN 9781789693959. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

An Illustrated Companion to Japanese Archaeology provides for the first time a comprehensive visual introduction to a wide range of sites and finds from the earliest occupation of the Japanese archipelago prior to 35,000 years ago to the early historical periods and the establishment of the Chinese-style capital at Heijo, modern-day Nara, in the 8th century AD. The volume originated in the largest ever exhibition of Japanese archaeological discoveries held in Germany in 2004, which brought together over 1500 exhibits from 55 lenders around Japan, and research by over 100 specialists. The Illustrated Companion brings the fruits of this project to an English-reading audience and offers an up-to-date survey of the achievements of Japanese archaeology.

About the Editors
Werner STEINHAUS is Lecturer in Archaeology at Hiroshima University and an Academic Associate at the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures. ;

Simon KANER is Executive Director of the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures (www.sainsbury-institute.org), where he is also Head of the Centre for Archaeology and Heritage, and Director of the Centre for Japanese Studies at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK. ;

Megumi JINNO is Chief Researcher of the Department of Palace Investigations at Nara National Research Institute for Cultural Properties in Japan. ;

Shinya SHODA is Head of the International Cooperation Section at Nara National Research Institute for Cultural Properties in Japan, and an Academic Associate at the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures, UK.
The Beau Street, Bath Hoard by Verity Anthony, Richard Abdy and Stephen Clews. Hardback; 205x290mm; 338 pages; 36 figures; 57 plates containing images of 1524 coins (75 pages in colour). 578 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 59. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915940. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915957. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Beau Street Hoard is one of the most remarkable archaeological discoveries ever to be made in Bath: the Roman town of Aquae Sulis. The discovery captured the public imagination and it became the focus for a major scientific investigation and a significant learning and public engagement programme. Carefully excavated by professional archaeologists the hoard was recovered intact and removed to the British Museum for more detailed examination and study. It was found to have been deposited in a cist in at least eight bags. Micro-investigation of the hoard in a conservation laboratory and further scientific analysis revealed more fascinating details and information reported on here. The Beau Street, Bath Hoard provides a thorough and complete publication and analysis of the hoard, which is one of the largest yet found in a Roman town in Britain. The high quality of the recovery and investigation process means that it makes a significant contribution to both archaeological and numismatic studies.

About the Authors
Verity Anthony is Visitor Experience and Collections Manager at Cornwall’s Regimental Museum. Prior to that she has worked in collections roles at the Museum of London and at The Roman Baths, where she played a major part in the Beau Street Hoard project.

Richard Abdy has been curator of Roman coins at the British Museum for many years, with particular interest in the middle and later imperial periods of the Roman Empire. He is in the process of publishing RIC II.3 on the coinage of Hadrian and has had long experience of recording Roman coin hoards through work on Treasure cases in England.

Stephen Clews is the Manager of the Roman Baths and Pump Room in Bath, where he has worked on the re-development and re-display of the site and its collections for more than thirty years. He also enjoys an occasional glass of spa water.
Hillforts: Britain, Ireland and the Nearer Continent Papers from the Atlas of Hillforts of Britain and Ireland Conference, June 2017 edited by Gary Lock and Ian Ralston. Paperback; 205x290mm; 250pp; 145 figures, 7 tables. 548 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692266. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692273. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Funded by the AHRC, the Atlas of Hillforts of Britain and Ireland project (2012-2016) involved a team drawn from the Universities of Oxford, Edinburgh and Cork which was responsible for compiling a massive database, now freely available online at https://hillforts.arch.ox.ac, on hillforts in Britain and Ireland. This was underpinned by a major desk-based re-assessment of accessible records. These twelve studies, presented at the end of that exercise to a conference in Edinburgh, and contributed by team members and colleagues, outline the background to and development of the project (Gary Lock) and offer a preliminary assessment of the online digital Atlas (John Pouncett) as well as presenting initial research studies using Atlas data. The volume is profusely illustrated with over 140 figures, including many new maps.

Ian Ralston provides a historical assessment of key stages in the enumeration and mapping of these important monuments on both sides of the Irish Sea. The hill- and promontory forts of England, Wales and the Isle of Man are assessed by Ian Brown and those of Ireland by James O’Driscoll, Alan Hawkes and William O’Brien. Stratford Halliday’s study of the Scottish evidence focuses on the impact of the application of the Atlas criteria to the records of forts in that country. Simon Maddison deploys Percolation Analysis as an example of the potential re-use of the Atlas data in analysing new distributions; Jessica Murray presents a GIS-based approach to hillfort settings and configurations.

Syntheses on insular Early Historic fortified settlements in northern Britain and Ireland, by James O’Driscoll and Gordon Noble, and on hillforts in areas of the nearer Continent are included. The latter comprise an overview by Sophie Krausz on Iron Age fortifications in France and a consideration of the south German records of hillforts and oppida by Axel Posluschny, while Fernando Rodriguez del Cueto tackles the north-western Spanish evidence.

About the Editors
GARY LOCK is Emeritus Professor of Archaeology, University of Oxford. He gained his first degree in Archaeology at the University of Leicester and then took his PhD based on post-excavation work at Danebury hillfort. His interest in the Iron Age and particularly hillforts and their landscapes resulted in thirty years teaching and researching at Oxford in both the School of Archaeology and the Continuing Education Department. Gary co-directed the Hillforts of the Ridgeway project which involved the excavation and publication of three hillforts: Uffington Castle; Segsbury Camp and Alfred’s Castle. Thereafter research at Marcham/Frilford, a large Iron Age ritual complex and Romano-British temple, necessitated eleven years of fieldwork. Post-excavation work on this community archaeology project is ongoing. Gary has also worked on hillfort projects in the Najera Valley, La Rioja (Spain) and the Sangro Valley (Italy). In recent years Gary has excavated a hillfort in North Wales, Moel-y-Gaer, Bodfari, which is currently being written up. He is a longstanding member of the Hillfort Study Group and was co-PI of the Atlas of Hillforts of Britain and Ireland project. Gary’s other major interest is the use of computers in archaeology, especially GIS on which he has published extensively. He has recently retired as Chair of the Computer Applications in Archaeology international conference.

IAN RALSTON’s doctorate was on the Iron Age enclosed sites of Limousin, France, following on from undergraduate studies in Stuart Piggott’s department at Edinburgh. For eleven years he was on the staff of the University of Aberdeen before transferring to Edinburgh in 1985, where he was appointed to a personal chair there in 1998 and as Abercromby Professor of Archaeology in 2012. Over his career he has primarily worked on various aspects of the prehistoric and early historic archaeology of eastern Scotland, including excavations at two promontory
La raccolta e la distribuzione dell’acqua a Ventotene in età romana Ricerche archeologiche nell’isola di Ventotene 2 by Giovanni Maria De Rossi. Paperback; 205x290mm; 360 pages; 608 figures (256 pages in colour). Italian text. (Print RRP £65.00). 527 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 57. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691467. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691474. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

La raccolta e la distribuzione dell’acqua a Ventotene in età romana is presented in two parts. The first examines the topographical and technical problem of the water supply on the island of Ventotene, where there is an absence of natural springs. The second, consisting of separate entries, analyses the individual components of the water supply system built by the Romans on the island. The Roman installation developed in two phases alongside changes in life at the villa located at Ventotene: the first connected to a residence used for otium, the second to an official site of relegatio ad insulam.

The Roman architect exploited the island’s natural slope to collect rainwater in a large initial reservoir, later known as the ‘Cistern of the Prisoners’, surmounted by a vast catchment basin: from here a conduit departed which, through various branches, reached the ‘heart’ of the villa extending over the promontory of Punta Eolo and the port facilities. The water was channelled from the cistern by an extensive network of tunnels, dug, depending on the height, either wholly or partially into the tufa or built on the surface.

Even during the second phase, when the villa was turned into a large and elaborate residential complex used throughout the year, it could rely only on rainwater as a resource. The Roman architect was thus forced to increase the collection areas, attempting to capture as much water as possible. This was achieved by increasing the number of large initial collection tanks, dislocating them strategically around the island to ensure that each of the sectors with the highest residential density and main infrastructure installations had its own independent resource alongside the standard existing resources. The number of catchment basins also multiplied considerably along the route of the main conduit and its branches.

About the Author
Giovanni Maria De Rossi (Rome 1942), Full Professor of Topography of Ancient Italy at the University of Salerno, has published many articles and books on ancient and medieval topography. He has directed archaeological excavations in Italy, and he conceived and designed the Archaeological park and Historical-Archaeological museum at Ventotene island, where he has been director for over twenty years.

Italian Description
La raccolta e la distribuzione dell’acqua a Ventotene in età romana si compone di due parti. Nella prima viene esaminato il problema topografico e tecnico relativo all’approvvigionamento idrico dell’isola di Ventotene, in rapporto alla sostanziale assenza di sorgenti d’acqua. Nella seconda, composta di schede, si analizzano le singole componenti del sistema idrico costruito dai Romani nell’isola. L’impianto romano va inserito nelle due fasi di vita della villa realizzata a Ventotene: la prima legata a una residenza per l’otium, la seconda a una sede ufficiale per la relegatio ad insulam. L’architetto romano sfruttò il naturale pendio dell’isola per raccogliere acqua piovana in un grande serbatoio iniziale, poi detto “Cisterna dei Carcerati”, sormontato da un vastissimo compluvio di raccolta: da qui partiva un condotto che raggiungeva, con varie diramazioni, il “cuore” della villa distesa sul promontorio di Punta Eolo e gli impianti portuali. Lo smistamento dell’acqua dal serbatoio venne affidato a una capillare rete di cunicoli, scavati, a seconda delle quote, interamente o parzialmente nel tufo oppure costruiti in superficie. Per aumentare notevolmente la quantità d’acqua messa a disposizione dell’impianto, si realizzarono lungo i condotti abbinamenti formati da compluvi di superficie e cisterne di raccolta. Potendo contare, anche per la seconda fase, in cui però la villa era stata trasformata in un grande e articolato complesso residenziale da utilizzarsi per tutto l’anno, sulla sola risorsa delle piogge, all’architetto romano di turno non rimase che l’espediente di aumentare i punti di raccolta, cercando c
Atlas of Ceramic Fabrics 2 Italy: Southern Tyrrhenian. Neolithic – Bronze Age by Sara T. Levi, Valentina Cannavò and Daniele Brunelli with contributions by Andrea Di Renzoni. Paperback; 175x245mm; viii+168 pages; 40 figures, 17 tables and 16-page colour plate section containing 163 illustrations. 525 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691177. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691184. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Atlas of Ceramic Fabrics 2. Italy: Southern Tyrrhenian. Neolithic – Bronze Age presents and interprets the petrographic composition of pre-protohistoric pottery (6th-1st millennia BCE) found in southwestern part of Italy. This is the second in a Atlas series organised according to geographical areas, chronology and types of wares. In this book 890 samples from 29 sites are discussed, encompassing results of more than 50 years of interdisciplinary archaeological, technological and archaeometric research by the authors’ team. Ninety petrographic fabrics (the potters’ ‘recipes’) are defined and presented based on their lithological character – a tool that can be used to compare different components of the ceramic pastes and to check possible provenance of non-local pots.

The volume is organized in chapters focused on methodology, fabric description and distribution, followed by the archaeological implications and the database, with contribution by Andrea Di Renzoni (CNR-ISMA, Roma). Illustrations and descriptions of the fabrics and a list of samples provide a rigorous and transparent presentation of the data. The archaeological implications are discussed through cross-correlatios between origin and technology, variability, standardisation, chronology, function, social organization, circulation, style, typology and cultural identity. We hope that this work will be considered an another stepping-stone in demonstrating that technological variability is as important as stylistic distinctions.

About the Authors
SARA T. LEVI’s research focuses on the ancient pottery through an integrated approach, and on the archaeology of central Mediterranean. She obtained a PhD in archaeology at the Sapienza University in Rome (1996). Her findings have been published in scientific journals and books, including a volume on the Italo-Mycenaean pottery (2014). Since 2015 she has been teaching at Hunter College in New York, after teaching for eight years at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia. Since 2009 she leads the interdisciplinary archaeological investigations at Stromboli (Aeolian Islands) and at Cannatello (Agrigento). Both projects hold international field school for students in a multidisciplinary environment.

VALENTINA CANNAVÓ’s research focuses on the archaeometric investigation of ancient pottery. She is a research fellow at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia where she obtained a PhD in archaeological science (2010). Valentina teaches pottery technology (Ferrara University) to graduate students. She is in charge of the database of prehistoric pottery is director of the field laboratory at Stromboli (Aeolian Islands).

DANIELE BRUNELLI’s research focuses on petrography, geochemistry and tectonics of oceanic ridges. He obtained his PhD at the University of Bologna (2002). Since 2007 he has been teaching at the University of Modena, is associated researcher at CNR-ISMAR, invited professor at the University of Brest and at the Institute de Physique du Globe de Paris. He supports the development of petrographic and geochemical approach of the archaeo-team by bringing expertise of the geological exploration of the volcanic terrains and the availability of cutting edge analytical approaches.
De la provincia Celtiberia a la Qūrā de Santabariyya: Arqueología de la Antigüedad tardía en la provincia de Cuenca (siglos V-VIII d.C.) by Rafael Barroso Cabrera. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+560 pages; 174 figures, 5 tables, 2 maps, 80 plates (45 plates in colour). Spanish text with extended English summary. 498 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690644. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690651. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £75.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The central position of the province of Cuenca, Spain, was a decisive factor in its relationship with Toledo, the capital of the Visigothic kingdom. Also, its location meant that, from the middle of the 6th Century, it was directly affected by some of the most relevant historical episodes of those times: the foundation of the royal city of Reccopoli, the establishment of the Servitanus monastery, the transformation of Toledo as the metropolitan seat of the Carthaginian province and the military campaigns against the imperial forces. Parallel to this, archaeological excavations document a process of disrupting the old urban centres in favour of small populations within their municipal territory. This process was resolved with a shift of power centres towards other cities supported by the political power of Toledo: Toledo itself in the case of Segobriga, Reccopoli in the Arcavica’s case and Illunum to the detriment of Valeria. In this way, the ancient Roman cities were reduced to serve as a symbolic reference of the small villages that developed in the shadow of the old urban centres. This volume presents a historical and archaeological study of the province of Cuenca in Late Antiquity. The study concludes with an examination of the archaeological collection from the province, which has been divided into three large groups: monumental sculpture and epigraphic items, ceramic productions and metalwork arts. The first group is mainly constituted by the findings made in the excavations of Cabeza de Griego (Segobriga). Most of the pottery productions correspond to vessels placed as funerary deposits. Due to the absence of excavations, the ceramics for kitchen and storage use are hardly represented, whereas there is an overrepresentation of types destined for use as libations or offerings. Finally, most of the elements of industrial arts correspond to elements of the Latin-Mediterranean fashion or Byzantine style of the 7th Century. The almost total absence of materials corresponding to the Pontic-Danubian fashion also should be noted.

La posición central de la provincia de Cuenca ha sido el factor determinante en su relación con Toledo, la capital del reino visigodo. Esta situación fue la causa también de que, desde mediados del siglo VI, se viera directamente afectada por algunos de los episodios históricos más relevantes del momento: la fundación de la ciudad regia de Recópolis, el establecimiento del monasterio Servitano, la transformación de Toledo en sede metropolitana de la provincia cartaginesa y las campañas militares contra los ejércitos imperiales. De forma paralela, las excavaciones arqueológicas documentan un proceso de desestructuración de los antiguos centros urbanos a favor de pequeñas poblaciones de su territorio. Este proceso se resolvió con un cambio de centros de poder hacia otras ciudades apoyadas por el poder político de Toledo: Toledo mismo en el caso de Segóbriga, Recópolis en el caso de Arcávica e Illunum en detrimento de Valeria. De este modo, las ciudades romanas quedaron reducidas servir como referentes simbólicos de las pequeñas poblaciones que se desarrollaron a la sombra de los antiguos centros urbanos. El presente trabajo se completa con el estudio de la colección arqueológica procedente de la provincia, que se ha dividido en tres grandes grupos: escultura monumental y epigrafía, producciones cerámicas y artes industriales. El primer grupo está constituido principalmente por los hallazgos realizados en las excavaciones de Cabeza de Griego (Segóbriga). Por otro lado, la mayoría de las producciones de cerámica corresponden a vasijas colocadas como depósitos funerarios. Debido a la ausencia de excavaciones, la cerámica de cocina y de almacenamiento apenas aparece representada, mientras que hay una sobrerrepresentación de tipos destinados a libaciones u ofrendas. Finalmente, la mayoría de los materiales de las artes industriales corresponden a elementos de la moda latino-mediterránea o del estilo
Essai bibliographique sur l’archéologie francophone de la Mésoamérique Bibliographical essay upon the French-speaking contributions to Mesoamerican archaeology; Ensayo bibliográfico sobre la arqueología francófona de Mesoamérica by Eric Taladoire. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+242 pages. Text presented in French, English and Spanish. 82 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690996. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691009. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The present bibliography of contributions in French to Mesoamerican studies aims to serve several purposes. For more than a century, Spanish, English and French were the three official languages of the International Congresses of Americanists. This situation stems from historical reasons: the first Congresses took place in Nancy, Luxemburg and Brussels. Since the fifties, the steady growth of Mexican and Central American national researches and the ever-growing weight of United States investigators slowly occulted the French contributions. Conversely, the establishment of research institutions in Belgium, Switzerland, France and Canada facilitated the multiplication of investigation projects in the whole continent, with their correlative publications.

With this essay, we wish, 1) to make an assessment of the existing situation; 2) to provide our colleagues with the most complete number of references and draw their attention on unknown contributions frequently illustrated with forgotten objects; 3) to evaluate the contribution of the most recent formations; 4) last but not least, to insist upon the necessary confrontation of methods and points of view. We consider as fundamental this confrontation of methodological approaches, not to underestimate the diversity of interpretations. A language is not only a linguistic vehicle. It implies also a way of thinking, of reasoning. Each researcher answers a question, a problem according to his formation, his prejudices, his culture, his methods and his possibilities. From their confrontation, we may obtain better results, new tools and henceforth a better understanding of these civilizations.

About the Author
ERIC TALADOIRE is Professor Emeritus at the University of Paris 1 Panthéon Sorbonne, and is a member of the research department Atchéologie des Amériques. He has done fieldwork mostly in the Maya area (Tonina, Xculoc, Xcaleumkin, Balamku, Rio Bec), but also in Guanajuato and in the Huasteca. He is series editor of the Paris Monographs in American Archaeology, published with Archaeopress. His main field of research is the Mesoamerican ballgame.

French Description
La présente bibliographie mésoaméricaniste francophone répond à plusieurs objectifs. Pendant des décennies, les trois langues « officielles » des Congrès Internationaux des Américanistes étaient l’Espagnol, l’Anglais et le Français. Cette situation provient du contexte historique, les premiers Congrès ayant eu lieu à Nancy, au Luxembourg et à Bruxelles. Depuis les années 1950, le développement des recherches nationales au Mexique et en Amérique centrale et le poids des chercheurs des Etats-Unis ont progressivement gommé le rôle du Français. Parallèlement, l’amplification et la structuration des recherches en Belgique, en France, au Canada, en Suisse ont entraîné une multiplication des projets de fouilles dans tout le continent, avec les publications corrélatives.

Avec cette bibliographie, nous souhaitons donc 1) faire un état des lieux; 2) mettre à la disposition de tous le plus grand nombre possible de références, et attirer l’attention sur des contributions originales, souvent illustrées d’objets méconnus; 3) évaluer l’impact des jeunes formations francophones; 4) et surtout insister sur l’importance de la variété des points de vue dans la recherche. . Il nous paraît en effet fondamental de confronter cette diversité et de tenir compte des approches méthodologiques. Une langue n’est pas seulement un mode d’expression. Elle exprime aussi un mode de pensée, un raisonnement. Chaque chercheur aborde un problème en fonction de ses préjugés, de sa formation, de sa culture, de ses moyens, de ses méthodes. C’est de leur confrontation que naît l’amélioration des connaissances, des outils d’interprétation et par conséquent de notre compréhension de ces civilisations.

Resumé
ERIC TALADOIRE est Professeur émérite à l’Université de Paris 1 Panth
Practices of Personal Adornment in Neolithic Greece Πρακτικές Προσωπικής Κόσμησης στη Νεολιθική Ελλάδα by Fotis Ifantidis. Paperback; xxxvi+596 pages; 121 figures + fully illustrated catalogue (31 plates in colour). Greek text with English Summary. 75 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691139. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691146. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The objective of this book is the reconsideration of the practices of personal adornment during the Neolithic period in Greece, through the assemblage, extensive bibliographic documentation, and critical evaluation of all the available data deriving from more than a hundred sites in the mainland and the Aegean islands –an archaeological archive of wide geographical and chronological scope. In addition, a thorough study of the personal ornament corpus from the Middle-Late Neolithic Dispilio in Kastoria, an important lakeside settlement in north-western Greece, was conducted.

The book begins with an overview of the anthropological and archaeological literature on theoretical and methodological issues concerning practices of personal adornment. Then follows an examination of the problems and key points of study regarding personal adornment in Neolithic Greece, as well as a critical evaluation of the methodological approaches and classification schemes that have been applied in previous archaeological works. Subsequently, the technologies and processes of production, consumption, recycling, deposition, and distribution of personal ornaments in Neolithic Greece are discussed. Finally, the social correlates of personal adornment are explored, as they are reflected in the choice of different raw materials (shell, clay, bone, stone, and metal) and ornament types (beads, pendants, annulets, and so forth).

About the Author
FOTIS IFANTIDIS studied archaeology at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. His academic research is focused on personal adornment practices in prehistory, and on the interplay between photography and archaeology, with case studies the Athenian Acropolis, the ancient city of Kalaureia on the island of Poros, and the Neolithic settlements of Dispilio and Koutroulou Magoula. Among his publications are Spondylus in Prehistory (co-authored with M. Nikolaidou), Camera Kalaureia (co-authored with Y. Hamilakis) and Archaeographies: Excavating Neolithic Dispilio.

Greek description
Στόχος του βιβλίου είναι η επανεξέταση των πρακτικών προσωπικής κόσμησης κατά τη νεολιθική περίοδο στην Ελλάδα μέσω της επανεκτίμησης των διαθέσιμων στοιχείων που προέρχονται από περισσότερες από εκατό ανεσκαμμένες νεολιθικές θέσεις, καθώς και η λεπτομερειακή μελέτη του corpus κοσμημάτων που προέρχονται από τη λιμναία θέση της Μέσης-Νεότερης Νεολιθικής περιόδου στ&#
The Affect of Crafting Third Millennium BCE Copper Arrowheads from Ganeshwar, Rajasthan by Uzma Z. Rizvi. Paperback; 210x297; 176 pages; 53 figures, 13 tables plus extensive catalogue (black and white throughout). 475 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690033. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690040. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Affect of Crafting presents an interrogation of materiality and crafting, a consideration of the situatedness of the technological practice of crafting itself, and the forms of relationships that exist between all things transformed in the act of crafting: bodies, minerals and landscapes. Linked to those transformations, this volume presents an argument for cultural resonance as a manner through which to understand the resilience and repetition of certain styles and forms of copper arrowheads across the region during the third millennium BCE. Morphological consistency is theorized as producing affective responses that engender belonging: one belongs with and through things.

About the Author
UZMA Z. RIZVI is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Urban Studies, Department of Social Science and Cultural Studies at the Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, NY. She is also Visiting Researcher at the American University of Sharjah.
How Did the Persian King of Kings Get his Wine? The upper Tigris in antiquity (c.700 BCE to 636 CE) by Anthony Comfort and Michał Marciak. Paperback; 175x245mm; iv+148 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (46 plates in colour). (Print RRP £32.00). 457 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919566. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919573. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

How did the Persian King of Kings Get His Wine? the upper Tigris in antiquity (c.700 BCE to 636 CE) explores the upper valley of the Tigris during antiquity. The area is little known to scholarship, and study is currently handicapped by the security situation in southeast Turkey and by the completion during 2018 of the Ilısu dam. The reservoir being created will drown a large part of the valley and will destroy many archaeological sites, some of which have not been investigated. The course of the upper Tigris discussed here is the section from Mosul up to its source north of Diyarbakır; the monograph describes the history of the river valley from the end of the Late Assyrian empire through to the Arab conquests, thus including the conflicts between Rome and Persia. It considers the transport network by river and road and provides an assessment of the damage to cultural heritage caused both by the Saddam dam (also known as the Eski Mosul dam) in Iraq and by the Ilısu dam in south-east Turkey. A catalogue describes the sites important during the long period under review in and around the valley. During the period reviewed this area was strategically important for Assyria’s relations with its northern neighbours, for the Hellenistic world’s relations with Persia and for Roman relations with first the kingdom of Parthia and then with Sassanian Persia.

About the Authors
ANTHONY COMFORT is an independent scholar associated with the Centre for the Study of Greek and Roman Antiquity at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. After a career in the secretariat of the European Parliament, he completed a doctoral dissertation dealing with the roads on the frontier between Rome and Persia at Exeter University under the supervision of Stephen Mitchell. He is a specialist in the use of satellite imagery for archaeology in the Middle East but is now responsible for a project concerning the Roman roads of south-west France, where he lives.

MICHAL MARCIAK, PhD (2012), Leiden University, is an Assistant Professor at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków (Poland). He has published extensively on Northern Mesopotamia, including two monographs Izates, Helena, and Monobazos of Adiabene (Harrassowitz, 2014) and Sophene, Gordyene, and Adiabene: Three Regna Minora of Northern Mesopotamia Between East and West (Brill, 2017). He is currently also the Principal Investigator of the Gaugamela Project (in cooperation with the Land of Nineveh Archaeological Project of the University of Udine, Italy) which is dedicated to the identification of the site of the Battle of Gaugamela (331 BCE).
Metal Sewing-Thimbles Found in Britain by Brian Read; principal illustrator: Mike Trevarthen. Paperback; 203x273mm; viii+88 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (26 colour plates). 450 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919450. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919467. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This is the first reference book that deals specifically with all types of sewing-thimble made from copper-alloy or silver, or either of these metals combined with iron or steel, and found in Britain: also included is a seemingly rare gold specimen. Domed, ring-type and open-top (here the latter classed as a new type) sewing-thimbles are described, among them unusual examples and others previously absent from the known record. From Britain the earliest reliable dating for these humble yet fascinating tools is between c.1270 – c.1350, and continues through the medieval and early post-medieval periods and into the 18th and 19th centuries.

Dating from at least the 17th century, subjected to detailed attention is the largely neglected sailmakers’ and sailors’ palm-iron, a heavy-duty tool made from either iron, steel or copper alloy. Also described are the two known types of silver or copper-alloy finger guard, an 18th – 19th century tool used in conjunction with finer sewing-thimbles.

The majority of sewing-thimbles and other sewing-tools catalogued here are credited to metal-detectorists or members of The Society of Thames Mudlarks, who also use metal-detectors. To show constructional detail, each object is archaeologically drawn. This information is essential for metal-detectorists, archaeologists, museum curators, sewing-tool collectors and dealers, or anyone with an interest, seeking to gauge the type or age of any particular sewing-thimble or palm-iron.

About the Author
BRIAN READ was born in 1939 in Essex and raised in East and South-East London. With no formal educational qualifications, in 1954 he left Secondary Modern School and became a trainee millwright and then a trainee groundsman before joining the Merchant Navy in 1955 where he travelled widely. In 1961 he embarked on a fire service career, first with the Devon County Fire Service, then the City of Plymouth Fire Brigade, and finally the newly formed Devon Fire Brigade. While on duty in 1983, in the rank of assistant divisional officer, he sustained an injury that, in 1986, resulted in his medical discharge.

Since leaving the fire service he has worked as a freelance writer. His first book History Beneath Our Feet, published in 1988, was a bestseller and after extensive revision underwent re-publication in 1995 and again proved successful. Between 1999 – 2015 he self-published, under the imprint Portcullis Publishing.

From 1978, metal detecting and its associated study of small metal artefacture, has been his primary leisure interest.