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The World of Disney: From Antiquarianism to Archaeology by David W. J. Gill. Paperback; 156x234mm; 154 pages; 44 figures. 700 2020 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698275. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698282. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Dr John Disney (1779-1857) was the benefactor of the first chair in archaeology at a British university. He also donated his major collection to the University of Cambridge. The sculptures continue to be displayed in the Fitzwilliam Museum.

The Disney family traced its origins back to the Norman invasion of England, and the family home was at Norton Disney in Lincolnshire. Disney’s father, the Reverend John Disney DD (1746-1816) left the Church of England to become a minister at the Unitarian Essex Street Chapel in London. A major sponsor of the chapel was Thomas Brand-Hollis of The Hyde, Essex, who bequeathed the house and his Grand Tour collection (formed with Thomas Hollis) on his death in 1804 to the Reverend John Disney. Disney inherited part of the classical collection of his uncle and father-in-law Lewis Disney-Ffytche, owner of the 18th century pleasure gardens, Le Désert de Retz, outside Paris. Disney’s brother-in-law was Sir William Hillary, founder of the RNLI. Disney was instrumental in the creation of the Chelmsford Museum through the Chelmsford Philosophical Society, and the formation of the Essex Archaeological Society.

About the Author
Professor David Gill is Honorary Professor in the Centre for Heritage at the University of Kent, and Academic Associate in the Centre for Archaeology and Heritage in the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures at the University of East Anglia (UEA). He is a Fellow of the RSA and the Society of Antiquaries. In 2012 he received the Outstanding Public Service Award from the Archaeological Institute of America for his research on cultural property.

Reviews
'This volume sits somewhat uncomfortably in a series devoted to Archaeological Lives. It concerns the family history of John Disney (1779–1857), who inherited a very important collection of antiquities, some of which he gave to Cambridge University, where he went on to found the premier chair of archaeology in Britain.'—Martin Henig, Journal of the History of Collections, June 2021
Travelling the Korosko Road: Archaeological Exploration in Sudan’s Eastern Desert edited by W. Vivian Davies and Derek A. Welsby. Hardback; 205x290mm; 252 pages; 493 plates, 74 figures (colour throughout). 688 2020 Sudan Archaeological Research Society Publication 24. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698039. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698046. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume publishes accounts of archaeological exploration carried out during the last 30 years or so in the Sudanese Eastern Desert. It is divided into two related parts.

The first and foremost covers results from the work of the Centro Ricerche sul Deserto Orientale (CeRDO), which is based at Varese in northern Italy. Between 1989 and 2006, CeRDO, directed by the brothers Alfredo and Angelo Castiglioni, ran a pioneering programme of expeditions, which traversed the so-called ‘Korosko Road’ (the main desert route connecting Egypt and Sudan) and followed multiple other tracks throughout the Eastern Desert. They encountered in the process a rich archaeological landscape, hundreds of previously undocumented sites, many frequented over millennia, prominent among them gold-production areas and their associated settlements. The CeRDO record, the photographic database, the material retrieved, to which several of the papers published here are devoted, are now all the more valuable, in that many of these sites have since been badly disturbed and some entirely destroyed by recent goldmining activities.

The second part, introduced by a concise account of the historical usage of the Korosko Road, reports in full on a single, short season of documentation, organized in 2013 under the auspices, and with the support, of the Sudan Archaeological Research Society. Its main aim was detailed recording of a group of pharaonic rock-inscriptions discovered by CeRDO expeditions, most located along the Korosko Road and almost all related to the colonial gold-working industry. The project included also a degree of investigation and mapping of the wider context, as well as the recording and study of associated archaeological material, in particular of ceramic remains. The results complement and usefully extend in part those of CeRDO.

Reviews:
'The Korosko Road serves as the main route through the desert between Egypt and the Sudan. The present volume covers the archeological exploration carried out in the region over the past 30 years in a series of essays by several scholars. The first part explores and documents the region between 1989 and 2006. There are chapters on the archeological remains, pottery finds and on the gold mines—the main reason for colonial penetration into this region otherwise inhospitable to Europeans. The second part of the book, the fruit of a brief season in 2013 by the Sudan Archeologist Research Society, opens with a useful summary of travelers to the region going back to antiquity. The aim is to consolidate the previous survey and document the more than 40 hieroglyphic inscriptions found in the region. The book is beautifully produced with full and detailed academic records of all finds. The hundreds of excellent photographs are of importance, since the recent informal reopening of many mines has led to much looting of archeological sites.'—Caroline Stone, AramcoWorld, May 2021
Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 5 2020 edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). DOI: 10.32028/9781789697926. Paperback; 205x290mm; 652 pages; colour throughout. 5 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697926. £60.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697933. £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Volume 5 is perhaps the richest and most diverse volume of the Journal of Greek Archaeology so far offered to readers. The editors have kept to the journal's core brief to cover all the major periods of Greek Archaeology in a literal sense, with articles from the Neolithic through Greco-Roman times and the Middle Ages and up to the 19th century AD. Geographically, papers range from Sicily through the Aegean to Turkey.

A major novelty is the inclusion of two Colloquia, one on the economics of Greek Protohistoric to Archaic ‘colonisation’ edited by Lieve Donnellan, the second on Byzantine landscape archaeology edited by Effie Athanassopoulos.

Alongside a wealth of period-based papers on settlements, ceramics, lithics and urban infrastructure, the volume also presents a major report on the nature and future of surface survey in Mediterranean lands, a group article – the fruit of some twenty years of twice-yearly conferences by the International Mediterranean Survey Workshop community.

The review section also ranges through prehistory to the recent past, including the historiography of research which includes and extensive and enlightening (but disturbing) review article by Margriet Haagsma on discrimination against female scholars in early 20th century Classical Archaeology.

‘Blood Is Thicker Than Water’ – Non-Royal Consanguineous Marriage in Ancient Egypt An Exploration of Economic and Biological Outcomes by Joanne-Marie Robinson. Paperback; 175x245mm; 246 pages; 21 figures, 14 tables (11 colour pages). 646 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 29. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695434. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695441. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Discussions on consanguineous marriage within Egyptology usually focus on brother-sister marriages recorded in census returns from Roman Egypt, or royal sibling marriages amongst the ruling Ptolemies. However, no wide-ranging review exists of non-royal consanguineous marriage in ancient Egypt despite the economic and biological implications of such relationships. This is the first time that evidence for nonroyal consanguineous marriage in ancient Egypt has been collated from select sources spanning the Middle Kingdom to the Roman Period and a method created to investigate the potential economic and biological outcomes of these unions, particularly beyond the level of sibling and half-sibling unions. The working definition of consanguineous marriage used throughout this study is that used by clinical geneticists: unions contracted between cousins biologically related as second cousins or closer biological kin. This research argues that for some families, and under certain conditions, consanguineous marriage was a preferred economic strategy in terms of gifts given at marriage and in inheritance, and that families who married consanguineously may have received greater levels of intra-familial support without the expectation of reciprocity. Although there may have been adverse biological outcomes arising from congenital anomalies and genetic disorders in the offspring of consanguineous marriages, the research suggests that it is unlikely that these physical or cognitive disorders were distinguished from other medical disorders in the general health environment of ancient Egypt. The investigation focuses primarily on ancient Egyptian documentary and archaeological sources, including human remains, and is informed by research on consanguinity from a range of disciplines including anthropology, demography, economics and pathology.

About the Author
Joanne-Marie Robinson is a Visiting Scholar at the KNH Centre for Biomedical Egyptology at the University of Manchester. She has a research interest in non-royal consanguineous marriage in ancient Egypt and the Eastern Mediterranean, and the socio-cultural and religious factors that influence this choice of marriage partner. Her work also considers the potential biological outcomes of consanguineous marriage and investigates the reception to congenital physical and cognitive anomalies in ancient Egypt. This book presents the outcomes of a research project. The author holds a PhD in Egyptology and has worked as a lecturer, writer and advisor for television and radio programmes focusing on religion and history.
Henry Hunter Calvert’s Collection of Amphora Stamps and that of Sidney Smith Saunders by Alan Johnston. Paperback; 175x245mm; 118 pages; illustrated catalogue, 5 plates. 634 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696431. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696448. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Henry Hunter Calvert died at his family house at Çannakale in 1880 a few months after escaping from the rioting in Alexandria where he was British consul. The consulate was sacked and his collections destroyed. He had however sent an annotated list of his Greek amphora stamps to the British Museum, presumably to Charles Newton, with whom he and his brother Frank had frequent correspondence. This list was forgotten until the present writer ‘found’ it in a box-file in the Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities (its title at the time). Henry Hunter Calvert’s Collection of Amphora Stamps and that of Sidney Smith Saunders publicly presents that material.

About the Author
Alan Johnston is Emeritus Reader in Classical Archaeology at University College London. He has published widely on Greek archaeology, notably ceramics and epigraphy, having contributed to excavation reports from Aigina, Antikythera, Gravisca, Kition, Kommos and Kythera. Recently he has been working at the British Museum with the Naukratis Project team and on a catalogue of amphora stamps in the collection, and this publication is an offshoot of that work.

Table of Contents
Introduction ;

Catalogue ;
Baetica ;
Brindisi ;
Thasos ;
Chios ;
Kos ;
Knidos ;
Rhodes ;
Pamphylia ;
Egypt ;

Comment ;
Kos and Knidos ;
Rhodes ;
Unprovenanced ;

Index of names ;
Rhodian seconday stamps ;

Symbols (Rhodian unless otherwise stated) ;

Plates ;

Bibliography
Early Neolithic, Iron Age and Roman settlement at Monksmoor Farm, Daventry, Northamptonshire by Tracy Preece. Paperback; viii+82 pages; 53 figures, 27 tables (36 plates presented in full colour). 544 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692105. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692112. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Includes contributions from Rob Atkins, Andy Chapman, Mary Ellen Crothers, Val Fryer, Rebecca Gordon, Tora Hylton, Rob Perrin and Yvonne Wolframm-Murray; illustrations by Olly Dindol and Rob Reed.

MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) has undertaken archaeological work at Monksmoor Farm on the north-eastern edge of Daventry in six different areas. The earliest archaeological features lay in Area 6 at the southern end of the development area, where two pits were radiocarbon dated to the early Neolithic. They contained a moderate assemblage of worked flints along with sherds of early Neolithic pottery. In the middle Iron Age a settlement was established in the same location comprising a roundhouse and several enclosures.

Two other contemporary settlements are thought to have originated in the late Iron Age/ early 1st century BC and were identified in Areas 1 and 2 between c0.2km and 0.5km apart and 500m to the north of Area 6. Area 1 contained evidence for a cluster of eight roundhouses with associated enclosures clearly showing sequential activity, while in Area 2, a large ditched enclosure defined as a Wootton Hill type, within which another roundhouse was present. It is possible that the Wootton Hill type enclosure in particular may have a slighter earlier origin than the limited pottery assemblage suggests. Sparse early Roman features were also found in Areas 3, 4 and 5.

This settlement continued in use through the later 1st to 2nd century AD. During the early Roman period the settlement in Area 6 was greatly expanded with large rectilinear ditched enclosures along with smaller enclosures and paddocks being established on either side of a routeway indicating movement of livestock was important.
The Classification of Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age Copper and Bronze Axe-heads from Southern Britain by Stuart Needham. 74 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 3 plates in colour. 43 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917401. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917418. Download Full PDF   Buy Now

This work presents a comprehensive classification of the morphology of early metal age axe-heads, chisels and stakes from southern Britain. It is illustrated by a type series of 120 representative examples.

Despite their relative simplicity, flat and early flanged axes from Britain and Ireland show considerable diversity in form. The main variation lies in outline shapes and the classification scheme arrived at therefore depends on careful evaluation of condition, followed by rigorous analysis of shape using metrical ratios. This ensures objectivity in both the formulation of the scheme and future object attributions, for which guidelines are given. Comparative material in northern Britain and Ireland is systematically referred to and a few crucial Continental parallels noted. Hoards and other associated finds, essential in underpinning the chronology, are cited throughout.

The style sequence outlined spans nine centuries of evolution, a regional trajectory which was nevertheless inextricably tied to axe developments in northern Britain, Ireland and, to a lesser extent, the near Continent. While technological advance is apparent at the broad scale, this was not the sole driver of the style changes taking place.

The study will be indispensable for those researching early metalwork, those concerned with European Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age cultures and those interested in patterns of style-cum-technological development.

About the Author
Stuart Needham specialised in metalwork in his early career and has since diversified to cover many aspects of the Chalcolithic and Bronze Age of north-west Europe, involving themes such as deposition practices, metal circulation systems, periodisation, life- and refuse-cycles of material culture, exchange systems, maritime interactions and alluvial archaeology. Further publications have emanated from excavations at Runnymede Bridge and Ringlemere. A curator at the British Museum for thirty years before becoming an independent researcher, he co-founded the Bronze Age Forum in 1999 and delivered the Rhind lectures for the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland in 2011. He is currently Research Director of the People of the Heath project investigating Early Bronze Age barrows in the Rother Valley of East Hampshire and West Sussex.

Athens and Attica: Journal of a Residence there by Christopher Wordsworth. A revised edition with additional material. First published in 1836. Edited by Gerald Brisch. Paperback, 274 pages, 2 maps, 3 plates. 2004. 3rdguides 40 2004 3rdGuides - Archaeopress Travel 1. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9780953992331. £15.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £15.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Buy Now

Christopher Wordsworth (1807-85), the “Great Christopher” of Winchester and Trinity College, Cambridge, was a nephew of William the poet, and brother to the student who launched the University Boat Race. In 1832 he took a gap-year, after his brilliant studies in ancient Greek and Latin classics, to travel back in time over two thousand years to Pericles’ Athens. The account of his tour, Athens and Attica (1836), is still the perfect scholarly companion to the history, topography, and myths of an area compact in dimension yet vast in terms of its contribution to Western civilization. “The Bazaar or Market at Athens is a long street. Looking up you command a view of the commodities. Barrels of black caviar, small pocket-looking-glasses in red pasteboard cases, onions, tobacco piled up in brown heaps, black olives, figs strung together upon a rush, pipes with amber mouthpieces and brown clay bowls, silver-chased pistols, dirks, belts, and embroidered waistcoats. Such is the present state of Athens…a few Turks still doze in the archways of the Acropolis, or recline while smoking their pipes, and leaning with their backs against the rusty cannon. A few days ago the cannon of the Acropolis fired the signal of the conclusion of the Turkish Ramazam – the last which will ever be celebrated in Athens.” – Christopher Wordsworth, 1832
The Hellenistic gymnasia of Cyprus and Ptolemaic propaganda Journal of Greek Archaeology 5 (2020): 309–326 by Dorothea Stavrou. DOI: 10.32028/9781789697926-11.ISBN 9781789697926-11. Buy Now

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