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NEW: Die Entstehung komplexer Siedlungen im Zentraloman: Archäologische Untersuchungen zur Siedlungsgeschichte von Al-Khashbah by Conrad Schmidt, Stephanie Döpper, Jonas Kluge, Samantha Petrella, Ullrich Ochs, Nick Kirchhoff, Susanne Maier und Mona Walter. Hardback; 210x297; 590 pages; 358 figures, 68 plates (colour throughout). German text.. 803 2021 Arabia Orientalis: Studien zur Archäologie Ostarabiens 5. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271002. £96.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271019. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Die Entstehung komplexer Siedlungen im Zentraloman: Archäologische Untersuchungen zur Siedlungsgeschichte von Al-Khashbah presents the results of a survey conducted in 2015 and beyond by the Institut für die Kulturen des Alten Orients of the Universität Tübingen in Al-Khashbah, one of the largest Early Bronze Age sites on the Omani Peninsula. Ten monumental buildings, 273 tombs and other structures from the Hafit (3100-2700 BC) and Umm an-Nar periods (2700-2000 BC) were documented here. This makes Al-Khashbah ideally suited for the investigation of the beginnings of complex settlements and social structures in northern Inner Oman at the transition from the 4th to the 3rd millennium BC, because many of the achievements previously attributed to the Umm an-Nar period, such as monumental architecture and the smelting of copper, can already be proven here in the preceding Hafit period. In the Umm an-Nar period, the development of Al-Khashbah continues steadily, giving the site additional importance. According to the results of the survey, however, copper production at the site no longer seems to play a role in this period.

Aus den auf die frühe Bronzezeit folgenden Epochen des 2. und 1. Jahrtausends v. Chr. sowie des 1. und 2. Jahrtausends n. Chr. gibt es in Al-Khashbah nur äußerst wenige Befunde. Erst im 18.–20. Jahrhundert n. Chr. erfährt der Ort eine intensive Wiederbelebung, wovon insbesondere die alte Lehmziegelsiedlung im Norden der Palmenoase, eine kleine Siedlung im Osten des Untersuchungsgebiets, eine Reihe von Bewässerungsanlagen, mehrere Friedhöfe, Petroglyphen sowie zahlreiche an der Oberfläche gefundene spätislamische Keramikscherben zeugen.
NEW: ArcheoFOSS XIV 2020: Open Software, Hardware, Processes, Data and Formats in Archaeological Research edited by Julian Bogdani, Riccardo Montalbano and Paolo Rosati. Paperback; 174x245mm; 204pp; Illustrated in colour throughout. Papers in Italian and English. Print RRP: £38.00. 796 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271248. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271255. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Please note this title has been released online first to launch alongside the latest conference. Print copies can be ordered and will be despatched as soon as stock arrives (in approx 2-3 weeks)

ArcheoFOSS XIV 2020: Open software, hardware, processes, data and formats in archaeological research collects the proceedings of the fourteenth ArcheoFOSS international conference, held online due to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. The book gathers seventeen papers on three principal topics, the main sessions of the conference: use and application of free/libre and open-source (FLOS) tools in archaeology; creation, use and promotion of open data and open formats in archaeology; and development and customization of FLOS software and hardware solutions for cultural heritage. Forty-one scholars of very diverse age, academic affiliation and geographic location, but all actively involved in the promotion of FLOS culture, open data and open science in digital archaeology and humanities, contribute. The volume is completed by a critical analysis of the contribution of these important annual meetings to the scientific and cultural activity of the ArcheoFOSS community. The opportunity offered by the pandemic-related difficulties to widen the geographical scope of the conference has been further boosted by the decision to adopt the English language for most of the papers, with the hope that this will extend the work of the ArcheoFOSS community far beyond the Italian national borders.

About the Editors
Julian Bogdani is an assistant professor at Sapienza University of Rome, where he teaches Digital Archaeology and Digital Humanities. The main focus of his research is the theoretical and practical issues related to the application of Computer Science to the archaeological and historical domain. He is the developer of Bradypus, a cloud-based database for archaeology. He directs the archaeological mission of Sapienza at Çuka e Ajtoit, a Hellenistic, Roman and Late Antique site in Albania. ;

Riccardo Montalbano is an archaeologist, specialist in ancient topography. He is currently GIS expert and Data Manager at Parco Archeologico di Ercolano (Naples) and Adjunct Professor at the University Uninettuno. As GIS expert, he is involved in several fi eld projects in Italy and abroad, and he is a member of the core team of the SITAR Project (Superintendency of Rome) and a research fellow of MAGOH Project (University of Pisa). ;

Paolo Rosati received his PhD in 2016 from L’Aquila University for research on the economic sustainability of software in archaeology and the development of FLOSS methods in Humanities (philology, archaeology, history, topography). Today he is a researcher at the Sapienza University of Rome as part of the ERC project PAThs (http:// paths.uniroma1.it).
NEW: The Romano-British Villa and Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Eccles, Kent A Summary of the Excavations by Alex Detsicas with a Consideration of the Archaeological, Historical and Linguistic Context by Nick Stoodley and Stephen R Cosh with contributions by Jillian Hawkins and Courtnay Konshuh. Paperback; 205x290mm; 276 pages; 132 figures, 22 tables (colour throughout). 790 . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695878. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695885. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Romano-British Villa and Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Eccles, Kent presents a study of the central and lower Medway valley during the 1st millennium AD. It takes as its focus the Eccles Roman villa and Anglo-Saxon cemetery, excavated between 1962–1976 and directed by Alec Detsicas. An account of this important villa throughout its long history is outlined, and a re-assessment of the architectural evidence which Detsicas presented, with fresh interpretations, is provided. In the middle of the 7th century, a large Anglo-Saxon cemetery was established south of the villa. It started as a typical ‘Final Phase’ cemetery but continued into the late Saxon period. The evidence from the cemetery is presented as a site report, with a burial catalogue, a discussion of the grave goods and a study of the wider aspects of mortuary practice. The monograph also includes a chapter on some fragmentary Iron Age evidence and a discussion of an Anglo-Saxon timber building and its relationship to the cemetery. The evidence from the villa and Anglo-Saxon cemetery is discussed within the context of the Medway valley, which highlights the important contribution that Eccles makes to archaeological knowledge. The significance of the area is further investigated by studies devoted to the pre-English place-names of the valley and the documentary evidence of the area during the Anglo-Saxon period. The volume concludes with a general discussion, which draws together all the strands of evidence and evaluates the significance of the Medway valley during the 1st millennium AD.

About the Authors
Nick Stoodley was awarded his PhD from the University of Reading and is currently an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Winchester. His research interests concern the archaeology of early Anglo-Saxon England, with a particular interest in the region of Wessex. He has published monographs on Anglo-Saxon cemeteries and contributed papers on aspects of the period’s mortuary ritual to edited volumes. He is the lead archaeologist for the community-based Meon Valley Archaeology and Heritage Group, which is currently investigating settlement patterns in this Hampshire valley. ;

Stephen R. Cosh is an archaeological writer and illustrator specialising on the Roman period. He is the co-author of the four-volume corpus of Romano-British mosaics and has written numerous articles and specialist reports. He was awarded the degree of D Litt from the University of Reading in 2006.

Jillian Hawkins was awarded her PhD from the University of Winchester and is a place-name specialist.

Courtnay Konshuh is a lecturer at the University of Calgary and was awarded her PhD from the University of Winchester.
NEW: Religious Practice and Cultural Construction of Animal Worship in Egypt from the Early Dynastic to the New Kingdom Ritual Forms, Material Display, Historical Development by Angelo Colonna. Paperback; 205x290mm; 242pp; 33 figures, 23 tables (5 pages of colour). 788 2021 Archaeopress Egyptology 36. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698213. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698220. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Religious Practice and Cultural Construction of Animal Worship in Egypt from the Early Dynastic to the New Kingdom presents an articulated historical interpretation of Egyptian ‘animal worship’ – intended as a segment of religious practice focused on the mobilisation of selected animals within strategically designed ritual contexts – from the Early Dynastic to the New Kingdom, and offers a new understanding of its chronological development through a fresh review of pertinent archaeological and textual data. The goal is twofold: (1) to re-conceptualise the notion of ‘animal worship’ on firm theoretical and material bases, reassessing its heuristic value as a tool for analysis; (2) to demonstrate, accordingly, that ‘animal worship’ did not represent a late degeneration of traditional religion, socially (popular cult) and thematically (animal mummies and burials) restricted, but a complex domain of religious practice with a longer history and a larger variety of configurations than usually assumed.

About the Author Angelo Colonna is Research Fellow in Egyptology at Sapienza University of Rome, where he graduated in 2010 and completed his PhD in 2014. In 2017 he was Academic Visitor at the Oriental Institute – Oxford University. His research on animal worship has been awarded by the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei (2016) and the Istituto Italiano per la Storia Antica (2017).
NEW: Lyde Green Roman Villa, Emersons Green, South Gloucestershire edited by Matthew S. Hobson and Richard Newman. Paperback; 205x290mm; 212 pages; 58 figures, 44 tables, 27 plates (colour throughout). 787 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 85. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270463. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270470. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Lyde Green Roman Villa, Emersons Green, South Gloucestershire was excavated between mid-2012 and mid-2013 along with its surroundings and antecedent settlement. The excavations took place as part of the Emersons Green East Development Area, funded through the mechanism of commercial archaeology by Gardiner & Theobald LLP. The results of the stratigraphic analysis are given here along with specialist reports on the human remains, pottery (including thin sections), ceramic building material, small finds, coinage and iron-working waste. Six open-area excavations allowed the archaeologists the rare opportunity to trace a substantial part of the site’s layout. Three ancillary buildings within the villa compound, including a bathhouse, were excavated. Evidence of advanced water management was uncovered in the form of lead piping, ceramic drain tiles and an enigmatic stone structure built into a canalised spring line. The villa’s economy included stock raising, crop processing and iron and textile production. The settlement appears to have originated in the mid-1st century AD, or slightly earlier.

About the Editors
Matthew Hobson is a specialist in Roman Archaeology, with a focus on Britain and the Maghreb and has authored numerous academic publications. He has taught undergraduate and post-graduate courses at universities in the UK and in the Netherlands and directed excavations in the UK, France, Italy and North Africa. In 2017-2020 Matthew arranged and delivered educational courses in the use of satellite imagery and GIS for Heritage Managers across the Middle East and North Africa. ;

Richard Newman is a specialist in Landscape Archaeology, with a focus on Northern England and Gloucestershire. He has authored or co-authored numerous publications. Major archaeological projects include, in the 1990s, the Second Severn Crossing English Approach Roads, and more recently, the East Anglia One cable trench. He has been a visiting fellow at Newcastle University and worked at Lancaster and Bournemouth universities. His PhD was in the post-medieval landscape history of west Gloucestershire.

Table of Contents (provisional)
Editors’ foreword ;

Chapter 1 Introduction – Richard Newman, Matthew S. Hobson, and Damion Churchill ;

Chapter 2: Research objectives, methodologies and summary of results – Richard Newman, Matthew S. Hobson, and Damion Churchill ;

Chapter 3: The development of the landscape before the 1st millennium AD – Richard Newman and Robert Young with contributions by Adrian Bailey, Kimberley Colman, Lynne Gardiner, David Jackson, Mike McElligott and Megan Stoakley ;

Chapter 4: Dating the origins of the rural settlement at Lyde Green: a Late Iron Age enclosure system? – Richard Newman and Matthew S. Hobson with contributions by Lynne Gardiner, Mike McElligott, Ed McSloy and Megan Stoakley ;

Chapter 5: The Romano-British period and the villa estate – Mike McElligott, Richard Newman, Matthew S. Hobson and Megan Stoakley with contributions by Don O’Meara and Lynne Gardiner ;

Chapter 6: The Romano-British artefacts (mid-1st century AD to 5th century AD) ;

Chapter 7: The development of the landscape from the Roman period to the present day – Richard Newman with contributions from Ed McSloy and Megan Stoakley ;

Chapter 8: Lyde Green and the Romano-British villas of South Gloucestershire – Richard Newman ;

Chapter 9: Appendices ;
Appendix 1: Catalogue of Bronze Age pottery ;
Appendix 2: Table of radiocarbon dates ;
Appendix 3: Catalogue of decorated Samian and Samian stamps ;
Appendix 4: Petrographic report of thin-section analyses ;
Appendix 5: Fabric descriptions of ceramic building material ;
Appendix 6: XRF methodology and tables ;
Appendix 7: Met
NEW: Roman Amphora Contents: Reflecting on the Maritime Trade of Foodstuffs in Antiquity (In honour of Miguel Beltrán Lloris) Proceedings of the Roman Amphora Contents International Interactive Conference (RACIIC) (Cadiz, 5-7 October 2015) edited by Darío Bernal-Casasola, Michel Bonifay, Alessandra Pecci and Victoria Leitch. Paperback; 210x297mm; 512pp; 175 figures (colour throughout). 784 2021 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 17. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781803270623. £68.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270630. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £68.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Roman Amphora Contents: Reflecting on the Maritime Trade of Foodstuffs in Antiquity gathers together the results of the RACIIC International Congress (Roman Amphora Contents International Interactive Conference, Cádiz, 2015), dedicated to the distinguished Spanish amphorologist Miguel Beltrán Lloris. The aim is to reflect on the current state of knowledge about the palaeocontents of Roman amphorae. With over 30 specialists from different countries, the text examines four elements diachronically throughout the Roman period up to the 7th century, with some insights on pre-Roman times: 1) the intimate relationships between amphorae and their contents, from an interdisciplinary perspective (from tituli picti to the evidence from underwater sites, including the problems of reuse); 2) the contribution and current state of knowledge concerning archaeometric approaches (especially organic residue analysis); 3) the evidence at regional / provincial level (from Lusitania to Egypt); and 4) recent case studies, from Corinth, Pompeii and Arles to the Fretum Gaditanum, which allow us to illustrate the different and combined study methods, necessarily interdisciplinary (archaeological, archaeobotanical, archaeozoological, epigraphic, palynological or biomolecular), in order to advance in this transcendental theme and its significance for the economic history and maritime traffic of the Ancient World.

About the Editors
Darío Bernal-Casasola is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Cádiz in Andalusia, Spain, specialising in the Roman Economy and Maritime Archaeology. He studied at Madrid and his main research topics are marine resources exploitation in antiquity and Roman trade. He has directed field projects in Spain, Italy and Morocco. ;

Michel Bonifay is Research Director at the Centre Camille Jullian (Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, CCJ, Aix-en-Provence, France). He is an archaeologist specialising in the classification, production and distribution of Roman African ceramics and their economic significance. He has been involved in field projects in Tunisia, Libya and Algeria. ;

Alessandra Pecci is Lecturer in Archaeology, Universitat de Barcelona. She specialises in archaeometry and food practices, mainly through the organic residue analysis of archaeological materials, mortars and plasters. She has participated in international and interdisciplinary projects in Italy, Spain, Turkey and Mexico. ;

Victoria Leitch is an Honorary Research Fellow at Durham University and a Research Associate at the Centre Camille Jullian (Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, CCJ, Aix-en-Provence, France), specialising in Roman African/Libyan ceramics. She is Publications Manager at the Society for Libyan Studies and Editor of Libyan Studies.
NEW (REPRINT AND OPEN ACCESS): The Roman Cemetery at Lankhills Pre-Roman and Roman Winchester. Part II by Giles Clarke. Hardback; 215x276 pages; 614pp. 777 2021 Winchester Studies 3. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270081. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270098. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Winchester Studies 3.ii: Outside the north gate of Venta Belgarum, Roman Winchester, a great cemetery stretched for 500 yards along the road to Cirencester. Excavations at Lankhills from 1967 to 1972 uncovered 451 graves, many elaborately furnished, at the northern limits of this cemetery, and dating from the fourth century A.D. This book, the second in a two-part study of Venta Belgarum, which forms the third volume of Winchester Studies, describes the excavations of these burials and analyses in detail both the graves and their contents. There are detailed studies and important re-assessments of many categories of object, but it is the information about late Roman burial, religion, and society which is of special interest.

This is a reprint of the volume originally published in 1979 (Oxford, ISBN 9780198131779). The reprint is based on scans of the original publication, with minor changes to present folding or pull-out sections on standard folio pages. A brief introduction to the reprint is provided by the author, Giles Clarke.

Reviews of the 1979 edition:
This meticulous and detailed work is of major importance for the study of Roman burial practices and their relevance for our knowledge of Roman religion. No such comprehensive study has appeared elsewhere … a model of what such a work should be.Prof. J.C. Mann, British Book News (1980) ;

The excavation and report on the Lankhills cemetery is something of a landmark. It is a lesson to Roman archaeologists about what they have been missing through neglect of their cemetery sites, and also a lesson to every-one engaged in cemetery site studies, whatever their period, in how to analyse and present their evidence to maximum advantage. This model publication will be an indispensable work of reference for many years to come.Dr Sonia Hawkes, Times Literary Supplement (1980) ;

… auch ein Musterbeispiel für die gesamte spätantike provinzialrömische Archäologie.’ [‘… also a model example for the whole of provincial Roman archaeology in the late Roman period.Prof. Jochen Garbsch, Bayerische Vorgeschichtsblätter (1981)

NEW: Environment, Archaeology and Landscape: Papers in honour of Professor Martin Bell edited by Catherine Barnett and Thomas Walker. Paperback; 205x290mm; 220 pages; 72 figures, 18 tables (colour throughout). 774 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270845. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270852. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Environment, Archaeology and Landscape is a collection of papers dedicated to Martin Bell on his retirement as Professor of Archaeological Science at the University of Reading. Three themes outline how wetland and inland environments can be related and investigated using multi-method approaches. ‘People and the Sea: Coastal and Intertidal Archaeology’ explores the challenges faced by humans in these zones – particularly relevant to the current global sea level rise. ‘Patterns in the Landscape: Mobility and Human-environment Relationships’ includes some more inland examples and examines how past environments, both in Britain and Europe, can be investigated and brought to public attention. The papers in ‘Archaeology in our Changing World: Heritage Resource Management, Nature Conservation and Rewilding’ look at current challenges and debates in landscape management, experimental and community archaeology. A key theme is how archaeology can contribute time depth to an understanding of biodiversity and environmental sustainability. This volume will be of value to all those interested in environmental archaeology and its relevance to the modern world.

About the Editors
Catherine Barnett is a senior visiting research fellow, Department of Archaeology, University of Reading, investigating UK prehistoric landscapes; an IMAA workshop co-organiser and former codirector of the Silchester Environs project. She uses archaeological science techniques to examine human involvement in and responses to landscape-scale change. She is a technical director at Stantec, leading a multi-disciplinary team in pursuit of sustainable global design solutions. ;

Thomas Walker studied archaeology as a mature student at the University of Reading, gaining a BSc in 2010 and PhD in 2015. He is the author of The Gwithian Environment; molluscs and archaeology on Cornish sand dunes (Archaeopress, 2018). His current interests are in molluscs in archaeology. He regularly assists Martin Bell in his excavations and research, particularly at Goldcliff in the Gwent Levels.

Table of Contents (Provisional):
Editors’ foreword ;
Editors’ acknowledgements ;

Martin Bell: a personal appreciation – Mike Walker ;

Bishopstone, Sussex ;
NEW: I reperti e i motivi egizi ed egittizzanti a Pompei Indagine preliminare per una loro contestualizzazione by Nikola D. Bellucci. Paperback; 174x245mm; 596 pages; 51 figures, 63 plates (colour throughout). Italian text. 773 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 83. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699241. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699258. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

I reperti e i motivi egizi ed egittizzanti a Pompei. Indagine preliminare per una loro contestualizzazione presents a synthesis of Nikola Belluci’s research on Egyptian and Egyptianizing material from Pompeii. Starting from the historical context in which to frame these phenomena and proceeding with a review of terminology in order to offer a common lexicon for future research, the work provides a first up to date corpus of Egyptian and Egyptianizing subjects and finds from Pompeii. More specific analysis focuses on the various Nilotic scenes. Furthermore, the first results of correlations between frescoes and finds allow us to understand better the general and particular distribution of the various types of subjects and finds, evaluating their diffusion among regiones, insulae and domus. The volume includes numerous plates and a rich and up to date bibliography.

About the Author
Nikola D. Bellucci holds Masters degrees in Classical Philology and in Archaeology and Cultures of the Ancient World from the Alma Mater Studiorum (University of Bologna), and a doctorate from the University of Bern, where he is a member of the Department of Mediterranean Archaeology. He is a collaborator with the Pompeii Artistic Landscapes Project (PALP) and is the author of numerous scientific publications, including L’Egitto dei Flavi (with Brunella L. Longo) (2020) and Racconto d’Egitto (with Ahmed F. Kzzo) (2020), both published by Archaeopress.

in italiano
I reperti e i motivi egizi ed egittizzanti a Pompei. Indagine preliminare per una loro contestualizzazione, rappresenta la sintesi delle ricerche svolte dal dott. Bellucci su questa complessa e articolata tematica. Partendo dal contesto storico in cui inquadrare tali fenomeni e proponendo una riflessione terminologica al fine di offrire un lessico comune per future e auspicabili ricerche, l’opera raccoglie, mette in luce, definisce e fornisce un primo e aggiornato corpus dei soggetti e dei reperti egizi ed egittizzanti nel contesto pompeiano, permettendo così anche analisi più specifiche riguardo le diverse scene nilotiche presenti a Pompei. Inoltre, primi risultati di correlazioni tra affreschi e reperti consentono ora di comprendere meglio la distribuzione generale e particolare di questa varia tipologia espressiva valutandone la diffusione tra Regiones, Insulae e domus. Composta di due sezioni per un totale di nove capitoli, con cinque appendici di dati e tre tavole di supplemento fotografico, il volume offre inoltre una ricca e aggiornata bibliografia sul tema.

Nikola D. Bellucci, dottore magistrale in Filologia classica (Th. Papirologia), dottore magistrale in Archeologia e culture del mondo antico (Th. Egittologia) presso l’
NEW: Dana Island: The Greatest Shipyard of the Ancient Mediterranean edited by Hakan Öniz. Paperback; 174x245mm; 232 pages; 311 figures, 18 plates (colour throughout). 759 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699517. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699524. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Dana Island: The Greatest Shipyard of the Ancient Mediterranean presents the dramatic archaeological discoveries from Dana Island, off the coast of Rough Cilicia in southern Turkey, where underwater investigations and surface survey in advance of excavation have revealed nearly 300 ancient rock-cut slipways, the largest number of such naval installations discovered to date. Further slipways have been lost to erosion or await excavation. The slipways accommodated a range of different sizes of warship and are identified as ship-sheds, grouped within a shipyard area, behind which are various structures seen as workshops used in shipbuilding, as well as living spaces, military and religious buildings, managerial facilities, barn areas for animals, baths and dock areas, shops, villas, columned areas, watchtow¬ers, and many other buildings whose functions cannot yet be understood. The majority are mortarless stone structures, and some of the architectural forms show resemblances to Iron Age masonry. The volume presents and analyses the slipways, their use and possible dating. Water supply is discussed, and cisterns documented. Further chapters focus on the tombs found on the island, its geology, plant usage, and the geoarchaeology of the island’s structures. Extensive contextual sections review the island’s geographical situation and ancient naval history. Finally, computer modelling is used to produce stunning 3D visualisations of the ancient shipyard and naval base.

About the Author
Hakan Oniz completed his masters and PhD in Underwater Archaeology at Selçuk University, Konya. He is one of the founders and was the first coordinator of the UNESCO UniTwin Underwater Archaeology Network between 2012 and 2015. He is the head of the Mediterranean Underwater Cultural Heritage Division in the Mediterranean Civilizations Research Institute of Akdeniz University, Head of the Department of Restoration and Conservation of Cultural Heritage in the Faculty of Art, and Director of the Underwater Archaeology Research Center in the same University. He manages several Underwater Archaeology research and excavation projects on the Turkish Mediterranean Coast, is Secretary and bureau member of ICOMOS-ICUCH (International Committee of Underwater Cultural Heritage), a member of the UNESCO National Observation Committee of Underwater Archaeology, and a member of the CMAS Scientific Committee.

Table of Contents
List of Figures ;
Acknowledgments ;
Foreword – Ahmet Ünal ;
The Prehistoric Strategic Location of Dana Island – Şengül G. Aydingün ;
The Importance of the Southern Mediterranean Coast – Ahmet Ünal ;
Hittites And Seafaring – Özlem Sir Gavaz ;
Ancient shipsheds on Dana Island: Some preliminary observations – Olaf Höckmann and Hakan Öniz ;
An Ancient Naval Yard On The Southern Coast Of Anatolia – Mustafa H. Sayar ;
Dana Island Ancient Shipyard, Rough Cilicia: Archaeological Observations – Hakan Öniz ;
Coastal Aeolianite as the Geological Heritage of Dana Island: Preliminary Results – Ahmet Evren Erginal, Oya Erenoğlu, Hakan Öniz and Savaş Sarialtun ;
Geoarchaeological Investigation Of Architectural Structures On Dana Island – Savaş Sarialtun, Hakan Öniz and Günay Dönmez ;
The Ancient Naval Base/Shipyard on Dana Island – Ahmet Denker and Hakan Öniz ;
Usage Forms Of Plant Species On Dana Island And Its Surroundings From Past To Present – Zerrin Koşdemir ;
The Tomb Types Of Dana Island (Ancient Pityoussa) – Günay Dönmez and Ercan Soydan ;
Water Cisterns On Dana Island – Dilber Bala, Hakan Öniz ;
The Possible Role of Dana Island in the Events Of 1200 BC – Haldun Aydingün ;
Mavikent Harbor: The Mainland Connection Point of the Dana Island Shipyard?
NEW: A Catalogue of the Pictures and Drawings at Wilton House by Francis Russell. Hardback with Dust Jacket; 229x305mm; 310 pages; 126 plates in full colour. 779 2021. ISBN 9781789699845. £80.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

The collection of pictures at Wilton has been celebrated since the seventeenth century; and its historic arrangement is uniquely well documented in a series of catalogues of which the first, issued in 1731, was the earliest such publication about any private collection in England. Of successive owners of the house, three made significant contributions: William, 4th Earl of Pembroke, who commissioned van Dyck’s monumental portrait of his family that dominates the Double Cube Room he had created; his grandson, Thomas, 8th Earl of Pembroke who assembled what was in some respects a pioneering collection of old master pictures for the house; and his grandson, Henry, 10th Earl of Pembroke, patron of Reynolds and Wilson, among others. Such masterpieces as Lucas van Leyden’s Card Players, Cesare da Sesto’s Leda – long attributed to Leonardo – and Ribera’s Democritus are matched by remarkable portrait drawings by Raphael and Holbein. These are complemented by a substantial deposit of family portraits and other pictures that attest to the tastes and interests of successive generations of the Herbert family.

About the Author
Francis Russell is a Deputy Chairman of Christie’s. He has contributed numerous articles on subjects ranging from Italian Renaissance painting and Grand Tour portraiture and patronage to the history of collecting to scholarly periodicals, including the Burlington Magazine, Apollo and Master Drawings, to Country Life and to exhibition catalogues. Previous books include John, 3rd Earl of Bute: Patron and Collector, 2004; Places in Italy, 2007 (enlarged editions 2014 and 2019); Places in Turkey, 2010 (enlarged edition 2017); Places in Syria, 2011; and Places in Jordan, 2012.
NEW: Later Prehistoric Settlement in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly: Evidence from Five Excavations edited by Andy M Jones and Graeme Kirkham. Paperback; 205x290mm; 380 pages; 178 figures, 62 tables (60 pages in colour). 778 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699579. £52.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699586. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £52.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Later Prehistoric Settlement in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly reports on the excavation between 1996 and 2014 of five later prehistoric and Roman period settlements. Three of the mainland sites – Killigrew, Nancemere and Higher Besore – are located in central Cornwall, near Truro, with the fourth, at Porthleven, situated on the south coast in west Cornwall. The fifth settlement, Porth Killier, is on the island of St Agnes on the Isles of Scilly. All the sites were multi-phased, revealing both similar and contrasting patterns of occupation stretching from the Bronze Age into the Iron Age and beyond. Despite having broadly comparable chronological sequences, there are considerable differences in both the tempo and intensity of occupation, and significant contrasts in practices associated with them. Significantly, all four mainland sequences culminate with an enclosed settlement in the Late Iron Age and especially during the Roman period, a time of significant economic and social change following the conquest. During this period there continued to be differences in the character of occupation. Notably two of the enclosures seem to have been strongly associated with industrial activities, including metalworking at Killigrew, suggesting that the working of iron may have been a controlled or ritualized activity undertaken within a dedicated space. The volume presents the results from each of the five settlement sites, before reviewing the key themes which have emerged from the investigations.

About the Editors
Andy M Jones is Principal Archaeologist with the Cornwall Archaeological Unit. His research interests include the Neolithic and Bronze Age, as well as the archaeology of the uplands and coastal areas of western Britain. Ongoing research projects include the social responses to the later prehistoric drowning of the Mount’s Bay landscape in west Cornwall and social organization of metalworking in the British Bronze Age. His recent publications include: Excavation of Later Prehistoric and Roman Sites along the Route of the Newquay Strategic Road Corridor, Cornwall (2019); An Intellectual Adventurer in Archaeology: Reflections on the work of Charles Thomas (2018); Preserved in the Peat: An Extraordinary Bronze Age Burial on Whitehorse Hill (2016); and Metalworking in the Middle Bronze Age and Beyond: New evidence from Tremough, Cornwall (2015). ;

Graeme Kirkham was formerly a project archaeologist with Cornwall Archaeological Unit, now a freelance historic environment consultant and independent researcher; joint editor of Cornish Archaeology since 2003. Current research interests include medieval and post-medieval responses to prehistoric monuments and a range of landscape history topics.
NEW: Interdisciplinary Research into Iron Metallurgy along the Drava River in Croatia The TransFER Project edited by Tajana Sekelj Ivančan and Tena Karavidović. DOI: 10.32028/9781803271026. Paperback; 205x290mm; 284 pages; 146 figures, 8 maps, 20 plates, 30 tables (colour throughout). 777 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781803271026. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271033. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Interdisciplinary Research into Iron Metallurgy along the Drava River in Croatia – The TransFER Project presents the results of the scientific project ‘Production of Iron Along the Drava River During Antiquity and Middle Ages: Creation and Transfer of Knowledge, Technology and Commodities - TransFER project (IP – 2016 - 06 - 5047)’ funded by the Croatian Science Foundation. The research presented explores the evidence for and nature of iron production in the lowland area of the central Drava River basin in Croatia during late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages, from the turn of the 4th to the early 9th centuries. The wide-ranging methodology of the project features non-destructive archaeological site identification (surface survey and geophysics), archaeological excavation of sites with attested bloomery iron production and processing along with their associated dwelling and settlement structures, as well as experimental archaeology. The record of bloomery iron production and processing is explored via an interdisciplinary approach which examines the technology used as well as the natural resources (bog iron ores, wood and plant remains) exploited in the production process. The results of the research testify to the importance and longevity of iron production in the area of the Drava river valley.

About the Editors
Tajana Sekelj Ivančan graduated archaeology at the Faculty of Philosophy of the University of Zagreb where she also obtained her doctorate in 1999. She is a Scientific Advisor – Second Appointment (permanent position) at the Institute of Archaeology in Zagreb, where she has been leading the TransFER project funded by the Croatian Science Foundation. Tajana's scholarly interests include Early Middle Ages, High Middle Ages, settlements, ceramics, smelting workshops, smelting furnaces, and iron ore processing. Tajana received the Josip Brunšmid annual award of the Croatian Archaeological Society for her monograph Podravina in the Early Middle Ages published in 2012. ;

Tena Karavidović graduated archaeology at the University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. She is currently a doctoral fellow – research assistant a
NEW: The Not Very Patrilocal European Neolithic Strontium, aDNA, and Archaeological Kinship Analyses by Bradley E. Ensor. Paperback; 174x245mm; 252 pages; 24 figures, 18 tables. 776 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699807. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699814. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Two decades of strontium isotope research on Neolithic European burials – reinforced by high-profile ancient DNA studies – has led to widespread interpretations that these were patrilocal societies, implying significant residential mobility for women. The Not Very Patrilocal European Neolithic questions that narrative from a social anthropological perspective on kinship. It introduces models for inferring residence and descent with isotope and genetic data and provides in-depth descriptions of archaeological kinship analysis. From social anthropological insights to reassessments of data, an alternative perspective on the social dynamics of Neolithic European societies emerges from this new guide for prehistorians working with biological and archaeological materials.

About the Author Bradley E. Ensor (PhD 2003, University of Florida) is a professor of anthropology at Eastern Michigan University (2003-present). He teaches archaeology, social anthropology, and physical anthropology. His research addresses theory and methods in archaeology, bioarchaeology, and ethnology emphasizing the intersections of political economy, kinship, and gender. His publications include Crafting Prehispanic Maya Kinship (2013), The Archaeology of Kinship (2013), Oysters in the Land of Cacao (2020), 17 journal articles, and 7 chapters in edited volumes.
NEW: Rock Art Studies: News of the World VI edited by Paul G. Bahn, Natalie Franklin and Matthias Strecker. Paperback; 205x290mm; 370 pages; 149 figures, 3 tables (colour throughout). 772 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699623. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699630. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Rock Art Studies: News of the World VI, like the previous editions in the series, covers rock art research and management all over the world over a five-year period, in this case, the years 2015 to 2019 inclusive. The current volume once again shows the wide variety of approaches that have been taken in different parts of the world and reflects the expansion and diversification of perspectives and research questions. One constant has been the impact of new techniques of recording rock art. This is especially evident in the realm of computer enhancement of the frequently faded and weathered rock imagery. As has been the case in past volumes, this collection of papers includes all of the latest discoveries, including in areas hitherto not known to contain rock art. While relatively little has happened in some areas, a great deal has occurred in others. Rock art studies continue to go through a period of intense scientific and technological development, but at the same time – due to the problems of preservation and vandalism – it is crucial to educate local people and the young about the importance of this fragile heritage.

About the Editors Paul G. Bahn studied archaeology at Cambridge and wrote his doctoral thesis on the prehistory of the French Pyrenees. He then held postdoctoral fellowships at Liverpool and London, plus a Getty postdoctoral fellowship in the History of Art and the Humanities. Since the mid-80s, he has devoted himself to writing and editing books on archaeology and lecturing on numerous archaeological tours. His main speciality is prehistoric art, especially rock art of the world, most notably Palaeolithic art, as well as Easter Island. ;

Natalie Franklin is an internationally renowned rock art specialist. She has published widely in academic journals, co-edited the previous three volumes of Rock Art News of the World and contributed chapters to the entire series. She has extensive experience in recording rock art and developing management plans for rock art sites. Natalie currently works as a cultural heritage consultant in Brisbane, Australia. ;

Matthias Strecker is an educator and rock art expert. Both in Bolivia and internationally, Strecker has contributed signifi cantly to the knowledge, appreciation and conservation of rock art. He has carried out fi eldwork in Mexico, Bolivia and Peru and has published numerous studies of rock art in Latin America. Since 1987 he has been Secretary of the Sociedad de Investigación del Arte Rupestre de Bolivia (SIARB) and editor of its publications.
NEW: Tinqueux « la Haubette » (Marne, France): Un site exceptionnel du Néolithique ancien edited by Lamys Hachem. Paperback; 210x297mm; 220 pages; 92 figures, 30 tables (colour throughout). French text with English Summary. 771 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699760. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699777. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Neolithic site of Tinqueux ‘la Haubette’ (Marne) dated to the ‘Blicquy/Villeneuve-Saint-Germain’ (5000-4700 cal. BC) is composed of five houses, further series of pits and the remains of an oven. An abundance of finds has allowed us to explore a number of themes in greater detail. The first concerns the potential singularity of the site due to its very easterly location within the BVSG area of expansion and its place within the broader chronological sequence. The second is the nature of the settlement within the network of ‘producer’ and ‘receiver’ sites which characterises the BVSG. The third theme that we focus on is the provenance of raw materials, and the fourth one is the internal settlement chronology.

The analyses carried out on the settlement structure and on the archaeological finds reveal hitherto unknown facets of the BVSG culture, like refining the chronological sequence for this period in its regional facies; and establishing a particularly valuable periodisation for the site itself. Comparison with nearby and distant sites has helped us to understand the relationship of this settlement to other contemporary sites. It reveals that the site looked to the east and that there was a strong cultural dynamic which was expressed by varied networks of influence and circulation, particularly for the acquisition of raw materials and finished products.

About the Author
Lamys Hachem is a researcher in zooarchaeology and pre-history at the Institut National de Recherches Archéologiques Préventives (INRAP). As part of the team Trajectoires « De la sédentarisation à l’Etat » (UMR 8215 of CNRS and Paris I-Sorbonne University), her research and publications focus on the societies of the Early, Middle and Final Neolithic period, particularly in the northern half of France, where she has led teams performing preventive archaeological excavations for more than two decades.

En français
Le site néolithique de Tinqueux « la Haubette » (Marne) daté du « Blicquy/Villeneuve-Saint-Germain » (5000-4700 cal. BC) a livré cinq maisons, ainsi que des fosses et une structure de combustion. Les éléments de la culture matérielle abondants ont permis d’approfondir différentes problématiques. La première traite de la singularité du site en raison de sa position très orientale dans l’aire d’extension du BVSG et sa place dans la séquence chronologique. Le second sujet porte sur la nature de l’habitat dans le réseau des sites « producteurs » ou « receveurs » qui caractérise le BVSG. Le troisième thème abordé est celui de la provenance des matières premières et le quatrième est celui des caractéristiques chronologiques internes au village.

Les analyses menées sur la structuration du village et sur le mobilier archéologique ont permis de révéler un pan encore inconnu de la culture BVSG. Ainsi, la séquence chronologique fine de cette période dans son faciès régional a pu être établie ; comme que la périodisation interne du village. La comparaison avec des sites proches ou éloignés a été déterminante pour comprendre le rapport de cet habitat avec les sites contemporains. Elle révèle une ouverture vers l’est et une forte dynamique culturelle qui se traduit par des réseaux d’influences et de circulations variées, notamment pour l’approvisionnement en matières premières et en produits finis.
NEW: A Vanishing Landscape: Archaeological Investigations at Blakeney Eye, Norfolk by Naomi Field. Paperback; 205x290mm; 240 pages; 65 figures, 76 plates, 71 tables (colour throughout). 769 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698404. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698411. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A Vanishing Landscape: Archaeological Investigations at Blakeney Eye, Norfolk documents the results of several archaeological investigations undertaken on Blakeney Eye on behalf of the Environment Agency after the decision was taken for a managed retreat of the area. The Eye is a part of the north Norfolk coastline that has been under constant pressure of erosion for centuries.

Excavation revealed evidence for multi-period occupation, with abandonments driven by the ever-changing climate. Neolithic features and artefacts were the earliest remains present. Fragmentary remains of an enclosed 13-14th century farmstead were identified, mainly preserved beneath the two-celled flint building of 16th-17th century date (the scheduled monument known locally as Blakeney Chapel). Archaeological evidence for the function of this building is discussed in conjunction with the documentary sources. The archaeological remains throw light on the trading links between the medieval and post-medieval port of Cley and the Continent, as well as the storms and tidal influxes of the past that resulted in repeated abandonments of the area.

Includes contributions from Kathryn Blythe, Michael Clark, Jacqueline Churchill, Jane Cowgill, John Giorgi, Alison Locker, Adrian Marsden, Graham Morgan, Quita Mould, Andrew Peachey, Sara Percival, James Rackham, Ian Rowlandson, Zoe Tomlinson, Alan Vince†, Hugh Willmott, Jane Young.

About the Author
Naomi Field MCIfA has been a Senior Archaeological Consultant at Prospect Archaeology Ltd since 2011. She was Director of Lindsey Archaeological Services Ltd from 1987-2009, the company that undertook the excavations at Blakeney Eye in 2004-5. Her many publications include the Lincolnshire excavations of an Iron Age timber causeway at Fiskerton and the medieval timber-framed building, Gainsborough Old Hall. She was archaeology advisor on the Lincoln Diocesan Advisory Committee for over 30 years and her present interests are focused on the recording of historic buildings.
NEW: The Shaping of the English Landscape: An Atlas of Archaeology from the Bronze Age to Domesday Book by Chris Green and Miranda Creswell. Paperback; 219x297mm; 134 pages; illustrated in colour throughout. 767 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270609. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270616. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Shaping of the English Landscape is an atlas of English archaeology covering the period from the middle Bronze Age (c. 1500 BC) to Domesday Book (AD 1086), encompassing the Bronze and Iron Ages, the Roman period, and the early medieval (Anglo-Saxon) age. It was produced as part of the English Landscape and Identities (EngLaId) project at the University of Oxford, which took place from 2011 to 2016, funded by the European Research Council.

In this book, you will find maps (produced by Chris Green) and discussion of themes including landscape agency, settlement, foodways and field systems, belief and the treatment of the dead, mobility and defence, making things, and material culture. Alongside are artworks (produced by Miranda Creswell) dealing with similar themes and depicting archaeological sites from across England. The authors hope to inspire and encourage debate into the past history of the English landscape.

Includes contributions from Anwen Cooper, Victoria Donnelly, Tyler Franconi, Roger Glyde, Chris Gosden, Zena Kamash, Janice Kinory, Sarah Mallet, Dan Stansbie, John Talbot, and Letty Ten Harkel.

About the Contributors
Chris Green is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the School of Archaeology within the University of Oxford. He worked on English Landscape and Identities throughout the lifespan of the project. Chris specialises in applications of Geographic Information Systems and data science in archaeology. He particularly enjoys making maps. ;

Miranda Creswell is a visual artist based in Oxford. She is currently Artist in Residence at the School of Archaeology and previously worked within the team on English Landscape and Identities, documenting working methods and also creating the Recording England artworks presented in this book.
NEW: Prehistoric Fisherfolk of Oman: The Neolithic Village of Ras Al-Hamra RH-5 by Lapo Gianni Marcucci, Emilie Badel & Francesco Genchi. Paperback; 210x297mm; 248 pages; 164 figures, 7 tables (colour throughout). 764 2021 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 6. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781803270340. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270357. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Prehistoric Fisherfolk of Oman reports on excavations at the prehistoric site Ras Al-Hamra RH-5, located on a large promontory in the Qurum area of Muscat, conducted by the Italian Archaeological Mission in Oman with support from the Ministry of Heritage and Tourism. The site dates from the late fifth to the end of the fourth millennia BC and comprises an accumulation of superimposed food discards deriving from continuous and repeated subsistence activities such as fishing, collecting shells, hunting and herding. Dwellings and household installations, including objects of daily use and ornaments, have also been found throughout the occupation sequence. Excavations at RH-5 yielded unprecedented data on the economic and social dynamics of Neolithic societies in eastern Arabia. The exploitation of different ecological niches supplied all the necessary requirements for year-round sedentary human occupation. The lifestyle of fisher-gatherer communities during the Middle Holocene represents a fundamental step of the neolithisation process in Oman.

About the Authors
Lapo Gianni Marcucci obtained his Ph.D in partnership between the University of Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne and the University of Bologna. Working in Oman since 1998 on the Neolithic and Bronze Age periods, he has directed various excavations including Ras Al-Hamra RH-5 and RH-6. Marcucci researches Neolithic coastal villages and manufacturing process with a particular focus on shell. Since 2006, he is working on rescue archaeology for various institutes in France and is a consultant for museums in Oman. ;

Emilie Badel is Associated Researcher at the Vepmo laboratory of French CNRS. She obtained her Ph.D from the University of Paris 1 Panthéon- Sorbonne. Badel specializes in the Neolithic and Bronze Age periods of the Near East and researches on technological revolution that has coincided with the emergence of complex societies, in particular for what concerns man-shaped bitumen assemblages. She worked on the field in Oman, at the archaeological sites of Ras Al-Hamra RH-5 and RH-6 from 2009 to 2013. ;

Francesco Genchi is a Research Fellow at the Sapienza–University of Rome. He is a professional archaeologist specializing in stratigraphic excavation and 3D digital documentation, as well as in archaeological survey and landscape mapping. Genchi participated in excavations at Ras Al-Hadd, Ras Al-Jinz and Ras Al-Hamra and was also field-director for the Ministry of Heritage and Culture in several rescue projects. He is presently directing the excavation of Iron Age collective graves at Dibbā Al-Bayah in the Musandam Governorate.
NEW: Archaeology and History of Toraijin Human, technological, and cultural flow from the Korean Peninsula to the Japanese Archipelago c. 800 BC–AD 600 by Song-nai Rhee and C. Melvin Aikens with Gina L. Barnes. Paperback; 185x250mm; 242 pages; 47 figures, 1 table, 11 maps (black & white throughout). 763 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699661. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699678. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Archaeology and History of Toraijin: Human, technological, and cultural flow from the Korean Peninsula to the Japanese Archipelago c. 800 BC–AD 600 explores the fundamental role in the history of the Japanese archipelago played by Toraijin – immigrants mainly from the Korean Peninsula – during this formative period. The arrival of immigrant rice-agriculturalists from the peninsula in the early first millennium BC was the first of three major waves of technological transfer between the continent and the islands. The second brought bronze and iron-working to the archipelago around the 4th century BC, and the third brought elite crafts and administrative technology as well as Confucianism and Buddhism in the 5th and 6th centuries AD.

In light of the recently uncovered archaeological data and ancient historical records, this book presents a panoramic bird’s eye view of the fourteen centuries-long Toraijin story, from c. 800~600 BC to AD 600 or thereabouts by answering the following seven questions: Where did the Toraijin come from? What was their historical and socio-cultural background? Why did they leave their homeland? Where did they settle in the Archipelago? What did they do in the Archipelago? How did the Archipelago people treat the Toraijin? What contributions did the Toraijin make to the ancient Japanese society?

About the Authors
Song-nai Rhee holds PhDs in archaeology and anthropology from the University of Oregon and from the Dropsie University for Hebrew and Cognate Learning. He is Academic Vice President/Dean Emeritus and Emeritus Professor of Archaeology at Bushnell University, Eugene, OR and Courtesy Research Professor in the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies, University of Oregon. His research interests include East Asian history and archaeology; emerging complex society in ancient Korea and Japan; history and archaeology of the Toraijin; archaeology and ancient history of Israel and the Near East; Jewish history; origins and evolution of fortification systems in the Levant.

C. Melvin Aikens obtained his PhD in archaeology and anthropology from the University of Chicago. He is Emeritus Professor of Archaeology at the University of Oregon and Emeritus Director of the Natural and Cultural History Museum, University of Oregon. His research interests include: archaeology and ancient History of Pacific Northeast Asia; prehistory and protohistory of Korea and Japan; transnational cultural interactions in the Japan Oikumene; archaeology of the Great Basin; Oregon archaeology.

Gina L. Barnes, PhD in archaeology and anthropology, University of Michigan, is Professor Emeritus of Japanese Studies, Durham University, Project Affiliate, Earth Sciences, Durham University, and Professorial Research Associate in the Department of History of Art and Archaeology, SOAS University of London. Her Research interests include: archaeology and ancient history of East Asia with a special emphasis on Japan and Korea; state formation in Korea and Japan; ancient Korea-Japan relations; emergence of Yamato kingship; Japanese geology; tectonic archaeology.
NEW: Assessing Iron Age Marsh-Forts With Reference to the Stratigraphy and Palaeoenvironment Surrounding The Berth, North Shropshire by Shelagh Norton. Paperback; 205x290mm; 234 pages; 113 figures, 20 tables (colour throughout). 758 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698633. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698640. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Iron Age marsh-forts are large, monumental structures located in low-lying waterscapes. Although they share chronological and architectural similarities with their hillfort counterparts, their locations suggest that they may have played a specific and alternative role in Iron Age society. Despite the availability of a rich palaeoenvironmental archive at many sites, little is known about these enigmatic structures, and until recently, the only acknowledged candidate was the unusual, dual-enclosure monument at Sutton Common, near Doncaster.

Assessing Iron Age Marsh-Forts considers marsh-forts as a separate phenomenon within Iron Age society through an understanding of their landscape context and palaeoenvironmental development. At the national level, a range of Iron Age wetland monuments has been compared to Sutton Common to generate a gazetteer of potential marsh-forts. At the local level, a multi-disciplinary case-study is presented of the Berth marsh-fort in North Shropshire, incorporating GIS-based landscape modelling and multi-proxy palaeoenvironmental analysis (plant macrofossils, beetles and pollen).

The results of both the gazetteer and the Berth case-study challenge the view that marsh-forts are simply a topographical phenomenon. These substantial Iron Age monuments appear to have been deliberately constructed to control areas of marginal wetland and may have played an important role in the ritual landscape.

About the Author
Shelagh Norton (BA, MPhil, PhD) specialises in the reconstruction of macro-and micro-palaeolandscapes, and in particular, the interpretation of plant macrofossil and coleopteran remains from wetland contexts. Her research is based on the practical application of archaeological principles in a real-world context both in the UK and New Zealand, where she worked as a Regional Archaeologist for Heritage New Zealand. Her publications include The Archaeological and Palaeoenvironmental Potential of the Weald Moors, Shropshire (Transactions of the Shropshire Archaeological and Historical Society, 2016). She is an active member of the Hillfort Studies Group (University of Oxford), Worcestershire Archaeological Society and Worcestershire Archive Services.

Table of Contents
Summary ;
Chapter 1: Assessing Iron Age marsh-forts - an introduction ;
Chapter 2: The British Iron Age, hillforts and marsh-forts - Literature Review ;
Chapter 3: Methodology and Resources ;
Chapter 4: Marsh-forts in a landscape context ;
Chapter 5: North Shropshire’s marsh-forts ;
Chapter 6: The Berth – a marsh-fort in its landscape context ;
Chapter 7: The Berth – stratigraphic sequencing and radiocarbon dating ;
Chapter 8: The Berth – Palaeoenvironmental Reconstruction ;
Chapter 9: Assessing Iron Age marsh-forts – Discussion and Conclusions ;
Bibliography ;
Appendix 1 – Radiocarbon dates ;
Appendix 2 – Samples weights and volumes ;
Appendix 3 – Full species lists
FORTHCOMING: Irish Late Iron Age Equestrian Equipment in its Insular and Continental Context by Rena Maguire. Paperback; 205x290mm; 294pp; 63 figures, 6 tables, 119 plates. Print RRP: £44.00. 802 2021 Queen's University Belfast Irish Archaeological Monograph Series 2. ISBN 9781789699913. Book contents pageBuy Now

Irish Late Iron Age Equestrian Equipment in its Insular and Continental Context is the first practical archaeological study of Irish Iron Age lorinery. The volume examines the bits and bosals (Y-pieces) holistically, using practical stable-yard knowledge merged with archaeological techniques such as morphometrics, use-wear, GIS, functional comparison to European and British equipment and distribution analysis to place it within its time and place. Irish Iron Age artefacts have always been beset by issues of chronology, but by using these various analytical methods, a more precise timeframe for the objects is indicated. A complex relationship with Roman Britain and the Empire also becomes visible, with aspects of identity and belief being expressed through the sophisticated equestrian equipment. The analysis of the bridle components reveal that the Ireland of the first centuries AD shares some characteristics with other boundary zones of the Roman Empire, such as Scotland and northern Germany, but also has its own unique interpretation of introduced technology. The Ireland of the Late Iron Age, then, is a society in flux, picking and choosing which traditions it maintains. The horse and associated equipment were very much at the heart of the social changes set in motion by contact with the Roman Empire, and as such, the examination of the snaffles and bosals allows us to bring the people of the Late Iron Age in Ireland into focus.

About the Author
Rena Maguire studied Archaeology at Queen’s University Belfast, graduating with a BA Hons. in 2013. She was awarded an MSc in 2014 and a PhD in 2018. She has worked for the Historic Environment Division of the Northern Ireland Civil Service, and currently is a visiting Research Fellow at QUB. She has published extensively on ancient equitation and its associated technology and is an enthusiastic horsewoman.
FORTHCOMING: A Quaint & Curious Volume: Essays in Honor of John J. Dobbins edited by Dylan K. Rogers and Claire J. Weiss. Hardback; 174x245mm; 204 pages; 87 figures, 10 tables (colour throughout). Print RRP: £49.00 (Open Access eBook). 801 2021. ISBN 9781789692181. Book contents pageBuy Now

John J. Dobbins, Professor of Roman Art and Archaeology, taught at the University of Virginia in the Department of Art from 1978 until his retirement in 2019. His legacy of research and pedagogy is explored in A Quaint & Curious Volume: Essays in Honor of John J. Dobbins. Professor Dobbins’ research in the field of Roman art and archaeology spans the geographical and chronological limits of the Roman Empire, from Pompeii to Syria, and Etruria to Spain. This volume demonstrates some of his wide-reaching interests, expressed through the research of his former graduate students. Several essays examine the city of Pompeii and cover the topics of masonry analysis, re-examinations of streets and drains, and analyses of the heating capacity of baths in Pompeii. Beyond Pompeii, the archaeological remains of bakeries are employed to elucidate labor specialization in the Late Roman period across the Mediterranean basin. Collaborations between Professor Dobbins and his former students are also explored, including a pioneering online numismatic database and close examination of sculpture and mosaics, including expressions of identity and patronage through case studies of the Ara Pacis and mosaics at Antioch-on-the-Orontes. A Quaint & Curious Volume not only demonstrates John Dobbins’ scholarly legacy, but also presents new readings of archaeological data and art, illustrating the impact that one professor can have on the wider field of Roman art and archaeology through the continuing work of his students.

About the Editors
Dylan K. Rogers, PhD (2015), University of Virginia, is Lecturer of Roman Art and Archaeology at UVa and previously served as the Assistant Director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens from 2015-2019. He is the author of Water Culture in Roman Society (2018), and is the co-editor of the volumes, What’s New in Roman Greece? (2019) and The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Athens (2021). His research specialty is Roman fountains throughout the Roman Empire, investigating their impact on surrounding landscapes through the lens of sensory archaeology. He has also published on the topics of wall-painting in Pompeii, Roman mosaics, the siege of Athens by L. Cornelius Sulla in 86 BC, and archaeological archives. Rogers has worked on archaeological excavations in Pompeii, Sicily, Greece, and Turkey. ;

Claire J. Weiss, PhD (2018), University of Virginia, is a classical archaeologist whose research focuses on Roman urbanism, especially the sidewalks of ancient Roman cities and the relationship of these structures to urban social and economic organization. She has conducted archaeological field work and excavations in Pompeii since 2001, serving as the Assistant Director and Project Coordinator of the Via Consolare Project in Pompeii from 2006 to 2018, and now co-directing the Roman Colonial Urbanism Project.
FORTHCOMING: The Shipwreck of Gnalić A mirror to the Renaissance world by Irena Radić Rossi, Mariangela Nicolardi, Mauro Bondioli and Katarina Batur. Paperback; 176x250mm; 182pp; 189 figures (colour throughout). Print RRP: £30.00. 800 2021. ISBN 9781803271507. Book contents pageBuy Now

Unlike official history, which takes long and impersonal strides through the past, The Shipwreck of Gnalić describes individual human destinies that convey the story of the late Renaissance period throughout Europe and the Mediterranean as uncovered at the site of the shipwreck. Transiting the permanent route between Venice and Constantinople, the ship Gagliana grossa, formerly known as Lezza, Moceniga e Basadonna, symbolically connected two apparently opposing, yet tightly interwoven worlds. The stunning objects that spent four centuries at the bottom of the sea briefly made the Gnalić shipwreck famous in the 1960s and 1970s, but only in recent years has the scholarly community finally started collecting all the available information hidden in museum collections, at the shipwreck site, and in the archives. After many years of effort by the authors of this publication, the University of Zadar restarted the research in 2012 thanks to the support of many domestic and foreign institutions and organisations that, through their participation, continue to contribute to the successful realisation of project activities. The reconstruction of ancient events was successfully started by Astone Gasparetto in the 1970s. After a long pause, the painstaking work was undertaken by Mauro Bondioli, who, through dedicated archival work at the State Archives in Venice, discovered hundreds of documents and pieced them together into a multi-layered historical story, which is summarised in the second part of the book.

About the Authors
Irena Radić Rossi graduated from the Department of Archaeology of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences of the University of Zagreb in 1988, and in the same year obtained the permanent position in the Department of Archaeology of the Republic Institute for the Protection of Cultural Monuments in Zagreb. In 2009 she moved to the University of Zadar. She is associated researcher of the Centre Camille Jullian (Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS), adjunct professor at Texas A&M University, and affiliated scholar of the Institute of Nautical Archaeology. Her main research interests focus on maritime cultural heritage, with special emphasis on the technological development of the Adriatic shipbuilding and seafaring. ;

FORTHCOMING: Architectures néolithiques de l’île d’Yeu (Vendée) edited by Audrey Blanchard, Serge Cassen and Jean-Noël Guyodo. Paperback; 205x290mm; 294pp; 196 figures, 29 tables (colour throughout). Print RRP: £52.00. 798 2021. ISBN 9781789695793. Book contents pageBuy Now

Architectures néolithiques de l’île d’Yeu (Vendée) gathers documentation, unpublished material and the principal results of studies, prospections, excavations and surveys carried out on domestic settlements, funeral monuments, quarries and symbolic sites. Situated off the Atlantic coast of the Vendée (France), the Isle of Yeu has been occupied since Prehistory. Domestic, industrial, funerary or symbolic sites dating from the Neolithic are numerous. Their state of conservation is exceptional, with much of the stone-built architecture preserved above ground. This is notably so for the walled enclosures of the fourth millennium BC, which have been the subject of several research programs since 2010.

The initial chapters propose an inventory of the mineral resources as well as the main forms of exploitation, supply strategies and uses of stones. The main part of the volume is dedicated to the excavation of the two principal walled enclosures dating from the late Neolithic, the Pointe de la Tranche and Ker Daniaud. The emphasis is on the architecture of these promontory forts that directly open to the Ocean but whose occupation seems not to have been permanent. Finally, the surveys (plan, photogrammetry, microtopography) and the digital modelling of the megalithic burials of the Tabernaudes, the Plauche a Puare and the Petits Fradets allow a three-dimensional reconstruction of Neolithic funerary architectures. For the rocks marked by cupules, the current concentration of which is one of the most important (more than 120 sites), a first analysis of the corpus of signs is proposed, although their dating remains uncertain.

This contribution allows us to open a window on the material and imaginary worlds of one population from the end of Prehistory, through the analysis of their testimonies and expressions, physical and symbolic, revealing a people settled - and not trapped - in a restricted territory beaten by the winds and surrounded by the waves. Audrey Blanchard obtained her doctorate from the University of Rennes 1, and is an associate member of UMR 6566, CReAAH (LARA laboratory). A specialist in lithic and ceramic production, her research focuses mainly on coastal and island settlements and Neolithic domestic architecture ;

Serge Cassen obtained his doctorate in Anthropology, Ethnology and Prehistory in 1986 from the University of Paris-Sorbonne under the supervision of G. Bailloud, his thesis focusing on Neolithic societies of the 4th millennium BC between Loire and Gironde. Upon joining the CNRS in 1991, he devoted himself to the study of the funerary and other megalithic monuments of western France, in particular through their ancient engravings and through their social valorisation. ;

Jean-Noël Guyodo is Lecturer in Prehistory at the University of Nantes and director of the LARA laboratory (UMR6566 CReAAH). A specialist in lithic technology and stone architecture, he has directed numerous excavations on Neolithic settlement sites in western France. His research focuses more broadly on the first agro-pastoral societies on the Atlantic coast of Europe.

en français
Au large des côtes atlantiques vendéennes (France), l’île d’Yeu est un territoire occupé depuis la Préhistoire. Les sites à vocations domestiques, artisanales, funéraires ou encore symboliques datés du Néolithique sont nombreux. Leur état de conservation est exceptionnel car les architectures bâties en pierre sont préservées en élévation pour beaucoup d’entre eux. C’est le cas, par exemple, sur les habitats du IVème millénaire avant J.-C., qui ont fait l’objet de plusieurs programmes de recherche depuis 2010.

Cet ouvrage regroupe la documentation, les informations inédites et les principaux résultats des études, prospections, fouilles et relevés réalisés sur les habitats, les monuments funéraires, les carrières et les sites symboliques. Les premiers travaux t
FORTHCOMING: The Early Iron Age Metal Hoard from the Al Khawd Area (Sultan Qaboos University) Sultanate of Oman by Nasser S. Al-Jahwari, Paul A. Yule, Khaled A. Douglas, Bernhard Pracejus, Mohammed A. Al-Belushi, Ali T. ElMahi. Paperback; 210x297mm; 334 pages; 98 figures, 30 tables, 18 plates (colour throughout). Print RRP: £58.00. 797 2021 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 7. ISBN 9781803270821. Book contents pageBuy Now

Numerous metallic artefacts, which anciently were deposited in a hoard, came to light per chance on the campus of the Sultan Qaboos University in Al Khawd, Sultanate of Oman. Mostly fashioned from copper, these arrowheads, axes/adzes, bangles, daggers, knives, socketed lance/ spearheads, metal vessels, razors, rings, swords, and tweezers compare well with numerous documented artefact classes from south-eastern Arabia assigned to the Early Iron Age (1200–300 BCE). Discussion of the international trade between ancient Makan, Dilmun, and Mesopotamia during the 3rd millennium BCE dominates the archaeological literature about Arabia archaeology. The Al Khawd hoard and its contemporaries lend weight to the suggestion that 1st millennium BCE Qadē (the name of south-eastern Arabia at that time) was even more important than Bronze Age Makan in terms of the copper trade volume. A reassessment shows the Early Iron Age by no means to be a dark age, but rather an innovative, successful adaptive period characterised by evident population growth.

About the Authors
Nasser S. Al-Jahwari, Full Professor at Sultan Qaboos University, is a specialist in landscape archaeology, settlement patterns, and quantification in archaeology. He has directed several archaeological projects and intensively published in scientific journals. He is a also heritage expert for ICOMOS and UNESCO, and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Oman Studies. ;

Paul A. Yule, since 1986 has conducted fieldwork in the Sultanate of Oman, Zafar in Yemen, Orissa in India, and Tigrey in Ethiopia. His most important work focuses on Arabia in the first half of the 1st millennium CE. Editor and referee for different institutes and periodicals, he is an active author, draughtsman and cartographer. ;

Khaled A. Douglas, PhD from Tübingen University in 1998, he is now Associate Professor at the Department of Archaeology of Sultan Qaboos University, Oman, and the Hashemite University, Jordan. Interested in the Bronze and Iron Age archaeology of south-east Arabia and southern Levant, he directed and co-directed several excavations in Oman and Jordan. ;

Bernhard Pracejus, PhD (Adelaide University), Habilitation, (Free University Berlin), Associate Professor (Sultan Qaboos University, Oman). His research concentrated on economic geology (modern VMS deposits, precious opal, coltan, uranium, clays), geochemistry, and more recently on metal recycling from mine wastes and the examination of ancient copper slags in Oman. ;

Mohammed Ali K. Al-Belushi, MA from the University of Liverpool and a PhD from the University of Birmingham, UK, is now Associate Professor at the Archaeology Department of the Sultan Qaboos University, Oman. He is also a former Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Oman Studies. ;

Ali Tigani ElMahi, PhD from the University of Bergen, Norway, focuses his research interests on archaeology and statistics, anthropology, animal osteology and behaviour, ecology, wildlife, and zoogeography. ElMahi has an intensive field experience in Sudan, Norway, and Oman, where he has conducted several archaeological and ethnoarchaeological studies.
FORTHCOMING: Man and Bird in the Palaeolithic of Western Europe Paperback; 205x290mm; 160 pages; 82 figures, 28 tables (colour throughout) by Anne Eastham. Paperback; 205x290mm; 160 pages; 82 figures, 28 tables (colour throughout). Print RRP: £30.00. 795 2021. ISBN 9781789699098. Book contents pageBuy Now

Man and Bird in the Palaeolithic of Western Europe considers the nature of the interaction between birds and hunter-gatherers. It examines aspects of avian behaviour and the qualities that could be (and were) targeted at different periods by hunter-gatherers, who recognised the utility of the diversity of avian groups in various applications of daily life and thought. It is clear from the records of excavated sites in western Europe that during the evolution of both the Neanderthal period and the subsequent occupations of Homo sapiens, avian demographics fluctuated with the climate along with other aspects of both flora and fauna. Each was required to adapt to these changes. The present study considers these changes through the interactions of man and bird as evidenced in the remains attached to Middle and Upper Palaeolithic occupation sites in western Europe and touches on a variety of prey/predator relationships across other groups of plant and animal species. The book describes a range of procurement strategies that are known from the literature and artistic record of later cultures to have been used in the trapping, enticement and hunting of birds for consumption and the manufacture of weapons, domestic items, clothing, ceremony and cultural activities. It also explores how bird images and depictions engraved or painted on the walls of caves or on the objects of daily use during the Upper Palaeolithic may be perceived as communications of a more profound significance for the temporal, seasonal or social life of the members of the group than the simple concept of animal. Certain bird species have at different times held a special significance in the everyday consciousness of particular peoples and a group of Late Glacial, Magdalenian settlements in Aquitaine, France, appear to be an example of such specialised culling. A case study of the treatment of snowy owl at Arancou in the Atlantic Pyrenees seems to illustrate such a specialisation. Discussion of the problems of reconciling dating and research methods, of the last two hundred years of Palaeolithic research, and of possible directions for future research offer an open conclusion to the work.

About the Author
At the age of seven Anne Eastham’s questions regarding the behaviour of the local avifauna drove her parents to purchase the five volumes of Witherby on British birds, while a Victorian rubbish heap invited excavation. Both predilections persisted. Post London University, she continued research into the identification, physical, cultural and habitat interpretation of avian assemblages from archaeological sites. This was financed through teaching, with students ranging from Special Needs Primary to Post-graduates. Her published reports cover sites in Britain, Europe and the Near East, dated to medieval, Roman and Prehistoric eras, particularly the Palaeolithic.
FORTHCOMING: Historiographie de préhistoriens et de protohistoriens français du XX° siècle Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 19, Session VII-5 edited by François Djindjian. Paperback; 205x290mm; 140 pages; 73 figures. French text. Print RRP: £29.00. 794 2021. ISBN 9781803271385. Book contents pageBuy Now

In France, the post-World War II period corresponds to a second golden age of prehistory and protohistory, thanks to the development of the CNRS and the creation of the first university chairs. This volume presents the biographies of a wide selection of French archaeologists whose scientific work has particularly marked this period.

Le XVIII° congrès mondial de l’UISPP, qui s’est déroulé à Paris, en juin 2018, a étél’occasion de rendre hommage à plusieurs préhistoriens et protohistoriens, qui ont fontl’objet de communications orales dans une session spéciale du congrès, la session VII-5,et qui sont publiées dans ce volume. En France, la période de l’après deuxième guerremondiale correspond à un deuxième âge d’or de la préhistoire et de la protohistoire,grâce au développement du CNRS et de la création des premières chaires universitaires.Historiographie de préhistoriens et de protohistoriens français du XX° siècle présente lesbiographies d’une sélection étendue d’archéologues français dont l’oeuvre scientifique aparticulièrement marqué cette période.

François Djindjian, professeur honoraire à l’Université de Paris 1 Panthéon Sorbonne, estun spécialiste de la théorie et des méthodes de l’archéologie et du paléolithique supérieureuropéen. Il est l’actuel président de l’Union Internationale des Sciences préhistoriques etprotohistoriques.
FORTHCOMING: Use of Space and Domestic Areas: Functional Organisation and Social Strategies Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 18, Session XXXII-1 edited by Luc Jallot and Alessandro Peinetti. Paperback; 205x290mm; 150 pages; 73 figures, 4 tables (colour throughout). Papers in English, abstracts in French and English. Print RRP: £30.00. 793 2021. ISBN 9781803271361. Book contents pageBuy Now

Use of Space and Domestic Areas: Functional Organisation and Social Strategies presents the papers from Session XXXII-1 of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). The organization of inhabited space is the direct expression of the deep integration of societies with their cultural and natural environment. According to the distribution and the patterning of activities, the organization of human communities and the role of their actors can be brought to light. The various contributions in this volume show the progress of research in terms of understanding the use of space on different scales, from the household to the village, focusing on Neolithic and Bronze Age contexts. Each of the contributions shows the diversity of issues concerning the interpretation of the living spaces, and the diversity of approaches carried out to answer them.

About the Editors
Luc Jallot, archaeologist, is Maître de conférences at the University Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3 (UMR 5140 « Archéologie des Sociétés méditerranéennes »). His researches focus on settlement organisation and dynamics, on material culture, on anthropomorphic art and on the relationship between societies and environment at the end of the Neolithic in Southern France. Since the end of the 1990s he has been involved in several research projects on Neolithic earthen architecture. He has also worked in Eastern Africa and, more recently, on Neolithic and Copper Age contexts in Morocco. ;

Alessandro Peinetti, geoarchaeologist, PhD (University Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, UMR 5140 « Archéologie des Sociétés méditerranéennes », Università di Bologna) is an independent researcher. His researches focus on the formation processes of the archaeological record, on the built environment, on earthen architecture and on the organisation of settlements and activity areas documented by the analysis of soils and archeological sediments through micromorphology. He is especially involved in research into Neolithic and Bronze Age villages in Italy and Southern France.
FORTHCOMING: Arab Music: A Survey of Its History and Its Modern Practice by Leo Plenckers. Paperback; 174x245mm; 212 pages; 55 figures. Print RRP: £32.00. 792 2021. ISBN 9781789699326. Buy Now

Arab Music: A survey of its history and modern practice is primarily meant for the general Western reader with some basic knowledge of music and music notation. It aims at correcting the still prevalent romantic image of Arab music, spread in the 19th century, as exotic and typified by long, plaintive and erotic sounding melodic lines and inciting rhythms. It offers the reader a comprehensive survey of the history and the development of Arab music and musical theory from its pre-Islamic roots until 1970, as well as a discussion of the major genres and forms practiced today, such as the Egyptian gīl, the Algerian raï and Palestinian hip hop. Other topics touched upon are musical instruments and folk music. The analysis of each genre is accompanied by a complete musical notation of an exemplary composition or improvisation, including lyrics and translation.

About the Author
Leo Plenckers’ chief specialisations are music theory and ethnomusicology. He obtained his doctorate with a dissertation on the Algerian classical nawba tradition and published articles about various aspects of Arab music and music theory. Until his retirement he worked at the Musicological Institute of the Amsterdam University.