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Rome and Barbaricum: Contributions to the Archaeology and History of Interaction in European Protohistory
edited by Roxana-Gabriela Curcă, Alexander Rubel, Robin P. Symonds and Hans-Ulrich Voß. Paperback; 175x245mm; 164 pages; 60 figures (29 colour pages). Print RRP: £32.00. 641 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 67. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691030. Epublication ISBN 9781789691047.
Book contents page
Rome and Barbaricum: Contributions to the archaeology and history of interaction in European protohistory asks the following questions: How did the ‘Barbarians’ influence Roman culture? What did ‘Roman-ness’ mean in the context of Empire? What did it mean to be Roman and/or ‘Barbarian’ in different contexts? The papers presented here explore the concepts of Romanisation and of Barbaricum from a multi-disciplinary and comparative standpoint, covering Germania, Dacia, Moesia Inferior, Hispania, and other regions of the Roman Empire. They deal with issues such as conceptual analysis of the term ‘barbarian’, military and administrative organization, inter-cultural and linguistic relations, numismatics, religion, economy, prosopographic investigations, constructing identities; and they present reflections on the theoretical framework for a new model of Romanisation.

About the Editors
Alexander Rubel served at the Goethe Institute and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) in Romania before being appointed Senior Research Fellow at the Archaeological Institute of the Romanian Academy and Associate Professor at the Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi. Since 2011 he has been the Director of the Institute of Archaeology in Iasi. His academic writings include cultural history and literary studies but focus mainly on ancient history and religion as well as on Roman archaeology. These are geographically centered on the fringes of the Empire and the ‘barbarian’ people who lived there.

Roxana-Gabriela Curcă is Assistant Professor at the Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Romania and Director of the Department for Long Distance Learning at the Faculty of History. Her academic papers focus on ancient bilingualism, the language of Greek and Latin inscriptions and onomastics. She has been a visiting professor at a number of universities: State University of New York at Buffalo, UCLA, University of West Alabama (USA); National University of La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, Santiago de Chile (Chile); Flinders University, Adelaide (Australia).

Hans-Ulrich Voß (Voss) is Scientific Assistant at the Romano-Germanic Commission (RGK) of the German Archaeological Institut (DAI) at Frankfurt am Main. He is responsible for the Iron Age, Roman and Migration Periods, and for editorial work. He is project coordinator of the ‘Corpus of Roman Finds in the European Barbaricum (CRFB)’. From 1985 to 1991 he was Scientific Assistant, at the Central Institute of Ancient History and Archaeology of the Academy of Sciences of the GDR, in the department of Pre- and Protohistory, at Berlin. He conducts research into the proto-history of Central Europe, and is a collaborator of the CRFB project.

Robin P. Symonds is a specialist in Roman ceramics and author of Rhenish Wares: Fine Dark Coloured Pottery from Gaul and Germany (1992). He was employed as a Roman pottery specialist for the Colchester Archaeological Trust (1981–1990), then for the Museum of London Archaeology Service (1991–2004) and thereafter in France at the Institut national de recherches archéologiques préventives (INRAP), based at Dijon. He retired from Inrap in 2015 and moved with his family to eastern Romania in 2017. He has reported on the ceramics from many different international sites, and has published numerous papers and reviews on aspects of Roman pottery research.



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