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Archaeopress: Publishing Scholarly Archaeology since 1997
Communicating the research of thousands of archaeologists worldwide.

Archaeopress is an Oxford-based publisher specialising in scholarly books and journals in the field of archaeology and related heritage subjects.
 
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NEW: Banquets, Rations et Offrandes Alimentaires au Proche-Orient ancien 10,000 ans d’histoire alimentaire révélée by Daniel Bonneterre. Paperback; 175x245mm; 410 pages; 40 figures, 5 maps (34 pages in colour). 751 2021. ISBN 9781789699746. £55.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Banquets, Rations et Offrandes alimentaires au Proche-Orient ancien investigates the essential question of food consumption in the ancient Near East, in particular between the 4th and 1st millennium BC. Thanks to archaeological discoveries and to abundant textual documentation, historians are well equipped to reconstruct the food supply of the cities of Mesopotamia and have a better idea of the variety of products available, a far greater range than might be imagined. The analysis of the treatment of ingredients also reveals techniques unsuspected in pre-industrial times. The codification of culinary recipes developed for the use of temples also reflects a high stage of development. Religious rituals were based on a structured code of food consumption, of which prohibitions and taboos are only one facet. The book presents some aspects of everyday life in a new light. First and foremost, the banquet is seen as a critical institution in shaping urban behaviour. The representation of feasts and banquets in temples and palaces are classic themes of ancient art and literature. Understanding the importance of the meal as a rite of social cohesion, furthermore, allows us to better envision events that would unfold centuries later.

About the Author
Daniel Bonneterre is a specialist in ancient history and an Associate Professor at the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières. He gained his doctorate in languages and civilizations of the Ancient Near East from Johns Hopkins University. He has taught in the United States and Canada and has conducted archaeological research in France, Italy, Syria, and Israel. His publications focus on the relationships (or discrepancies) between textual sources and anthropological realities.

En français
L’ouvrage se propose de présenter la question essentielle de la consommation alimentaire dans le Proche-Orient ancien, notamment entre le IVe et le Ier millénaire av. J.-C. Grâce aux découvertes archéologiques et surtout grâce à une abondante documentation textuelle, les historiens disposent aujourd’hui de sources fiables décrivant les approvisionnements des cités de Mésopotamie. Ainsi voit-on mieux la variété des produits disponibles, celle-ci était largement plus grande que ce que l’on pouvait imaginer il y a peu. La transformation des ingrédients fait aussi apparaître des techniques insoupçonnées à une époque préindustrielle. La codification en recettes culinaires élaborées pour l’usage des temples reflète également un haut développement. Les rituels religieux s’appuyaient sur un code alimentaire structuré, dont les interdits et les tabous ne forment que l’une des facettes. Certains aspects de la vie quotidienne sont présentés sous un jour nouveau. Au premier chef le banquet qui est envisagé comme une véritable institution modelant des comportements urbains. De fait, la représentation des festins et des banquets dans les temples et les palais constituent des thèmes classiques de l’art et de la littérature antique. Comprendre l’importance du repas comme rite de cohésion sociale permet incidemment de mieux envisager des événements qui se dérouleront des siècles plus tard.

Daniel Bonneterre est spécialiste de l’histoire antique et docteur en langues et civilisations du Proche-Orient ancien (Ph D). Il a enseigné aux États-Unis ainsi qu’au Canada, et a mené des recherches archéologiques (France, Italie, Syrie, Israël). Ses publications portent sur les rapports entre sources textuelles et réalités anthropologiques.
NEW: Visual Culture, Heritage and Identity: Using Rock Art to Reconnect Past and Present edited by Andrzej Rozwadowski and Jamie Hampson. Paperback; 205x290mm; 150 pages; 90 illustrations (colour throughout). 750 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698466. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698473. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Visual Culture, Heritage and Identity: Using Rock Art to Reconnect Past and Present sets out a fresh perspective on rock art by considering how ancient images function in the present. In recent decades, archaeological approaches to rock paintings and engravings have significantly advanced our understanding of rock art in regional and global terms. On the other hand, however, little research has been done on contemporary uses of rock art. How does ancient rock art heritage influence contemporary cultural phenomena? And how do past images function in the present, especially in contemporary art and other media? In the past, archaeologists usually concentrated more on reconstructing the semantic and social contexts of the ancient images. This volume, on the other hand, focuses on how this ancient heritage is recognised and reified in the modern world, and how this art stimulates contemporary processes of cultural identity-making. The authors, who are based all over the world, off er attractive and compelling case studies situated in diverse cultural and geographical contexts.

About the Editors
Andrzej Rozwadowski is Associate Professor at the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland, where he also completed his PhD. He is also an honorary Research Fellow of the Rock Art Research Institute of Wits in Johannesburg and has been involved in rock art research since the 1990s. ;

Jamie Hampson is a Senior Lecturer in the Humanities Department at the University of Exeter. He has a PhD and MPhil in archaeology from the University of Cambridge. He has written more than forty articles on Indigenous rock art and heritage.
NEW: Fores et Fenestrae: A Computational Study of Doors and Windows in Roman Domestic Space by Lucia Michielin. Paperback; 205x290mm; 296 pages; 146 figures, 39 tables, 52 renders. 749 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 82. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696172. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696189. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Fores et Fenestrae aims to analyse Roman doors and windows and their role as an essential part of daily life. They are the structures that connect not only rooms but also houses themselves to the outside world. They relate to privacy, security, and light in domestic spaces. Until very recently, the role of doors and windows in shaping the life and structure of Roman private dwellings has been greatly underestimated. The reason for this lies primarily in the difficulties linked to their study. The low level of preservation of walls and the widespread use of perishable and recyclable materials hinder in many cases a correct assessment of these structures. To achieve greater understanding, the author followed a computational approach. The two cores of the research are the analysis of the database and the observation of results based on new 3D models. 1855 doors and windows were surveyed across eight towns of Roman imperial Italy. The information collected has been organised in a database comprised of nine tables and mined through statistical analyses. Three 3D models of different dwelling types have been generated simulating natural materials and light conditions to observe the role of doors and windows in context.

The work is subdivided into three sections. The first explains the study’s methodology and analyses previous scholarship on the topic, highlighting how the issue of doors and windows has often be ignored or only superficially considered. The second section collects typologies of complementary sources to better comprehend the results of the statistical analyses and to integrate the 3D models; literary, epigraphic, and visual sources are considered. To these are added the analysis of the archaeological sources. The third part constitutes the core of the analysis. It is composed of two chapters, the fi rst of which provides a detailed overview of the statistical analyses produced from the sample collected. The latter chapter investigates the results of the renders and analyses views and natural light in the Roman house.

About the Author
Lucia Michielin holds an MSc in Geotechnologies for Archaeology (Università degli Studi di Siena) and an MA in Classical Archaeology (Università degli Studi di Padova). In 2019 she obtained a PhD at Edinburgh University. She has previously worked in commercial archaeology and has been involved in many surveys and cultural heritage projects in Italy and Croatia, in cooperation with UK, US, and Italian universities and research centres. She currently holds the post of Digital Skills Training Manager at Edinburgh University.
NEW: Enemy – Stranger – Neighbour: The Image of the Other in Moche Culture by Janusz Z. Wołoszyn. Paperback; 205x290mm; 200 pages; 350 figures, 4 tables (colour throughout). 748 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698824. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698831. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Enemy – Stranger – Neighbour: The Image of the Other in Moche Culture is dedicated to artistic renderings of the Recuay people in Moche art, in all available and preserved media. The Moche and the Recuay were the creators of the two main cultures of northern Peru in the Early Intermediate Period (approx. 100-750 CE). They were both illiterate and they left no written documents concerning the nature of their mutual contacts. The Moche, however, represented the Recuay quite extensively in their ceremonial art, which served as a powerful ideological tool of social influence and control. Its iconography gives an exceptional opportunity to study the mechanisms of perceiving and presenting the ‘other’ in a traditional society. This study offers an analysis of a set of several dozen complex, painted and bas-relief scenes, as well as several hundred mould-pressed, sculpted depictions of foreigners in Moche art. It tries to answer the questions of how the message regarding the ‘other’ was created and communicated, what its concept may have been and what social functions it may have served among the groups living in the Southern Moche Region. The attitude to foreigners – as reconstructed on the basis of Moche iconography – was not unidimensional. It was characterized by a combination of extreme feelings and emotions such as fear and admiration, resentment and interest, repulsion and fascination. It has many features of a typical approach to all ‘others’ studied by specialists of different disciplines in various contexts and cultures. The observations made in this book will prove of interest not only to Moche scholars, Andean archaeologists or, people interested in the pre-Columbian cultures of South America, but also – if only as an analogy – to historians, art historians, sociologists and anthropologists dealing with the issue of alterity.

About the Author
Janusz Z. Wołoszyn is Associate Professor of Archaeology at the University of Warsaw. He is author of four books and numerous articles on the archaeology and iconography of Pre-Columbian Andean cultures.
NEW: Living Opposite to the Hospital of St John: Excavations in Medieval Northampton 2014 by Jim Brown. Paperback; 205x290mm; 362 pages; 205 figures, 91 tables (colour throughout). 747 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699364. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699371. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Living Opposite to the Hospital of St John: Excavations in Medieval Northampton 2014 presents the results of archaeological investigations undertaken on the site of new county council offices being built between St. John’s street and Angel Street, Northampton in 2014. The location was of interest as it lay directly opposite the former medieval hospital of St. John, which influenced the development of this area of the town.

Initially open ground situated outside the Late Saxon burh, the area was extensively quarried for ironstone during the earlier part of the 12th century, and by the mid-12th century, a few dispersed buildings began to appear. Domestic pits and a bread oven were located to the rear of Angel Street along with a carver’s workshop, which, amongst other goods, produced high-quality antler chess pieces. This workshop is currently without known parallel. The timber workshop was refurbished once and then replaced in stone by the mid-13th century. During the late 12th and early part of the 13th centuries, brewing and baking were undertaken in the two plots adjacent to the workshop. A stone building with a cobbled floor lay towards the centre of the St. John’s street frontage, and behind the building were four wells, a clay-lined tank for water drawn from the well, and several ovens, including at least two bread ovens and three malting ovens. This activity ceased at around the time that the carver’s workshop was replaced in stone, and much of the frontage was cleared.

Subsequently, although there was still one building standing on St. John’s street in the early 15th century, the former cleared ground was gradually incorporated back into the plots, perhaps as gardens adjoining the surviving late medieval tenement. The stone tenement was extended and refurbished in the late 15th century and was occupied until c. 1600. Another building was established on Fetter Street after c. 1450 but had disappeared by c. 1550. However, this is the first archaeological indication for the existence of Fetter Street, and further demarcation occurred in this period with a rear boundary ditch being established along the back of the Angel Street plot, separating the land to the south. In the 17th–18th centuries, the area was covered by the dark loamy soils of gardens and orchards until the construction of stables and terraced buildings on the site, which would stand into the Victorian period and beyond.
NEW: Roots of Reform: Contextual Interpretation of Church Fittings in Norfolk During the English Reformation by Jason Robert Ladick. Paperback; 205x290mm; 182pp; 17 black & white figures, 21 tables, 62 colour plates. 746 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697667. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697674. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Roots of Reform provides a thorough examination of the impact of the English Reformation through a detailed analysis of medieval and early modern church fittings surviving at parish churches located throughout the county of Norfolk in England. By utilizing an archaeological approach along with the written record, a deeper and more nuanced understanding of public worship reveals the theological imperatives of the reformers and conformers. This study compiled data from both rural and urban parish churches which provides a regional approach to engaging the issues of visuality, space and identity. Church fittings were selected based on their liturgical function and propensity to feature decorative iconography. This includes baptismal fonts, screens, wall paintings, and sculptures. Through an extensive analysis of church fittings, this research is the first to suggest that the Bible-centric component to Protestant theology provided the framework which contributed to the success of the Reformation. The religious identity of England was transformed as visual continuity enabled an entire generation to continue their religious experience in a traditional context despite the moderate alteration to liturgy and comprehensive transformation of doctrine. This criterion eased the transition, as liturgical continuity and selective iconoclasm forged a new physical religious environment that retained enough elements to satiate traditionalist. Furthermore, an assessment of post-Reformation innovations reveals the use of vernacular Biblical text as a preferred mode of decoration, with an increase in the use of secular heraldry and commemoration directly on church fittings.

Jason Robert Ladick is an independent researcher and public library administrator in Long Island, NY. Ladick recently completed his PhD and MA in Historical Archaeology from the University of Leicester and MS in Library and Information Science from Long Island University. His research interests lie in the late medieval/early modern period and historical archaeology, with a particular interest in the archaeology of standing buildings and the transformation of religious architecture in the period following the 16th-century Protestant Reformation.
NEW: Pharmacy and Medicine in Ancient Egypt Proceedings of the conference held in Barcelona (2018) edited by Rosa Dinarès Solà, Mikel Fernàndez Georges and Maria Rosa Guasch-Jané. Paperback; 174x245mm; 156 pages; 76 figures, 14 tables. 744 2021 Archaeopress Egyptology 34. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697704. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697711. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Pharmacy and Medicine in Ancient Egypt presents the proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Pharmacy and Medicine in Ancient Egypt (Barcelona, October 25-26, 2018). The conference included presentations on new research and advances in the topics covered in the first two conferences (Cairo, 2007 and Manchester, 2008). It showcased the most recent pharmaceutical and medical studies on human remains and organic and plant material from ancient Egypt, together with related discussions on textual and iconographic evidence, to evaluate the present state of knowledge and the advances we have made on pharmacy and veterinary and human medicine in Ancient Egypt. The conference program combined plenary sessions, oral communications and posters with discussions that established interdisciplinary collaborations between researchers and research groups to formulate breakthrough approaches in these fi elds. Participation in the conference and poster sessions ranged from distinguished researchers and professors from academic institutions, museums and universities, to postgraduates and doctoral students at the beginning of their careers.

About the Editors
Dr Rosa Dinarès Solà holds a BSc in Medicine (1980), specialising in radiology and a MA in Egyptology (2000) from the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB). She was President of the Catalan-Balearic Association of Paleopathology (2014-2017) and has conducted research in missions at Luxor (Egypt) practicing radiographs on mummies and human remains. ;

Dr Mikel Fernandez Georges has obtained BScs in both Biology (1995) and Linguistics (2005) from the University of Barcelona. He has a MA in Egyptology (1999) from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and a PhD in Linguistics (2015) from the University of Barcelona. Dr Fernandez took part in the excavation campaign (1986) of Tertiary fauna at the palaeontological site of Incarcal. He currently teaches at the INS Frederica Montseny secondary school at Badia del Vallès. ;

Dr Maria Rosa Guasch-Jané holds a BSc in Pharmacy (1996), MSc in Nutrition and Food Science (1998), MA in Egyptology (2000) and PhD in Pharmacy (2005). Dr Guasch has been director of the Study of Viticulture and Oenology in Egyptian Tombs research project (2011-2014) at Nova University, Lisbon, and post-doctoral researcher Marie-Sklodowska Curie on the EGYWINE European project (2016-2018) at the Mondes Pharaoniques lab (UMR 8167 ‘Orient et Méditerranée’) of Sorbonne University in Paris.
NEW: Chios dicta est… et in Aegæo sita mari: Historical Archaeology and Heraldry on Chios by Ioanna N. Koukouni. Paperback; 205x290mm; 330 pages; 18 figures, 6 maps, 125 plates. 743 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697469. £54.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697476. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £54.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Historical Archaeology and Heraldry on Chios presents the results of research into the island’s medieval period, a terra incognita in the contemporary scholarly record. It is the first to be devoted to this topic in more than 100 years, following the publication of the seminal History of Chios by G. Zolotas in the 1920s. The book discusses the archaeology and history of Chios during the Byzantine and Genoese periods, focusing on Mount Amani, the region on the north-western part of the island. Harsh, remote, and poor, Mount Amani is nevertheless surprisingly rich in material for the landscape archaeologist and the student of historical topography, yet unknown in scholarly literature. Different types of evidence—both tangible and intangible—are used to discuss aspects of the local history and culture, from the evolution of the Byzantine settlement pattern, the rural economy, communications by land and sea and the chain of watchtowers, to the genealogy, the prosopography and the insignia of the local aristocracy, with many stone carvings illustrated for the first time.

About the Author
Ioanna N. Koukouni is a medieval archaeologist and expert in Cultural Heritage Digitisation, a graduate of the National & Kapodistrian University of Athens and the University of Birmingham. After holding a European research fellowship, she co-founded the Centro degli Studi sui Genovesi in Oltremare – NPO together with Professors Sandra Origone and Gabriella Airaldi, aiming to promote and disseminate research on the medieval Genoese network overseas.
NEW: Santuari e spazi confessionali nell’Italia tardoantica by Alessandro Luciano. Paperback; 205x290mm; 274 pages; 274 black & white figures. Italian text. 742 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697544. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697551. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The cult of relics, encouraged by, among others, the emperor Constantine, Pope Damasus and the bishops Ambrose of Milan and Paulinus of Nola, led to the transformation of the Late Antique Italian landscape, and of suburban areas in particular. The process of gradual enhancement of the martyrs' tombs led to the creation of extensive sanctuaries, generally composed of funerary and cultic buildings, as well as service structures, pilgrims' lodgings and monasteries. The most important sanctuaries, such as those of Saints Peter in the Vatican, Paul on the Ostiense, Erasmus in Formia, Alexander in Nomentum, Felix in Cimitile, Gennaro in Naples, Felix in Venosa, Marcianus in Syracuse, and the Apostles in Concordia Sagittaria, became so popular that they justified Jerome's phrase: movetur urbs sedibus suis et currit ad martyrum tumulos. Between the 5th and 6th century, sanctuaries spread also in rural areas, usually along important roads, as documented by the site of San Canzian d'Isonzo. Analysing hypogeal and subdial contexts, Santuari e spazi confessionali nell’Italia tardoantica outlines the evolution of loca sancta, in a process that led the venerated tombs to become first memoriae, then places of worship and finally articulated sanctuaries. For the first time, the contexts of Rome are organically compared with those of the rest of Italy.

About the Author
Alessandro Luciano works at the National Archaeological Museum of Naples and has a PhD in the Science of Antiquity. His main scientific interests lie in the transition between Antiquity and the Middle Ages. He has published dozens of articles in specialist and popular journals and presented the results of his research at national and international conferences. He has published several books, including further academic studies alongside works of historical fiction.

Italian Description
Il culto delle reliquie, incentivato tra gli altri dall’imperatore Costantino, da papa Damaso e dai vescovi Ambrogio di Milano e Paolino di Nola, ha determinato la trasformazione del paesaggio italiano tardoantico, delle aree suburbane in particolare. Il processo di graduale valorizzazione delle tombe martiriali, infatti, condusse alla nascita di estesi santuari, generalmente composti da edifi ci funerari e cultuali, oltre che da strutture di servizio, alloggi per pellegrini e monasteri. I santuari più importanti, come quelli dei santi Pietro in Vaticano, Paolo sull’Ostiense, Erasmo a Formia, Alessandro a Nomentum, Felice a Cimitile, Gennaro a Napoli, Felice a Venosa, Marciano a Siracusa, nonché degli Apostoli a Concordia Sagittaria, divennero così popolari da giustifi care la locuzione di Girolamo: movetur urbs sedibus suis et currit ad martyrum tumulos. Tra V e VI secolo i santuari si diff usero anche in aree rurali, di solito lungo importanti percorsi viari, come documenta il sito di San Canzian d’Isonzo. Analizzando contesti ipogei e subdiali, il volume delinea l’evoluzione degli spazi santifi cati da reliquie, in un processo che portò le tombe venerate a divenire dapprima memoriae, quindi luoghi di culto e infi ne articolati santuari. Per la prima volta nella storia degli studi, i contesti di Roma sono messi organicamente a confronto con quelli del resto d’Italia.

Alessandro Luciano, nato nel 1980, lavora al Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli ed è dottore
NEW: Spectacle and Display: A Modern History of Britain’s Roman Mosaic Pavements by Michael Dawson. Paperback; 176x250mm; 256 pages; 60 figures. 740 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 79. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698312. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698329. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Spectacle and Display: A Modern History of Britain’s Roman Mosaic Pavements is the first narrative to explore responses and attitudes to mosaics, not just at the point of discovery but during their subsequent history. It is a field which has received scant attention in the literature and provides a compelling insight into the agency of these spectacular remains. Analysis shows how mosaics have influenced and have been instrumental in the commodification of the past, the development of conservation practice and promoting the rise of the archaeologist. ‘The most spectacular remains of Roman Britain’ is a familiar description applied to the discovery of mosaics floors. They are exceptional symbols of Roman life in the province of Britannia and each new discovery is eagerly reported in the press. Yet one estimate suggested that 75% of all known mosaics from Britain have been lost, and they are commonly displayed out of context, wall mounted as artwork in museums and exhibitions and far from their role as floors. This is a contested narrative in which spectacle and survival, conservation and fine art, ownership and curation provide the discourse and texts of contemporary attitudes.

About the Author
Michael Dawson is a heritage consultant, Heritage Director at RPS (UK and Ireland). He is editor of the international journal Historic Environment Policy and Practice and is panel lecturer with Oxford University Dept. of Continuing Education. He has excavated in Britain, Bulgaria and Romania, publishing widely both in Britain and eastern Europe and has been instrumental in making the case for the Roşia Montană World Heritage nomination.
NEW: Some Thoughts about the Evolution of Human Behavior: A Literature Survey by Arthur J. Boucot (with edits by John M. Saul and John B. Southard). Paperback; 174x245mm; 252 pages. 739 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699036. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699043. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

On his death, Arthur Boucot (1924–2017) left an unfinished manuscript in which he surveyed the skeletal, behavioural, and cultural changes that have characterized Homo from its first recognition in the Late Pliocene to the present. The subjects he treated were as varied as the preparation of food for infants, the length of intestines, hafting, plastering, use of flint and metals, the domestication of grains and animals, and the prevalence of parasitic diseases. His text repeatedly notes the difficulties imposed by the enormous gaps in both fossil and archaeological records. Boucot deduced a continuity in basic human behaviours from the Oldowan and Acheulian into modern forms, and made a point of including Neandertals and Denisovans. But he also pointed out that morphological changes in successive species of Homo do not coincide in time with major changes in lithic technologies. Boucot concluded that a quantum evolutionary gap separates hominins from the great apes: that members of our line were sapient and had been using language long before they became sapiens. In his text he also indicates his concern for changes to the environment wrought by human activities. The results of this late-life effort, edited after his death, provide a heavily referenced sourcebook for future workers in diverse fields.

About the Author
Arthur James Boucot (1924-2017) was an internationally renowned paleontologist, a former President of the Paleontological Society (1980-1981), and the recipient of numerous awards and medals. His seven-decade career involved fieldwork that covered all continents, including Antarctica, resulting in over 500 peer-reviewed publications and books.
NEW: The Greeks and Romans in the Black Sea and the Importance of the Pontic Region for the Graeco-Roman World (7th century BC-5th century AD): 20 Years On (1997-2017) Proceedings of the Sixth International Congress on Black Sea Antiquities (Constanţa – 18-22 September 2017) edited by Gocha R. Tsetskhladze, Alexandru Avram and James Hargrave. Paperback; 205x290mm; 778 pages; 476 figures, 16 tables; Papers in English, French and German. 736 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697582. £85.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697599. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £85.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Greeks and Romans in the Black Sea presents the Proceedings of the Sixth International Congress on Black Sea Antiquities, dedicated to the 90th birthday of Prof. Sir John Boardman, President of the Congress since its inception. It was held in Constanţa in September 2017 with the same theme as the first of these congresses, which took place just down the coast in Varna 20 years earlier (‘the Greeks and Romans in the Black Sea and the importance of the Pontic region for the Graeco-Roman world between the 7th century BC and 5th century AD’), celebrating the work of successive congresses in bringing together scholars and scholarship from Eastern and Western Europe and the extensive progress of ‘Black Sea Studies’ in the intervening years. Overall, 85 papers were received for publication from authors in Western and Eastern Europe—there is also a full set of the abstracts submitted to the Congress in Appendix 2. As with previous congresses, the work is divided into sections, the largest of which, the fourth, is, following a pattern established with the first congress, devoted to New Excavations and Projects. The opening lectures and various papers in the first sections reflect (on) the ‘20 years on’ in the title. The vast majority of contributions are in English, a handful each in French and German.

About the Editors
Gocha Tsetskhladze (PhD Moscow, DPhil Oxford) is a classical archaeologist who specialises in ancient Greek colonisation and the archaeology of the Mediterranean, the Black Sea, Caucasia, Anatolia, and Central and Eastern Europe in the 1st millennium BC. He is the founder and series editor of the publication series Colloquia Antiqua; and founder and editor-in-chief of the journal Ancient West and East. He has organised many international conferences, notably the International Congress on Black Sea Antiquities that he established in 1995. ;

Alexandru Avram has been a professor of ancient Greek history at the University of Le Mans since 2002 after having taught at the University of Bucharest. He is also a fellow of the Vasile Pârvan Institute of Archaeology, Bucharest and, since 2011, has been co-director of the excavations at Istros (Histria). His academic interests include Greek archaeology and amphorology and Greek and Latin epigraphy, in particular from the region of the Black Sea and Asia Minor. ;

James Hargrave has a PhD in Economic History from the University of Durham and a Diploma in Archive Administration from the University of Wales (Aberystwyth). He specialised for 25 years in cataloguing large collections of papers accumulated by dukes, prime ministers, businesses, etc., but his historical interests stretch from antiquity to railway finance and equipment, Central and Eastern Europe, and the British Empire-Commonwealth, including comparisons between colonisations and empires ancient and modern.
NEW: The Hippos of Troy Why Homer Never Talked about a Horse by Francesco Tiboni. Paperback; 175x245mm; 120 pages; 32 figures. 734 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698992. £24.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699005. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Hippos of Troy: Why Homer Never Talked About a Horse deals with one of the most famous episodes of the whole of Classical mythology, the Wooden Horse of Troy. Thanks to the analysis of words, images and wrecks, the author proposes a new interpretation of what Homer actually intended when he spoke of the hippos used by the Greeks to conquer the city of Troy. The archaeological, iconographic and philological evidence discussed by the author leads to the conclusion that Homer never talked about a giant wooden horse, nor a war machine. In fact, Homer referred to the use of a particular ship type, a merchant ship of Levantine origin in use in the Late Bronze Age/Early Iron Age Mediterranean, used to pay tribute to Levantine kings, as well as to trade precious metal around the Mediterranean coast.

About the Author
Francesco Tiboni graduated with a degree in Prehistory from the University of Milan and a PhD in Naval Archaeology from the Centre Camille Jullian - Université Aix-Marseille in France. He has directed dozens of underwater archaeological research projects in Italy and abroad, including the recovery of three wrecks, two of which date to the Roman era. He has published books and articles on the themes of nautical archaeology, underwater archaeology and naval archaeology and history.
NEW: Burials and Society in Late Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age Ireland by Cormac McSparron. Paperback; 205x290mm; 176 pages; 76 figures, 27 tables. 630 2020 Queen's University Belfast Irish Archaeological Monograph Series 1. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696318. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696325. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Burials and Society in Late Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age Ireland describes and analyses the increasing complexity of later Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age burial in Ireland, using burial complexity as a proxy for increasing social complexity, and as a tool for examining social structure. The book commences with a discussion of theoretical approaches to the study of burials in both anthropology and archaeology and continues with a summary of the archaeological and environmental background to the Irish Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age. Then a set of criteria for identifying different types of social organisation is proposed, before an in-depth examination of the radiocarbon chronology of Irish Single Burials, which leads to a multifaceted statistical analysis of the Single Burial Tradition burial utilising descriptive and multivariate statistical approaches. A chronological model of the Irish Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age is then presented which provides the basis for a discussion of increasing burial and social complexity in Ireland over this period, proposing an evolution from an egalitarian society in the later Chalcolithic Period through to a prestige goods chiefdom emerging around 1900 BC. It is suggested that the decline of copper production at Ross Island, Co. Cork after 2000 BC may have led to a ‘copper crisis’ which would have been a profoundly disrupting event, destroying the influence of copper miners and shifting power to copper workers, and those who controlled them. This would have provided a stimulus towards the centralisation of power and the emergence of a ranked social hierarchy. The effects of this ‘copper crisis’ would have been felt in Britain also, where much Ross Island copper was consumed and may have led to similar developments, with the emergence of the Wessex Culture a similar response in Britain to the same stimulus.

About the Author
Cormac McSparron studied Archaeology and Modern History at Queen’s University Belfast, graduating with a BA in 1989. He was awarded an MPhil in 2008 and a PhD in 2018. Since 2002, he has worked at the Centre for Archaeological Fieldwork at Queen’s and has directed and published a large number of important excavations in Northern Ireland.

The Queen’s University Belfast Irish Archaeological Monograph series
The Queen’s University Belfast Irish Archaeological Monograph series is designed as a publication venue for excavation reports, proceedings volumes and postgraduate theses relating to all aspects of Irish archaeology from the first settlers of the Mesolithic through to the twentieth century. The volumes encompass a range of approaches from fieldwork through to specialist artefact studies, and the application of scientific techniques to the study of the past. Submissions are welcome that showcase the diversity of archaeological research being undertaken across the island and among the Irish diaspora.
FORTHCOMING: Tres usurpadores godos: Tres estudios sobre la tiranía en el reino visigodo de Toledo by Rafael Barroso Cabrera, Jorge Morín de Pablos and Isabel Mª. Sánchez Ramos. Paperback; 203x276mm; 446 pages; 112 figures (colour throughout). Spanish text with English summaries. 138 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699593. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699609. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Tres usurpadores godos is a study of three famous usurpations of the Visigothic period. It first examines the nature of the uprising of Prince Hermenegild (579-585), the civil war and the complex political context of the time, as well as the important implications of the conflict. The second study deals with the rebellion of Duke Argimundo at the beginning of the reign of Recaredo and the consequences it had on the newly conquered Suebi kingdom. A prominent member of the Aula Regia and doge prouinciae, Argimundus started a rebellion in the province of Gallaecia that could have ruined the political endeavours of Leovigild and Recaredo. Finally, it analyses the figure of Duke Theudemirus, one of the great magnates of the kingdom of Toledo at the end of the 7th century, his actions within the complicated Visigothic political situation and the role he played in the transmission of power between Visigoths and Arabs after the fall of the kingdom of Toledo.

About the Authors
Rafael Barroso Cabrera (Madrid, 1963) holds a degree in Prehistory and Archaeology from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. He is a specialist in studies on the Visigothic kingdom of Toledo, a period to which he has devoted much of his research work and numerous publications. ;

Jorge Morín de Pablos (Madrid, 1967) holds a PhD in Archaeology from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid and is director of the Department of Archaeology, Palaeontology and Cultural Resources at AUDEMA. He has directed more than 300 archaeological excavations at different sites in Spain and abroad, with chronologies ranging from the Palaeolithic to contemporary times. ;

Isabel Sánchez Ramos (Córdoba, 1977) holds a PhD in Archaeology, specialising in the historical period of Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. Her main scientific interest has been the study of phenomena related to urban societies in transformation between the Roman period and the High Middle Ages in the western Mediterranean, the spaces and architectures of power linked to the elites, and the impact they had on the evolution of urban landscapes.

Spanish Description
Tres usurpadores godos es un estudio sobre tres famosas usurpaciones de época visigoda. Se analiza en primer lugar la naturaleza del levantamiento del príncipe Hermenegildo (579-585), la guerra civil y el complejo contexto político del momento, así como las importantes implicaciones que se derivaron del conflicto. El segundo estudio aborda la rebelión del duque Argimundo a comienzos del reinado de Recaredo y las consecuencias que ésta tuvo en el recién conquistado reino suevo. Destacado miembro del Aula Regia y dux prouinciae, Argimundus inició una rebelión en la provincia Gallaecia que pudo haber arruinado la obra política construida por Leovigildo y Recaredo. Por último, se analiza la figura del duque Theudemirus, uno de los grandes magnates del reino de Toledo de finales del siglo VII, su actuación dentro de la complicada situación política visigoda y el papel que desempeñó en la transmisión del poder entre visigodos y árabes a la caída del reino de Toledo.

Rafael Barroso Cabrera (Madrid, 1963) es Licenciado en Prehistoria y Arqueología por la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Es especialista en estudios sobre el reino visigodo de Toledo, periodo al que ha dedicado buena parte de su labor investigadora y numerosas publicaciones. ;

Jorge Morín de Pablos (Madrid, 1967) es Doctor en Arqueología por la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid y director del Departamento de Arqueología, Paleontología y Recursos Culturales de AUDEMA. Ha dirigido más de 300 excavaciones arqueológicas en diferentes yacimientos de España y el extranjero, con cronologías que van desde el Paleolítico hasta época contemporánea. ;

Isabel Sánchez Ramos (Córdoba, 1977) es doctora en Arqueología especialista en el periodo histórico de la Ant
NEW: Vincenzo La Rosa (1941- 2014): Un archeologo tra Sicilia e Egeo edited by Lucia Arcifa and Pietro Militello. Paperback; 150x210mm; 172 pages; 36 figures. Italian text. Italian text. Print RRP: £30.00. 9 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698176. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698183. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Vincenzo La Rosa (1941- 2014) Un archeologo tra Sicilia e Egeo collects the contributions of the Study Day Una lezione per il futuro. Vincenzo La Rosa (1941-2014) organised in 2015 by the University of Catania in collaboration with ISVNA, to re-examine the scientific figure of Vincenzo La Rosa, professor of Aegean Civilisations at the University of Catania, director of the excavations at Haghia Triada and Festòs in Crete, and the excavations at Milena in Sicily. Scholars and students demonstrate the contribution that Vincenzo La Rosa has made to our knowledge of the prehistory of Crete, Sicily and the Aegean, and to the application of a long-term perspective linking the ancient and modern worlds, emerges in his long career as a university lecturer, director of the Centre for the Study of Greek Archaeology at the C.N.R. in Catania, deputy director of the Italian Archaeological School in Athens (1993-1999) and director of the Centre of Cretan Archaeology (1998-2011).

About the Editors
Lucia Arcifa is professor of Medieval Archaeology at the University of Catania and director of the archaeological excavations in Rocchicella and Milena, in Sicily. Her interests focus on Byzantine and Islamic Mediterranean and on the relation between Sicily, Byzantium, Ifrīqiya in the Early Middle Age. ;

Pietro Militello is professor of Aegean civilisation at the University of Catania and director of the Mission of Phaistos in Crete. He is also directing excavations in Sicily. His interests focus on II millennium Crete and on the relation between the Aegean and Sicily in prehistory.

Italian Description
Vincenzo La Rosa (1941- 2014) Un archeologo tra Sicilia e Egeo raccoglie i contributi della Giornata di Studio Una lezione per il futuro. Vincenzo La Rosa (1941-2014) organizzata nel 2015 dall’Università di Catania in collaborazione con l’ISVNA, per riesaminare la figura scientifico di Vincenzo La Rosa, professore ordinario di Civiltà Egee presso l’Università di Catania, e direttore degli scavi di Haghia Triada e Festòs a Creta, e degli scavi di Milena in Sicilia. Attraverso i contributi di studiosi ed allievi emerge il contributo che Vincenzo La Rosa ha apportato alla conoscenza della preistoria di Creta, della Sicilia e dell’Egeo, ed alla applicazione di una prospettiva di lunga durata che collegava il mondo antico a quello moderno, nella sua lunga carriera di docente universitario, direttore del Centro di studi sull’Archeologia greca del C.N.R. di Catania, vicedirettore della Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Atene (1993-1999) e Direttore del Centro di Archeologia Cretese (1998-2011).
NEW: Peoples in the Black Sea Region from the Archaic to the Roman Period Proceedings of the 3rd International Workshop on the Black Sea in Antiquity held in Thessaloniki, 21-23 September 2018 edited by Manolis Manoledakis. Paperback; 205x290mm; 200 pages; 93 figures (28 pages in colour). 738 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698671. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698688. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Peoples in the Black Sea Region from the Archaic to the Roman Period includes papers presented at the Third International Workshop on the Black Sea in Antiquity, which, like the two previous ones, took place at the International Hellenic University, Greece, on 21-23 September 2018. The ‘Peoples’ of the title are defined widely to include not only those that either inhabited or colonised the Black Sea area, but also those who are considered to have visited, acted in, or influenced the region. Papers draw on a mix of archaeological evidence, epigraphy and written sources, as well as maps to explore the activities and characteristics of these peoples. The contributors are scholars from ten countries, and their papers cover all shores of the Black Sea.

About the Editor
Manolis Manoledakis is Associate Professor of Classical Archaeology at the International Hellenic University in Thessaloniki. He has participated in various research programmes and is the director of the International Hellenic University’s excavation in Neo Rysio, Thessaloniki. His research concentrates on the archaeology and ancient history of the Black Sea as well as central Macedonia, ancient topography and geography, ancient Greek religion and cults, Greek mythology in its historical context, and ancient Greek painting and vase-painting.
NEW: Le commerce de céramiques fines à ammaia, une ville du sud de la Lusitanie (50 – 550 apr. J.-c.) by José Carlos Quaresma. Paperback; 210x297mm; 228 pages; 133 figures; French text. 737 2021 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 16. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696837. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696844. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents the entire assemblage of fine wares (terra sigillata, lamps and thin-walled wares) from Ammaia, a Roman and Late Antique town located in the hinterland of southern Lusitania (presently in Portuguese territory). Despite its distance from the Atlantic coast, Ammaia took advantage of its proximity to Augusta Emerita, the capital of Lusitania. This aspect is particularly strong between c. AD 50 and c. AD 150, when the local market imported large quantities of fine wares from the capital. The Late Antique phase reveals a balanced capacity of importation at Ammaia, whose fine wares, essentially related to terra sigillata, were provided by wares from northern Hispania (Douro and Ebro valleys) and North Africa (Tunisia). Moreover, recent research at Ammaia has provided excellent stratigraphic contexts dated to between c. AD 50 and c. AD 150, crucial for the understanding of the chronological evolution of Italian, South-Gaulish and Hispanic terra sigillata. In the final chapter, the author undertakes a wide-ranging analysis of southern Lusitania with regard to the consumption of fine wares and amphorae. Several chronological phases have been established, based on stratigraphic and typological evidence, for the period between c. AD 50 and c. AD 550: that is the Early Empire (from the Claudio-Neronian period onwards) and its transition into the Late Roman period and the post-Roman phase. In the final sub-chapters, this analysis focuses on the problematic 5th century and up to the latest Lusitanian stratigraphic evidence of around the middle of the 6th century AD.

About the Author
José Carlos Quaresma is a professor at the New University of Lisbon. His research centres on Roman and Late Antique Archaeology, with special focus on ceramics, trade and the ancient economy. Over the last decade the author has carried out studies not only within Portugal (roughly equivalent to the Roman province of Lusitania), but also in Spain (Tarragona and Mallorca) and southern France (Arles).

French Description:
Ce livre présente l’ensemble de céramiques fines (sigillées, lampes et parois fines) d’Ammaia, une ville d’époque romaine et tardo-romaine, située dans l’hinterland de la région méridionale de la Lusitania (actuellement dans le territoire portugais). Malgré la distance de la côte atlantique, Ammaia a profité de sa proximité avec Augusta Emerita, la capitale de la provincia de la Lusitania. Cet aspect est particulièrement important entre c.50 et c.150 apr. J.-C., quand le marché local a importé de grandes quantités de céramiques fines de la capitale. La phase de l’Antiquité Tardive démontre une importation équilibrée à Ammaia, dont les céramiques fines, essentiellement formées par des sigillées, sont fournies par les productions du Nord de l’Hispania (les vallées du Douro et de l’Èbre) et l’Afrique du Nord. En plus, la recherche plus récente à Ammaia a livré d’excellents contextes datés entre c.50 et c.150 apr. J.-C., un aspect crucial pour la compréhension de l’évolution chronologique de la sigillée italique, sud-gallique et hispanique. Dans le dernier chapitre, l’auteur met en place une analyse à large spectre de la Lusitania méridionale, par rapport à la consommation de céramiques fines et d’amphores. Quelques phases chronologiques furent établies, basées sur l’évidence stratigraphique et typologique, pour la période entre c. 50 et c. 550 apr. J.-C., c’est-à-dire le Haut-Empire (à partir de la période claudio-néronienne) et sa transition vers la période romaine tardive et la phase post-romaine. Au cours des derniers sous-chapitres, cette analyse se concentre sur les problématiques du Ve siècle, jusqu’à la dernière évidence stratigraphique lusitanienne, au milieu du VIe siècle.

José Carlos Quaresma est professeur à l’Université Nouvelle de Lisbonne. Ce livre fut écrit au cours d’une bours
NEW: Pits and Boots: Excavation of Medieval and Post-medieval Backlands under the Bon Accord Centre, Aberdeen by Michael Roy. Paperback; 205x290mm; 368 pages; 170 figures, 43 tables. 735 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694871. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694888. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Pits and Boots derives from excavations carried out in 2007-8, in advance of an extension to the Bon Accord Centre in Aberdeen, that uncovered the backlands of an area that would have formed part of the industrial quarter of the medieval town. The site is well-dated by dendrochronology, augmented by artefactual evidence, and indicates activity from the late 12th century AD into the early modern period, with a particularly intensive period in the 13th century. Structural evidence consists primarily of the backland boundaries, hearth/ovens, several wood-lined wells and many large pits. It is the contents of these pits and wells which forms the core of this monograph. The waterlogged conditions within the pits and wells has meant that a remarkable assemblage of organic remains including leather, wooden artefacts, textiles, animal pelts, fibres, and cordage has survived. The leather assemblage is the largest ever to be found in Scotland and has revealed a range of activities associated with the use of animal hides, from hide processing to tanning and shoemaking. The wood assemblage is also extensive and includes bowls, platters, coopered vessels and tools. Metalwork, crucibles, clay mould fragments and ceramics all testify to the industrial nature of the area, while the large quantities of animal and fishbone demonstrate that butchery on an industrial scale took place in the area. The excavation charts the changing nature of this once-peripheral area of Aberdeen, from an industrial zone in the medieval period, to horticultural and domestic spaces in post-medieval times, and has thus greatly enhanced our knowledge of Scottish urban development.

About the Author
Michael Roy currently works as a Project manager in the Post-Excavation sector at AOC Archaeology Group. After graduating from the University of Cambridge in 1993 and the University of Leicester in 1994, Michael has worked in archaeology across the UK, working for several years for the Scottish Urban Archaeological Trust and Essex County Council’s Field Archaeology Unit. Joining AOC Archaeology in 2004, he has directed substantial urban excavations in Edinburgh (Parliament House), Aberdeen (Bon Accord) and Dunbar, in addition to working in their Consultancy sector.
NEW: Crimes in the Past: Archaeological and Anthropological Evidence edited by Tatyana Shvedchikova, Negahnaz Moghaddam and Pier Matteo Barone. Paperback; 205x290mm; 264 pages; 102 figures, 5 tables. 733 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697780. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697797. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Crimes in the Past: Archaeological and Anthropological Evidence aims to discuss the possible examples of crimes in the archaeological past, their detection and interpretation with the help of modern scientific methods, and how interdisciplinary approaches can be conducted in further research concerning ‘crimes of the past.’ The idea to create this publication was born after organizing Session #169 Past Crimes during the 25th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA 2019) in Bern. In this book, readers will find cases of historic and prehistoric ‘crimes scenes’ known from various contexts, including the findings of (pre)historic (mass) graves and lethal violent acts related to warfare, ritual killings, or possible murder cases. In order to get to the bottom of the possible archaeological crime scenes, contemporary interdisciplinary approaches will be used, which allow us to extend the frames of classical archaeological study.


About the Editors
Tatyana Shvedchikova completed her studies in Social Anthropology at the Russian State University for the Humanities in Moscow. From 2010 she has worked as a research fellow at the Department of Theory and Methods at the Institute of Archaeology, Russian Academy of Sciences. Dr Shvedchikova’s main research interests lie in the fields of forensic anthropology and archaeology, in particular bone tissue degradation processes and multidisciplinary approaches to the study and identification of human remains. ;

Negahnaz Moghaddam completed her studies in Human Genetics and Physical Anthropology at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Germany. Since 2017 she has been head of the forensic anthropology research group at the Unit of Forensic Imaging and Anthropology (UIAF) and the Swiss Human Institute of Forensic Taphonomy (SHIFT). Her activities on archaeological excavations, laboratory analyses including stable isotope research, and forensic case work have allowed her to bridge the gaps between various disciplines. ;

Pier Matteo Barone is a full-time lecturer in the Archaeology and Classics Department of the American University of Rome. He teaches Forensic Geoscience with particular regard to geophysical prospections, remote sensing, GIS, and archaeology applied to crime scene investigations and to crimes in antiquity.
NEW: Barāqish/Yathill (Yemen) 1986-2007 Excavations of Temple B and related research and restoration / Extramural excavations in Area C and overview studies edited by Sabina Antonini and Francesco G. Fedele. DOI: 10.32028/9781789694703. Paperback; 205x290mm; 2 volumes: 398pp & 546pp; 700 figures, tables and plates. Contributions in English, Italian, and French. Chapter abstracts in English and Arabic. 732 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694703. £98.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694710. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The walled town of Barāqish in interior Yemen – ancient Yathill of the Sabaeans and Minaeans – was for Alessandro de Maigret (1943-2011) ‘one of the archaeological marvels not just of Yemen, but of the entire Near East’. Established as an oasis settlement in the semi-desert depression of the Jawf, it became in the 1st millennium BCE a thriving caravan station on the ‘incense’ route and a famed place of worship, controlled by rich rulers and merchants. Topography and trade made it a crucible of South Arabian and foreign traditions, and on several occasions, it was a border town disputed between rival powers. A sustained archaeological effort to investigate the site and area began in 1986 by the Italian Archaeological Mission, led by de Maigret, and developed in two phases. In 1989-1992 the temple of the patron god was excavated, while between 2003-2007 a range of new excavations were undertaken, including a second temple, a sounding, a dissection of the tell's edge outside the Minaean wall, and a cemetery.

Presented across two volumes, Volume 1: Excavations of Temple B and related research and restoration is particularly devoted to the temple of god ʿAthtar dhu-Qabḍ (Temple B), dated to the second half of the 1st millennium BCE. Six chapters fully illustrate its excavation, architecture, restoration, findings, inscriptions, and dating. The contribution of this work and monument to regional history transcends its local significance. The report is framed by ten chapters detailing the historiography of research on Barāqish, the initial surveys carried out in 1986-1987, the architecture and restoration of Temple A together with the extramural excavation at the adjacent curtain wall, the cultic equipment, and radiocarbon datings. The nine contributors are leading scholars in the above fields and include recognized experts in South Arabian archaeology.

The core of Volume 2: Extramural excavations in Area C and overview studies is a final report on Area C, an exploratory dissection through the western edge of the Barāqish mound outside the curtain wall, and a unique operation for Yemen until now. Eight chapters detail the excavation, stratigraphy, and geoarchaeology (from about 800 BCE to the present), in addition to radiocarbon chronology, cultural finds, animal and plant remains, economy, major historical events, and unique evidence for trade. Four further chapters offer a glimpse of settlement archaeology for Sabaean Yathill and the survey of a religious centre to the west, together with a first typology of Minaean pottery and an epigraphic and political-historical overview for Barāqish and the Jawf. The contributors are recognized experts in South Arabian archaeology.

About the Editors
Sabina Antonini heads the Italian Archaeological Mission to Yemen c/o Monumenta Orientalia (Rome). Since 1984 she has taken part in archaeological surveys and excavations of prehistoric sites in Khawlān al-Ṭiyāl and Ramlat al-Sabʿatayn and of South Arabian sites, including Yalā, Tamnaʿ, Ḥayd ibn ʿAqīl, and Barāqish. She is a specialist in South Arabian archaeology and history of art. Her contribution, ‘The Italian Archaeological Mission at Šibām al-Ġirās, Yemen’, has appeared in Festschrift in honour of Professor Mikhail Piotrovsky (2019). ;

Francesco G. Fedele has been Professor of Anthropology and Prehistoric ecology at the Università di Napoli ‘Federico II’, Naples, until retirement in 2011. As a member of the Italian Archaeological Mission to Yemen since 1984 he has conducted excavations in Khawlān al- Ṭiyāl and at Barāqish, with a particular focus on site geoarchaeology and archaeofaunas. His recent publications include ‘New data on domestic and wild camels in Sabaean and Minaean Yemen’ in Archaeozoology of the Near East 9 (2017).
NEW: The First Thousand Years of Glass-Making in the Ancient Near East Compositional Analyses of Late Bronze and Iron Age Glasses by Wendy Reade. Paperback; 205x290mm; 274 pages; 204 figures, 72 tables. 731 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697032. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697049. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Glass-Making in the Ancient Near East explores glass composition and production from the mid-second to mid-first millennia BC, essentially the first thousand years of glass-making. Multi-element analyses of 132 glasses from Pella in Jordan, and Nuzi and Nimrud in Iraq (ancient Mesopotamia), produce new and important data that provide insights into the earliest glass production. A novel method for data interpretation and presentation has been developed and used to characterise the glass types and to investigate questions of composition, raw materials, regional differences and similarities, and changes through time from the earliest consistent glass manufacture as represented at 16th century BC Pella, which is compared with Late Bronze Age Nuzi, to the Iron Age at both Pella and Nimrud. These compositional data are compared with available glass compositional data from the widespread regions of the Levant, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Iran and France, uncovering fascinating connections that, when placed in the archaeological context, reveal much about glass production, raw material sources, and distribution of finished and raw glasses. Technological innovations, including the introduction of natron-fluxed glasses, early decolouring with antimony, and the use of Egyptian cobalt colourant in Near Eastern glasses, are explored as part of this unique investigation of the critical developments in sophisticated and complex glass-making that laid the foundations for the establishment of large-scale production in the ensuing Hellenistic and Roman periods.

About the Author
Wendy Reade has obtained a Postgraduate Diploma in Ancient Documentary Studies from Macquarie University and a PhD in Archaeological Science from the University of Sydney in 2009. She is an Honorary Associate in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Sydney, where she lectured in Archaeology and Archaeological Science from 1999 to 2015. She has worked as an archaeologist and conservator on excavations in Jordan, Egypt, Bahrain, United Arab Emirates, Syria, Greece, the Republic of North Macedonia, Myanmar and Australia.
NEW: Classification of Lithic Artefacts from the British Late Glacial and Holocene Periods by Torben Bjarke Ballin. Paperback; 205x290mm; 100 pages; 128 figures. 730 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698695. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698701. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

A system for the hierarchical Classification of Lithic Artefacts from the British Late Glacial and Holocene Periods is offered in this book. It is hoped that it may find use as a guide book for archaeology students, museum staff, non-specialist archaeologists, local archaeology groups and lay enthusiasts. To allow the individual categories of lithic objects to be classified and characterised in detail, it was necessary to first define a number of descriptive terms, which forms the first part of this guide. The main part of the book is the lithic classification section, which offers definitions of the individual formal debitage, core and tool types. The basic questions asked are: what defines Object X as a tool and not a piece of debitage or a core; what defines a microlith as a microlith and not a knife or a piercer; and what defines a specific implement as a scalene triangle and not an isosceles one? As shown in the book, there are disagreements within the lithics community as to the specific definition of some types, demonstrating the need for all lithics reports to define which typological framework they are based on.

The eBook edition of this publication is available in Open Access, supported by Historic Environment Scotland.

About the Author
After having worked as an archaeological specialist and Project Manager in Denmark, the Faroe Islands and Norway, Torben Ballin relocated to Scotland in 1998. Since then, he has worked as an independent lithics specialist in Scotland, England, Northern Ireland and Ireland, representing the consultancy Lithic Research. Torben’s special interests have been lithic terminology and typology, lithic technology, chronological frameworks, raw material studies, intra-site spatial analyses, prehistoric territories and exchange networks, and Scotland’s Late Upper Palaeolithic and Early Mesolithic industries. His interest in lithic terminology and typology led to the production and publication of a number of works on general lithic typology within and outwith Britain.
NEW: Visions of the Roman North: Art and Identity in Northern Roman Britain by Iain Ferris. Paperback; 175x245mm; 236pp; 107 figures, colour throughout. 729 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 80. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699050. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699067. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Visions of the Roman North: Art and Identity in Northern Roman Britain is the first book to present an analysis of art from the northern frontier zones of Roman Britain and to interpret the meaning and significance of this art in terms of the formation of a regional identity at this time. It argues that a distinct and vibrant visual culture flourished in the north during the Roman period, primarily due to its status as a heavily militarized frontier zone. Artworks from forts and the frontier-works of Hadrian’s Wall and the Antonine Wall, along with funerary monuments from military and civilian cemeteries, are analysed and discussed. The book also explores religious sculpture depicting classical deities, Romano-British gods and goddesses and eastern deities such as Mithras in terms of the use of imagery in various belief systems and in terms of the establishment of individual and group identities.

About the Author
Iain Ferris is an archaeologist living in Pembrey, Carmarthenshire, Wales. He has over forty years of experience working in professional archaeology in Britain and abroad and in teaching archaeology at Birmingham and Manchester universities. His research interests include Roman art and material culture and Romano-British archaeology and artefacts. He has directed major archaeological research excavations in northern and midland England and is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries. He has published widely in academic journals and is the author of nine books, all on Roman art and archaeology.

Reviews
‘…this is amongst the very best books on Roman Britain which I have ever read. It engages with what made Northern Britain special and culturally distinct in the Roman Empire. There is a real understanding for Northern Roman Britain here, and an understanding for a unique artistic culture that raises it very high indeed as a book on the provincial art of the Roman Empire.’ – Revd Professor Martin Henig, University of Oxford
NEW: El tesoro de Regina Turdulorum (Casas de Reina, Badajoz) by David Martínez Chico. Paperback; 203x276mm; 94 pages; 9 figures, 3 tables, illustrated catalogue (30 plates); colour throughout. Spanish text. 137 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699401. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699418. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Regina Turdulorum Hoard (Casas de Reina, Badajoz) was buried with 818 imitative antoniniani of Divo Claudio type, minted in copper. The vast majority of the coins bear the reverse legend CONSECRATIO. This figure makes the Regina Turdulorum hoard one of the most important in Spain and Portugal. In numismatic terms, the most common reverse type is the funeral pyre, as opposed to the eagle. In addition to this main group, there is a second group, where there are curious imitations that follow various prototypes for the manufacture of the reverse. The study of the posthumous coinage of Claudius II and his imitations represents one of the most complex tasks in ancient numismatics. The work is considerably complicated by the fact that they are highly copied coins, which means that regular issues are very difficult to distinguish from the imitations. In this sense, the hoard provides vital information for the western monetary circulation of the Roman Empire, contributing to the debate on Gallic and African imitations. It also opens the way to the hypothesis that Hispania may have been another centre for issuing Divo Claudio imitations. Although the latter remains to be proven, the tentative and open nature of this book provides the opportunity to open new lines of study in the hope that they will be resolved sooner rather than later.

Spanish Description:
El tesoro de Regina Turdulorum (Casas de Reina, Badajoz) se compone de 818 antoninianos de imitación, fundamentalmente del tipo Divo Claudio, acuñados en cobre. La inmensa mayoría de las monedas tiene en el reverso la característica leyenda CONSECRATIO. Esta cifra convierte al tesoro de Regina Turdulorum como de los más importantes en España y Portugal. A nivel numismático, la tipología de reverso más común es la de pira funeraria, frente a la de águila. Junto a este principal grupo se añade otro segundo, donde hay curiosas imitaciones que siguen varios prototipos para la confección de los reversos. El lector debe ser consciente que el estudio de las acuñaciones póstumas de Claudio II y sus imitaciones representa una de las tareas más complejas en numismática antigua. La labor se complica considerablemente por el hecho de ser monedas muy copiadas, de tal modo que las emisiones regulares son muy difíciles de distinguir de las imitaciones. En este sentido, el tesoro aporta una información vital para la circulación monetaria occidental del Imperio Romano, contribuyendo al debate de las imitaciones galas y africanas. Y abriendo paso a la hipótesis de que Hispania posiblemente fue otro centro emisor de imitaciones divoclaudianas. Aunque esto último estaría por demostrarse, el carácter provisional y abierto de este libro brinda la oportunidad de abrir nuevas líneas de estudio, con la esperanza de que se resuelvan más pronto que tarde.

David Martínez Chico es un historiador, arqueólogo y numismático, así como fundador y director editorial desde 2014 de Revista Numismática Hécate. Anteriormente, en 2008, fundó plataformas numismáticas como Foro Imperio Numismático, consciente de la importancia en la difusión y transferencia de conocimientos en su campo.
NEW: Conversations in Human Evolution: Volume 2 edited by Lucy Timbrell. Paperback; 203x276mm; 132 pages; colour throughout. 136 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699470. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699487. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Conversations in Human Evolution is an ongoing science communication initiative seeking to explore the breadth and interdisciplinarity of human evolution studies. This volume reports another twenty interviews (referred to as ‘conversations’ as they are informal in style) with scholars at the forefront of human evolution research, covering the broad scientific themes of Palaeolithic archaeology, palaeoanthropology and biological anthropology, earth science and palaeoclimatic change, evolutionary anthropology and primatology, and human disease co-evolution. This project features academics at various different stages in their careers and from all over the world; in this volume alone, researchers are based at institutions in eleven different countries (namely Iran, India, the United Kingdom, Greece, Australia, South Africa, the United States of America, the Netherlands, Germany, France and Israel), covering five continents.

Having arisen at the start of the COVID19 pandemic, Conversations in Human Evolution aims to encourage engagement with both human evolutionary studies and the broader socio-political issues that persist within academia, the latter of which is particularly pertinent during this time of global uncertainty. The conversations delve deeply into the study of our species’ evolutionary history through the lens of each sub-discipline, as well as detailing some of the most current advances in research, theory and methods. Overall, Conversations in Human Evolution seeks to bridge the gap between the research and researcher through contextualisation of the science with personal experience and historical reflection.

About the Editor
Lucy Timbrell is a PhD researcher in the Archaeology of Human Origins Research Group at the University of Liverpool, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, The Leakey Foundation and the Lithic Studies Society. Broadly, she is interested in the evolution of modern human diversity, with her doctoral research focussing on quantifying the population structure of early Homo sapiens in Late-Middle Pleistocene Africa. Alongside her PhD research, she organises the widely-known University of Liverpool Evolutionary Anthropology seminar series.
NEW: Toniná, una ciudad maya de Chiapas Vida y muerte en las postrimerías del colapso maya by Judith L. Ruiz González. Paperback; 203x276mm; 328 pages; 150 figures, 68 tables. Spanish text. 135 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699289. £49.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699296. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Toniná was a Mayan city, located between two cultural areas near the Chiapas Highlands. It has been widely proposed that the Maya collapse implied the disappearance and depopulation of many cities; this research addresses the survival of Toniná towards the threshold of the Postclassic. For this purpose, 15,956 human bones found in Structure 15 of the fifth platform in the Acropolis of Toniná were analysed. The analysis of anthropological osteology allowed us to know the biological profile and to document the cultural taphonomy, through which the practice of human sacrifice and the posthumous treatment of the victims was evidenced. The application of stable isotope and strontium analyses also allowed us to determine the dietary profile of those sacrificed, their geographical origin and mobility throughout their lives. A change in ritual practices in the Mayan area was glimpsed, as ideological influences were found, possibly from the Gulf Coast in the cult of other deities, as in the case of Xipe Totéc; the Gulf Coast had great influence in the Mayan area since ancient times and this has been confirmed at this site through ceramics.

Spanish Description
Toniná fue una ciudad maya, localizada entre dos áreas culturales hacia los Altos de Chiapas. Se ha planteado de manera generalizada que el colapso maya implicó la desaparición y despoblamiento de muchas ciudades; en esta investigación se aborda la pervivencia de Toniná hacia el umbral del Posclásico. Para ello se analizaron 15 956 huesos humanos hallados en la Estructura 15 de la quinta plataforma en la Acrópolis de Toniná. El análisis de osteología antropológica permitío conocer el perfil biológico y documentar la tafonomía cultural, a través de la cual se evidenció la práctica del sacrificio humano y los tratamientos póstumos de las víctimas. Así también la aplicación de análisis de isótopos estables y de estroncio permitió conocer el perfil dietario de los sacrificados, su origen geográfico y movilidad a lo largo de su vida. Se vislumbró un cambio en las prácticas rituales en el área maya, al encontrar influencias ideológicas posiblemente de la Costa del Golfo en el culto a otras deidades, es el caso de Xipe Totéc; la Costa del Golfo tuvo gran influencia en el área maya desde tiempos remotos y se ha constatado en este sitio a través de la cerámica.

Judith L. Ruiz González: Antropóloga Física por la ENAH, estudios de Maestría y Doctorado en el Posgrado de Estudios Mesoamericanos, UNAM. Líneas de interés académico. 1) Condiciones de vida y salud en poblaciones esqueléticas y en restos momificados prehispánicos y coloniales. 2) Paleopatología y perspectivas bioarqueológicas en Mesoamérica. 3) Diversidad dietaria y movilidad humana a través de estudios bioarquemétricos en poblaciones antiguas. 4) Evidencias de sacrificio humano y tratamientos rituales póstumos del cuerpo en Mesoamérica. Ha participado en diferentes proyectos de investigación de la Dirección de Estudios Arqueológicos del INAH, de la Zona Arqueológica de Tlatelolco, INAH, del Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas y del Instituto de Geología de la UNAM. Es profesora de Asignatura en el Centro de Estudios Antropológicos, Facultad de Ciencias Políticas y Sociales, UNAM. Protecyo de investigacion reciente: Interacciones culturales y dinámicas poblacionales desde la Costa veracruzana al interior: isotopía de la dieta e historia residencial.
NEW: Ash-Sharq - Bulletin of the Ancient Near East Vol 5 No 1-2 2021 edited by Laura Battini (editor-in-chief). Paperback; 127x245mm; Vol 5 No 1: 78pp, Vol 5 No 2: TBA. 5 2021. Only available as e-version. £10.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £68.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Buy Now

Vol 5 No 1 digital edition available to access now. Printed edition of Vol 5 will contain issues 1 and 2 and will be released when Vol 5 No 2 becomes available later in the year.

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FORTHCOMING: Flint Procurement and Exploitation Strategies in the Late Lower Paleolithic Levant by Aviad Agam. Paperback; 174x245mm; 216 pages; 84 figures, 54 tables. 753 2021. ISBN 9781789699340. Book contents pageBuy Now

Flint Procurement and Exploitation Strategies in the Late Lower Paleolithic Levant examines twelve lithic assemblages from Qesem Cave. Potential flint sources were located, petrographic thin sections of archaeological and geologic samples were studied, and a geochemical analysis was performed. The results show that flint from local Turonian sources was often brought to the cave, forming most of the identified flint. Flint from non-Turonian geologic origins was also used in noteworthy proportions, in specific typotechnological categories. The availability of desired flints around the cave, highly suitable for the production of the commonly-used blades, as well as for the production of other tools, probably played a role in the decision to settle there. The notable proportions of non-Turonian flint types, a pattern that repeats itself through time, demonstrate consistency in accessing sources containing non-local flint, implying the existence of knowledge transmission mechanisms concerning the distribution of sources and the suitability of specific flint types for the production of specific blanks/tools.

About the Author Aviad Agam is a researcher at Tel Aviv University, Israel. He specializes in lithic technology, strategies of lithic procurement and exploitation during Paleolithic and Neolithic times, the use of fire among early humans, and human-proboscidea relations during prehistory. He is a team member of projects at the Acheulo-Yabrudian site Qesem Cave (Israel, 420,000-200,000 years before the present day) and the Late Acheulian sites Revadim and Jaljulia (both in Israel, ~500,000 years before the present day).
FORTHCOMING: Les pratiques funéraires en Gaule lyonnaise de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle by András Márton. Paperback; 205x290mm; 482 pages; 299 figures; 379 maps (black & white throughout). French text. Print RRP: £60.00. 752 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 81. ISBN 9781789698077. Book contents pageBuy Now

Les pratiques funéraires en Gaule lyonnaise de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle aims to provide an overview of Roman burial practices in the Gallia Lugdunensis province during the Early Roman Empire.

Among the different approaches proposed by R. Reece for the study of Roman cemeteries, this work focuses on grave treatment and grave furnishing. The funerary practices are thus apprehended through the study of the structure of the tombs and the selection and treatment of the grave goods and human remains. The main objective was to propose a synthesis of the published finds which could serve as a basis for future research.

The analysis consists of a documentary review of the published data (presented in the catalogue and numerous tables) as complete as possible, accompanied by a detailed analysis of the latest information available to highlight trends regarding the entire province, and the peculiarities seen at a regional level. Many graphics and maps support this analysis.

Many general trends, common to the western provinces of the Roman Empire, were detected, but also many particularities linked to the regional nature of the funerary practices and the economic and social situation of the communities. Some of these particularities reflect more profound cultural differences due to the unequal penetration of Mediterranean funerary practices into the territory of the province. They reflect the somewhat 'artificial' formation of the Gallia Lugdunensis, which incorporated tribes belonging to different cultural spheres (sharing particularities with Aquitania and the Belgic Gaul or more exposed to the Mediterranean influences).

About the Author
András Márton was born in Budapest. He studied at the Eötvös Lorand University where he obtained two master degrees, one in History and another in Archaeology specializing in Roman provincial and Classical archaeology. After graduation, he worked at the Hungarian National Museum and the Museum of Fine Arts in Budapest. He defended his thesis summa cum laude at the Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest under the direction of Professor Patrick Galliou. He lives in France and is involved in research programs at the Louvre and the Museum of Fine Arts of Lyon. He has published many scientific papers and co-authored several books. His research interests are pottery studies and ancient funerary practices.

En français
Les pratiques funéraires en Gaule lyonnaise de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle, qui est la publication non remaniée d’une partie de la thèse de doctorat de l’auteur soutenue, avec félicitations, à l’Université de Bretagne occidentale (Brest, France) en 2013, vise à donner un aperçu des pratiques funéraires romaines dans la Gaule Lyonnaise au cours du Haut-Empire. Parmi les diffff érentes approches de l’étude des nécropoles romaines, ce travail se concentre sur les tombes et le traitement du mobilier. Les pratiques funéraires sont ainsi appréhendées à travers l’étude de la structure des tombes, de la sélection et du traitement du mobilier funéraire et des restes humains. L’objectif principal est de proposer une synthèse des résultats publiés qui puisse servir de base aux recherches futures. L’analyse consiste en une reprise documentaire (présentée dans le catalogue et les nombreux tableaux) aussi complète que possible des données publiées, accompagnée d’une analyse détaillée des informations aujourd’hui disponibles afifi n de mettre en évidence les tendances concernant l’ensemble de la province, mais aussi les particularités que l’on peut distinguer au niveau régional. L’analyse est soutenue par de nombreux graphiques et cartes. Bien sûr, des tendances générales, communes aux provinces occidentales de l’Empire romain, peuvent être détectées, mais des particularités liées aux spécififi cités régionales et à la situation économique et sociale