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Comparative and Global Perspectives on Japanese Archaeology

Japanese archaeology is a tremendously rich resource of case studies in various fields including prehistory, historical archaeology, artefact studies, and new scientific analyses. The great wealth of archaeological material available for study in Japan remains largely inaccessible to non- Japanese audiences, however, due to the language barrier. This series of monographs, translations, edited volumes and conference proceedings emerged after long-term research collaborations between Japanese and European archaeologists facilitated by the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures.

Series Editor: Simon Kaner (Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures)

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The Archaeology of Medieval Towns: Case Studies from Japan and Europe edited by Simon Kaner, Brian Ayers, Richard Pearson and Oscar Wrenn. Paperback; 210x297mm; 154pp; 111 black & white figures. 649 2020 Comparative and Global Perspectives on Japanese Archaeology 3. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694260. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694277. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In recent years, major new archaeological discoveries have redefined the development of towns and cities in the Japanese archipelago. The uncovering of the plans of major port towns such as Sakai, Kusado Sengen and Ichijōdani, and the revealing of early phases in the development of cities such as Kamakura and Hakata provide an important new resource in understanding the cultural and economic processes which shaped medieval Japan.

This fully illustrated book provides a sampler of these findings for a western audience. The new discoveries from Japan are set in context of medieval archaeology beyond Japan by accompanying essays from leading European specialists.

The global significance of Japanese medieval archaeology is assessed through comparing the development of towns in Japan and northern Europe. The medieval period in Japan and northwest Europe saw urban growth with towns not only providing centres of administration but also fostering economic development. The pressures which led to such growth, however, be they political or social, were universal in character. following basic requirements of food, shelter, security and spiritual nourishment, towns provided commercial infrastructures, transport and storage facilities, and the setting for trade, craft specialists and art.

Chapters include ‘The archaeology of medieval towns in Japan and europe: an introduction’ (Brian Ayers and Simon Kaner); ‘Permanent urban frameworks (‘armature’) and economic networks in northern France c.700 – c.1000’ (Henri Galinié); ‘Medieval urbanism and culture in the cities of the Baltic: with a comparison between Lübeck, Germany, and Sakai, Japan’ (Manfred Gläser); ‘The development of Hakata as a medieval port town’ (Ōba Kōji); ‘The establishment and transformation of Japan’s medieval capital, Kamakura’ (Oka Yōichirō); ‘Ichijōdani: the archaeology of a Japanese medieval castle town’ (Ono Masatoshi); ‘Japanese medieval trading towns: Sakai and Tosaminato’ (Richard Pearson); and ‘Medieval ceramic production in the aegean, 1100 – 1600 AD: some considerations in an east-west perspective’ (Joanita Vroom).

About the Editors
Simon Kaner is Executive Director of the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures where he is also Head of the Centre for Archaeology and Heritage, and Director of the Centre for Japanese Studies at the University of East Anglia. His publications include The Power of Dogu: Ceramic Figures from Ancient Japan and An Illustrated Companion to Japanese Archaeology.

Brian Ayers served as Honorary Secretary of the Society of Antiquaries of London, and Chief Executive of the Butrint Foundation and County Archaeologist for Norfolk. A specialist in medieval urban archaeology, his publications include Norwich: A Fine City and The German Ocean: Medieval Europe around the North Sea.

Richard Pearson is Emeritus Professor of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia and Senior Research Adviser to the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures. His publications include Ancient Ryukyu: An Archaeological Study of Island Communities and Ōsaka Archaeology.

Oscar Wrenn is Academic Associate at the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures.
An Illustrated Companion to Japanese Archaeology 2nd Edition edited by Werner Steinhaus, Simon Kaner, Megumi Jinno and Shinya Shoda. Paperback; 210x297mm; 352 pages; 209 figures, 248 plates (full colour throughout). 273 2016 Comparative and Global Perspectives on Japanese Archaeology 1. ISBN 9781789693959. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

An Illustrated Companion to Japanese Archaeology provides for the first time a comprehensive visual introduction to a wide range of sites and finds from the earliest occupation of the Japanese archipelago prior to 35,000 years ago to the early historical periods and the establishment of the Chinese-style capital at Heijo, modern-day Nara, in the 8th century AD. The volume originated in the largest ever exhibition of Japanese archaeological discoveries held in Germany in 2004, which brought together over 1500 exhibits from 55 lenders around Japan, and research by over 100 specialists. The Illustrated Companion brings the fruits of this project to an English-reading audience and offers an up-to-date survey of the achievements of Japanese archaeology.

About the Editors
Werner STEINHAUS is Lecturer in Archaeology at Hiroshima University and an Academic Associate at the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures. ;

Simon KANER is Executive Director of the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures (www.sainsbury-institute.org), where he is also Head of the Centre for Archaeology and Heritage, and Director of the Centre for Japanese Studies at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK. ;

Megumi JINNO is Chief Researcher of the Department of Palace Investigations at Nara National Research Institute for Cultural Properties in Japan. ;

Shinya SHODA is Head of the International Cooperation Section at Nara National Research Institute for Cultural Properties in Japan, and an Academic Associate at the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures, UK.
Burial Mounds in Europe and Japan Comparative and Contextual Perspectives edited by Thomas Knopf, Werner Steinhaus and Shin’ya Fukunaga. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+226 pages; 162 figures, 1 List, 1 Table (76 plates in colour). 470 2018 Comparative and Global Perspectives on Japanese Archaeology 2. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690071. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690088. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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Burial Mounds in Europe and Japan brings together specialists of the European Bronze and Iron Age and the Japanese Yayoi and Kofun periods for the first time to discuss burial mounds in a comparative context. The book aims to strengthen knowledge of Japanese archaeology in Europe and vice versa.

The papers demonstrate many methodological and interpretive commonalities in the archaeology of burial mounds in Japan and Europe and provide a series of state-of-the-art case studies highlighting many different aspects of burial mound research in both regions. Topics addressed by both European and Japanese specialists include research histories, excavation methods, origins and development of graves with burial mounds, the relationship of burial mounds to settlements and landscape, and above all administrative power and ritual.

About the Editors
Thomas Knopf is Professor of Pre- and Protohistory at the University of Tübingen in Germany. He has conducted fieldwork at some of the largest Celtic settlements in Europe. He works on theoretical themes including the concept of continuity, and is a specialist in human-environments relationships in prehistory. He works together with soils scientists and archaeobotanists focussing on the development and the perception of landscapes.

Werner Steinhaus is Lecturer in Archaeology at Hiroshima University in Japan. After graduating from Freiburg University in Germany he undertook postgraduate research at Ōsaka University in Japan, specialising in the archaeology of the Kofun period. He curated the largest overseas exhibition of Japanese archaeology Die Zeit der Morgenröte, held in Germany in 2004-2005.

FUKUNAGA Shin’ya is Professor of Archaeology at the Graduate School of Letters at Ōsaka University in Japan. He graduated and received his doctorate from the Department of History, Graduate School of Letters, Ōsaka University. Professor Fukunaga is a member of the Science Council of Japan and the Committee for the World Heritage Inscription of the Mozu-Furuichi Kofun groups of mounted tombs. His publications include From the Yamatai Kingdom to the Yamato Court (Ōsaka University Press, in Japanese).
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