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NEW: Religious Practice and Cultural Construction of Animal Worship in Egypt from the Early Dynastic to the New Kingdom Ritual Forms, Material Display, Historical Development by Angelo Colonna. Paperback; 205x290mm; 242pp; 33 figures, 23 tables (5 pages of colour). 788 2021 Archaeopress Egyptology 36. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698213. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698220. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Religious Practice and Cultural Construction of Animal Worship in Egypt from the Early Dynastic to the New Kingdom presents an articulated historical interpretation of Egyptian ‘animal worship’ – intended as a segment of religious practice focused on the mobilisation of selected animals within strategically designed ritual contexts – from the Early Dynastic to the New Kingdom, and offers a new understanding of its chronological development through a fresh review of pertinent archaeological and textual data. The goal is twofold: (1) to re-conceptualise the notion of ‘animal worship’ on firm theoretical and material bases, reassessing its heuristic value as a tool for analysis; (2) to demonstrate, accordingly, that ‘animal worship’ did not represent a late degeneration of traditional religion, socially (popular cult) and thematically (animal mummies and burials) restricted, but a complex domain of religious practice with a longer history and a larger variety of configurations than usually assumed.

About the Author Angelo Colonna is Research Fellow in Egyptology at Sapienza University of Rome, where he graduated in 2010 and completed his PhD in 2014. In 2017 he was Academic Visitor at the Oriental Institute – Oxford University. His research on animal worship has been awarded by the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei (2016) and the Istituto Italiano per la Storia Antica (2017).
NEW: The Not Very Patrilocal European Neolithic Strontium, aDNA, and Archaeological Kinship Analyses by Bradley E. Ensor. Paperback; 174x245mm; 252 pages; 24 figures, 18 tables. 776 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699807. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699814. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Two decades of strontium isotope research on Neolithic European burials – reinforced by high-profile ancient DNA studies – has led to widespread interpretations that these were patrilocal societies, implying significant residential mobility for women. The Not Very Patrilocal European Neolithic questions that narrative from a social anthropological perspective on kinship. It introduces models for inferring residence and descent with isotope and genetic data and provides in-depth descriptions of archaeological kinship analysis. From social anthropological insights to reassessments of data, an alternative perspective on the social dynamics of Neolithic European societies emerges from this new guide for prehistorians working with biological and archaeological materials.

About the Author Bradley E. Ensor (PhD 2003, University of Florida) is a professor of anthropology at Eastern Michigan University (2003-present). He teaches archaeology, social anthropology, and physical anthropology. His research addresses theory and methods in archaeology, bioarchaeology, and ethnology emphasizing the intersections of political economy, kinship, and gender. His publications include Crafting Prehispanic Maya Kinship (2013), The Archaeology of Kinship (2013), Oysters in the Land of Cacao (2020), 17 journal articles, and 7 chapters in edited volumes.
FORTHCOMING: Irish Late Iron Age Equestrian Equipment in its Insular and Continental Context by Rena Maguire. Paperback; 205x290mm; 294pp; 63 figures, 6 tables, 119 plates. Print RRP: £44.00. 802 2021 Queen's University Belfast Irish Archaeological Monograph Series 2. ISBN 9781789699913. Book contents pageBuy Now

Irish Late Iron Age Equestrian Equipment in its Insular and Continental Context is the first practical archaeological study of Irish Iron Age lorinery. The volume examines the bits and bosals (Y-pieces) holistically, using practical stable-yard knowledge merged with archaeological techniques such as morphometrics, use-wear, GIS, functional comparison to European and British equipment and distribution analysis to place it within its time and place. Irish Iron Age artefacts have always been beset by issues of chronology, but by using these various analytical methods, a more precise timeframe for the objects is indicated. A complex relationship with Roman Britain and the Empire also becomes visible, with aspects of identity and belief being expressed through the sophisticated equestrian equipment. The analysis of the bridle components reveal that the Ireland of the first centuries AD shares some characteristics with other boundary zones of the Roman Empire, such as Scotland and northern Germany, but also has its own unique interpretation of introduced technology. The Ireland of the Late Iron Age, then, is a society in flux, picking and choosing which traditions it maintains. The horse and associated equipment were very much at the heart of the social changes set in motion by contact with the Roman Empire, and as such, the examination of the snaffles and bosals allows us to bring the people of the Late Iron Age in Ireland into focus.

About the Author
Rena Maguire studied Archaeology at Queen’s University Belfast, graduating with a BA Hons. in 2013. She was awarded an MSc in 2014 and a PhD in 2018. She has worked for the Historic Environment Division of the Northern Ireland Civil Service, and currently is a visiting Research Fellow at QUB. She has published extensively on ancient equitation and its associated technology and is an enthusiastic horsewoman.
FORTHCOMING: Man and Bird in the Palaeolithic of Western Europe Paperback; 205x290mm; 160 pages; 82 figures, 28 tables (colour throughout) by Anne Eastham. Paperback; 205x290mm; 160 pages; 82 figures, 28 tables (colour throughout). Print RRP: £30.00. 795 2021. ISBN 9781789699098. Book contents pageBuy Now

Man and Bird in the Palaeolithic of Western Europe considers the nature of the interaction between birds and hunter-gatherers. It examines aspects of avian behaviour and the qualities that could be (and were) targeted at different periods by hunter-gatherers, who recognised the utility of the diversity of avian groups in various applications of daily life and thought. It is clear from the records of excavated sites in western Europe that during the evolution of both the Neanderthal period and the subsequent occupations of Homo sapiens, avian demographics fluctuated with the climate along with other aspects of both flora and fauna. Each was required to adapt to these changes. The present study considers these changes through the interactions of man and bird as evidenced in the remains attached to Middle and Upper Palaeolithic occupation sites in western Europe and touches on a variety of prey/predator relationships across other groups of plant and animal species. The book describes a range of procurement strategies that are known from the literature and artistic record of later cultures to have been used in the trapping, enticement and hunting of birds for consumption and the manufacture of weapons, domestic items, clothing, ceremony and cultural activities. It also explores how bird images and depictions engraved or painted on the walls of caves or on the objects of daily use during the Upper Palaeolithic may be perceived as communications of a more profound significance for the temporal, seasonal or social life of the members of the group than the simple concept of animal. Certain bird species have at different times held a special significance in the everyday consciousness of particular peoples and a group of Late Glacial, Magdalenian settlements in Aquitaine, France, appear to be an example of such specialised culling. A case study of the treatment of snowy owl at Arancou in the Atlantic Pyrenees seems to illustrate such a specialisation. Discussion of the problems of reconciling dating and research methods, of the last two hundred years of Palaeolithic research, and of possible directions for future research offer an open conclusion to the work.

About the Author
At the age of seven Anne Eastham’s questions regarding the behaviour of the local avifauna drove her parents to purchase the five volumes of Witherby on British birds, while a Victorian rubbish heap invited excavation. Both predilections persisted. Post London University, she continued research into the identification, physical, cultural and habitat interpretation of avian assemblages from archaeological sites. This was financed through teaching, with students ranging from Special Needs Primary to Post-graduates. Her published reports cover sites in Britain, Europe and the Near East, dated to medieval, Roman and Prehistoric eras, particularly the Palaeolithic.
FORTHCOMING: Hunde in der römischen Antike: Rassen/Typen - Zucht - Haltung und Verwendung by Heidelinde Autengruber-Thüry. Paperback; 205x290mm; 482 pages; 487 figures, 8 maps (colour throughout). German text. Print RRP: £70.00. 786 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 84. ISBN 9781789698367. Book contents pageBuy Now

Hunde in der römischen Antike: Rassen/Typen, Zucht, Haltung und Verwendung deals extensively with the living environment of the dog in Roman antiquity, based on literary and iconographic sources as well as archaeological and archaeozoological finds. The knowledge gained from this is documented by numerous images. Older research opinions, some of which have gone unchecked for more than a hundred years, are examined and—where necessary—corrected.

For the first time, a catalogue of the more than eighty dog breeds/types documented from antiquity is presented with their names, origins, appearance and the special characteristics of these animals. The ancient theories of dog breeding are compared with modern practices. A catalogue of the previously known dog names has been revised with around sixty new names added. The book examines how dogs were housed, what accessories were used and how the animals were fed. It sheds light on illnesses, medical treatment and the care of elderly dogs. A catalogue of epitaphs and extant canine tombstones gives an insight into the emotional world of grieving animal owners. Dogs not only served as guards, shepherds, hunters and lap dogs but also had other important roles such as sacred animals in temples or as waste disposers for sanitation. But they were also used corporeally: their fur was tanned, and their body parts were needed for magical rituals. In short, dogs played an important role in many areas of life, such that everyday life in the Classical world could not be imagined without them.

About the Author
Heidelinde Autengruber-Thüry completed her studies in history at the University of Vienna with a master's degree (with distinction) in 1999 and a doctorate in 2017. She acquired her specialist practical and theoretical knowledge in the field of cynology through many years of collaboration with the Irish Setter Club of Austria.

Auf Deutsch
Hunde in der römischen Antike beschäftigt sich umfassend mit dem Lebensumfeld des Hundes in der römischen Antike. Als Grundlagen dazu dienen die Quellen der griechisch-römischen Literatur, der Kunst und die archäologischen sowie archäozoologischen Funde. Durch zahlreiche Bilddarstellungen werden die daraus gewonnenen Erkenntnisse dokumentiert. Ältere Forschungsmeinungen, die zum Teil seit mehr als hundert Jahren ungeprüft übernommen und bis heute tradiert werden, werden überprüft und – wo nötig – richtiggestellt.

Erstmals wird ein Katalog der über achtzig aus der Antike belegten Hunderassen/-typen mit Namen, Herkunft, Aussehen und den speziellen Eigenschaften dieser Tiere vorgestellt. Der Wissensstand der Antike über Hundezucht wird mit den heutigen Standpunkten der modernen Hundezucht verglichen. Ein aus dem vorigen Jahrhundert stammender Katalog der bis dahin bekannten Hundenamen wurde adaptiert und konnte um circa sechzig neue Namen erweitert werden. Es wird untersucht, wie Hunde untergebracht wurden, welches Zubehör Verwendung fand und wie die Tiere ernährt wurden. Krankheiten, medizinische Behandlung und die fürsorgliche Pflege sehr alter Hunde zeigen weitere Aspekte der Hundehaltung. Eine Zusammenstellung der überlieferten Grabgedichte und erhaltenen Grabsteine für Hunde geben Einblicke in die Gefühlswelt der trauernden Tierbesitzer. Hunde dienten nicht nur als Wach-, Hirten-, Jagd- und Schoßhunde, sie hatten auch weitere wichtige Aufgaben wie zum Beispiel als heilbringende Tiere in Tempeln oder als Abfallentsorger für die Siedlungshygiene. Aber auch als Rohstofflieferanten wurden sie genützt, ihr Fell wurde gegerbt und ihre Körperteile wurden für magische Rituale benötigt. Kurz gefasst lässt sich sagen, dass Hunde in vielen Lebensbereichen des antiken Menschen eine wichtige Rolle spielten und sie aus dem täglichen Leben nicht wegzudenken waren.

Heidelinde Autengruber-Thüry legt hier die Druckfassung ihrer Dissertation vor. Sie hat ihr Studium der G
FORTHCOMING (OPEN ACCESS): The People of Early Winchester by Caroline M. Stuckert. Hardback; 215x276mm; 528pp; extensively illustrated with photographs, line drawings, maps, and charts. Print RRP: £80.00 (eBook to be Open Access). 782 2021 Winchester Studies 9. ISBN 9781803270142. Buy Now

Winchester Studies 9.i: The People of Early Winchester traces the lives, health, and diseases of Winchester's inhabitants as seen in their skeletal remains from the mid-third century to the mid-sixteenth century, a period of over 1,300 years. Although the populations of other British urban areas, York and London in particular, have been studied over an extended period, this volume is unique in providing a continuous chronological window, rather than a series of isolated studies. It is particularly notable for the large sample of Anglo-Saxon burials dated to the 8th - 10th centuries, which provide a bridge between the earlier Romano-British material and the later medieval samples.

This study includes information on demography, physical characteristics, dental health, disease, and trauma collected from over 2,000 skeletons excavated from the Roman Cemetery at Lankhills and the Anglo-Saxon and medieval cemeteries of the Old and New Minster and Winchester Cathedral, as well as other Early Anglo-Saxon sites in neighbouring areas of Hampshire. The study establishes the underlying continuity of the population in spite of massive culture change between the Roman and Early Saxon periods, and delineates the increasing tendency to rounder skulls seen in the medieval period, a trend which is found in continental Europe at the same time. There were also significant differences through time in disease patterns and trauma. Leprosy, for example, is found only in post-Roman skeletons, while decapitations are seen only in Roman skeletons. Weapons injuries are confined to Anglo-Saxon and medieval individuals, although broken bones were common during the Roman period.

This is a new edition of the volume originally published in 2017 (Oxford, ISBN 9780198131700). The new edition will appear online first, with a printed edition to follow in the future.

About the Author:
Caroline M. Stuckert (Connie) holds a B. A. in history from Bryn Mawr College, and an M. A. in physical anthropology and Ph. D. in archaeology and physical anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania. She has taught at Muhlenberg College and the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests centre on the British Isles from the Iron Age through medieval periods, and she has conducted research and participated in excavations in both England and Ireland. In addition, she has enjoyed a 25-year career as a consultant and senior museum executive. A native Philadelphian, Connie has spent extended periods in Britain, and currently lives in the Philadelphia suburbs.

Reviews of the 2017 edition:
Just one of an incredibly comprehensive series examining the history of Winchester, this book uncovers the story of the city's occupants from AD 250 to 1540, as told by their skeletal remains.Emma Watts-Plumpkin, Current Archaeology ;

This volume is a valuable contribution to long-term population history. The production and illustration standards are high, and Caroline Stuckert should be congratulated for finally bringing all of this important research to publication ...Sam Lucy, Antiquity

Table of Contents:
List of illustrations ;
List of tables ;
List of abbreviations ;
List of references ;

Part 1 IntroductionMartin Biddle and Birthe Kjølbye-Biddle ;
1:Introduction ;
2:Concept ;
3:The origin, growth, and completion of this study ;
4:The outcome: a summary ;

Part 2 Romano-British Populations from Lankhills and other cemeteries in WinchesterCaroline M. Stuckert ;
1:Introduction ;
2:Demography ;
3:Physical characteristics ;
4:Dentition ;
5:Pathology ;
Studies on the Palaeolithic of Western Eurasia Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 14, Session XVII-4 & Session XVII-6 edited by György Lengyel, Jarosław Wilczyński, Marta Sánchez de la Torre, Xavier Mangado, Josep Maria Fullola. Paperback; 205x290mm; 262 pages; 109 figures, 34 tables (54 pages in colour). Papers in English (one in French). 760 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697179. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697186. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Studies on the Palaeolithic of Western Eurasia presents the papers from Sessions XVII-4 and XVII-6 of the 18th UISPP World congress (Paris, June 2018). The geographic areas discussed in the Session 4, Central and Eastern Europe, are prehistorically strongly articulated, their cultural successions are highly similar, and they share several common archaeological issues for investigation. The papers disseminate a wealth of archaeological data from Bavaria to the Russian Plain, and discuss Aurignacian, Gravettian, Epigravettian, and Magdalenian perspectives on lithic tool kits and animal remains. The papers of Session 6 are concerned with lithic raw material procurement in the Caucasus and in three areas of the Iberian peninsula.

About the Editors György Lengyel an associate professor at the Department of Prehistory and Archaeology of the University of Miskolc, Hungary, and research associate at the Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals of the Polish Academy of Sciences. He graduated at the University of Miskolc, and received a PhD degree from the University of Haifa, Israel. His main field of research is the Upper Palaeolithic of Central Europe. The focus of his research is hunter-gatherer subsistence strategy and the formation of the corresponding archaeological record. He conducts research projects on the Upper Palaeolithic of the Levant and Central Europe. ORCID: 0000-0002-7803-3043 ;

Jarosław Wilczyński is head of the Department of Vertebrate Zoology of the Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals of the Polish Academy of Sciences. He graduated in archaeology at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków, and received his PhD in archaeozoology at the Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals, Polish Academy of Sciences. His interests are two-pronged, including studying Upper Palaeolithic and Neolithic lithic inventories, as well as Pleistocene and Holocene faunal assemblages. He conducts research projects on the Gravettian and the Epigravettian of Central Europe. ORCID: 0000-0002-9786-0693 ;

Marta Sánchez de la Torre is currently a Beatriu de Pinós postdoctoral researcher at the Prehistoric Studies and Research Seminar (SERP) of the University of Barcelona. Her research has mainly focused on the analysis of lithic raw materials by Palaeolithic groups settled in the Pyrenean region by the use of traditional approaches as well as geochemical methods. She is currently directing archaeological seasons at several sites in NE Iberia and participates in different projects in France and Spain. ;

Xavier Mangado is a professor in prehistory at the University of Barcelona and researcher at the Prehistoric Studies and Research Seminar (SERP) of the University of Barcelona. He specialise in the analysis of lithic raw materials, mostly by using petrographic and micropalaeontological tools. His research is mainly focused on the study of Palaeolithic groups settled in NE Iberia and he has also participated in several international projects at Portugal, France and Jordan. ;

Josep Maria Fullola has been a professor in prehistory at the University of Barcelona since 1985. In 1986 he created the Prehistoric Studies and Research Seminar (SERP) of the University of Barcelona, a research group that promotes advanced research in prehistoric archaeology, being since its creation the main director. He has directed archaeological seasons in several Palaeolithic sites in NE Iberia, but he has also been involved in international projects in Baja California, France and Portugal.
Mammoths and Neanderthals in the Thames Valley by Katharine Scott and Christine M. Buckingham. Paperback; 174x245mm; 272 pages; 133 figures, 55 tables (colour throughout). 752 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699647. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699654. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Today the Upper Thames Valley is a region of green pastures and well-managed farmland, interspersed with pretty villages and intersected by a meandering river.

The discovery in 1989 of a mammoth tusk in river gravels at Stanton Harcourt, Oxfordshire, revealed the very different ancient past of this landscape. Here, some 200,000 years ago, mammoths, straight-tusked elephants, lions, and other animals roamed across grasslands with scattered trees, occasionally disturbed by small bands of Neanderthals.

The pit where the tusk was discovered, destined to become a waste disposal site, provided a rare opportunity to conduct intensive excavations that extended over a period of 10 years. This work resulted in the recording and recovery of more than 1500 vertebrate fossils and an abundance of other biological material, including insects, molluscs, and plant remains, together with 36 stone artefacts attributable to Neanderthals. The well-preserved plant remains include leaves, nuts, twigs and large oak logs. Vertebrate remains notably include the most comprehensive known assemblage of a distinctive small form of the steppe mammoth, Mammuthus trogontherii, that is characteristic of an interglacial period equated with marine isotope stage 7 (MIS 7).

Richly illustrated throughout, Mammoths and Neanderthals in the Thames Valley offers a detailed account of all these finds and will be of interest to Quaternary specialists and students alike.

About the Authors
Katharine Scott is internationally recognised for her work on Middle and Upper Pleistocene vertebrate fossils. Her fieldwork at various Upper Thames Quaternary sites concentrated especially on the 10-year excavation of 200,000-year-old fossiliferous deposits at Stanton Harcourt near Oxford. This now comprises the largest collection of excavated mammoths in Britain. She is an Emeritus Fellow of St Cross College Oxford and an Honorary Associate of the Oxford University Museum. ;

Christine Buckingham was born and educated in Oxford. Between 1989 and 1999, Christine was co-director of the excavations at Stanton Harcourt with overall responsibility for recording the geology and stratigraphy and also carried out fieldwork at several other Upper Thames sites. Christine graduated with a DPhil from Oxford Brookes University (in collaboration with the Donald Baden-Powell Quaternary Research Centre, Oxford University) in 2004. She is an Honorary Associate of the Oxford University Museum.
Crimes in the Past: Archaeological and Anthropological Evidence edited by Tatyana Shvedchikova, Negahnaz Moghaddam and Pier Matteo Barone. Paperback; 205x290mm; 264 pages; 102 figures, 5 tables. 733 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697780. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697797. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Crimes in the Past: Archaeological and Anthropological Evidence aims to discuss the possible examples of crimes in the archaeological past, their detection and interpretation with the help of modern scientific methods, and how interdisciplinary approaches can be conducted in further research concerning ‘crimes of the past.’ The idea to create this publication was born after organizing Session #169 Past Crimes during the 25th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA 2019) in Bern. In this book, readers will find cases of historic and prehistoric ‘crimes scenes’ known from various contexts, including the findings of (pre)historic (mass) graves and lethal violent acts related to warfare, ritual killings, or possible murder cases. In order to get to the bottom of the possible archaeological crime scenes, contemporary interdisciplinary approaches will be used, which allow us to extend the frames of classical archaeological study.


About the Editors
Tatyana Shvedchikova completed her studies in Social Anthropology at the Russian State University for the Humanities in Moscow. From 2010 she has worked as a research fellow at the Department of Theory and Methods at the Institute of Archaeology, Russian Academy of Sciences. Dr Shvedchikova’s main research interests lie in the fields of forensic anthropology and archaeology, in particular bone tissue degradation processes and multidisciplinary approaches to the study and identification of human remains. ;

Negahnaz Moghaddam completed her studies in Human Genetics and Physical Anthropology at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Germany. Since 2017 she has been head of the forensic anthropology research group at the Unit of Forensic Imaging and Anthropology (UIAF) and the Swiss Human Institute of Forensic Taphonomy (SHIFT). Her activities on archaeological excavations, laboratory analyses including stable isotope research, and forensic case work have allowed her to bridge the gaps between various disciplines. ;

Pier Matteo Barone is a full-time lecturer in the Archaeology and Classics Department of the American University of Rome. He teaches Forensic Geoscience with particular regard to geophysical prospections, remote sensing, GIS, and archaeology applied to crime scene investigations and to crimes in antiquity.
Conversations in Human Evolution: Volume 2 edited by Lucy Timbrell. Paperback; 203x276mm; 132 pages; colour throughout. 136 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699470. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699487. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Conversations in Human Evolution is an ongoing science communication initiative seeking to explore the breadth and interdisciplinarity of human evolution studies. This volume reports another twenty interviews (referred to as ‘conversations’ as they are informal in style) with scholars at the forefront of human evolution research, covering the broad scientific themes of Palaeolithic archaeology, palaeoanthropology and biological anthropology, earth science and palaeoclimatic change, evolutionary anthropology and primatology, and human disease co-evolution. This project features academics at various different stages in their careers and from all over the world; in this volume alone, researchers are based at institutions in eleven different countries (namely Iran, India, the United Kingdom, Greece, Australia, South Africa, the United States of America, the Netherlands, Germany, France and Israel), covering five continents.

Having arisen at the start of the COVID19 pandemic, Conversations in Human Evolution aims to encourage engagement with both human evolutionary studies and the broader socio-political issues that persist within academia, the latter of which is particularly pertinent during this time of global uncertainty. The conversations delve deeply into the study of our species’ evolutionary history through the lens of each sub-discipline, as well as detailing some of the most current advances in research, theory and methods. Overall, Conversations in Human Evolution seeks to bridge the gap between the research and researcher through contextualisation of the science with personal experience and historical reflection.

About the Editor
Lucy Timbrell is a PhD researcher in the Archaeology of Human Origins Research Group at the University of Liverpool, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, The Leakey Foundation and the Lithic Studies Society. Broadly, she is interested in the evolution of modern human diversity, with her doctoral research focussing on quantifying the population structure of early Homo sapiens in Late-Middle Pleistocene Africa. Alongside her PhD research, she organises the widely-known University of Liverpool Evolutionary Anthropology seminar series.
Toniná, una ciudad maya de Chiapas Vida y muerte en las postrimerías del colapso maya by Judith L. Ruiz González. Paperback; 203x276mm; 328 pages; 150 figures, 68 tables. Spanish text. 135 2021 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 54. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699289. £49.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699296. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Toniná was a Mayan city, located between two cultural areas near the Chiapas Highlands. It has been widely proposed that the Maya collapse implied the disappearance and depopulation of many cities; this research addresses the survival of Toniná towards the threshold of the Postclassic. For this purpose, 15,956 human bones found in Structure 15 of the fifth platform in the Acropolis of Toniná were analysed. The analysis of anthropological osteology allowed us to know the biological profile and to document the cultural taphonomy, through which the practice of human sacrifice and the posthumous treatment of the victims was evidenced. The application of stable isotope and strontium analyses also allowed us to determine the dietary profile of those sacrificed, their geographical origin and mobility throughout their lives. A change in ritual practices in the Mayan area was glimpsed, as ideological influences were found, possibly from the Gulf Coast in the cult of other deities, as in the case of Xipe Totéc; the Gulf Coast had great influence in the Mayan area since ancient times and this has been confirmed at this site through ceramics.

Spanish Description
Toniná fue una ciudad maya, localizada entre dos áreas culturales hacia los Altos de Chiapas. Se ha planteado de manera generalizada que el colapso maya implicó la desaparición y despoblamiento de muchas ciudades; en esta investigación se aborda la pervivencia de Toniná hacia el umbral del Posclásico. Para ello se analizaron 15 956 huesos humanos hallados en la Estructura 15 de la quinta plataforma en la Acrópolis de Toniná. El análisis de osteología antropológica permitío conocer el perfil biológico y documentar la tafonomía cultural, a través de la cual se evidenció la práctica del sacrificio humano y los tratamientos póstumos de las víctimas. Así también la aplicación de análisis de isótopos estables y de estroncio permitió conocer el perfil dietario de los sacrificados, su origen geográfico y movilidad a lo largo de su vida. Se vislumbró un cambio en las prácticas rituales en el área maya, al encontrar influencias ideológicas posiblemente de la Costa del Golfo en el culto a otras deidades, es el caso de Xipe Totéc; la Costa del Golfo tuvo gran influencia en el área maya desde tiempos remotos y se ha constatado en este sitio a través de la cerámica.

Judith L. Ruiz González: Antropóloga Física por la ENAH, estudios de Maestría y Doctorado en el Posgrado de Estudios Mesoamericanos, UNAM. Líneas de interés académico. 1) Condiciones de vida y salud en poblaciones esqueléticas y en restos momificados prehispánicos y coloniales. 2) Paleopatología y perspectivas bioarqueológicas en Mesoamérica. 3) Diversidad dietaria y movilidad humana a través de estudios bioarquemétricos en poblaciones antiguas. 4) Evidencias de sacrificio humano y tratamientos rituales póstumos del cuerpo en Mesoamérica. Ha participado en diferentes proyectos de investigación de la Dirección de Estudios Arqueológicos del INAH, de la Zona Arqueológica de Tlatelolco, INAH, del Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas y del Instituto de Geología de la UNAM. Es profesora de Asignatura en el Centro de Estudios Antropológicos, Facultad de Ciencias Políticas y Sociales, UNAM. Protecyo de investigacion reciente: Interacciones culturales y dinámicas poblacionales desde la Costa veracruzana al interior: isotopía de la dieta e historia residencial.
Bioarchaeology and Dietary Reconstruction across Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages in Tuscany, Central Italy by Giulia Riccomi. Paperback; 205x290mm; 192 pages; 95 figures, 26 maps. 726 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698657. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698664. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Bioarchaeology and Dietary Reconstruction across Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages in Tuscany, Central Italy presents the results of the first multidisciplinary bioarchaeological analysis to reconstruct living conditions in Tuscany between Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages. This was done through the examination of stress markers, including adult stature, periosteal reaction, cranial porosities, and linear enamel hypoplasia, and through palaeodietary reconstruction in order to explore the effects of socio-cultural and environmental factors in a diachronic perspective.

The shift from Classical to Medieval times has long left its mark on the European historical consciousness. Nevertheless, the impact of this transition on living conditions and dietary practices remains a subject of debate, with a prevailing perception of these ‘Dark Ages’ as an impoverished phase following the collapse of the Roman agrarian villa system, particularly in the Mediterranean area. This volume analyses bioarchaeological data from three sites in Tuscany, in the former core of the western Roman Empire and potentially most vulnerable to the major socio-political constraints of the first millennium AD, to provide a corrective view, which begins to show how communities perceived and reacted to changes during the passage to post-Classical times.

About the Author
Giulia Riccomi received an MSc in Archaeology at the University of Pisa and a PhD in Classical Studies and Archaeology at the same institution. As a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Division of Palaeopathology (University of Pisa), she is committed to conducting multidisciplinary research programmes focussing on human bioarchaeology and palaeodiets of Italian Etruscan and Medieval osteological collections. Giulia has several international, peer-reviewed publications concentrating mainly on osteoarchaeology and palaeopathology.
Excavations at Stanground South, Peterborough Prehistoric, Roman and Post-Medieval Settlement along the Margins of the Fens by William A Boismier, Edmund Taylor and Yvonne Wolframm-Murray. Paperback; 205x290mm; 314 pages; 120 figures, 91 tables. 716 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698442. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698459. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

MOLA (formerly Northamptonshire Archaeology) undertook archaeological excavations at Stanground South between September 2007 and November 2009 on behalf of Persimmon Homes (East Midlands) Ltd and in accordance with a programme of works designed and overseen by CgMs Heritage. The site is situated on the south-eastern outskirts of Peterborough, on glacial tills overlooking along the Fen edge. The works comprised five areas of set-piece excavation and a series of strip map and record areas, targeted on areas of archaeological potential identified by previous evaluation works. In total, an area of 70ha was subject to archaeological mitigation.

The excavations recorded archaeological remains dating from the Bronze Age to the medieval period. The earliest features comprised four burnt mounds dating to the early Bronze Age, one of which was associated with two superimposed buildings and a small group of up to six cremations. In the middle Bronze Age there was a substantial unenclosed cemetery (urnfield) comprising 78 cremations (as well as a further possible three outlying cremations to the urnfield). In the late Bronze Age/early Iron Age a substantial droveway, up to 65m wide, was constructed leading northwards from the Fen edge to higher ground. A series of post-built roundhouses were later constructed within the confines of the droveway.

In the middle Iron Age, the droveway was partitioned to form a series of enclosures, within one of which a settlement was established adjacent to the Fen edge. This included roundhouses and a number of two-post and four-post structures.

In the later Iron Age, an enclosed settlement had developed to the north-west. This comprised several roundhouses within a substantial rectangular enclosure, which was open at its southern end. It appears that this began as an unenclosed site, which was later enclosed. Removal of cattle horn for working may have been occurring.

In the Roman period (2nd and late 4th centuries AD) a series of small enclosures were constructed on the eastern side of the later Iron Age enclosed settlement. These contained structures and features apparently associated with rural industry, which may have also exported surplus to market. Industries including the processing of hide, late Roman cheese making (with seven presses recovered), late Roman pottery production and some metalworking.

The economy of the site from the later Bronze Age onwards was focussed on pastoralism, with limited evidence for grain cultivation. During the Roman period, this seems to have specialised further towards dairy farming. The environment of the site seems to have undergone little change from the later Bronze Age, being largely open with areas of woodland and wetter areas. Peat growth during the Iron Age resulted in the covering of some of the Bronze Age features.

During the medieval period, large portions of the site were given over to open field cultivation, evidenced by the remains of ridge and furrow cultivation. The area was partitioned in the post-medieval period by the construction of a series of drainage ditches, which form the basis of the current field pattern.

About the Authors
William A Boismier’s professional background includes four university degrees and extensive fieldwork experience across Eastern and Southern England with archaeological remains ranging in date from the Palaeolithic to the medieval and postmedieval periods. He has published reports and other work in monographs, journals and other peer-reviewed outlets and has written a number of ‘grey literature’ reports, project designs and period summaries. He currently works as an archaeological consultant. ;

Edmund Taylor is a Project Manager for the York Archaeological Trust. He gained his degree in Archaeology from the University of Bradford in 2000 and soon after joined Northamptonshire Archaeology (now Mola Northampton)
New Frontiers in Archaeology: Proceedings of the Cambridge Annual Student Archaeology Conference 2019 edited by Kyra Kaercher, Monique Arntz, Nancy Bomentre, Xosé L. Hermoso-Buxán, Kevin Kay, Sabrina Ki, Ruairidh Macleod, Helena Muñoz-Mojado, Lucy Timbrell and Izzy Wisher. Paperback; 203x276mm; 308 pages; illustrated throughout (83 pages of colour). Print RRP: £48.00. 127 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697940. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697957. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume is the result of the Cambridge Annual Student Archaeology Conference (CASA), held at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research from September 13–15, 2019. CASA developed out of the Annual Student Archaeology Conference, first held in 2013, which was formed by students at Cambridge, Oxford, Durham and York. In 2017, Cambridge became the home of the conference and the name was changed accordingly. The conference was developed to give students (from undergraduate to PhD candidates) in archaeology and related fields the chance to present their research to a broad audience.

The theme for the 2019 conference was New Frontiers in Archaeology and this volume presents papers from a wide range of topics such as new geographical areas of research, using museum collections and legacy data, new ways to teach archaeology and new scientific or theoretic paradigms. From hunting and gathering in the Neolithic to the return of artefacts to Turkey, the papers contained within show a great variety in both geography and chronology. Discussions revolve around access to data, the role of excavation in today’s archaeology, the role of local communities in archaeological interpretation and how we can ask new questions of old data. This volume presents 18 papers arranged in the six sessions with the two posters in their thematic sessions.
Animal Husbandry and Hunting in the Central and Western Balkans Through Time edited by Nemanja Marković and Jelena Bulatović. Paperback; 205x290mm; 198 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 687 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696936. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696943. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Herding and hunting, along with farming, represented the economic basis of subsistence of communities in the past. The strategies of animal husbandry and hunting were diverse and different between communities, whilst they also changed over time. The differences and variations were sometimes caused by local or regional environmental conditions, but were also the result of social, cultural, political, and even religious factors.

Animal Husbandry and Hunting in the Central and Western Balkans Through Time brings new results of research on animal herding and hunting in the central and western Balkans during prehistoric and historic periods. The investigations presented here cover a wide range of topics related to animal exploitation strategies; they range from broad syntheses to specific case studies and, moreover, include interdisciplinary studies that use zooarchaeological and historical data, iconographic representations and modern laboratory analysis.

About the Editors
Nemanja Marković is a research associate, zooarchaeologist at the Institute of Archaeology, Belgrade (Serbia). The focus of his research is the reconstruction of past human-animal relationships, mainly in the field of animal economy, strategies in animal husbandry and palaeopathology. ;

Jelena Bulatović is a research associate at the Laboratory for Bioarchaeology, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade (Serbia). Her research interests focus on zooarchaeology, studying human-animal interrelationships in the central and western Balkans from the Early Neolithic to the Late Iron Age.
Environment and Religion in Ancient and Coptic Egypt: Sensing the Cosmos through the Eyes of the Divine Proceedings of the 1st Egyptological Conference of the Hellenic Institute of Egyptology, Co–Organized with the Writing & Scripts Centre of the Bibliotheca Alexandrina and the Institute of Coptic Studies (University of Alexandria), at the People’s University of Athens, under the High Auspices of His Eminence Mgr Damianos, Archbishop of Sinai. Athens: Wednesday 1st, Thursday 2nd & Friday 3rd February 2017 edited by Alicia Maravelia and Nadine Guilhou. Paperback; 210x297mm; 582 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour. 673 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 30. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696394. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696400 . £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Environment and Religion in Ancient and Coptic Egypt: Sensing the Cosmos through the Eyes of the Divine presents the proceedings of a conference held in Athens between 1st-3rd February 2017. The Hellenic Institute of Egyptology, in close collaboration with the Writing & Scripts Centre of Bibliotheca Alexandrina and the University of Alexandria, organized the conference concerning the ancient Egyptian religion, Coptic Christianity and Environment. Thus, the endeavour was to sense the Cosmos, through a virtual Einfahlung, as a manifestation of the Divine and the manifestations of the Divine in the environmental, cosmic and societal spheres. Egyptians were particularly pious and they considered their surroundings and the Universe itself as a creation and a direct immanence of the Divine, being also convinced that they were congenital parts of the Cosmos and adoring their divinities, who were also personifications of environmental and/or cosmic aspects and forces. There are many examples (epigraphic, textual, monumental, & c.) corroborating these relations and that ancient Egyptian piety was rooted on the bi-faceted texture of the ancient Egyptian religion, containing a solar and an astral component: the former was related to Rec, while the latter was related to Osiris. The conference took place with participations of a pleiade of Egyptologists, archaeologists, archaeoastronomers, theologians, historians and other scholars from more than 15 countries all over the world. In this unique volume are published most of the contributions of the delegates who sent their papers for peer-reviewing, enriching the bibliographic resources with original and interesting articles. This publication of more than 580 pages containing 34 fresh and original papers (plus 2 abstracts) on the ancient Egyptian religion, Environment and the Cosmos, fruitfully connects many interdisciplinary approaches and Egyptology, archaeology, archaeoastronomy, geography, botany, zoology, ornithology, theology and history.

About the Editors
Alicia Maravelia is Founder and President of the Hellenic Institute of Egyptology (2011). She is Professor of Egyptology at the People's University of Athens and Institute's Seminar. A member of the Editorial Board of several peer-reviewed journals, she is the Editor in Chief of the JHIE. She is Coordinator of the Athens Mummy Project. ;

Nadine Guilhou studied French Literature, History of Art & Archaeology in the University Paul-Valery, Montpellier, obtaining her PhD in Egyptology under Prof. Dr Fr. Daumas. She specializes in ritual and funerary texts from the OK to the PP and has published many books and papers concerning this topic.
Demography and Migration Population trajectories from the Neolithic to the Iron Age Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 5: Sessions XXXII-2 and XXXIV-8 edited by Thibault Lachenal, Réjane Roure and Olivier Lemercier. Paperback; 205x290mm; 180 pages; 89 figures, 2 tables. Papers in English and French. Print RRP: £35.00. 653 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696653. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696660. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

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This volume presents the combined proceedings of two complementary sessions of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4–9 June 2018, Paris, France): Sessions XXXII-2 and XXXIV-8. These sessions aimed to identify demographic variations during the Neolithic and Bronze Age and to question their causes while avoiding the potential taphonomic and chronological biases affecting the documentation. It appears that certain periods feature a large number of domestic and/or funeral sites in a given region and much fewer in the following periods. These phenomena have most often been interpreted in terms of demographics, habitat organization or land use. They are sometimes linked to climatic and environmental crises or historical events, such as population displacements. In the past few years, the increase in large-scale palaeogenetic analyses concerning late prehistory and protohistory has led to the interpretation of genomic modifications as the result of population movements leading to demographic transformations. Nevertheless, historiography demonstrates how ideas come and go and come again. Migration is one of these ideas: developed in the first part of the XX century, then abandoned for more social and economic analysis, it recently again assumed importance for the field of ancient people with the increase of isotopic and ancient DNA analysis. But these new analyses have to be discussed, as the old theories have been; their results offer new data, but not definitive answers. During the sessions, the full range of archaeological data and isotopic and genetic analysis were covered, however for this publication, mainly archaeological perspectives are presented.

About the Editors
Réjane Roure is Senior Lecturer in Protohistoric Archaeology at Paul Valéry Montpellier 3 University; she works in the Joint Research Unit ‘Archaeology of Mediterranean Societies’ (JRU5140-ASM). Specialist in Iron Age societies in Mediterranean Celtic, she works on relations between the Mediterranean and continental Europe, on contacts between Greeks and Gauls and on the ritual practices of ancient societies. Since 2002, she has directed excavations at the archaeological site of Cailar (South of France), where had been found human remains linked to the Gallic practice of severed heads.

Thibault Lachenal is a CNRS Research Fellow and manager of the ‘Society of Prehistory and Protohistory’ team of the ‘Archaeology of Mediterranean Societies’ laboratory (UMR5140-ASM) in Montpellier. Specialist in the Bronze Age in the North-Western Mediterranean, his work focuses on the study of material culture, settlement and selective deposition of metalwork. He has supervised and collaborated in several archaeological excavations in southern France, Corsica and northern Italy and is currently in charge of underwater research at the La Motte site in Agde, a submerged Late Bronze Age settlement.

Olivier Lemercier is Professor of Prehistory at the University Paul Valéry - Montpellier 3 (France), and director of studies for the Master of Archaeology and Doctor of Archaeology degrees sp. Prehistory, Protohistory, Paleoenvironments, Mediterranean and African. Specialist in Bell Beakers and more generally the Neolithic and the transition to the Bronze Age in Europe and the Mediterranean, he is member of the editorial board of the Bulletin de la Société Préhistorique Française, member appointed to the CNRA and the Scientific Council of the Inrap. Author or coordinator of five books and a hundred scientific articles. He is currently President of
The Neglected Goat: A New Method to Assess the Role of the Goat in the English Middle Ages by Lenny Salvagno. Paperback; 203x276mm; 888 pages; 744 figures, 351 tables (colour throughout). 113 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696295. £120.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696301. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Distinguishing between the bones of sheep and goats is a notorious challenge in zooarchaeology. Several methods have been proposed to facilitate this task, largely based on macro-morphological traits.

This approach, which is routinely adopted by zooarchaeologists, although still valuable, has also been shown to have limitations: morphological discriminant traits can differ in different sheep/ goat populations and a correct identification is highly dependent upon experience, as well as the availability of appropriate reference collections and the degree to which a researcher is prepared to ‘risk’ an identification.

The Neglected Goat provides a new, more objective and transparent methodology, based on a combination of morphological and biometrical analyses, to distinguish between sheep and goat post cranial bones. Additionally, on the basis of the newly proposed approach, it reassesses the role of the goat in medieval England.

There are several historical and archaeological questions concerning the role of this animal that have so far remained unanswered: why is the goat commonly recorded in the Domesday Book, when it appears to be so scarce in the contemporary archaeological record? Is the goat under-represented in the archaeological record or over-represented in the Domesday Book? Why is this animal, when identified in English medieval animal bone assemblages, almost exclusively represented by horncores?

Through the investigation of a number of English sheep and goat medieval assemblages, this study sheds light on these questions, and suggests that the goat was indeed rarer than the Domesday Book suggests.

About the Author
Lenny Salvagno has an Honours Degree in Cultural Heritage with Archaeology from the University of Parma (Italy) and a PhD in zooarchaeology from the University of Sheffield (UK). At Sheffield, she also completed a two-year Post-Doc (funded by the Gerda Henkel Stiftung) focussing on changes in pig husbandry during the Late Medieval-Early Modern transition in England. She is now an Honorary Research Fellow at the Department of Archaeology in Sheffield and a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Post- Doctoral Fellow at the Institute of Palaeoanatomy, domestication research and veterinary history, at the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich (Germany). Lenny’s main interests are in animal domestication and husbandry intensification, the use of animals in medieval and post-medieval Britain, as well as Bronze and Iron Age Italy, ritual deposits, and the use of statistics and geometric morphometrics in zooarchaeology. She is also passiona oarchaeology and the presentation of this field of study to the general public.
Les restes humains badegouliens de la Grotte du Placard Cannibalisme et guerre il y a 20,000 ans by Bruno Boulestin and Dominique Henry-Gambier. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+138 pages; 47 figures, 14 tables (56 pages of colour). 579 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693690. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693706. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Placard is a major Upper Palaeolithic site in France, known from as early as the middle of the nineteenth century. Paradoxically, owing to the antiquity of the poorly-documented early excavations, dozens of thousands of remains that were uncovered then are either unpublished to this day, or have only been the subjects of limited and often obsolete studies. This is the case in particular for the human remains, for which, until recently, the cultural attribution was moreover still under debate. Dating makes it clear they belong to various periods, yet most of them form a homogeneous group remarkable by traces of a specific treatment. Thanks to radiocarbon dating and to data from further excavations carried out some thirty years ago, this group can be dated from the Badegoulian period.

The writers present in this book a detailed study of the Badegoulian human remains. On the basis of quantification and bone modification analyses, they describe and identify the treatments of the dead. Whereas the general treatment pertains to the practice of cannibalism, more specific ones, focused on the head, can be explained by the crafting of trophies. On the whole, these treatments can be interpreted in a consistent manner by one or several episodes of armed conflicts, begging the question of the possible existence of warfare during the Upper Palaeolithic. Thus, despite the antiquity of the discovery, the Badegoulian human bones from le Placard still constitute a unique assemblage that contributes greatly to our knowledge of the behaviours of hunter-gatherer populations in European prehistory.

About the Authors
Bruno Boulestin and Dominique Henry-Gambier are anthropologists at the University of Bordeaux (France), members of the research unit ‘De la Préhistoire à l’Actuel : Culture, Environnement, Anthropologie’ (PACEA, UMR 5199 of the CNRS). They are working on practices surrounding death in ancient societies, from both archaeological, bioarchaeological and socio-anthropological data. B. Boulestin’s work deals more specifically with bone modifications and the treatments of corpses. D. Henry-Gambier is a former Research Director at France's National Scientific Research Centre (CNRS) and is a specialist of Upper Palaeolithic populations.

French Description:
Connu depuis le milieu du 19e siècle, le site du Placard est un site majeur du Paléolithique supérieur français. Paradoxalement, en raison de l’ancienneté des premières fouilles, mal documentées, les dizaines de milliers de vestiges qui y ont été découverts sont pour la plupart inédits ou n’ont fait l’objet que d’études ponctuelles et souvent obsolètes. C’est le cas en particulier des restes humains, dont l’attribution culturelle était par ailleurs jusqu’à récemment discutée. Leur datation montre qu’ils appartiennent à plusieurs époques, mais la plus grande partie d’entre eux constitue un lot homogène qui se distingue par les traces d’un traitement spécifique. Grâce au radiocarbone et aux données provenant de nouvelles fouilles menées il y a une trentaine d’années, ce lot peut être daté du Badegoulien.

Les auteurs livrent ici l’étude détaillée de ces restes humains badegouliens. À partir de l’analyse quantitative et de celle des modifications osseuses, ils décrivent et identifient les traitements des morts. L’un, général, renvoie à la pratique du cannibalisme, tandis que d’autres, particuliers à la tête, peuvent s’expliquer par la fabrication de trophées. Globalement, ces traitements peuvent être interprétés de façon cohérente par un ou plusieurs épisodes de conflits armés, ce qui conduit à s’interroger sur la possible existence de la guerre au Paléolithique supérieur. Ainsi, malgré l’ancienneté de leur découverte, les restes humains badegouliens du Placard forment un ensemble exceptionnel qui apporte une contribution importante à notre connaissance des comportements des populations de chasseurs-cueilleurs de la Préhistoire europé
Wari Women from Huarmey Bioarchaeological Interpretation of Human Remains from the Wari Elite Mausoleum at Castillo de Huarmey, Peru by Wiesław Więckowski. Paperback; 175x245; vi+152 pages; 56 figures (37 plates in colour). 535 2019 Archaeopress Pre-Columbian Archaeology 11. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691849. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691856. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Excavations at the Castillo de Huarmey archaeological site brought to light the first intact burial of female high-elite members of the Wari culture. It was found beneath a large adobe mausoleum, a landmark and focal point of the lower Huarmey Valley. Abundant grave goods, among which were precious metal artefacts, luxurious pottery, beautifully decorated bone and wooden objects, as well as spinning and weaving utensils, leave no doubt about the social status of individuals buried within the main chamber. The very unique character of the find was additionally emphasized by the fact that all of the buried individuals were women, accompanied by two grave guardians, and the remains of ancestors. This book presents the results of bioarchaeological analyses performed to date, and focuses on reconstructing the funeral rite and social status of the deceased. About the Author
WIESŁAW WIĘCKOWSKI (born 1974) is a graduate of the Institute of Archaeology, University of Warsaw. He has also studied at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem where he specialized in bioarchaeology and funeral archaeology. He has worked on many sites, including Ashkelon, Gesher, Tel Zahara in Israel, Achaia Klaus in Greece, Churajon, and Maucallacta in Peru, both as archaeologist and bioarchaeologist. Since 2010, he has been a member of the Polish-Peruvian research team, led by Miłosz Giersz, that in 2013 discovered the first completely preserved burial of the highest elites of the Wari culture at the site Castillo de Huarmey. He is currently professor at the Department of Bioarchaeology of the University of Warsaw.
Tentsmuir: Ten Thousand Years of Environmental History by Robert M. M. Crawford. Paperback; 254x203mm; vi+190 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. 519 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691245. £24.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691252. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Tentsmuir has been a scene of human activity for over 10,000 years. It witnessed one of the earliest known occurrences in Scotland of Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and has supported human activities throughout the Neolithic and Iron Age. In medieval times it was a home for the Norman nobility, and then a royal hunting forest with highly-valued fishing rights for Scottish Kings.

Tentsmuir is prone to flooding in winter due to the front line of dunes blocking drainage to the sea. It provides a natural refuge for a wide range of plants, as well as resident and migrating birds, and other animals, including outstanding populations of butterflies and moths. Consequently, this led to the creation in 1954 of a National Nature Reserve at the north-eastern end of the Tentsmuir Peninsula. Initially, an active period of coastal accretion more than trebled the size of the reserve. Now, however, Tentsmuir is eroding in places. The probability of rising sea levels and increasing exposure to storms may cause a level of destruction such that the physical existence and biological future of Tentsmuir cannot be guaranteed.

This book is an attempt to record how even within a limited geographical area, such as this peninsula on the east coast of Scotland, plant and animal communities are constantly reacting to environmental change. Frequently, it is difficult to decide whether or not these changes should be resisted, encouraged, or ignored. Examples are provided of instances where human intervention to counteract change has resulted in negative as well as positive consequences for biodiversity.

About the Author
ROBERT M. M. CRAWFORD is a graduate of the Universities of Glasgow and Liège. Postdoctoral years were spent at the Bakh Institute of Biochemistry in Moscow and at the biochemistry and botany departments of the Universities of Freiburg, Munich, and Oxford. From 1962 – 1999 he taught and researched at the University of St Andrews, pursuing in particular the study of the physiological ecology of plants in a wide range of habitats in Scotland, Scandinavia, North and South America, and the Arctic. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the Linnean Society of London, and an associate member of the Belgian Royal Academy of Sciences.
Execution by Styrax in Ancient Thasos by Anagnostis P. Agelarakis. Paperback; 203x276mm; vi+42 pages; 33 figures, 5 graphs (27 plates presented in full colour). 86 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692129. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692136. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Searching through interdisciplinary research to recover echoes of the human condition ingrained as they may be in the skeletal record of the ancients, there have been few cases in the forty year experience of the author which in defiance to the relentless passage of Chrόnos and even the chthonic potency of the waters of Léthe to dissolve all strings relating to Mnenosỳne could offer compelling evidentiary data, critical for generating meaningful interpretive answers as a nexus to life pathways and experiences in antiquity, reflective of dynamics and circumstances, that were not always possible to be recorded or spoken of by the attendants of Cléo. And yet in rare cases, millennia later, ostensibly through the works of Láchesis, a synergy between the fields of Archaeological Anthropology and Bioarchaeology may offer a unique portal whereby the dictum mortui vivos docent may be reiterated.

Sharing in the objectives of an ongoing archaeo-anthropological endeavor, aiming to better decipher and elucidate facets of the human condition while carrying out funerary archaeological research of Hellenistic to Roman periods family graves at the extensive ancient necropolis of Thasos, the most northern Aegean island, this essay addresses a case of unique forensic / bioarchaeological interest involving an older male individual, a member of one of the clusters of burials, who had been placed as a single interment in a most conspicuous limestone cyst grave of the Hellenistic period.

While odontological, cranio-infracranial skeleto-anatomic manifestations and palaeopathologies revealed a detailed rostrum on aspects of his developmental growth, of acquired and degenerative somatic changes, reflective of his life experiences which involved long term most active participations in physically demanding yet specialized activities, a staggering ‘through and through’ sternal trauma of astonishing preservation, provided for a distinct opportunity to conduct a unique cross-disciplinary investigation on the nature of the weapon reconstructed in bronze, the archaeometry on the trajectory and factors of speed and force at the deliverance of the strike, along with the diagnostic assessments of the thoracic tissues pierced consecutively and their moribund consequences.

A review of historical references on the implementation of capital punishment either through the decision of a dicastic or ephetic court, and/or execution carried out as a result of outlawry are evaluated in relevance to funerary practices as these pertained to the interment of the Thasian male within the context of the burial ground, offering in retrospect assessments on the probable cause of his violent death.

About the Author
ANAGNOSTIS P. AGELARAKIS is Professor of Anthropology at Adelphi University in New York. He studied Classical Archaeology and European Ethnology as an undergraduate, and as graduate Environmental Studies at Lund University and Lund Polytechnic Institute in Sweden. He holds a M. Phil. and Ph.D. (1989) in Anthropology from Columbia University, New York.

In the earlier years of his career, he carried out field and/or lab archaeo-anthropological research projects focusing on the organizational abilities, capacities, and adaptations of the human condition during the Holocene in SE and SW Asia, the Middle East, the American Northeast, and the Caribbean.

The central area of his research remains however the Eastern Mediterranean with emphasis on the ancient world of the Greeks, at the cross roads and sea routes between Africa, Asia, and Europe. Under the domains of Anthropological Archaeology, Funerary Archaeology, Bio-Archaeology and Forensics he studies the biological profiles, the demographic dynamics, and palaeopathological records of human skeletal populations from prehistoric periods to the late medieval era. Based on the skeletal record, he i
Recommendations for best practices in data acquisition methods for natural and cultural heritage management of Moroccan coastal wetlands Recommandations pour les bonnes pratiques en matière de méthodes d’acquisition de données pour la gestion du patrimoine naturel et culturel des zones humides côtières marocaines by Athena Trakadas and Nadia Mhammdi. Paperback; 170x240mm; vi+92 pages; full colour throughout. 522 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691504. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691511. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

As part of the CBDAMM Project (Capacity Building of Data Acquisition Methods with a view to promoting natural and cultural heritage management practices in Morocco), a set of recommendations for the processes of acquiring data in marine environments and coastal wetlands has been established for Moroccan stakeholders.

Recommendations for best practices in data acquisition methods for natural and cultural heritage management of Moroccan coastal wetlands aims to outline the functional procedures for conducting scientific coastal marine surveys in the Moroccan context. It outlines the requirements, methods, and practices of the four scientific fields that rely on shared data from such surveys: hydrography, marine geology, marine biology and toxicology, and maritime archaeology and heritage management. The content is derived from workshops, study visits, and fieldwork surveys carried out during the CBDAMM Project, utilising the specific case-study of the Oued Bouregreg, a tidal river and wetland that runs between the urban centres of Rabat and Salé, on the Atlantic coast of Morocco.

Dans le cadre du projet CBDAMM (Renforcement des capacités des méthodes d’acquisition de données en vue de promouvoir les pratiques de gestion du patrimoine naturel et culturel au Maroc), un ensemble de recommandations pour les processus d’acquisition de données dans les milieux marins et les zones humides côtières a été établi pour les parties prenantes marocaines.

Cette brochure, intitulée Recommandations pour les bonnes pratiques en matière de méthodes d’acquisition de données pour la gestion du patrimoine naturel et culturel des zones humides côtières marocaines, vise à décrire les procédures fonctionnelles pour mener des études côtières scientifiques dans le contexte marocain. Cette brochure décrit les exigences, les méthodes et les pratiques des quatre domaines scientifiques qui reposent sur des données partagées provenant de ces investigations: hydrographie, géologie marine, biologie marine et toxicologie, archéologie maritime et gestion du patrimoine. Le contenu résume les ateliers, les séjours scientifiques et les recherches sur le terrain menées au cours du projet CBDAMM, avec pour étude de cas spécifique: Oued Bouregreg, une rivière à marée semidiurne de type mésotidal et une zone humide qui s’étend entre les centres urbains de Rabat et Salé, sur la Côte Atlantique du Maroc.
Profane Death in Burial Practices of a Pre-Industrial Society: A study from Silesia by Paweł Duma. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+122 pages; 66 figures, 6 tables (31 plates in colour). 506 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690897. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690903. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Profane Death in Burial Practices of a Pre-Industrial Society: A study from Silesia discusses phenomena characteristic of the funeral practices of the pre-industrial society of Silesia (Poland). The author explores specific groups of people: unbaptised children, women who died in childbirth, suicides, convicts and those who perished in epidemics, who were refused an honorary burial in consecrated land or had ceremonies conducted on special terms. Also discussed are the places where the bodies of these excluded individuals were interred. The study is supplemented by an analysis of the results of archaeological research, which mainly involved fieldwork carried out at former execution sites. The skeletal remains of numerous convicts were discovered during these investigations, together with the remnants of stonebuilt gallows. This analysis is especially relevant for interpreting selected funeral finds, socalled ‘vampire burials’, and the general question of atypical treatment of bodies perceived as unworthy, badly-deceased or ‘unclean’. The research subject is novel, as no similar synthetic studies on unusual funerary practices have yet been conducted in Polish archaeology for this particular era and territory. The author is primarily concerned with cases mentioned in historical and archaeological sources from the region of Silesia, but evidence from beyond this area is also presented. Chronologically the study covers the period between the 15th and early 19th centuries.

About the Author
PAWEŁ DUMA is Assistant Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, University of Wroclaw, Poland. His main interests concern historical archaeology, profane death, late medieval and post-medieval material culture. Has excavated historical execution sites in Silesia both as team member and as a supervisor. He is author and co-author of several articles published in Polish and international scholarly journals.
Étude paléoanthropologique et analyse des rituels funéraires de deux sites laténiens valaisans Randogne – Bluche et Sion – Parking des Remparts by Tobias Hofstetter. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+240 pages; 171 figs + 6 tables (colour and black & white throughout). French text; English abstract. 444 2018 Laboratoire d’archéologie préhistorique UNIGE . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919375. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919382. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume concerns the bioanthropological analysis and the investigation of Second Iron Age (also known as the La Tène period: 470–25 BC) funerary practices in central Valais. More precisely, it deals with the study of two necropolises lately discovered in this mountainous region of southern Switzerland: Randogne–Bluche (excavated between 2001 and 2005) and Sion–Parking des Remparts (excavated in 2006). The matter of Second Iron Age funeral practices has been investigated since the late 19th century in Switzerland and has ever since yielded many exceptional finds. In archaeological terms, the research presented in this work introduces a consistent summary of the current archaeological and historiographical state of knowledge regarding Second Iron Age funeral practices in southern Switzerland.

Étude paléoanthropologique et analyse des rituels funéraires de deux sites laténiens valaisans : Randogne – Bluche et Sion – Parking des Remparts porte sur l’analyse bioanthropologique et l’étude des rituels funéraires laténiens en Valais central. Plus précisément, elle traite des ensembles funéraires de Randogne – Bluche (fouillé entre 2001 et 2005) et de Sion – Parking des Remparts (fouillé en 2006). Le premier objectif de cette étude a consisté à attribuer une identité et des caractéristiques biologiques aux individus inhumés au sein de ces deux ensembles. Ensuite, il s’est agi de caractériser ces deux ensembles funéraires par leur insertion au cadre géographique et archéologique, de s’intéresser à leur organisation chronologique et spatiale et à l’architecture des sépultures, ainsi qu’aux positions d’inhumation, de même qu’au mobilier funéraire présent. Par la suite, nous avons développé une vision comparative de ces deux ensembles funéraires, avant de finalement les confronter à l’intégralité du corpus funéraire laténien actuellement connu pour le Valais central et ainsi chercher à proposer une vision synthétique de la question.

About the Author
TOBIAS HOFSTETTER (B.A, M.Sc.) was born in Zürich in 1992. He currently works as consulting bioanthropologist to the Laboratory of Prehistoric Archaeology and Bioanthropology at the University of Geneva, where he has collaborated in various archaeological fieldwork operations and bioanthropological assessments, covering the Mesolithic to the Middle Ages, in Switzerland, Italy, Bulgaria, Kuwait and Jordan.

TOBIAS HOFSTETTER (BA ; MSc) est né à Zürich (Suisse) en 1992. Il a obtenu son Bachelor en archéologie préhistorique et classique ainsi qu’en anthropologie à l’Université de Neuchâtel (Suisse) en 2013. Il a poursuivi ses études en Master d’archéologie préhistorique et bioanthropologie à l’Université de Genève (Suisse) ; formation qu’il a terminée en 2016. Il travaille couramment en tant que bioanthropologue consultant pour le laboratoire d’archéologie préhistorique et d’anthropologie de l’Université de Genève. À ce titre, il a participé à de nombreuses campagnes de fouilles archéologiques et expertises bioanthropologiques, s’étendant du Paléolithique jusqu’à la période médiévale, en Suisse, France, Italie, Bulgarie, Koweït et Jordanie. En parallèle, il a repris un deuxième cursus de Master en histoire et littérature anglaise à l’Université de Neuchâtel.
Treinta años de Arqueología Medieval en España edited by Juan Antonio Quirós Castillo. Paperback; 203x276mm; xii+418 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English preface and introduction (Print RRP £64.00). 58 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919238. £64.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919245. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This book presents, in sixteen papers, recent developments and some of the main topics seen in academic Medieval Archaeology studies in Spain. The papers explore some of the emergent and consolidated topics of the discipline, such as landscapes, cities, rural spaces, bio-archaeological records, archaeology of architectures, agrarian archaeology, post-Roman archaeology, colonial archaeology in the Canary Islands and the archaeology of religious minorities, opening new lines of enquiries and providing new theoretical and methodological approaches. An overview of Medieval Archaeology studies in Spain is offered, proposing a wide range of topics for discussion. Finally, the book explores the connections between Spanish Medieval Archaeology and other European traditions, specifically, English, Italian and Portuguese Medieval Archaeology.

About the Editor
Juan Antonio Quirós is a Professor of Medieval Archaeology at the University of the Basque Country, Honorary Senior Research Associate at the Institute of Archaeology (University College London), and Visiting Fellow at All Souls College (University of Oxford). He is the director of the ‘Heritage and Cultural Landscapes Research Group’ of the University of the Basque Country and the 'Rural Medieval Research Group', CSIC-UPV/EHU. His principal interests lie in the study of the archaeology of landscapes, the archaeology of rural communities, Mediterranean Archaeology, Archaeology of Architectures, and the study of Social Complexity. Besides, he is very interested in a multi-proxy and multidisciplinary approach to cultural resources. Some of his recent works include ‘Arqueología de una comunidad campesina medieval: Zornoztegi’ (Bilbao, 2018); ‘Longhouses, house biography and social complexity in Early Medieval Northwestern Iberia’ (Arqueología de la Arquitectura 2017); ‘Local identities and desertions in Late Medieval period’ (Reti Medievali, 2017); ‘Social complexity in Early Medieval rural communities’ (Oxford, 2016); and ‘Agrarian Archaeology in Early Medieval Europe’ (Quaternary International 346, 2014). Currently, he is preparing a book about the Archaeology of Medieval Peasantry.
Identified skeletal collections: the testing ground of anthropology? by Charlotte Yvette Henderson and Francisca Alves Cardoso. 428 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918057. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918064. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Human skeletons are widely studied in archaeological, anthropological and forensic settings to learn about the deceased. Methods used to identify individuals in forensic contexts and to determine age and sex in archaeological settings are normally tested on identified skeletal collections: collections of skeletons with known age-at-death, sex, often occupation and cause of death. These collections often represent individuals dying within the last century, but this is variable and often depends on the purpose for creating the collection. Many were developed in attempts to understand local population biology whereas those collected recently are for forensic purposes: to improve identification in legal contexts. Some of these collections were developed from body donation programmes, while others have come from cemeteries: cemeteries which were either no longer viable or needed clearing. All these factors impact on who curates these collections: archaeology or anthropology departments and museums. However, unlike many other skeletons curated in these locations, these are individuals with names. All this raises ethical questions about their creation, curation and their use for research.

This book focusses on identified skeletal collections in the UK, Portugal, South Africa, USA and Canada. The chapters discuss how and why collections were amassed including the local legislation governing them. Alongside this run the ethical issues associated with their collection, curation and access to them. The demographics of the collections: who is included and why, along with such biases and how they can impact on research are also discussed, as are limitations in the documentary data associated with these individuals. The importance of these collections is also focussed on: particularly their role in developing and testing methods for age determination in adults. This shows why these collections are so vital to improve methods and interpretations for archaeological and forensic research. The importance of communicating this to the wider public is also addressed.

About the Editors CHARLOTTE HENDERSON is a researcher in CIAS – Research Centre for Anthropology and Health based in the Department of Life Sciences, Coimbra (Portugal). She completed her PhD at the University of Durham in the Department of Archaeology. Her research focusses on methods for identifying activity in past populations. She has a long-standing interest in ethics which she studied as part of her undergraduate degree in Philosophy.

FRANCISCA ALVES CARDOSO is a research fellow at CRIA – Centre for Research in Anthropology (Portugal). In 2008 she was awarded a PhD in Biological Anthropology/Paleopathology by the University of Durham (UK). Her research focuses on the significance of socio-economic and cultural variables in the interpretation of human skeletons. In 2014 she was awarded a grant to develop the project - Portuguese Human Identified Skeletal Collections (HISC): Shaping their ethical and legal framework, which aims to build a bridge between science and society on the importance of HISC, whilst considering their scientific value, social and cultural, as well as ethical implications.
The Gwithian Landscape: Molluscs and Archaeology on Cornish Sand Dunes by Thomas M. Walker with contributions from Rowena Y. Banerjea and C. Rob Batchelor. xiv+194 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (125 colour plates). 406 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918033. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918040. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Gwithian, on the north coast of Cornwall, is a multiperiod archaeological site. Excavations by Charles Thomas in the mid-twentieth century provided evidence of human activity from the Mesolithic to the post-medieval period. The present work explores the palaeoenvironment of the area around the settlement sites, from the Neolithic, when sand dunes initially developed in the Red River valley, to the present post-industrial landscape. Multiproxy analyses on sediments from coring, a test pit and mollusc columns provide a view of the changing landscape and how it may have influenced, or been influenced by, human presence and settlement. Mollusc studies are used as the principal analytical method. Multiple radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminesce dates permit these changes to be studied on a tighter time frame than was previously possible. Mining activity from the Bronze Age to the present is explored using fine-resolution geochemistry. Dating allows the timing of the extinction and introduction of some mollusc species to be refined.

About the Author
THOMAS WALKER is Visiting Research Fellow in the Department of Archaeology, University of Reading. After a career in medicine he entered the world of archaeology in retirement, initially studying for a BSc at Reading and then progressing to a PhD. This monograph is based on his PhD thesis, which explored the palaeoenvironment of blown sands in Cornwall, principally at Gwithian. Table of Contents
Excavation of the Late Saxon and Medieval Churchyard of St Martin’s, Wallingford, Oxfordshire by Iain Soden. xii+86 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (22 colour plates). 392 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917661. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917678. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) undertook excavations over 2003-4 at the former St Martin’s churchyard, Wallingford, Oxfordshire. St Martin’s, one of perhaps eight churches of late Saxon Wallingford, was located in a prominent position in the centre of the burh. No middle Saxon activity was found and the earliest remains consisted of a layer sealing the natural subsoil which contained a probable late Saxon lead cross. Earliest use of the churchyard has been dated to the late 10th to early 11th century by radiocarbon dating, and burials continued until the end of the 14th century, serving a dwindling parish population, before the cemetery rapidly fell out of use thereafter. No burials post-date 1412. Part of the cemetery has not been disturbed by the present development. The unexcavated areas and previous post-medieval and modern disturbances has meant the original size of the cemetery remains unknown.

A late Saxon mortar mixer found on the site has added to a growing number of this distinctive early constructional feature. While its presence indicates the vicinity of the late Saxon church, no foundations of St Martin’s church appear to have survived cellar digging and quarrying for gravel that occurred in the early 18th century.

Osteological analysis of 187 of the 211 excavated skeletons of the cemetery has depicted a lay population which was almost equally split between males and females, with only a slight bias towards males. Their distribution showed no observable cluster within the churchyard by age or gender. A high proportion of children is notable but newborns and very young children were comparatively rare. The significance of this is unclear since so many disarticulated remains were also present due to later disturbance. Both degenerative pathologies and inherited conditions affecting bone were noted, as were a high frequency of trauma, some of it violent. Generally the population could be shown to have led healthy early lives compared to other urban assemblages, although evidence of tuberculosis and iron deficiency suggest that living conditions and diet at the heart of medieval Wallingford were far from ideal.

Within the excavated area of the cemetery, a number of the burials demonstrated known pre-Conquest burial rites and there are some aspects which may be peculiar to the area, suggesting local variations to common rites. Eight pre-Conquest burials had their heads supported mostly by stones, but one had his head supported by two disarticulated skulls. One 30-40 year old male was buried wearing a pierce scallop-shell, presumably a pilgrim badge from Santiago de Compostella. Four burials were interred in stone-built cists and these ranged from a c1 year old to adults of both sexes. A further six burials lay in stone-built cists without a cover. All post-Conquest burials were earth-cut examples.

Reviews:
'Wallingford has recently benefitted from a period of intense archaeological and documentary research, the outcomes of which include Iain Soden's monograph on St Martin's churchyard. It records the most extensively excavated graveyard in the town, which was centrally located close to the intersection of the two main streets before it was lost to later development. The publication provides an important source for later Anglo-Saxon and medieval burial practises for the region.'—Grenville Astill, Oxoniensia, Vol. 85, 2020