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NEW: Alexandria Antiqua: A Topographical Catalogue and Reconstruction by Amr Abdo. Paperback; 205x290mm; 374pp; 346 figures plus 5 online AutoCAD Maps (colour throughout). 812 2022. ISBN 9781789699432. £58.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Alexandria Antiqua: A Topographical Catalogue and Reconstruction is an attempt to find a way through an archaeological labyrinth of fragmentary evidence. Taking into account the last two centuries of systematic research into the topography of the ancient city while integrating the latest discoveries, the volume aims to catalogue the archaeological sites in Alexandria, from the recordings of the French expedition (1798-99) to the present-day finds. The attempt is also made to reconstruct the urban layout and landscape at the time of the city’s Graeco-Macedonian foundation in the 4th century BC, and then through the successive changes which took place up to the Arab conquest in the 7th century AD. To this end, a holistic approach to topographic reconstruction is adopted, where material culture is studied in conjunction with the historical record. The results are displayed in AutoCAD maps and over 340 illustrations.

About the Author
Amr Abdo is a classical archaeologist and independent researcher. In 2019, he received his PhD with a cum laude distinction from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (Catalonia). Since 2013, his research has focused on landscape archaeology and urbanism in antiquity, with a special focus on the topography of ancient Alexandria.
NEW: The Life and Works of Robert Wood Classicist and Traveller (1717-1771) by Rachel Finnegan and Lynda Mulvin. Paperback; 156x234; 204 pages. 810 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781803271767. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271774. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Life and Works of Robert Wood (1717-1771) commemorates the Irish classicist and traveller on the 250th anniversary of his death and provides the general reader with a study that can be regarded as a source book for the fascinating life and career of a much-neglected figure in the realm of Irish eighteenth-century travels and antiquarianism. The book starts by setting the context of eighteenth-century travels to the east and then examines the primary sources emanating from Wood’s own eastern voyages, as well as the relevant literary sources available to him before, during, and after his travels. It then provides an extensive and much-needed biographical account of Robert Wood, with particular reference to his Irish and English patrons, before examining the main results of the second tour (1750-1751), namely his three pioneering books: Ruins of Palmyra (1753), Ruins of Balbec (1757), and The Original Genius of Homer (1775). It ends by considering the enormous legacy of Robert Wood, in terms of the popularity of his books; the variety and quality of portraits commissioned by his friends and associates; his contribution to the study of classical literature; his influence on architectural drawing in late eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Europe; and the cultural significance of his work on building design. The text also reflects on the somewhat questionable nature of his works, in terms of the fact that his second voyage of the east, and the entire production of the first two books, were financed by his friend Dawkins, whose wealth derived from a slave plantation in Jamaica.

About the Authors
Rachel Finnegan has a BA in Classics from Trinity College Dublin and a PhD in Classics from the National University of Ireland, is a is a member of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, and has written widely on the subject of the Grand Tour, especially the Irish experience in the east. Her publications include a monograph on the Divan Club, a threevolume edition of the hitherto unpublished travel correspondence of Richard Pococke, several articles on the 2nd and 3rd Earls of Bessborough, and two books with Brill on English explorers in the east. ;

Lynda Mulvin has a BA, an MLitt and a PhD from Trinity College Dublin and an MArchSc from the University of Louvain. She is Professor of Art History at UCD and is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries (2018). Her special interests are Classical Antiquity & Reception Studies; Late Antique to Medieval; and Architectural Conservation. Her monograph on Irish architect James Cavanah Murphy (1760-1814) is forthcoming (Brill 2022).
NEW: Thorvald’s Cross The Viking-Age Cross-Slab ‘Kirk Andreas MM 128’ and Its Iconography by Dirk H. Steinforth. Paperback; 156x234mm; 86 pages; 45 figures (colour throughout). 809 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698558. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698565. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £20.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Buy Now

Thorvald’s Cross. The Viking Age Cross-Slab ‘Kirk Andreas MM 128’ and its Iconography provides an in-depth analysis of one of the Isle of Man’s most important and intriguing monuments. The Manx Crosses are a unique collection of Scandinavian-style grave stones unequalled in the medieval Viking World. Their carvings and inscriptions offer a window into Viking Age society and spirituality at a time when the Celtic Manx and Scandinavian settlers in the Island came to terms with each other. Among these stones, the iconic ‘Thorvald’s Cross’ (MM 128) in St Andrew’s church in the village of Andreas demands particular attention, as it features figural scenes with humans and animals deriving from both pagan Norse mythology and Christian religious imagery. According to the prevailing view, the triumph of Christianity over paganism is shown in the two preserved reliefs, but differing opinions have been put forward. This book brings together all available information about Thorvald’s Cross and discusses and analyses former and current hypotheses regarding the stone’s iconography, weighing their respective merits and shortcomings. Based on in-depth research and an ‘autopsy’ of the stone on-site, it considers the images in their spiritual, cultural, and chronological context and presents a new interpretation of this remarkable monument, arguing that the depiction of religious confrontation was not its original purpose, but that both scenes convey a common, much more subtle and comforting Christian message.

About the Author:
Dirk H. Steinforth is a medieval archaeologist. He gained his MA and PhD from the Georg-August-University of Gottingen, Germany, and specialises in the early Viking Age in the Isle of Man and Irish Sea area. He has published two books as well as a number of articles on the subject. His interests include history and chronology, religion and burial-customs, art-history and iconography, ethnogenesis, and settlement archaeology. His current research as an independent scholar focuses especially on the early Vikings in north-west England, and medieval stone monuments and their imagery. He also works as a translator, proofreader, and editor.
NEW: Laying the Foundations: Manual of the British Museum Iraq Scheme Archaeological Training Programme edited by John MacGinnis and Sébastien Rey. Paperback; 205x225mm; illustrated in full colour throughout. 808 2022. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271408. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271415. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Laying the Foundations, which developed out of the British Museum’s ‘Iraq Scheme’ archaeological training programme, covers the core components for putting together and running an archaeological field programme. The focus is on practicality. Individual chapters address background research, the use of remote sensing, approaches to surface collection, excavation methodologies, survey with total (and multi) stations, use of a dumpy level, context classification, on-site recording, databases and registration, environmental protocols, conservation, photography, illustration, post-excavation site curation and report writing. While the manual is oriented to the archaeology of Iraq, the approaches are no less applicable to the Middle East more widely, an aim hugely facilitated by the open-source distribution of translations into Arabic and Kurdish.
NEW: The Archaeological Dictionary: English-Greek/Greek-English by Nikos Koutsoumpos. Paperback; 156x234mm; 188 pages. 807 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698572. £19.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698589. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £19.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The absence of a specialized bilingual dictionary (or glossary) of terminology which would facilitate the work of both scholars and students of archaeology (and, to a lesser degree, history) has long been noted. Several dictionaries or compact encyclopaedias of archaeological terms have been published in both Greek and English since the 19th century (some of the latter have been translated in Greek as well). All of them however have been written in one of those languages, explaining (quite often with useful images) each term but not providing its equivalent in the other language. It is hoped that the present work will cover this lacuna in international bibliography. An adequate knowledge of English is essential to anyone professionally involved with classical archaeology and/or Greek prehistory, since English has become undoubtedly the lingua franca of our time. The dominance of the German and French “schools” in this field has given its place to Anglophone (principally British and American) studies since the Second World War and English-language bibliography is indispensable to any researcher of any topic relating to the archaeology of Greek lands. The present dictionary is intended to be a tool both for students and scholars or professional archaeologists studying, reading and publishing in both Greek and English.

About the Author
Nikos Koutsoumpos studied Classical Archaeology at University College London; he then received an MPhil (Archeaology of the Early Bronze Age Aegean) and a PhD (The domestic architecture of eastern Crete in the Bronze Age) from the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. He has been working as an archivist and has catalogued, among other collections, the photographic collection of the Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies at ELIA/MIET (Athens); he has also participated in the documentation of the Cavafy Archive. He has published articles and has participated in congresses with papers concerning archaeological photography.
NEW: A Quaint & Curious Volume: Essays in Honor of John J. Dobbins edited by Dylan K. Rogers and Claire J. Weiss. Hardback; 174x245mm; 204 pages; 87 figures, 10 tables (colour throughout). 801 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692181. £49.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692198. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

John J. Dobbins, Professor of Roman Art and Archaeology, taught at the University of Virginia in the Department of Art from 1978 until his retirement in 2019. His legacy of research and pedagogy is explored in A Quaint & Curious Volume: Essays in Honor of John J. Dobbins. Professor Dobbins’ research in the field of Roman art and archaeology spans the geographical and chronological limits of the Roman Empire, from Pompeii to Syria, and Etruria to Spain. This volume demonstrates some of his wide-reaching interests, expressed through the research of his former graduate students. Several essays examine the city of Pompeii and cover the topics of masonry analysis, re-examinations of streets and drains, and analyses of the heating capacity of baths in Pompeii. Beyond Pompeii, the archaeological remains of bakeries are employed to elucidate labor specialization in the Late Roman period across the Mediterranean basin. Collaborations between Professor Dobbins and his former students are also explored, including a pioneering online numismatic database and close examination of sculpture and mosaics, including expressions of identity and patronage through case studies of the Ara Pacis and mosaics at Antioch-on-the-Orontes. A Quaint & Curious Volume not only demonstrates John Dobbins’ scholarly legacy, but also presents new readings of archaeological data and art, illustrating the impact that one professor can have on the wider field of Roman art and archaeology through the continuing work of his students.

About the Editors
Dylan K. Rogers, PhD (2015), University of Virginia, is Lecturer of Roman Art and Archaeology at UVa and previously served as the Assistant Director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens from 2015-2019. He is the author of Water Culture in Roman Society (2018), and is the co-editor of the volumes, What’s New in Roman Greece? (2019) and The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Athens (2021). His research specialty is Roman fountains throughout the Roman Empire, investigating their impact on surrounding landscapes through the lens of sensory archaeology. He has also published on the topics of wall-painting in Pompeii, Roman mosaics, the siege of Athens by L. Cornelius Sulla in 86 BC, and archaeological archives. Rogers has worked on archaeological excavations in Pompeii, Sicily, Greece, and Turkey. ;

Claire J. Weiss, PhD (2018), University of Virginia, is a classical archaeologist whose research focuses on Roman urbanism, especially the sidewalks of ancient Roman cities and the relationship of these structures to urban social and economic organization. She has conducted archaeological field work and excavations in Pompeii since 2001, serving as the Assistant Director and Project Coordinator of the Via Consolare Project in Pompeii from 2006 to 2018, and now co-directing the Roman Colonial Urbanism Project.
NEW: The Shipwreck of Gnalić A mirror to the Renaissance world by Irena Radić Rossi, Mariangela Nicolardi, Mauro Bondioli and Katarina Batur. Paperback; 176x250mm; 182pp; 189 figures (colour throughout). 800 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781803271507. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271514. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Unlike official history, which takes long and impersonal strides through the past, The Shipwreck at Gnalić describes individual human destinies that convey the story of the late Renaissance period throughout Europe and the Mediterranean as uncovered at the site of the shipwreck. Transiting the permanent route between Venice and Constantinople, the ship Gagliana grossa, formerly known as Lezza, Moceniga e Basadonna, symbolically connected two apparently opposing, yet tightly interwoven worlds. The stunning objects that spent four centuries at the bottom of the sea briefly made the Gnalić shipwreck famous in the 1960s and 1970s, but only in recent years has the scholarly community finally started collecting all the available information hidden in museum collections, at the shipwreck site, and in the archives. After many years of effort by the authors of this publication, the University of Zadar restarted the research in 2012 thanks to the support of many domestic and foreign institutions and organisations that, through their participation, continue to contribute to the successful realisation of project activities. The reconstruction of ancient events was successfully started by Astone Gasparetto in the 1970s. After a long pause, the painstaking work was undertaken by Mauro Bondioli, who, through dedicated archival work at the State Archives in Venice, discovered hundreds of documents and pieced them together into a multi-layered historical story, which is summarised in the second part of the book.

About the Authors
Irena Radić Rossi graduated from the Department of Archaeology of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences of the University of Zagreb in 1988, and in the same year obtained the permanent position in the Department of Archaeology of the Republic Institute for the Protection of Cultural Monuments in Zagreb. In 2009 she moved to the University of Zadar. She is associated researcher of the Centre Camille Jullian (Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS), adjunct professor at Texas A&M University, and affiliated scholar of the Institute of Nautical Archaeology. Her main research interests focus on maritime cultural heritage, with special emphasis on the technological development of the Adriatic shipbuilding and seafaring. ;

Mariangela Nicolardi graduated in 2008 in Archaeology and Conservation of Archaeological Heritage from the University of Ca ‘Foscari in Venice, with the dissertation entit
NEW: Plant Food Processing Tools at Early Neolithic Göbekli Tepe by Laura Dietrich. Paperback; 205x290mm; 245pp; 103 figures, 62 tables, 33 plates (colour throughout). 798 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270920. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270937. Download Full PDF   Buy Now

Plant Food Processing Tools at Early Neolithic Göbekli Tepe reconstructs plant food processing at this key Pre-Pottery Neolithic (9600-8000 BC) site, with an emphasis on cereals, legumes and herbs as food sources, on grinding and pounding tools for their processing, and on the vessels implied in the consumption of meals and beverages. Functional investigations on grinding and pounding tools and on stone containers through use-wear and residue analyses are at the core of the book. Their corpus amounts to more than 7000 objects, constituting thus the largest collection published so far from the Neolithic of Upper Mesopotamia. The spectrum of tools and of processed plants is very broad, but porridges made of cereals, legumes and herbs, and beers predominate over bread-like food. The find contexts show that cooking took place around the well-known monumental buildings, while the large quantity of tools suggests feasting in addition to daily meals.

About the Author
NEW: The Early Iron Age Metal Hoard from the Al Khawd Area (Sultan Qaboos University) Sultanate of Oman by Nasser S. Al-Jahwari, Paul A. Yule, Khaled A. Douglas, Bernhard Pracejus, Mohammed A. Al-Belushi, Ali T. ElMahi. Paperback; 210x297mm; 334 pages; 98 figures, 30 tables, 18 plates (colour throughout). 797 2021 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 7. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781803270821. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270838. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £58.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Numerous metallic artefacts, which anciently were deposited in a hoard, came to light per chance on the campus of the Sultan Qaboos University in Al Khawd, Sultanate of Oman. Mostly fashioned from copper, these arrowheads, axes/adzes, bangles, daggers, knives, socketed lance/ spearheads, metal vessels, razors, rings, swords, and tweezers compare well with numerous documented artefact classes from south-eastern Arabia assigned to the Early Iron Age (1200–300 BCE). Discussion of the international trade between ancient Makan, Dilmun, and Mesopotamia during the 3rd millennium BCE dominates the archaeological literature about Arabia archaeology. The Al Khawd hoard and its contemporaries lend weight to the suggestion that 1st millennium BCE Qadē (the name of south-eastern Arabia at that time) was even more important than Bronze Age Makan in terms of the copper trade volume. A reassessment shows the Early Iron Age by no means to be a dark age, but rather an innovative, successful adaptive period characterised by evident population growth.

About the Authors
Nasser S. Al-Jahwari, Full Professor at Sultan Qaboos University, is a specialist in landscape archaeology, settlement patterns, and quantification in archaeology. He has directed several archaeological projects and intensively published in scientific journals. He is a also heritage expert for ICOMOS and UNESCO, and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Oman Studies. ;

Paul A. Yule, since 1986 has conducted fieldwork in the Sultanate of Oman, Zafar in Yemen, Orissa in India, and Tigrey in Ethiopia. His most important work focuses on Arabia in the first half of the 1st millennium CE. Editor and referee for different institutes and periodicals, he is an active author, draughtsman and cartographer. ;

Khaled A. Douglas, PhD from Tübingen University in 1998, he is now Associate Professor at the Department of Archaeology of Sultan Qaboos University, Oman, and the Hashemite University, Jordan. Interested in the Bronze and Iron Age archaeology of south-east Arabia and southern Levant, he directed and co-directed several excavations in Oman and Jordan. ;

Bernhard Pracejus, PhD (Adelaide University), Habilitation, (Free University Berlin), Associate Professor (Sultan Qaboos University, Oman). His research concentrated on economic geology (modern VMS deposits, precious opal, coltan, uranium, clays), geochemistry, and more recently on metal recycling from mine wastes and the examination of ancient copper slags in Oman. ;

Mohammed Ali K. Al-Belushi, MA from the University of Liverpool and a PhD from the University of Birmingham, UK, is now Associate Professor at the Archaeology Department of the Sultan Qaboos University, Oman. He is also a former Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Oman Studies. ;

Ali Tigani ElMahi, PhD from the University of Bergen, Norway, focuses his research interests on archaeology and statistics, anthropology, animal osteology and behaviour, ecology, wildlife, and zoogeography. ElMahi has an intensive field experience in Sudan, Norway, and Oman, where he has conducted several archaeological and ethnoarchaeological studies.
NEW: Man and Bird in the Palaeolithic of Western Europe by Anne Eastham. Paperback; 205x290mm; 160 pages; 82 figures, 28 tables (colour throughout). 795 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699098. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699104. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Man and Bird in the Palaeolithic of Western Europe considers the nature of the interaction between birds and hunter-gatherers. It examines aspects of avian behaviour and the qualities that could be (and were) targeted at different periods by hunter-gatherers, who recognised the utility of the diversity of avian groups in various applications of daily life and thought. It is clear from the records of excavated sites in western Europe that during the evolution of both the Neanderthal period and the subsequent occupations of Homo sapiens, avian demographics fluctuated with the climate along with other aspects of both flora and fauna. Each was required to adapt to these changes. The present study considers these changes through the interactions of man and bird as evidenced in the remains attached to Middle and Upper Palaeolithic occupation sites in western Europe and touches on a variety of prey/predator relationships across other groups of plant and animal species. The book describes a range of procurement strategies that are known from the literature and artistic record of later cultures to have been used in the trapping, enticement and hunting of birds for consumption and the manufacture of weapons, domestic items, clothing, ceremony and cultural activities. It also explores how bird images and depictions engraved or painted on the walls of caves or on the objects of daily use during the Upper Palaeolithic may be perceived as communications of a more profound significance for the temporal, seasonal or social life of the members of the group than the simple concept of animal. Certain bird species have at different times held a special significance in the everyday consciousness of particular peoples and a group of Late Glacial, Magdalenian settlements in Aquitaine, France, appear to be an example of such specialised culling. A case study of the treatment of snowy owl at Arancou in the Atlantic Pyrenees seems to illustrate such a specialisation. Discussion of the problems of reconciling dating and research methods, of the last two hundred years of Palaeolithic research, and of possible directions for future research offer an open conclusion to the work.

About the Author
At the age of seven Anne Eastham’s questions regarding the behaviour of the local avifauna drove her parents to purchase the five volumes of Witherby on British birds, while a Victorian rubbish heap invited excavation. Both predilections persisted. Post London University, she continued research into the identification, physical, cultural and habitat interpretation of avian assemblages from archaeological sites. This was financed through teaching, with students ranging from Special Needs Primary to Post-graduates. Her published reports cover sites in Britain, Europe and the Near East, dated to medieval, Roman and Prehistoric eras, particularly the Palaeolithic.
NEW: Colonial Geopolitics and Local Cultures in the Hellenistic and Roman East (3rd century BC – 3rd century AD) Géopolitique coloniale et cultures locales dans l’Orient hellénistique et romain (IIIe siècle av. J.-C. – IIIe siècle ap. J.-C.) edited by Hadrien Bru, Adrian G. Dumitru and Nicholas Sekunda. Paperback; 205x290mm; 228 pages; 38 figures, 4 maps, 3 tables, 7 charts, 17 plates (colour throughout). Papers in English and French. 791 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699821. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699838. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Colonial Geopolitics and Local Cultures in the Hellenistic and Roman East (3rd century BC – 3rd century AD) presents contributions taken in the main from a panel held during the Celtic Conference in Classics 2014 (Edinburgh, Scotland, June 25-28th 2014), but also incorporates a number of papers given previously at another panel which convened at Mamaia (Romania, September 23-27th, 2012). What changes in the material culture can we observe, when a state is overwhelming a local population with soldiers, katoikoi, and civil officials or merchants? One of the main concerns of local geopolitics was the central question of how agricultural land was distributed to the Greek or Roman colonists after it had been seized from the native population? In what way did the state watch over and administer the colonised territories? What were the exact social, legal, cultural and political relationships between the natives and the newcomers? Did the language of the colonists dominate the local vernacular language or not, and in what way? Did onomastics change or not in particular regions over centuries? What were the mutual influences between native and colonial cultures? This collection addresses these questions, focusing on the Hellenistic and Roman East.

About the Editors
Hadrien Bru is a French historian and epigrapher working on Hellenistic and Roman Anatolia and Near East, Maître de Conférences HDR in Ancient History at the University of Bourgogne-Franche Comté (Besançon). His notable publications include: L’Asie Mineure dans l’Antiquité : échanges, populations et territoires (2009), Le pouvoir impérial dans les provinces syriennes. Représentations et célébrations d’Auguste à Constantin (31 av. J.-C.-337 ap. J.-C.) (2011), L’Anatolie des peuples, cités et cultures (IIe millénaire av. J.- C.-Ve siècle ap. J.-C.) (2013) and La Phrygie Parorée et la Pisidie septentrionale aux époques hellénistique et romaine. Géographie historique et sociologie culturelle (2017). ;

Adrian George Dumitru is a Romanian historian of the Hellenistic world. He holds a PhD from the Universities of Bucharest and Paris IV Sorbonne and his research focuses principally on the Seleucid kingdom and the city of Byzantion. He is the author of a number of papers dedicated to those subjects (his most recent deals with the neglected topic of the tyrants of the Hellenistic Near East) and he also teaches seminars on Roman history at the University of Bucharest. ;

Nicholas V. Sekunda holds a PhD from Manchester University. He has held research positions at Monash University in Melbourne and at the Australian National University in Canberra. He currently holds the post of Head of Department of Mediterranean Archaeology at Gdansk University. He has participated in excavations in England, Poland, Iran, Greece, Syria and Jordan, and now co-directs excavations at Negotino Gradište in the Republic of North Macedonia. Nicholas is the author of a number of books concerning Greek Warfare.
NEW: Qatar: Evidence of the Palaeolithic Earliest People Revealed by Julie Scott-Jackson. Paperback; 240x270mm; 258 pages; 94 figures (colour throughout). Full text in English and Arabic. 766 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270500. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270517. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Qatar: Evidence of the Palaeolithic Earliest People Revealed, with full text in both English and Arabic, tells the story of the long and difficult search to discover the identity of the first people to inhabit the sovereign State of Qatar, which is situated on a peninsula, that extends into the Arabian Gulf. The book synthesises the results of extensive fieldwork by the PADMAC Unit with the many diverse historical records and reports of investigations, beginning with Holgar Kapel’s, in the early 1950s.

The archaeology of the State of Qatar is an important part of the cultural heritage of the world. The loss of archaeological sites to urban and industrial development since the 1950s has been inevitable but the loss of over 30 years of Palaeolithic research in Qatar, an area of prehistoric significance, as a result of academic dissension, is certainly regrettable. The work of the PADMAC Unit in Qatar now marks the end of this Palaeolithic research hiatus.

About the Author
Julie Scott-Jackson is the Director of the PADMAC Unit, based at Kellogg College, University of Oxford, where she also completed her doctorate In Palaeolithic Geoarchaeology. She has been studying Palaeolithic sites on high levels In the Middle East and Southern England since the 1990s.
NEW: The Rise of Metallurgy in Eurasia Evolution, Organisation and Consumption of Early Metal in the Balkans by Miljana Radivojević, Benjamin Roberts, Miroslav Marić, Julka Kuzmanović-Cvetković, Thilo Rehren. Paperback; 205x290mm; 698pp; 340 figures; 70 tables (colour throughout). 806 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270425. £95.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270432. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Please note, print copies can be ordered now and will despatch once stock arrives in approx. 3-4 weeks.

The Rise of Metallurgy in Eurasia is a landmark study in the origins of metallurgy. The project aimed to trace the invention and innovation of metallurgy in the Balkans. It combined targeted excavations and surveys with extensive scientific analyses at two Neolithic-Chalcolithic copper production and consumption sites, Belovode and Pločnik, in Serbia. At Belovode, the project revealed chronologically and contextually secure evidence for copper smelting in the 49th century BC. This confirms the earlier interpretation of c. 7000-year-old metallurgy at the site, making it the earliest record of fully developed metallurgical activity in the world. However, far from being a rare and elite practice, metallurgy at both Belovode and Pločnik is demonstrated to have been a common and communal craft activity.

This monograph reviews the pre-existing scholarship on early metallurgy in the Balkans. It subsequently presents detailed results from the excavations, surveys and scientific analyses conducted at Belovode and Pločnik. These are followed by new and up-to-date regional syntheses by leading specialists on the Neolithic-Chalcolithic material culture, technologies, settlement and subsistence practices in the Central Balkans. Finally, the monograph places the project results in the context of major debates surrounding early metallurgy in Eurasia before proposing a new agenda for global early metallurgy studies.

About the Authors
Miljana Radivojević holds the Archaeomaterials Lectureship at the UCL Institute of Archaeology (UK), where she graduated in Archaeometallurgy. She has spent more than 20 years publishing on early metallurgy in the Balkans and southwest Asia and the role of aesthetics in the invention of novel technologies. ;

Benjamin Roberts has spent over 20 years researching and publishing on European Copper and Bronze Age archaeology and frequently metallurgy and metal objects across Europe. He co-edited with Chris Thornton Archaeometallurgy in Global perspective: Methods and Syntheses (2014) and is currently leading Project Ancient Tin. ;

Miroslav Marić is a specialist in the Neolithic-Bronze Age of the central Balkans at the Institute for Balkan Studies, Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Serbia. He is the field director of the Gradište Iđoš project. ;

Julka Kuzmanović-Cvetković was the Senior Custodian (now retired) at the Homeland Museum of Toplica in Prokuplje, Serbia. She spent more than four decades excavating the site of Pločnik, and developed a unique open air archaeo-park on the site that attracts tourists from the region, and across the globe. ;

Prof Thilo Rehren is the A.G. Leventis Professor for Archaeological Sciences and Director of the Science and Technology, Nicosia, Cyprus.
NEW: Excavations at Chester. Medieval and Post-Medieval Development within the Northern and Eastern Suburbs to c. 1900 by Leigh Dodd. Paperback; 205x290mm; 84 pages; 46 figures, 12 tables. 805 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698800. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698817. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Excavations at Chester: Medieval and post-medieval development within the northern and eastern suburbs to c. 1900 brings together for the first time the results from archaeological investigations carried out within the suburbs to the north and east of the medieval and later City of Chester between 2002 and 2018. At sites investigated to both the north and east of the City, significant stretches of the defensive ditch cut during the Civil War of the 17th century were excavated. The results bring into question the accepted lines of these massive defensive outworks. To the northwest of the City, the findings demonstrate that the land remained agricultural until late in the 18th century and was not truly developed until the arrival of the canal network. To the north of the City, development of terraced housing had begun by the 1830s, shortly before the arrival of the railway network, in the area that would become the suburb of Newtown.To the east of the City, and north of the major route of Foregate Street, evidence for industry in the form of tanneries was uncovered on land that had otherwise been predominately agricultural. This area too witnessed an explosion in terraced housing from the beginning of the 19th century, and the remains of buildings relating to both entertainment and worship were also encountered.

About the author
Leigh Dodd has worked in the commercial sector of archaeology since the early 1990s. During this time he has excavated a wide range of sites including many of the Roman and post-medieval periods, several of which have been published in regional and international journals. Additionally, he is the author of a companion volume on Roman Chester in the Archaeopress Roman Archaeology series. He is a Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists.
NEW: Die Entstehung komplexer Siedlungen im Zentraloman: Archäologische Untersuchungen zur Siedlungsgeschichte von Al-Khashbah by Conrad Schmidt, Stephanie Döpper, Jonas Kluge, Samantha Petrella, Ullrich Ochs, Nick Kirchhoff, Susanne Maier und Mona Walter. Hardback; 210x297; 590 pages; 358 figures, 68 plates (colour throughout). German text.. 803 2021 Arabia Orientalis: Studien zur Archäologie Ostarabiens 5. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271002. £96.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271019. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Die Entstehung komplexer Siedlungen im Zentraloman: Archäologische Untersuchungen zur Siedlungsgeschichte von Al-Khashbah presents the results of a survey conducted in 2015 and beyond by the Institut für die Kulturen des Alten Orients of the Universität Tübingen in Al-Khashbah, one of the largest Early Bronze Age sites on the Omani Peninsula. Ten monumental buildings, 273 tombs and other structures from the Hafit (3100-2700 BC) and Umm an-Nar periods (2700-2000 BC) were documented here. This makes Al-Khashbah ideally suited for the investigation of the beginnings of complex settlements and social structures in northern Inner Oman at the transition from the 4th to the 3rd millennium BC, because many of the achievements previously attributed to the Umm an-Nar period, such as monumental architecture and the smelting of copper, can already be proven here in the preceding Hafit period. In the Umm an-Nar period, the development of Al-Khashbah continues steadily, giving the site additional importance. According to the results of the survey, however, copper production at the site no longer seems to play a role in this period.

Aus den auf die frühe Bronzezeit folgenden Epochen des 2. und 1. Jahrtausends v. Chr. sowie des 1. und 2. Jahrtausends n. Chr. gibt es in Al-Khashbah nur äußerst wenige Befunde. Erst im 18.–20. Jahrhundert n. Chr. erfährt der Ort eine intensive Wiederbelebung, wovon insbesondere die alte Lehmziegelsiedlung im Norden der Palmenoase, eine kleine Siedlung im Osten des Untersuchungsgebiets, eine Reihe von Bewässerungsanlagen, mehrere Friedhöfe, Petroglyphen sowie zahlreiche an der Oberfläche gefundene spätislamische Keramikscherben zeugen.
NEW: Irish Late Iron Age Equestrian Equipment in its Insular and Continental Context by Rena Maguire. Paperback; 205x290mm; 294pp; 63 figures, 6 tables, 119 plates. 802 2021 Queen's University Belfast Irish Archaeological Monograph Series 2. ISBN 9781789699913. £44.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Irish Late Iron Age Equestrian Equipment in its Insular and Continental Context is the first practical archaeological study of Irish Iron Age lorinery. The volume examines the bits and bosals (Y-pieces) holistically, using practical stable-yard knowledge merged with archaeological techniques such as morphometrics, use-wear, GIS, functional comparison to European and British equipment and distribution analysis to place it within its time and place. Irish Iron Age artefacts have always been beset by issues of chronology, but by using these various analytical methods, a more precise timeframe for the objects is indicated. A complex relationship with Roman Britain and the Empire also becomes visible, with aspects of identity and belief being expressed through the sophisticated equestrian equipment. The analysis of the bridle components reveal that the Ireland of the first centuries AD shares some characteristics with other boundary zones of the Roman Empire, such as Scotland and northern Germany, but also has its own unique interpretation of introduced technology. The Ireland of the Late Iron Age, then, is a society in flux, picking and choosing which traditions it maintains. The horse and associated equipment were very much at the heart of the social changes set in motion by contact with the Roman Empire, and as such, the examination of the snaffles and bosals allows us to bring the people of the Late Iron Age in Ireland into focus.

About the Author
Rena Maguire studied Archaeology at Queen’s University Belfast, graduating with a BA Hons. in 2013. She was awarded an MSc in 2014 and a PhD in 2018. She has worked for the Historic Environment Division of the Northern Ireland Civil Service, and currently is a visiting Research Fellow at QUB. She has published extensively on ancient equitation and its associated technology and is an enthusiastic horsewoman.
NEW: Architectures néolithiques de l’île d’Yeu (Vendée) edited by Audrey Blanchard, Serge Cassen and Jean-Noël Guyodo. Paperback; 205x290mm; 294pp; 196 figures, 29 tables (colour throughout). 798 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695793. £52.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695809. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £52.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Architectures néolithiques de l’île d’Yeu (Vendée) gathers documentation, unpublished material and the principal results of studies, prospections, excavations and surveys carried out on domestic settlements, funeral monuments, quarries and symbolic sites. Situated off the Atlantic coast of the Vendée (France), the Isle of Yeu has been occupied since Prehistory. Domestic, industrial, funerary or symbolic sites dating from the Neolithic are numerous. Their state of conservation is exceptional, with much of the stone-built architecture preserved above ground. This is notably so for the walled enclosures of the fourth millennium BC, which have been the subject of several research programs since 2010.

The initial chapters propose an inventory of the mineral resources as well as the main forms of exploitation, supply strategies and uses of stones. The main part of the volume is dedicated to the excavation of the two principal walled enclosures dating from the late Neolithic, the Pointe de la Tranche and Ker Daniaud. The emphasis is on the architecture of these promontory forts that directly open to the Ocean but whose occupation seems not to have been permanent. Finally, the surveys (plan, photogrammetry, microtopography) and the digital modelling of the megalithic burials of the Tabernaudes, the Plauche a Puare and the Petits Fradets allow a three-dimensional reconstruction of Neolithic funerary architectures. For the rocks marked by cupules, the current concentration of which is one of the most important (more than 120 sites), a first analysis of the corpus of signs is proposed, although their dating remains uncertain.

This contribution allows us to open a window on the material and imaginary worlds of one population from the end of Prehistory, through the analysis of their testimonies and expressions, physical and symbolic, revealing a people settled - and not trapped - in a restricted territory beaten by the winds and surrounded by the waves. Audrey Blanchard obtained her doctorate from the University of Rennes 1, and is an associate member of UMR 6566, CReAAH (LARA laboratory). A specialist in lithic and ceramic production, her research focuses mainly on coastal and island settlements and Neolithic domestic architecture ;

Serge Cassen obtained his doctorate in Anthropology, Ethnology and Prehistory in 1986 from the University of Paris-Sorbonne under the supervision of G. Bailloud, his thesis focusing on Neolithic societies of the 4th millennium BC between Loire and Gironde. Upon joining the CNRS in 1991, he devoted himself to the study of the funerary and other megalithic monuments of western France, in particular through their ancient engravings and through their social valorisation. ;

Jean-Noël Guyodo is Lecturer in Prehistory at the University of Nantes and director of the LARA laboratory (UMR6566 CReAAH). A specialist in lithic technology and stone architecture, he has directed numerous excavations on Neolithic settlement sites in western France. His research focuses more broadly on the first agro-pastoral societies on the Atlantic coast of Europe.

en français
Au large des côtes atlantiques vendéennes (France), l’île d’Yeu est un territoire occupé depuis la Préhistoire. Les sites à vocations domestiques, artisanales, funéraires ou encore symboliques datés du Néolithique sont nombreux. Leur état de conservation est exceptionnel car les architectures bâties en pierre sont préservées en élévation pour beaucoup d’entre eux. C’est le cas, par exemple, sur les habitats du IVème millénaire avant J.-C., qui ont fait l’objet de plusieurs programmes de recherche depuis 2010.

Cet ouvrage regroupe la documentation, les informations inédites et les principaux résultats des études, prospections, fouilles et relevés réalisés sur les habitats, les monuments funéraires, les carrières et les sites symboliques. Les premiers travaux t
NEW: ArcheoFOSS XIV 2020: Open Software, Hardware, Processes, Data and Formats in Archaeological Research edited by Julian Bogdani, Riccardo Montalbano and Paolo Rosati. Paperback; 174x245mm; 204pp; Illustrated in colour throughout. Papers in Italian and English. 796 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271248. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271255. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

ArcheoFOSS XIV 2020: Open software, hardware, processes, data and formats in archaeological research collects the proceedings of the fourteenth ArcheoFOSS international conference, held online due to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. The book gathers seventeen papers on three principal topics, the main sessions of the conference: use and application of free/libre and open-source (FLOS) tools in archaeology; creation, use and promotion of open data and open formats in archaeology; and development and customization of FLOS software and hardware solutions for cultural heritage. Forty-one scholars of very diverse age, academic affiliation and geographic location, but all actively involved in the promotion of FLOS culture, open data and open science in digital archaeology and humanities, contribute. The volume is completed by a critical analysis of the contribution of these important annual meetings to the scientific and cultural activity of the ArcheoFOSS community. The opportunity offered by the pandemic-related difficulties to widen the geographical scope of the conference has been further boosted by the decision to adopt the English language for most of the papers, with the hope that this will extend the work of the ArcheoFOSS community far beyond the Italian national borders.

About the Editors
Julian Bogdani is an assistant professor at Sapienza University of Rome, where he teaches Digital Archaeology and Digital Humanities. The main focus of his research is the theoretical and practical issues related to the application of Computer Science to the archaeological and historical domain. He is the developer of Bradypus, a cloud-based database for archaeology. He directs the archaeological mission of Sapienza at Çuka e Ajtoit, a Hellenistic, Roman and Late Antique site in Albania. ;

Riccardo Montalbano is an archaeologist, specialist in ancient topography. He is currently GIS expert and Data Manager at Parco Archeologico di Ercolano (Naples) and Adjunct Professor at the University Uninettuno. As GIS expert, he is involved in several fi eld projects in Italy and abroad, and he is a member of the core team of the SITAR Project (Superintendency of Rome) and a research fellow of MAGOH Project (University of Pisa). ;

Paolo Rosati received his PhD in 2016 from L’Aquila University for research on the economic sustainability of software in archaeology and the development of FLOSS methods in Humanities (philology, archaeology, history, topography). Today he is a researcher at the Sapienza University of Rome as part of the ERC project PAThs (http:// paths.uniroma1.it).
NEW: Historiographie de préhistoriens et de protohistoriens français du XX° siècle Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 19, Session VII-5 edited by François Djindjian. Paperback; 205x290mm; 140 pages; 73 figures. French text. 794 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271385. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271392. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

In France, the post-World War II period corresponds to a second golden age of prehistory and protohistory, thanks to the development of the CNRS and the creation of the first university chairs. This volume presents the biographies of a wide selection of French archaeologists whose scientific work has particularly marked this period.

Le XVIII° congrès mondial de l’UISPP, qui s’est déroulé à Paris, en juin 2018, a étél’occasion de rendre hommage à plusieurs préhistoriens et protohistoriens, qui ont fontl’objet de communications orales dans une session spéciale du congrès, la session VII-5,et qui sont publiées dans ce volume. En France, la période de l’après deuxième guerremondiale correspond à un deuxième âge d’or de la préhistoire et de la protohistoire,grâce au développement du CNRS et de la création des premières chaires universitaires.Historiographie de préhistoriens et de protohistoriens français du XX° siècle présente lesbiographies d’une sélection étendue d’archéologues français dont l’oeuvre scientifique aparticulièrement marqué cette période.

François Djindjian, professeur honoraire à l’Université de Paris 1 Panthéon Sorbonne, estun spécialiste de la théorie et des méthodes de l’archéologie et du paléolithique supérieureuropéen. Il est l’actuel président de l’Union Internationale des Sciences préhistoriques etprotohistoriques.
NEW: Use of Space and Domestic Areas: Functional Organisation and Social Strategies Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 18, Session XXXII-1 edited by Luc Jallot and Alessandro Peinetti. Paperback; 205x290mm; 150 pages; 73 figures, 4 tables (colour throughout). Papers in English, abstracts in French and English. 793 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271361. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271378. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Use of Space and Domestic Areas: Functional Organisation and Social Strategies presents the papers from Session XXXII-1 of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). The organization of inhabited space is the direct expression of the deep integration of societies with their cultural and natural environment. According to the distribution and the patterning of activities, the organization of human communities and the role of their actors can be brought to light. The various contributions in this volume show the progress of research in terms of understanding the use of space on different scales, from the household to the village, focusing on Neolithic and Bronze Age contexts. Each of the contributions shows the diversity of issues concerning the interpretation of the living spaces, and the diversity of approaches carried out to answer them.

About the Editors
Luc Jallot, archaeologist, is Maître de conférences at the University Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3 (UMR 5140 « Archéologie des Sociétés méditerranéennes »). His researches focus on settlement organisation and dynamics, on material culture, on anthropomorphic art and on the relationship between societies and environment at the end of the Neolithic in Southern France. Since the end of the 1990s he has been involved in several research projects on Neolithic earthen architecture. He has also worked in Eastern Africa and, more recently, on Neolithic and Copper Age contexts in Morocco. ;

Alessandro Peinetti, geoarchaeologist, PhD (University Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, UMR 5140 « Archéologie des Sociétés méditerranéennes », Università di Bologna) is an independent researcher. His researches focus on the formation processes of the archaeological record, on the built environment, on earthen architecture and on the organisation of settlements and activity areas documented by the analysis of soils and archeological sediments through micromorphology. He is especially involved in research into Neolithic and Bronze Age villages in Italy and Southern France.
NEW: Arab Music: A Survey of Its History and Its Modern Practice by Leo Plenckers. Paperback; 174x245mm; 212 pages; 55 figures. 792 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699326. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699333. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Arab Music: A survey of its history and modern practice is primarily meant for the general Western reader with some basic knowledge of music and music notation. It aims at correcting the still prevalent romantic image of Arab music, spread in the 19th century, as exotic and typified by long, plaintive and erotic sounding melodic lines and inciting rhythms. It offers the reader a comprehensive survey of the history and the development of Arab music and musical theory from its pre-Islamic roots until 1970, as well as a discussion of the major genres and forms practiced today, such as the Egyptian gīl, the Algerian raï and Palestinian hip hop. Other topics touched upon are musical instruments and folk music. The analysis of each genre is accompanied by a complete musical notation of an exemplary composition or improvisation, including lyrics and translation.

About the Author
Leo Plenckers’ chief specialisations are music theory and ethnomusicology. He obtained his doctorate with a dissertation on the Algerian classical nawba tradition and published articles about various aspects of Arab music and music theory. Until his retirement he worked at the Musicological Institute of the Amsterdam University.
NEW: Koukounaries I: Mycenaean Pottery from Selected Contexts by Robert B. Koehl with a contribution by Richard Jones. Paperback; 205x290mm; 416pp; 8 figures, 5 tables, 16 colour plates, 158 black & white plates. 789 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698749. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698756. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The excavations on the Koukounaries Hill, Paros, Greece, conducted under the direction of Demetrius U. Schilardi for the Archaeological Society at Athens from 1976 to 1992, revealed a 12th century B.C.E. Mycenaean building, an Iron Age settlement, and an Archaic sanctuary. Koukounaries I: Mycenaean Pottery from Selected Contexts presents the pottery from five areas inside the building: three large storerooms, the main east-west corridor, and a small shrine, as well as the pottery from a limited reoccupation after the building’s fire destruction and abandonment. The ceramics from the main occupation phase comprise the largest and best-preserved domestic assemblage from the 12th century B.C.E. in the Cyclades and offer important evidence for the continuation of Mycenaean culture after the destruction of the mainland palatial citadels. The small deposits of pottery from the reoccupation phase, provide important stratigraphic evidence for defining the Late Helladic IIIC ceramic sequence. The volume also considers the function of the individual spaces within the building, based largely on the patterns of shape distributions and quantities, with the statistics for each context presented in a series of appendices. Other issues area also explored, including the evidence for itinerant potters, the trade in antique vases, and the place of origin of the settlers who founded and inhabited the Mycenaean building on the summit of the Koukounaries Hill.

About the Author
Robert B. Koehl, Emeritus Professor of Archaeology and former Chair of the Department of Classical and Oriental Studies, Hunter College, City University of New York, and director of the New York Aegean Bronze Age Colloquium from 1999-2018, received his BA in Classics from Pomona College in 1974 and his PhD in Classical Archaeology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1982. A specialist in Minoan and Mycenaean culture, Koehl has participated on excavations in Israel at Tell Gezer, and in Greece, at the Koukounaries Hill on Paros, the Mycenaean citadel at Gla, and on Crete at Kommos and Pseira. Since 2000, he has been the staff specialist in Aegean culture for the excavations at Tell Atchana (ancient Alalakh), Turkey. The author of Sarepta III. The Imported Bronze and Iron Age Wares from Area II, X (1985) and Aegean Bronze Age Rhyta (2006), and the editor of Amilla: The Quest for Excellence (2013), and Studies in Aegean Art and Culture (2016), Koehl has also written extensively on Aegean art and iconography, Minoan ‘rites of passage’, Aegean and Near Eastern zoomorphic vessels, and Minoan and Mycenaean interconnections with the Levant.
NEW: Hunde in der römischen Antike: Rassen/Typen - Zucht - Haltung und Verwendung by Heidelinde Autengruber-Thüry. Paperback; 205x290mm; 482 pages; 487 figures, 8 maps (colour throughout). German text. 786 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 84. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698367. £70.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698374. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £70.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Hunde in der römischen Antike: Rassen/Typen, Zucht, Haltung und Verwendung deals extensively with the living environment of the dog in Roman antiquity, based on literary and iconographic sources as well as archaeological and archaeozoological finds. The knowledge gained from this is documented by numerous images. Older research opinions, some of which have gone unchecked for more than a hundred years, are examined and—where necessary—corrected.

For the first time, a catalogue of the more than eighty dog breeds/types documented from antiquity is presented with their names, origins, appearance and the special characteristics of these animals. The ancient theories of dog breeding are compared with modern practices. A catalogue of the previously known dog names has been revised with around sixty new names added. The book examines how dogs were housed, what accessories were used and how the animals were fed. It sheds light on illnesses, medical treatment and the care of elderly dogs. A catalogue of epitaphs and extant canine tombstones gives an insight into the emotional world of grieving animal owners. Dogs not only served as guards, shepherds, hunters and lap dogs but also had other important roles such as sacred animals in temples or as waste disposers for sanitation. But they were also used corporeally: their fur was tanned, and their body parts were needed for magical rituals. In short, dogs played an important role in many areas of life, such that everyday life in the Classical world could not be imagined without them.

About the Author
Heidelinde Autengruber-Thüry completed her studies in history at the University of Vienna with a master's degree (with distinction) in 1999 and a doctorate in 2017. She acquired her specialist practical and theoretical knowledge in the field of cynology through many years of collaboration with the Irish Setter Club of Austria.

Auf Deutsch
Hunde in der römischen Antike beschäftigt sich umfassend mit dem Lebensumfeld des Hundes in der römischen Antike. Als Grundlagen dazu dienen die Quellen der griechisch-römischen Literatur, der Kunst und die archäologischen sowie archäozoologischen Funde. Durch zahlreiche Bilddarstellungen werden die daraus gewonnenen Erkenntnisse dokumentiert. Ältere Forschungsmeinungen, die zum Teil seit mehr als hundert Jahren ungeprüft übernommen und bis heute tradiert werden, werden überprüft und – wo nötig – richtiggestellt.

Erstmals wird ein Katalog der über achtzig aus der Antike belegten Hunderassen/-typen mit Namen, Herkunft, Aussehen und den speziellen Eigenschaften dieser Tiere vorgestellt. Der Wissensstand der Antike über Hundezucht wird mit den heutigen Standpunkten der modernen Hundezucht verglichen. Ein aus dem vorigen Jahrhundert stammender Katalog der bis dahin bekannten Hundenamen wurde adaptiert und konnte um circa sechzig neue Namen erweitert werden. Es wird untersucht, wie Hunde untergebracht wurden, welches Zubehör Verwendung fand und wie die Tiere ernährt wurden. Krankheiten, medizinische Behandlung und die fürsorgliche Pflege sehr alter Hunde zeigen weitere Aspekte der Hundehaltung. Eine Zusammenstellung der überlieferten Grabgedichte und erhaltenen Grabsteine für Hunde geben Einblicke in die Gefühlswelt der trauernden Tierbesitzer. Hunde dienten nicht nur als Wach-, Hirten-, Jagd- und Schoßhunde, sie hatten auch weitere wichtige Aufgaben wie zum Beispiel als heilbringende Tiere in Tempeln oder als Abfallentsorger für die Siedlungshygiene. Aber auch als Rohstofflieferanten wurden sie genützt, ihr Fell wurde gegerbt und ihre Körperteile wurden für magische Rituale benötigt. Kurz gefasst lässt sich sagen, dass Hunde in vielen Lebensbereichen des antiken Menschen eine wichtige Rolle spielten und sie aus dem täglichen Leben nicht wegzudenken waren.

Heidelinde Autengruber-Thüry legt hier die Druckfassung ihrer Dissertation vor. Sie hat ihr Studium der G
NEW (REPRINT AND OPEN ACCESS): The Roman Cemetery at Lankhills Pre-Roman and Roman Winchester. Part II by Giles Clarke. DOI: 10.32028/9781803270081. Hardback; 215x276 pages; 614pp. 777 2021 Winchester Studies 3. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270081. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270098. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Print copies now in stock

Winchester Studies 3.ii: Outside the north gate of Venta Belgarum, Roman Winchester, a great cemetery stretched for 500 yards along the road to Cirencester. Excavations at Lankhills from 1967 to 1972 uncovered 451 graves, many elaborately furnished, at the northern limits of this cemetery, and dating from the fourth century A.D. This book, the second in a two-part study of Venta Belgarum, which forms the third volume of Winchester Studies, describes the excavations of these burials and analyses in detail both the graves and their contents. There are detailed studies and important re-assessments of many categories of object, but it is the information about late Roman burial, religion, and society which is of special interest.

This is a reprint of the volume originally published in 1979 (Oxford, ISBN 9780198131779). The reprint is based on scans of the original publication, with minor changes to present folding or pull-out sections on standard folio pages. A brief introduction to the reprint is provided by the author, Giles Clarke.

Reviews of the 1979 edition:
This meticulous and detailed work is of major importance for the study of Roman burial practices and their relevance for our knowledge of Roman religion. No such comprehensive study has appeared elsewhere … a model of what such a work should be.Prof. J.C. Mann, British Book News (1980) ;

The excavation and report on the Lankhills cemetery is something of a landmark. It is a lesson to Roman archaeologists about what they have been missing through neglect of their cemetery sites, and also a lesson to every-one engaged in cemetery site studies, whatever their period, in how to analyse and present their evidence to maximum advantage. This model publication will be an indispensable work of reference for many years to come.Dr Sonia Hawkes, Times Literary Supplement (1980) ;

… auch ein Musterbeispiel für die gesamte spätantike provinzialrömische Archäologie.’ [‘… also a model example for the whole of provincial Roman archaeology in the late Roman period.Prof. Jochen Garbsch, Bayerische Vorgeschichtsblätter (1981)

NEW: The Romano-British Villa and Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Eccles, Kent A Summary of the Excavations by Alex Detsicas with a Consideration of the Archaeological, Historical and Linguistic Context by Nick Stoodley and Stephen R Cosh with contributions by Jillian Hawkins and Courtnay Konshuh. Paperback; 205x290mm; 276 pages; 132 figures, 22 tables (colour throughout). 790 . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695878. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695885. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Romano-British Villa and Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Eccles, Kent presents a study of the central and lower Medway valley during the 1st millennium AD. It takes as its focus the Eccles Roman villa and Anglo-Saxon cemetery, excavated between 1962–1976 and directed by Alec Detsicas. An account of this important villa throughout its long history is outlined, and a re-assessment of the architectural evidence which Detsicas presented, with fresh interpretations, is provided. In the middle of the 7th century, a large Anglo-Saxon cemetery was established south of the villa. It started as a typical ‘Final Phase’ cemetery but continued into the late Saxon period. The evidence from the cemetery is presented as a site report, with a burial catalogue, a discussion of the grave goods and a study of the wider aspects of mortuary practice. The monograph also includes a chapter on some fragmentary Iron Age evidence and a discussion of an Anglo-Saxon timber building and its relationship to the cemetery. The evidence from the villa and Anglo-Saxon cemetery is discussed within the context of the Medway valley, which highlights the important contribution that Eccles makes to archaeological knowledge. The significance of the area is further investigated by studies devoted to the pre-English place-names of the valley and the documentary evidence of the area during the Anglo-Saxon period. The volume concludes with a general discussion, which draws together all the strands of evidence and evaluates the significance of the Medway valley during the 1st millennium AD.

About the Authors
Nick Stoodley was awarded his PhD from the University of Reading and is currently an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Winchester. His research interests concern the archaeology of early Anglo-Saxon England, with a particular interest in the region of Wessex. He has published monographs on Anglo-Saxon cemeteries and contributed papers on aspects of the period’s mortuary ritual to edited volumes. He is the lead archaeologist for the community-based Meon Valley Archaeology and Heritage Group, which is currently investigating settlement patterns in this Hampshire valley. ;

Stephen R. Cosh is an archaeological writer and illustrator specialising on the Roman period. He is the co-author of the four-volume corpus of Romano-British mosaics and has written numerous articles and specialist reports. He was awarded the degree of D Litt from the University of Reading in 2006.

Jillian Hawkins was awarded her PhD from the University of Winchester and is a place-name specialist.

Courtnay Konshuh is a lecturer at the University of Calgary and was awarded her PhD from the University of Winchester.
NEW: Religious Practice and Cultural Construction of Animal Worship in Egypt from the Early Dynastic to the New Kingdom Ritual Forms, Material Display, Historical Development by Angelo Colonna. Paperback; 205x290mm; 242pp; 33 figures, 23 tables (5 pages of colour). 788 2021 Archaeopress Egyptology 36. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698213. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698220. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Religious Practice and Cultural Construction of Animal Worship in Egypt from the Early Dynastic to the New Kingdom presents an articulated historical interpretation of Egyptian ‘animal worship’ – intended as a segment of religious practice focused on the mobilisation of selected animals within strategically designed ritual contexts – from the Early Dynastic to the New Kingdom, and offers a new understanding of its chronological development through a fresh review of pertinent archaeological and textual data. The goal is twofold: (1) to re-conceptualise the notion of ‘animal worship’ on firm theoretical and material bases, reassessing its heuristic value as a tool for analysis; (2) to demonstrate, accordingly, that ‘animal worship’ did not represent a late degeneration of traditional religion, socially (popular cult) and thematically (animal mummies and burials) restricted, but a complex domain of religious practice with a longer history and a larger variety of configurations than usually assumed.

About the Author Angelo Colonna is Research Fellow in Egyptology at Sapienza University of Rome, where he graduated in 2010 and completed his PhD in 2014. In 2017 he was Academic Visitor at the Oriental Institute – Oxford University. His research on animal worship has been awarded by the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei (2016) and the Istituto Italiano per la Storia Antica (2017).
NEW: Lyde Green Roman Villa, Emersons Green, South Gloucestershire edited by Matthew S. Hobson and Richard Newman. Paperback; 205x290mm; 212 pages; 58 figures, 44 tables, 27 plates (colour throughout). 787 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 85. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270463. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270470. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Lyde Green Roman Villa, Emersons Green, South Gloucestershire was excavated between mid-2012 and mid-2013 along with its surroundings and antecedent settlement. The excavations took place as part of the Emersons Green East Development Area, funded through the mechanism of commercial archaeology by Gardiner & Theobald LLP. The results of the stratigraphic analysis are given here along with specialist reports on the human remains, pottery (including thin sections), ceramic building material, small finds, coinage and iron-working waste. Six open-area excavations allowed the archaeologists the rare opportunity to trace a substantial part of the site’s layout. Three ancillary buildings within the villa compound, including a bathhouse, were excavated. Evidence of advanced water management was uncovered in the form of lead piping, ceramic drain tiles and an enigmatic stone structure built into a canalised spring line. The villa’s economy included stock raising, crop processing and iron and textile production. The settlement appears to have originated in the mid-1st century AD, or slightly earlier.

About the Editors
Matthew Hobson is a specialist in Roman Archaeology, with a focus on Britain and the Maghreb and has authored numerous academic publications. He has taught undergraduate and post-graduate courses at universities in the UK and in the Netherlands and directed excavations in the UK, France, Italy and North Africa. In 2017-2020 Matthew arranged and delivered educational courses in the use of satellite imagery and GIS for Heritage Managers across the Middle East and North Africa. ;

Richard Newman is a specialist in Landscape Archaeology, with a focus on Northern England and Gloucestershire. He has authored or co-authored numerous publications. Major archaeological projects include, in the 1990s, the Second Severn Crossing English Approach Roads, and more recently, the East Anglia One cable trench. He has been a visiting fellow at Newcastle University and worked at Lancaster and Bournemouth universities. His PhD was in the post-medieval landscape history of west Gloucestershire.

Table of Contents (provisional)
Editors’ foreword ;

Chapter 1 Introduction – Richard Newman, Matthew S. Hobson, and Damion Churchill ;

Chapter 2: Research objectives, methodologies and summary of results – Richard Newman, Matthew S. Hobson, and Damion Churchill ;

Chapter 3: The development of the landscape before the 1st millennium AD – Richard Newman and Robert Young with contributions by Adrian Bailey, Kimberley Colman, Lynne Gardiner, David Jackson, Mike McElligott and Megan Stoakley ;

Chapter 4: Dating the origins of the rural settlement at Lyde Green: a Late Iron Age enclosure system? – Richard Newman and Matthew S. Hobson with contributions by Lynne Gardiner, Mike McElligott, Ed McSloy and Megan Stoakley ;

Chapter 5: The Romano-British period and the villa estate – Mike McElligott, Richard Newman, Matthew S. Hobson and Megan Stoakley with contributions by Don O’Meara and Lynne Gardiner ;

Chapter 6: The Romano-British artefacts (mid-1st century AD to 5th century AD) ;

Chapter 7: The development of the landscape from the Roman period to the present day – Richard Newman with contributions from Ed McSloy and Megan Stoakley ;

Chapter 8: Lyde Green and the Romano-British villas of South Gloucestershire – Richard Newman ;

Chapter 9: Appendices ;
Appendix 1: Catalogue of Bronze Age pottery ;
Appendix 2: Table of radiocarbon dates ;
Appendix 3: Catalogue of decorated Samian and Samian stamps ;
Appendix 4: Petrographic report of thin-section analyses ;
Appendix 5: Fabric descriptions of ceramic building material ;
Appendix 6: XRF methodology and tables ;
Appendix 7: Met
NEW: Roman Amphora Contents: Reflecting on the Maritime Trade of Foodstuffs in Antiquity (In honour of Miguel Beltrán Lloris) Proceedings of the Roman Amphora Contents International Interactive Conference (RACIIC) (Cadiz, 5-7 October 2015) edited by Darío Bernal-Casasola, Michel Bonifay, Alessandra Pecci and Victoria Leitch. Paperback; 210x297mm; 512pp; 175 figures (colour throughout). 784 2021 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 17. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781803270623. £68.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270630. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £68.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Roman Amphora Contents: Reflecting on the Maritime Trade of Foodstuffs in Antiquity gathers together the results of the RACIIC International Congress (Roman Amphora Contents International Interactive Conference, Cádiz, 2015), dedicated to the distinguished Spanish amphorologist Miguel Beltrán Lloris. The aim is to reflect on the current state of knowledge about the palaeocontents of Roman amphorae. With over 30 specialists from different countries, the text examines four elements diachronically throughout the Roman period up to the 7th century, with some insights on pre-Roman times: 1) the intimate relationships between amphorae and their contents, from an interdisciplinary perspective (from tituli picti to the evidence from underwater sites, including the problems of reuse); 2) the contribution and current state of knowledge concerning archaeometric approaches (especially organic residue analysis); 3) the evidence at regional / provincial level (from Lusitania to Egypt); and 4) recent case studies, from Corinth, Pompeii and Arles to the Fretum Gaditanum, which allow us to illustrate the different and combined study methods, necessarily interdisciplinary (archaeological, archaeobotanical, archaeozoological, epigraphic, palynological or biomolecular), in order to advance in this transcendental theme and its significance for the economic history and maritime traffic of the Ancient World.

About the Editors
Darío Bernal-Casasola is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Cádiz in Andalusia, Spain, specialising in the Roman Economy and Maritime Archaeology. He studied at Madrid and his main research topics are marine resources exploitation in antiquity and Roman trade. He has directed field projects in Spain, Italy and Morocco. ;

Michel Bonifay is Research Director at the Centre Camille Jullian (Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, CCJ, Aix-en-Provence, France). He is an archaeologist specialising in the classification, production and distribution of Roman African ceramics and their economic significance. He has been involved in field projects in Tunisia, Libya and Algeria. ;

Alessandra Pecci is Lecturer in Archaeology, Universitat de Barcelona. She specialises in archaeometry and food practices, mainly through the organic residue analysis of archaeological materials, mortars and plasters. She has participated in international and interdisciplinary projects in Italy, Spain, Turkey and Mexico. ;

Victoria Leitch is an Honorary Research Fellow at Durham University and a Research Associate at the Centre Camille Jullian (Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, CCJ, Aix-en-Provence, France), specialising in Roman African/Libyan ceramics. She is Publications Manager at the Society for Libyan Studies and Editor of Libyan Studies.
NEW: Environment, Archaeology and Landscape: Papers in honour of Professor Martin Bell edited by Catherine Barnett and Thomas Walker. Paperback; 205x290mm; 220 pages; 72 figures, 18 tables (colour throughout). 774 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781803270845. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270852. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Environment, Archaeology and Landscape is a collection of papers dedicated to Martin Bell on his retirement as Professor of Archaeological Science at the University of Reading. Three themes outline how wetland and inland environments can be related and investigated using multi-method approaches. ‘People and the Sea: Coastal and Intertidal Archaeology’ explores the challenges faced by humans in these zones – particularly relevant to the current global sea level rise. ‘Patterns in the Landscape: Mobility and Human-environment Relationships’ includes some more inland examples and examines how past environments, both in Britain and Europe, can be investigated and brought to public attention. The papers in ‘Archaeology in our Changing World: Heritage Resource Management, Nature Conservation and Rewilding’ look at current challenges and debates in landscape management, experimental and community archaeology. A key theme is how archaeology can contribute time depth to an understanding of biodiversity and environmental sustainability. This volume will be of value to all those interested in environmental archaeology and its relevance to the modern world.

About the Editors
Catherine Barnett is a senior visiting research fellow, Department of Archaeology, University of Reading, investigating UK prehistoric landscapes; an IMAA workshop co-organiser and former codirector of the Silchester Environs project. She uses archaeological science techniques to examine human involvement in and responses to landscape-scale change. She is a technical director at Stantec, leading a multi-disciplinary team in pursuit of sustainable global design solutions. ;

Thomas Walker studied archaeology as a mature student at the University of Reading, gaining a BSc in 2010 and PhD in 2015. He is the author of The Gwithian Environment; molluscs and archaeology on Cornish sand dunes (Archaeopress, 2018). His current interests are in molluscs in archaeology. He regularly assists Martin Bell in his excavations and research, particularly at Goldcliff in the Gwent Levels.

Table of Contents (Provisional):
Editors’ foreword ;
Editors’ acknowledgements ;

Martin Bell: a personal appreciation – Mike Walker ;

Bishopstone, Sussex ;
NEW: I reperti e i motivi egizi ed egittizzanti a Pompei Indagine preliminare per una loro contestualizzazione by Nikola D. Bellucci. Paperback; 174x245mm; 596 pages; 51 figures, 63 plates (colour throughout). Italian text. 773 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 83. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699241. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699258. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

I reperti e i motivi egizi ed egittizzanti a Pompei. Indagine preliminare per una loro contestualizzazione presents a synthesis of Nikola Belluci’s research on Egyptian and Egyptianizing material from Pompeii. Starting from the historical context in which to frame these phenomena and proceeding with a review of terminology in order to offer a common lexicon for future research, the work provides a first up to date corpus of Egyptian and Egyptianizing subjects and finds from Pompeii. More specific analysis focuses on the various Nilotic scenes. Furthermore, the first results of correlations between frescoes and finds allow us to understand better the general and particular distribution of the various types of subjects and finds, evaluating their diffusion among regiones, insulae and domus. The volume includes numerous plates and a rich and up to date bibliography.

About the Author
Nikola D. Bellucci holds Masters degrees in Classical Philology and in Archaeology and Cultures of the Ancient World from the Alma Mater Studiorum (University of Bologna), and a doctorate from the University of Bern, where he is a member of the Department of Mediterranean Archaeology. He is a collaborator with the Pompeii Artistic Landscapes Project (PALP) and is the author of numerous scientific publications, including L’Egitto dei Flavi (with Brunella L. Longo) (2020) and Racconto d’Egitto (with Ahmed F. Kzzo) (2020), both published by Archaeopress.

in italiano
I reperti e i motivi egizi ed egittizzanti a Pompei. Indagine preliminare per una loro contestualizzazione, rappresenta la sintesi delle ricerche svolte dal dott. Bellucci su questa complessa e articolata tematica. Partendo dal contesto storico in cui inquadrare tali fenomeni e proponendo una riflessione terminologica al fine di offrire un lessico comune per future e auspicabili ricerche, l’opera raccoglie, mette in luce, definisce e fornisce un primo e aggiornato corpus dei soggetti e dei reperti egizi ed egittizzanti nel contesto pompeiano, permettendo così anche analisi più specifiche riguardo le diverse scene nilotiche presenti a Pompei. Inoltre, primi risultati di correlazioni tra affreschi e reperti consentono ora di comprendere meglio la distribuzione generale e particolare di questa varia tipologia espressiva valutandone la diffusione tra Regiones, Insulae e domus. Composta di due sezioni per un totale di nove capitoli, con cinque appendici di dati e tre tavole di supplemento fotografico, il volume offre inoltre una ricca e aggiornata bibliografia sul tema.

Nikola D. Bellucci, dottore magistrale in Filologia classica (Th. Papirologia), dottore magistrale in Archeologia e culture del mondo antico (Th. Egittologia) presso l’