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Archaeopress: Publishing Scholarly Archaeology since 1997
Communicating the research of thousands of archaeologists worldwide.

Archaeopress is an Oxford-based publisher specialising in scholarly books and journals in the field of archaeology and related heritage subjects.
 
 
NEW: The Ovoid Amphorae in the Central and Western Mediterranean Between the last two centuries of the Republic and the early days of the Roman Empire edited by Enrique García Vargas, Rui Roberto de Almeida, Horacio González Cesteros and Antonio Sáez Romero. Paperback; 210x297mm; xii+414 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (65 pages in colour). 572 2019 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 13. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692969. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692976. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The production of amphorae and the export of commodities transported in them was a key activity for the Mediterranean world in Antiquity. Consequently, their study is of enormous value for analysing the agricultural and fishing economy, and also the commercial mechanism of that period. Through the typological and chronological analysis of these ceramic containers, a high degree of knowledge has been achieved, especially for the production of the different Mediterranean societies from the second millennium BC to the Middle Ages.

In The Ovoid Amphorae in the Central and Western Mediterranean between the last two centuries of the Republic and the early days of the Roman Empire, several series of amphorae created in the Late Republican Roman period (2nd and 1st centuries BC) have been studied – a group of material until now little studied. All of these groups of containers share a common feature in the shape of their bodies which is generally ovoid. The fact that they were conceived and developed in the economic and political context in which Rome expanded throughout the Mediterranean, transferring to its new territories its production and commercialization procedures, bears witness to the almost total integration of the Mediterranean markets.

This publication is based on the proceedings of the workshop held at Seville University in December 2015. The book brings together contributions on the main production areas of these ovoid amphorae from the Atlantic to the Greek mainland / North Peloponnese, analysing in detail the origins, evolution and disappearance of their main series. It also includes case studies that are particularly relevant in relation to their distribution, consumption patterns, contents and relationship with other groups of amphorae manufactured in the Roman Imperial era. The aim of this publication has been to present an updated and complete synthesis of the so-called ovoid amphorae, from an interdisciplinary, international and diachronic standpoint.

About the Editors
Enrique García Vargas (PhD History, University of Seville) is Lecturer at the University of Seville. Currently, he co-leads the Tomares Treasure Project, on a huge coin hoard buried near Seville during the first decades of the 4th century AD.

Rui Roberto de Almeida holds a Master’s degree in Archaeology and is currently developing his PhD research and thesis on maritime food trade from the Guadalquivir valley to Lusitania during the Roman era (I century BC - VI AD)’.

Horacio González Cesteros (PhD Archaeology, University of Tarragona and the Catalan Archaeological Institute) is a member of the research staff of the Austrian Archaeological Institute.

Antonio Sáez Romero (PhD Archaeology, University of Cadiz) is Assistant Professor at the University of Seville (Spain) and has been part or directed several research projects in Gibraltar, Portugal, Morocco, Italy and Greece.
NEW: Maritime-Related Cults in the Coastal Cities of Philistia during the Roman Period Legacy and Change by Simona Rodan. Paperback; 175x245mm; ii+212 pages; 40 figures (26 pages in colour). 571 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 60. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692563. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692570. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Maritime-Related Cults in the Coastal Cities of Philistia during the Roman Period questions the origins and the traditions of the cultic rites practised during Roman times along the southern shores of the Land of Israel. This area was known since biblical times as ‘Peleshet’ (Philistia), after the name of one of the Sea Peoples that had settled there at the beginning of the Iron Age. Philistia’s important cities Jaffa, Ashkelon, Gaza and Rafiah were culturally and religiously integrated into the Graeco-Roman world. At the same time, each city developed its own original and unique group of myths and cults that had their roots in earlier periods. Their emergence and formation were influenced by environmental conditions as well as by ethno-social structures and political circumstances. Philistia’s port cities served as crossroads for the routes connecting the main centres of culture and commerce in ancient times. Most of their cults were closely associated with the sea, and reflect the existential dependency of the inhabitants on the sea that supplied them with sustenance and livelihood and was regarded as a divine beneficent power. The myths also echo the lives of the sailors, their beliefs and fears derived from encountering the dangers of the sea: storms, floods, reefs and giant fish portrayed as monsters. The population of the cities was of mixed and varied ethnic and cultural origins. This was the result of the waves of conquests and migrations over the ages, yet each city was noted for its unique ethnic components. The book also deals with the political circumstances, which had a decisive impact on the formation of religious life and cultic rites in all four cities. It sheds new light to the understanding of the events and historical processes in the region.

About the Author
Simona Rodan is a historian whose field of research are the beliefs, customs and cultic practices in the ancient Mediterranean world, and their reflection in literature and art from the ancient period to the modern times. She holds a PhD in Maritime Civilizations from the University of Haifa. Rodan is the author of The Goddess of Luck, the City and the Sea: The Cult of Tyche and Fortuna in the Coastal Cities of Eretz Israel (2014) (in Hebrew) and Aegean Mercenaries in Light of the Bible: Clash of Cultures in the Story of David and Goliath (2015).
NEW: Experimental Archaeology: Making, Understanding, Story-telling Proceedings of a Workshop in Experimental Archaeology: Irish Institute of Hellenic Studies at Athens with UCD Centre for Experimental Archaeology and Material Culture, Dublin (Athens, 14th-15th October 2017) edited by Christina Souyoudzoglou-Haywood and Aidan O'Sullivan. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+106 pages; 96 figures, 1 table (59 pages in colour). (Print RRP £28.00). 570 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693195. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693201. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Experimental Archaeology: Making, Understanding, Story-telling is based on the proceedings of a two-day workshop on experimental archaeology at the Irish Institute of Hellenic Studies at Athens in 2017, in collaboration with UCD Centre for Experimental Archaeology and Material Culture. Scholars, artists and craftspeople explore how people in the past made things, used and discarded them, from prehistory to the Middle Ages. The papers include discussions of the experimental archaeological reconstruction and likely past experience of medieval houses, and also about how people cast medieval bronze brooches, or sharpened Bronze Age swords, made gold ornaments, or produced fresco wall paintings using their knowledge, skills and practices. The production of ceramics is explored through a description of the links between Neolithic pottery and textiles, through the building and testing of a Bronze Age Cretan pottery kiln, and through the replication and experience of Minoan figurines. The papers in this volume show that experimental archaeology can be about making, understanding, and storytelling about the past, in the present.

Aidan O’Sullivan is a Professor of Archaeology at University College Dublin, Ireland. He is Director of the UCD Centre for Experimental Archaeology and Material Culture and established the School of Archaeology’s MSc in Experimental Archaeology and Material Culture in 2016. His research interests focus on early medieval Ireland, AD 400-1100, in its northwest European context; Experimental Archaeology and Material Culture studies; and Wetland Archaeology and Environments globally. He is the author and co-author of 13 books, including Early Medieval Ireland, AD 400-1100. The evidence from archaeological excavations (Royal Irish Academy, 2013) and co-edited The Oxford Handbook of Wetland Archaeology (Oxford University Press, 2012).

Christina Souyoudzoglou-Haywood is Director of the Irish Institute of Hellenic Studies at Athens (IIHSA) and Adjunct Lecturer in the School of Classics, University College Dublin. Her main research area is the Late Bronze Age of Greece, particularly the western periphery of the Mycenaean world, focusing on the Ionian island of Kephalonia, where she has been conducting a diachronic fieldwalking survey since 2003. For many years Curator of the Classical Museum, UCD, she has published on its history and contents as well as on Greek and Cypriot antiquities in other Irish museum and university collections.
NEW: Historic Landscapes and Mental Well-being edited by Timothy Darvill, Kerry Barrass, Laura Drysdale, Vanessa Heaslip and Yvette Staelens. Paperback; xx+282 pages; 70 figures, 7 tables (75 pages in colour). 569 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692686. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692693. Book contents pageDownload

Using archaeological sites and historic landscapes to promote mental health well-being represents one of the most significant advances in archaeological resource management for many years. Its potential contribution to health-care and wellness initiatives is boundless. Prompted by the Human Henge project working within the Stonehenge and Avebury World Heritage Site, this volume provides an overview of work going on across Britain and the near Continent at many different scales. Contributors share experiences, and discuss the outcomes, implications, and theoretical underpinnings of heritage-based well-being projects.

About the Editors
Timothy Darvill is Head of the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology at Bournemouth University and leads the research on the Human Henge project; Kerry Barrass is a researcher on the project; Laura Drysdale is the Director of the Restoration Trust and project manager of Human Henge; Vanessa Heaslip is a Principal Academic in the Department of Nursing and Social Sciences at Bournemouth University and leads the participant monitoring programme on Human Henge; and Yvette Staelens is a visiting research fellow at Bournemouth University and was the programme facilitator for Human Henge.
NEW: La parure en callaïs du Néolithique européen edited by Guirec Querré, Serge Cassen and Emmanuelle Vigier; preface by Yves Coppens. Hardback; 203x276mm; viii+634 pages; illustrated in full colour throughout. Papers in French and English. (Print RRP £130.00). 568 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692808. £130.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692815. Book contents pageDownload

Callaïs refers to the green stones from which the remarkable ornaments discovered in several Neolithic sites in Western Europe are made. A term used at the beginning of our era by Pliny the Elder and taken up by the first archaeologists of the early 20th century during the first excavations of the large tumuli of the Carnac region (Morbihan), callaïs includes several mineral species, especially variscite and turquoise, both hydrated aluminium phosphates with a green to blue colour. Beads and pendants made of this precious material, combined with other objects such as axes made of alpine jade, fibrolite, amber or jet beads, sometimes from very distant sources, were deposited with the deceased, reflecting their high rank among the first agropastoral societies, or «sacrificed» in the form of deposits. The question of the nature and origin of these Callaïs pearls and pendants has been discussed many times during the last century by mineralogists and prehistorians. Since the first discoveries on this gem, many researches have been carried out both in the field and in the laboratory to elucidate what some had called ‘the mysteries of the callaïs’.

This volume, prefaced by Yves Coppens, Honorary Professor of the Collège de France, brings together the contributions of the best European specialists in callaïs, variscite and turquoise, who spoke at a symposium on this ancient gemstone held in April 2015 in Carnac. The objective of this book is to disclose the results of the latest research relating to these jewels by scanning multiple fields: variscite geology, gemmology, Neolithic but also Roman exploitations, chemical characterization, production of objects and their diffusion, inventory, dating, place of these jewels within agropastoral societies that occupied part of Europe from the 5th to the 3rd millennium.

French Description:
La callaïs désigne les pierres vertes dont sont faites les remarquables parures découvertes dans plusieurs sites néolithiques d’Europe occidentale. Terme utilisé au début de notre ère par Pline l’Ancien et repris par les premiers archéologues du début du XXème siècle lors des premières fouilles des grands tumulus de la région de Carnac (Morbihan), la callaïs regroupe plusieurs espèces minérales, surtout la variscite et la turquoise, tous deux des phosphates d’aluminium hydratés de couleur verte à bleue. Les perles et pendeloques en cette matière précieuse, associées à d’autres objets tels que haches en jade alpin, en fibrolite, perles en ambre ou en jais, provenant de sources parfois très éloignées, étaient déposés auprès des défunts, témoignant de leur haut rang au sein des premières sociétés agropastorales, ou « sacrifiées » sous forme de dépôts. La question de la nature et de l’origine de ces perles et pendeloques en callaïs a été maintes fois abordée durant le siècle dernier par les minéralogistes et les préhistoriens. Depuis les premières découvertes sur cette gemme, de nombreuses recherches ont été menées tant sur le terrain qu’en laboratoire afin d’élucider ce que certains avaient baptisé « les mystères de la callaïs ».

Ce volume, préfacé par Yves Coppens, Professeur honoraire du Collège de France, regroupe les contributions des meilleurs spécialistes européens de la callaïs, variscite et turquoise, qui sont intervenus lors d’un colloque consacré à cette gemme ancienne qui s’est tenu en avril 2015 à Carnac. L’objectif de cet ouvrage est de divulguer le fruit des dernières recherches relatives à ces bijoux en balayant de multiples domaines : géologie de la variscite, gemmologie, exploitations néolithiques mais aussi romaines, caractérisation chimique, production des objets et leur diffusion, inventaire, datation, place de ces bijoux au sein de sociétés agropastorales qui occupaient une partie de l’Europe du 5ème au 3ème millénaire.
NEW: New Global Perspectives on Archaeological Prospection 13th International Conference on Archaeological Prospection, 28 August – 1 September 2019, Sligo – Ireland edited by James Bonsall. Paperback; 205x290mm; 366 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 567 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693065. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693072. Book contents pageDownload

This volume is a product of the 13th International Conference on Archaeological Prospection 2019, which was hosted by the Department of Environmental Science in the Faculty of Science at the Institute of Technology Sligo. The conference is held every two years under the banner of the International Society for Archaeological Prospection and this was the first time that the conference was held in Ireland. New Global Perspectives on Archaeological Prospection draws together over 90 papers addressing archaeological prospection techniques, methodologies and case studies from 33 countries across Africa, Asia, Australasia, Europe and North America, reflecting current and global trends in archaeological prospection. At this particular ICAP meeting, specific consideration was given to the development and use of archaeological prospection in Ireland, archaeological feedback for the prospector, applications of prospection technology in the urban environment and the use of legacy data.

Papers include novel research areas such as magnetometry near the equator, drone-mounted radar, microgravity assessment of tombs, marine electrical resistivity tomography, convolutional neural networks, data processing, automated interpretive workflows and modelling as well as recent improvements in remote sensing, multispectral imaging and visualisation.

About the Editor
James Bonsall uses geophysical and remote sensing technology to investigate ancient people and landscapes. James is particularly interested in challenging upland and coastal environments that require technical expertise combined with novel methodological approaches to enhance the interpretation of past environments. James has twenty years of archaeological geophysical experience acquired in the commercial and academic sectors. His PhD, a fellowship from the National Roads Authority, focused on aspects of prospecting driven by legacy data collected during the ‘Celtic Tiger’ economic boom. James is a Lecturer in Archaeology at the Institute of Technology Sligo. His recent publications include a geoarchaeological study of shell middens on the west coast of Ireland; mapping pauper burials in the UK; and the challenges of surveying remote upland sites in Ireland and Italy.
NEW: The Archaeology of Medieval Villages Currently Inhabited in Europe edited by Jesús Fernández Fernández and Margarita Fernández Mier. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+120 pages; 40 figures, 7 tables (19 colour pages). (Print RRP £30.00). 566 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693003. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693010. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The study of deserted villages abandoned during the last millennium in Europe has been the primary focus of archaeological interventions in rural settlements over recent decades. However, most of the hamlets and villages of medieval origin remain inhabited today and excavations in these small and medium-sized settlements are more unusual. The Archaeology of Medieval Villages Currently Inhabited in Europe focuses on these locations, giving examples of sites excavated in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, France, Scandinavia and Spain. The case studies highlight the diversity of problems and debates around this subject such as the meaning of the term ‘village’, the chronology beyond the last millennium with continuities, discontinuities and ruptures, the integration of research into residential and working areas, the role of local communities in research programmes and the need for multidisciplinary approaches to address all these issues. Deserted villages research along with currently-inhabited settlement excavation has the important potential to achieve long-lasting historical syntheses on medieval settlement networks in Europe. These five chapters offer challenging approaches to the above issues and proposals for future research in the field from Spain to the North Sea.

About the Editors
Jesús Fernández Fernández’s lines of research and interests focus on Medieval Archaeology, Historical Archaeology, Landscape Archaeology, GIS and Heritage studies. His recent research interests and publications focus on the landscape and settlement transformations in the Asturian area, particularly in the early medieval period. Jesús has been the director of several archaeological fieldwork projects and a member of research projects in various universities. Currently he is co-director with Gabriel Moshenska and Margarita Fernández Mier of the Villanueva de Santu Adrianu medieval settlement excavation project. Currently he is teaching and researching at Oviedo University within the programme Marie-Curie COFUND. Fernández is also a social entrepreneur and director of La Ponte-Ecomuseum, an archaeological-museological community project in Asturias, founded in 2012 and an award winner in 2016 (Leading Culture Destination Awards) and 2019 (Hispania Nostra Awards for Good Practices in Cultural Heritage).

Margarita Fernández Mier is Professor of Medieval History at the University of Oviedo (Spain). Her principal interest is the study of early medieval societies in the north-western Iberian Peninsula, as well as the settlement analysis and the organisation of agrarian landscapes research. Margarita’s work is based on written and archaeological records and a long term analysis, from Roman times to Middle Ages. She is PI of the ‘Local spaces and social complexity: the medieval roots of a twentieth-century debate (ELCOS)’ project: a interdisciplinary research group funded by the Spanish Government which aims to situate the present-day rural communities of Southern Europe as inheritors of a centuries-long experience of collective organisation from medieval times. Margarita is the lead investigator of the LLABOR research group working on Agrarian and Public Archaeology in Spain and Latin America.
NEW: Listening to the Stones: Essays on Architecture and Function in Ancient Greek Sanctuaries in Honour of Richard Alan Tomlinson edited by Elena C. Partida and Barbara Schmidt-Dounas. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+264 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (45 pages in colour). 565 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690873. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690880. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Listening to the Stones: Essays on Architecture and Function in Ancient Greek Sanctuaries in Honour of Richard Alan Tomlinson deals with a range of topics that relate to the broad scope of Richard Tomlinson’s archaeological quests and echoes his own methodology in research. Innovative masonry modes, matters of style and orders, proportions and design principles, as well as the inter-regional connections which fostered the transmission of architectural traditions and technical know-how have been cardinal points in Tomlinson’s writings and lectures, as much as the Greek foundations on foreign soil, the forethought in planning, achievements in the field of engineering and the interaction between the secular, the sepulchral and the sacred premises in an ancient city. The conservative or progressive attitudes of a society usually leave an imprint on architectural creations. So, architecture is subject to evolution along with the developing societies. Its gradual changing signifies the building programs taken up by ancient communities. Within this frame, we better comprehend the function of public edifices, the remodeling of cult sites in accordance with historic circumstances, the role of politics in architecture. This book is a token of appreciation of a British professor of archaeology, who spread knowledge of the Greek civilization, manifesting the brilliant spirit of the versatile ancient Greek builders.

About the Editors
Elena C. Partida is research archaeologist at the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports, and adjunct professor at the University of Patras. She holds MA and PhD from the University of Birmingham. Trained by the Academic Staff Development Unit in ‘Teaching, assessing students and presentation skills’, she lectured on Classical archaeology at Birmingham University, as assistant to the head of the Department, Prof. R.A. Tomlinson. Elena attended seminars on Roman architecture at the Barber Institute of Fine Arts and the course ‘Interventions to monuments and historic settlements’ organised by the European Centre for the Precaution and Prognosis of Earthquakes. On the Acropolis of Athens E.P. was responsible for the documentation of architectural disiecta membra within the European project ‘Network of archaeological sites in Athens’. Appointed Curator of Antiquities at Delphi, E.P. carried out a study on the Delphi Museum Re-Exhibition (awarded with the Best Practices distinction), in parallel to studies on the restoration and consolidation of ancient monuments at Delphi; she also designed the installation of open-air exhibitions. As a curator of Patras Archaeological Museum, E.P. is in charge of interdisciplinary international collaborative projects involving cultural patrimony, new finds and new technologies.

Barbara Schmidt-Dounas studied classical archaeology, ancient history and prehistory at the Universities Johann Wolfgang von Goethe at Frankfurt/Main and Georg August at Göttingen in Germany. She was a scientific collaborator at the University Johann Wolfgang von Goethe in Frankfurt/Main – Germany within the project ‘Donations offered by Hellenistic Kings to Greek Cities and Sanctuaries’ which was funded by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) (1984-1986). Barbara was a lecturer and later an assistant and Associate Professor of Classical Archaeology at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki; in 2006 shewas appointed Professor of Classical Archaeology at the same University. Barbara is a member of the founding board of the Interdisciplinary Centre of Archaeological Studies ‘Manolis Andronikos’ (ΔΙ.ΚΕ.ΑΜ.) and a director of the Cast Museum of the Department of Archaeology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. Barbara is also a corresponding member of the German Archaeological Institute.
NEW: Geophysical Phenomena and the Alexandrian Littoral by N. Evelpidou, C. Repapis, C. Zerefos, H. Tzalas and C. Synolakis. Hardback; 175x245mm; x+132 pages; 51 figures, 2 tables (51 pages in colour). 561 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692341. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692358. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Alexandria is located on the Mediterranean coast of Egypt, bordered by Egypt’s Western Desert and the fertile Nile Delta. For many centuries, Alexandria was the major port city in the Eastern Mediterranean and it has been repeatedly struck by natural disasters, such as earthquakes, tsunamis and land subsidence, in its ~2400-year history. This book focuses on the geomorphological and archaeological evidence on the coastal zone of Alexandria, attempting to provide a comprehensive review of its evolution, taking into consideration long-term and short-term factors.

The book provides an extensive background on the geomorphology and recent geoarchaeological history of Alexandria, discussing historical maps and natural disasters. In the coastal area of Alexandria there is numerous archaeological evidence, such as burial sites, quarry activities and ancient building remnants, as well as geomorphological features, all revealing a complex evolution of the coastal zone. New evidence, such as fish tanks and ship wrecks in order to discuss the Late Holocene evolution of the coastal zone. Detailed illustrations and maps accompany the book chapters providing the reader the opportunity to gain an extensive view of Alexandria’s features.

About the Authors
Niki Evelpidou is a Professor of Geomorphology and Geoinformatics at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Faculty of Geology and Geoenvironment, and Faculty Affiliate of the Department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences of the College of Charleston, USA. Prof. Evelpidou is actively involved in the research fields of geomorphology, coastal geomorphology, sea level changes, palaeogeography, geology, spatial technologies, study and modelling of natural hazards, while emphasizing on the use of new technologies and innovation.

Christos Repapis was Director of the Research Centre of Atmospheric Physics and Climatology of the Academy of Athens (1985-2005) and has remained as Research Associate of the Centre since his retirement.

Christos Zerefos heads the Research Centre for Atmospheric Physics and Climatology, Academy of Athens and is president-elect of the General Assembly of the Hellenic Foundation for Research and Innovation. Other roles academic posts include Professor of Atmospheric and Environmental Physics (Universities of Athens and Thessaloniki), Visiting Professor (Universities of Minnesota and Boston) and Samarbeidspartnere (University of Oslo).

Harry Tzalas has conducted a range of innovative experimental archaeological studies relating to ancient sea vessels. In 1997 he formed the Hellenic Institute of Ancient and Mediaeval Alexandrian Studies and obtained a concession from the Egyptian Authorities for an underwater survey of 14 kilometers of the eastern littoral of Alexandria; 28 campaigns were successfully conducted.

Costas Synolakis is Professor of Civil Engineering at the University of Southern California and a a member of the Academy of Athens holding the Chair of Earth Sciences. His research studies the impact of natural hazards, and particularly tsunamis and extreme flooding events on beaches. He has participated or led 30 scientific expeditions in 21 countries, practically in all of the world’s oceans and seas.
NEW: The Buckley Potteries: Recent Research and Excavation by Nigel Jones. Paperback; x+122 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 551 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692228. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692235. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

With contributions by Peter Davey, Leigh Dodd, Richard Hankinson, Bob Silvester and Sophie Watson.

The small town of Buckley, in Flintshire, has been the focus for a regional pottery industry for at least 600 years, from the medieval period to the mid-20th century. However, despite Buckley’s impressive industrial past, a visit to the town today reveals little evidence to suggest the extent and importance of what was once a major industry supplying traditional earthenware.

This book is based on the results of recent research and excavation which has enhanced our understanding of the Buckley potteries, identifying over 30 individual production sites from documentary and cartographic sources. It considers the factors that influenced the siting and development of the industry, how it changed through time and the reasons for its eventual demise.

Few of the potteries have been the subject of archaeological excavation, and of those none have previously been published in detail. The book presents the results from excavations on the sites of four potteries, and includes a review of the evidence for others, including a gazetteer detailing the evidence for all of the potteries currently known.

About the Author
NIGEL JONES is the Principal Archaeologist at the Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust, where he has worked since the early 1980s. During this time he has excavated a wide range of archaeological sites from the Neolithic to industrial, the more significant of which have been published in regional and national journals. His career has focused principally on field archaeology, including numerous excavations, surveys of earthwork monuments and wider landscapes, building surveys and aerial photography. He is also a Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists.

Table of Contents
Introduction; Geology of the Buckley Area - By Richard Hankinson; Buckley Potteries and their relationship with Buckley Mountain Common – cartographic evidence - By Bob Silvester; History and Significance of the Buckley Potteries - By Peter Davey; Brookhill Pottery (Site 1), 2016 - By Richard Hankinson; Taylor’s Pottery (Site 3), 2005 - By Leigh Dodd; Lewis’s Pottery (Site 5), 2000 - By Leigh Dodd; Price’s Pottery (Site 11), 2014-15 - By Sophie Watson; A Gazetteer of Buckley Potteries; Bibliography
NEW: The Tekenu and Ancient Egyptian Funerary Ritual by Glennise West. Paperback; 205x290mm; 300pp; 362 figures (colour and black & white), 1 table. 539 2019 Archaeopress Egyptology . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691825. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691832. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

What is the Tekenu? What was its function? What are its origins? These are questions upon which Egyptologists have long pondered. However, Egyptologists, until now, have avoided any major work on the topic. Previous treatments of the Tekenu largely adopt a selective approach focusing on a specific form. Rarely has the Tekenu been examined profoundly in all of its forms or contexts with its possible origins commented upon merely in passing. The aim of The Tekenu and Ancient Egyptian Funerary Ritual is to provide a provocative examination and interpretation of the Tekenu in an endeavour to proffer plausible answers hitherto eluding scholars. Attested from the Fifth Dynasty until, and including the Saite Period, the Tekenu is a puzzling icon which is depicted within the funerary scenes in the tombs of some ancient Egyptian nobles. In this work four distinct types of Tekenu are identified and classified and then a Corpus Catalogue is formed. The Tekenu is appraised within the context of the wall scene. Two tombs are dealt with in greater detail.

About the Author
Glennise West graduated from the University of Sydney and taught English and History at secondary school level. Later she followed her lifelong interest in ancient Egypt obtaining MA and PhD from Macquarie University, Sydney. The topic of this book was the subject of her PhD dissertation. She lives in Sydney.
NEW: Conflict Landscapes: An Archaeology of the International Brigades in the Spanish Civil War by Salvatore Garfi. Paperback; 205x290mm; 156 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 530 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691344. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691351. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is an archaeological exploration of a conflict landscape encountered by the volunteers of the International Brigades in the Spanish Civil War of 1936-39. A great deal is known about the Brigades in terms of inter-world war geopolitics, their history and make-up, but less is known about the materiality of the landscapes in which they lived, fought, and died.

The Spanish Civil War was a relatively static conflict. As in the First World War, it consisted of entrenched Republican government lines facing similarly entrenched Nationalist (rebel) lines, and these ran north to south across Spain. Fighting was intermittent, so the front line soldiers had to settle in, and make what was an attritional war-scape, a place to live in and survive. This research examines one such war-scape as a place of ‘settlement’, where soldiers lived their daily lives as well as confronting the rigours of war – and these were the volunteers of the International Brigades, both foreign and Spanish, who occupied a section of lines southeast of Zaragoza in Aragón in 1937 and 1938.

This research draws, not only on the techniques of landscape archaeology, but also on the writings of international volunteers in Spain – in particular, George Orwell – and it incorporates historical photography as a uniquely analytical, archaeological resource.

About the Author
Salvatore Garfi has been a professional archaeologist since 1974, working on a range of projects from the prehistoric to the contemporary. Besides working in Britain, he has worked in Egypt, Southern Arabia, and elsewhere in the Middle East. Since 2010, he has specialised in the archaeology of modern conflict, and his doctoral research was on the late 20th Century conflict in Western Sahara. He was a post-doctoral Leverhulme Fellow in the School of Cultures, Languages and Area Studies, University of Nottingham (2015-2018), and co-founder of the International Brigades Archaeological Project (IBAP), which ran from 2014 to 2015.
NEW: Country in the City: Agricultural Functions of Protohistoric Urban Settlements (Aegean and Western Mediterranean) edited by Dominique Garcia, Raphaël Orgeolet, Maia Pomadère and Julian Zurbach. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+200; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (32 plates in colour). 518 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691320. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691337. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The validity of an opposition between rural and urban spaces is an important question for our societies; this question has been raised since the radical transformations of the 20th century and the so-called ‘end of the peasants’. In this context it becomes also a question for archaeologists and historians. Country in the City: Agricultural Functions in Protohistoric Urban Settlements (Aegean and Western Mediterranean) assembles contributions on the place of agricultural production in the context of urbanization in the Late Bronze and Early Iron Age Mediterranean. The contributions concentrate on the second millennium Aegean and the protohistoric northwestern Mediterranean. They offer a reflection on the nature of urbanization and its consequences for rural spaces near cities and on the many ways in which rural spaces and agricultural activities may be intertwined with urban spaces – a reconsideration of the very nature of urbanism. A deliberate accent is laid on the comparative perspectives between different regions and periods of Mediterranean protohistory, and on the integration of all kinds of sources and research methods, from texts to survey to environmental archaeology. Highlighted throughout are the original paths followed in the Peloponnese or in the Troad with regard to the Minoan model of urbanization, and the many aspects of Minoan urbanization, and many regional differences in Languedoc vis-à-vis Catalonia. Thus a new perspective on Mediterranean urbanization is offered.

About the Editors
Dominique Garcia is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Aix-Marseille and, since 2014, has been president of the lnstitut national de recherches archéologiques préventives (National Institute of Preventive Archaeological Research).

Raphaël Orgeolet is Senior Lecturer in Mediterranean Bronze Age Archaeology at Aix-Marseille University. His main research interests focus on settlement, funeral practices and society. He has taken part in various archaeological projects in the Mediterranean and especially in the Aegean and is now leading the excavations of the Neolithic and Bronze Age site of Kirrha in Mainland Greece.

Maia Pomadère is a Senior Lecturer in Aegean Archaeology at the University of Paris 1-Panthéon Sorbonne and member of the UMR 7041-ArScAn. Her research interests encompass Aegean Bronze Age and Early Iron Age archaeology, especially architecture and funerary practices. She has been directing an archaeological excavation in the Minoan town of Malia in Crete since 2005, and is codirecting a geoarchaeological project on the same site.

Julien Zurbach is Senior Lecturer in Greek history at the ENS Paris. He is working on agricultural practices, land distribution and workforce in the Aegean world from the Late Bronze Age to the Archaic period. He concentrates particularly on Mycenaean epigraphy and has led field projects in Kirrha (Phocis) and Miletus (Ionia).
NEW: Why Did Ancient States Collapse? The Dysfunctional State by Malcolm Levitt. Paperback; 203x276mm;56 pages; 4 tables, 1 diagram (black & white throughout). 93 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693027. £18.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693034. Book contents pageDownload

Ancient states were rooted in agriculture, sedentism and population growth. They were fragile and prone to collapse, but there is no consensus on the causes or meaning of collapse, and there is an ongoing debate about the importance, nature and even existence of state-wide collapse.

Explanations of collapse in terms of the competing mono-causal factors are found inferior to those incorporating dynamic, interactive systems. It is proposed that collapse should be explained as failure to fulfil the ancient state’s core functions: assurance of food supplies, defence against external attack, maintenance of internal peace, imposition of its will throughout its territory, enforcement of state-wide laws, and promotion of an ideology to legitimise the political and social status quo.

To fulfil these functions certain necessary conditions must be met. The legitimacy of the political and social status quo, including the distribution of political power and wealth, needs to be accepted; the state should be able to extract sufficient resources to fulfil its functions such as defence; it must be able to enforce its decisions; the ruling elite should share a common purpose and actions; the society needs to reflect a shared spirit (asibaya) and purpose across elites and commoners who believe it is worthy of defence.

Weaknesses and failure to meet any condition can interact to exacerbate the situation: maladministration, corruption and elite preoccupation with self-aggrandisement can induce fiscal weakness, reduced military budgets and further invasion; it can induce neglect of key infrastructures (especially water management). Inequality, a commonly neglected factor despite ancient texts, can erode asibaya and legitimacy and alienate commoners from the defence of the state.

These themes are explored in relation to the Egyptian Old Kingdom, Mycenae, the Western Roman Empire (WRE), and the Maya. They all exhibit, to varying degrees, weaknesses in meeting the above conditions necessary for stability.

About the Author
Malcolm Levitt held posts as lecturer in economics at Liverpool and Hallsworth Fellow at Manchester University (where his interest in state collapse originated) before joining HM Treasury where he became Senior Economic Adviser. He then moved to the OECD and later served as Chef de Division in the European Commission.

Since completing his MA in Archaeology at the UCL Institute of Archaeology in 2018 he has concentrated on deepening the theoretical basis of his dissertation on why ancient states collapsed.
FORTHCOMING: Carving Interactions: Rock Art in the Nomadic Landscape of the Black Desert, North-Eastern Jordan by Nathalie Østerled Brusgaard. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+206 pages; 216 figures, 32 tables (129 colour pages). 577 2019. ISBN 9781789693119. Buy Now

The Safaitic rock art of the North Arabian basalt desert is a unique and understudied material, one of the few surviving traces of the elusive herding societies that inhabited this region in antiquity. Yet little is known about this rock art and its role in the desert societies. Why did these peoples make carvings in the desert and what was the significance of this cultural practice? What can the rock art tell us about the relationship between the nomads and their desert landscape? This book investigates these questions through a comprehensive study of over 4500 petroglyphs from the Jebel Qurma region of the Black Desert in north-eastern Jordan. It explores the content of the rock art, how it was produced and consumed by its makers and audience, and its relationship with the landscape. This is the first-ever systematic study of the Safaitic petroglyphs from the Black Desert and it is unique for the study of Arabian rock art. It demonstrates the value of a material approach to rock art and the unique insights that rock art can provide into the relationship between nomadic herders and the wild and domestic landscape.

About the Author
Nathalie Østerled Brusgaard (PhD, Leiden University) is an archaeologist specialising in rock art studies and social zooarchaeology. Nathalie has worked on excavations in the Netherlands and Germany and on rock art surveys in Jordan and the USA.
FORTHCOMING: I Nebrodi nell’antichità: Città Culture Paesaggio by Francesco Collura. Paperback; 205x290mm; 384 figures (208 colour pages). Italian text with English Summary. 577 2019. ISBN 9781789692648. Buy Now

The Nebrodi mountains run along the central-northern part of Sicily. It is an area characterised by high ground that rises abruptly from the Tyrrhenian coast, separated by narrow valleys crossed by creeks and a few flat areas. Human presence there is very old due to the abundance of natural resources (water, wood, fertile land) and a favourable climate. In classical times, many cities prospered here, usually on well-defended hilltops; the archaic indigenous settlements encountered Greek culture from the 6th century BC, but they can be defined as totally Hellenized only after the middle of the 4th century BC.

The phase of greatest prosperity was the Hellenistic age, especially following the Roman conquest of Sicily. Important centres were, among others, Tyndaris, Halaesa, Kale Akte and Herbita. Their wealth derived from the great availability of natural resources and from direct or indirect trade with the rest of the island, the Italian peninsula and other areas of the Mediterranean, especially those overlooking the sea. The birth of many of these settlements often dates back to prehistory and the existence of some of them has continued until today. The physical characteristics of this mountainous part of Sicily, along with its remoteness from the main cities of antiquity, affected the forms of human occupation and the growth of an autonomous culture.

The Nebrodi have long remained archeologically unexplored: research and excavations were few and concentrated mainly on certain sites (particularly Tyndaris and Halaesa). Therefore, the history of these districts is still almost unknown. This volume presents the author’s many years of research, hoping to increase the knowledge of many aspects of this part of the island: the meeting between indigenous and Greek cultures, their coexistence, the types of settlement and the organization of cities, the trade and the local productions.

I Monti Nebrodi occupano la parte centro-settentrionale della Sicilia. Si tratta di un’area caratterizzata da rilievi che si elevano repentinamente dalla costa tirrenica, separati da strette vallate percorse da torrenti e con poche aree pianeggianti. La frequentazione umana è antichissima e fu agevolata dalla ricchezza di risorse naturali (acqua, boschi, terreni fertili) e da un clima molto favorevole. In epoca classica qui prosperarono numerose città, sorte in genere su rilievi ben difendibili; gli insediamenti indigeni incontrarono la cultura greca a partire dal VI secolo a.C. ma si possono definire totalmente ellenizzati solo dopo la metà del IV secolo a.C. La fase di maggiore prosperità fu l’età ellenistica, soprattutto quella successiva alla conquista romana della Sicilia: centri importanti furono, tra gli altri, Tyndaris, Halaesa, Kalè Akté, Herbita, la cui ricchezza derivava dalla grande disponibilità di risorse naturali e dai commerci diretti o indiretti svolti con il resto dell’Isola e con la Penisola Italiana, ma anche con altre aree del Mediterraneo, soprattutto per quelli che si affacciavano sul mare. La nascita di molti di questi insediamenti risale di frequente alla preistoria e l’esistenza di alcuni di essi si è prolungata fino ad oggi. Le caratteristiche fisiche di questa parte montagnosa della Sicilia determinarono peculiari forme di occupazione e lo sviluppo di una cultura autonoma, anche a causa della sua perifericità rispetto ai principali centri dell’antichità. I Nebrodi sono rimasti a lungo archeologicamente inesplorati: pochi sono stati i saggi di scavo, concentrati principalmente su alcuni siti (soprattutto Tyndaris e Halaesa). Pertanto la storia di queste contrade è rimasta a lungo quasi sconosciuta. L’autore ha svolto ricerche finalizzate alla conoscenza di molti aspetti inediti di questa parte dell’isola: l’incontro tra cultura indigena e cultura greca, la loro coesistenza, i modi d’insediamento e la forma delle città, i commerci anche ad ampio raggio, le produzioni locali. La ricerca ha tenuto c
FORTHCOMING: Bridge of Civilisations: The Near East and Europe c. 1100–1300 edited by Peter Edbury, Denys Pringle and Balázs Major. Hardback; 176x250mm; xx+344 pages; 171 figures, 10 maps. 576 2019. ISBN 9781789693270. Buy Now

This volume brings together 23 of the papers presented at a conference held in Esztergom, Hungary, in May 2018 to coincide with the 800th anniversary of the crusade of King Andrew II of Hungary to the Holy Land in 1217–18. The theme, Bridge of Civilizations, was chosen to highlight aspects of the links and contrasts between Europe and the areas around the eastern Mediterranean that were visited and occupied by western crusaders and settlers in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, giving special attention to the evidence provided by archaeology and material culture, as well as historical sources.

The results of the joint Syrian-Hungarian Archaeological Mission (SHAM) to the Hospitaller castle of Margat (al-Marqab) highlighted in this volume include an up-to-date overview of the structural development of the site from 1187 to 1285, as well as particular studies of the wall paintings, cooking installations and pottery. SHAM’s recent rescue work at Crac des Chevaliers also provides the basis for studies of the water-management system and medieval burials revealed in its courtyard, while other papers examine the masonry marks and surviving evidence of medieval trebuchet damage at both castles. Other papers focus on the medieval castles of Karak (Jordan) and Jubayl (Lebanon), the medieval buildings of Latakia (Syria), the impact of the Crusades on buildings in Cairo, historic bridges in Lebanon, the medieval chapels of Yanouh-Mghayreh and Edde-Jbeil (Lebanon), piscinas in Crusader churches in the East, the images of donors found in medieval Lebanese churches, and the activity of late thirteenth-century Western metalworkers in Cyprus.

Papers focusing more particularly on historical sources include a new edition of a late eleventh- to twelfth century pilgrimage itinerary from Hungary to the Holy Land, a discussion of two minor military orders in Hungary, a reassessment of the conceptualization of Holy War in the run-up to the First Crusade, and the portrayal of Sultan al-Kāmil in a contemporary western account of the Fifth Crusade.

About the Editors
Peter Edbury is Emeritus Professor of Medieval History in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. He has published widely on the history and institutions of the kingdoms founded by the crusaders in the Near East and has re-edited the legal treatises by John of Ibelin (2003) and Philip of Novara (2009).

Denys Pringle is Emeritus Professor in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. In addition to his four-volume corpus, The Churches of the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem (1993–2009), his recent publications include a volume of translated texts, Pilgrimage to Jerusalem and the Holy Land, 1187–1291 (2012), and a volume of collected studies, Churches, Castles and Landscape in the Frankish East (2013).

Balázs Major is an archaeologist, Arabist and historian by training and holds a PhD from Cardiff University. He is the director of the Institute of Archaeology at Pázmány Péter Catholic University and a lecturer in the Department of Arabic Studies.
FORTHCOMING: Dating Urban Classical Deposits: Approaches and Problems in Using Finds to Date Strata by Guido Furlan. Paperback; 205x290mm; xiv+288 pages; 153 figures, 6 tables (71 pages in colour). 576 2019. ISBN 9781789692525. Buy Now

Dating Urban Classical Deposits: Approaches and problems in using finds to date strata considers the issues surrounding the dating of archaeological strata on the basis of the assemblages recovered from them. This process is one of the most common processes in archaeology, yet it is still poorly structured theoretically, methodologically and operatively. No manuals specifically tackle the issue as a whole and consideration of useful theoretical and methodological tools is fragmentary. This book has been developed to try to correct this failing; it is based on the idea that for dating a given layer through the materials recovered from it, the embedding process of the materials must be modelled.

The book reviews the present state of archaeological practice and follows this with a theoretical discussion of the key concepts involved in the issue of dating deposits; the main methodological tools which can be employed (quantitative, qualitative and comparative) are then discussed in detail. The text presents a problem-oriented taxonomy of deposits, with depositional models for assessing how different assemblages can be analysed for dating; each type of deposit is accompanied by case studies where the methodological tools used are explained. Finally, a structured working method is proposed.

The topic of dating deposits crosses the chronological and spatial borders of many archaeologies, but the book focusses on Classical cities (particularly Roman), as they present specific traits (continuous occupation, high rates of residuality, high impact architecture, waste management etc.) making them unique fields for study.

About the Author
Guido Furlan is a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Padova, where he achieved his doctorate in 2015. His current research focuses on Roman archaeology and post-excavation methodologies. He was involved, among others, in the investigation of the forum of Nora (Sardinia) until 2008, and in the excavation of the House of Titus Macer, Aquileia, from 2009 to 2013. He is currently working on the theatre of the ancient city.
FORTHCOMING: Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit I: Excavations in the Metelite Nome, Egypt by Mohamed Kenawi. Paperback; xxviii+350 pages; 358 figures, 52 tables. 575 2019. ISBN 9781789692983. Buy Now

In 2012, fieldwork began at two large sites in Egypt’s western Delta, Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit, to investigate them thoroughly and to reveal their significance. They were ideally placed to take advantage of ancient trade between the areas around the Mediterranean and the important Egyptian ports of Rosetta, Thonis-Heracleion, and Alexandria.

This volume presents the results of the Italian archaeological mission at Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit, Beheira, Egypt between 2012 and 2016. It provides details of the survey and excavation results of the different occupation phases, which range from the Late Dynastic to the Early Islamic period. The discovery of a complete town beneath the Nile silt through the combination of sophisticated techniques provides rich data for the study of the region.

Research on the history of the region has been focused on the Meteliete nome and Lake Edkou as a base for archaeological investigations in the region. These have resulted in the discovery of tens of Hellenistic houses and the enclosure wall of a temple at Kom Wasit; and a Late Roman house, amphora storage building, cistern, and early Islamic cemetery at Kom al-Ahmer.
FORTHCOMING: Pottery from Roman Malta by Maxine Anastasi with contributions by David Cardona and Nathaniel Cutajar. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+172 pages; 87 figures, 7 tables. 574 2019. ISBN 9781789693294. Buy Now

Much of what is known about Malta’s ancient material culture has come to light as a result of antiquarian research or early archaeological work—a time where little attention was paid to stratigraphic context. This situation has in part contributed to the problem of reliably sourcing and dating Maltese Roman-period pottery, particularly locally produced forms common on nearly all ancient Maltese sites. This book presents a comprehensive study of Maltese pottery forms from key stratified deposits spanning the first century BC to mid-fourth century AD. Ceramic material from three Maltese sites was analysed and quantified in a bid to understand Maltese pottery production during the Roman period, and trace the type and volume of ceramic-borne goods that were circulating the central Mediterranean during the period. A short review of the islands’ recent literature on Roman pottery is discussed, followed by a detailed contextual summary of the archaeological contexts presented in this study. The work is supplemented by a detailed illustrated catalogue of all the forms identified within the assemblages, presenting the wide range of locally produced and imported pottery types typical of the Maltese Roman period.

About the Author
Maxine Anastasi is a Lecturer at the Department of Classics and Archaeology, University of Malta. She was awarded a D.Phil. in Archaeology from the University of Oxford for her thesis on small-island economies in the Central Mediterranean. Her research primarily focuses on Roman pottery in the central Mediterranean, with a particular emphasis on Maltese assemblages.
FORTHCOMING: Settlements and Necropoleis of the Black Sea and its Hinterland in Antiquity Select Papers from the Third International Conference ‘The Black Sea in Antiquity and Tekkeköy: An Ancient Settlement on the Southern Black Sea Coast’, 27-29 October 2017, Tekkeköy, Samsun edited by Gocha R. Tsetskhladze and Sümer Atasoy. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+278 pages; 299 figures, 13 tables. 573 2019. ISBN 9781789692068. Buy Now

Settlements and Necropoleis of the Black Sea and its Hinterland in Antiquity publishes a selection of some two dozen of the papers presented at an international conference held in October 2017 at Tekkeköy in Samsun, ancient Amisos, on the Turkish Black Sea coast. The archaeology sessions included presentations not only about the Tekkeköy/Samsun region but other parts of the Black Sea by participants from Bulgaria, France, Georgia, Romania, Russia, Turkey and the United Kingdom. The selection offered here includes almost all of the contributions on archaeology and ancient history. The conference spread its wings to include folklore, museology and tourism, but we felt that a more focused publication was necessary. The event was the child of Ondokuzmayıs University in Samsun (whose Archaeology Department regularly organises symposia on the Black Sea), the municipal authorities of Tekkeköy and the Governor of Samsun, brought to fruition by the personal initiative of the Mayor of Tekkeköy and the Governor).

The papers are based not only on archaeological sources but make use of epigraphy and ancient written material. They cover all shores of the Black Sea, studying (once again), the establishment dates of some Greek Colonies, East Greek transport amphorae, the Black Sea on the Tabula Peutingeriana, the history of Tekkeköy, a Sinopean from Tomis, imports at Açic Suat (Caraburun), arrowhead and dolphin-shaped monetary signs from Berezan, the pre-Roman economy of Myrmekion, the necropolis of Porthmion, Artyushchenko-1 settlement on the Taman Peninsula, South Pontic imports at Classical sites in Ajara, recent excavations in Gonio-Apsarus, the Alaca Höyük Chalcolithic culture in coastal settlements, the Baruthan Tumuli at Amisos, iron finds from the Fatsa Cıngırt Kayası excavations, new excavations at Amastris, ancient Sebastopolis, politics and diplomacy in Paphlagonia, the Great Göztepe tumulus in Paphlagonia, Amasya-Oluz Höyük, the Iron Age sites of Zile district, Byzantine finds at Komana, glass bracelets from Samsun Museum, and dating the Kavak Bekdemir Mosque in Samsun.

About the Editors
Prof. Gocha Tsetskhladze (PhD Moscow, DPhil Oxford) is a classical archaeologist who specializes in ancient Greek colonisation and the archaeology of the Mediterranean, the Black Sea, Caucasia, Anatolia, and Central and Eastern Europe in the 1st millennium BC. For more than 20 years he has excavated several Greek colonial sites around the Black Sea (in Georgia, Russia, and the Ukraine). He is currently affiliated with the University of Nottingham, as well as the International Hellenic University in Thessaloniki and the University of Bucharest.

Prof. Emeritus Sümer Atasoy (PhD Istanbul) is a classical archaeologist and a specialist in museum studies and cultural heritage. He has excavated many sites in Anatolia, including Amisos/Samsun, one of the principal Greek colonies on the southern Black Sea coast. For more than ten years he has been director of excavations at Tios, the only Greek colony in the southern Black Sea not to have been overbuilt.
FORTHCOMING: Farmsteads and Funerary Sites: The M1 Junction 12 Improvements and the A5–M1 Link Road, Central Bedfordshire Archaeological investigations prior to construction, 2011 & 2015–16 by Jim Brown. Hardback; 205x290mm; 566pp; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £120.00). 556 2019. ISBN 9781789692600. Buy Now

MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) undertook extensive excavations during the construction of two separate, but adjacent road schemes, some 4.5km apart near Houghton Regis and Toddington, in south Central Bedfordshire. Taken as a whole, the excavations provide a detailed multi-period dataset for regional and national comparison.

The first evidence for occupation occurred in the middle/late Bronze Age comprising pits and clusters of postholes, including four-post and six-post structures. Two pit alignments, more than 2km apart, also indicate that land divisions were being established, and in the late Bronze Age/early Iron Age a significant new settlement emerged in the valley bottom. Parts of a further contemporary earlier-middle Iron Age settlement lay at the top of the valley but neither settlement extended into the Roman period. In the late Iron Age or early Roman period three or four new settlements emerged with occupation continuing into the late Roman period in at least one of these. Of particular interest was the recovery of two significant Aylesford-Swarling type cemeteries as well as a third cemetery which largely comprised unurned burials, including some busta, but with few accompanying grave goods.

In the late 7th-century a small probable Christian conversion open-ground inhumation cemetery was established with burials accompanied by a range of objects, including a rare work box, knives, brooches, chatelaine keys and a spearhead. Parts of three medieval settlements were uncovered including one with a potters' working area.
FORTHCOMING: From Hispalis to Ishbiliyya: The ancient port of Seville, from the Roman Empire to the end of the Islamic period (45 BC – AD 1248) by Carlos Cabrera Tejedor. Paperback; 205x290mm; xiv+214 pages; 168 figures, 5 tables (92 plates in colour). (Print RRP £45.00). 534 2019. ISBN 9781789690583. Book contents pageBuy Now

From Hispalis to Ishbiliyya: The ancient port of Seville, from the Roman Empire to the end of the Islamic period (45 BC – AD 1248) focuses on the history and development of the ancient port of Seville, which is located in the lower Guadalquivir River Basin, Spain. This unique study is important because, despite its commercial importance, little has been known about the port, and so the purpose was to examine the topography, layout, and facilities of the ancient port of Seville, their history and development from approximately the 1st c. BC to about the 13th c. AD. This longue durée study was conducted adopting a holistic and interdisciplinary approach by examining a diverse range of information (historical, archaeological and scientific), a maritime archaeological perspective as well as a diachronic study of three different historical periods (Roman, Late Antique, Islamic). As a result, it has been possible to offer a description of the construction, development, and demise of the port. The study was one of the first comprehensive studies of an ancient port in Spain and one of the first to be conducted in a combined holistic and diachronic manner in Europe. This methodology has produced significant results not obtained with other simpler approaches, thus serving as a model for studies of other archaeological sites, especially those in relation with maritime or riverine culture.

About the Author
CARLOS CABRERA TEJEDOR is a maritime archaeologist with a diverse and multi-disciplinary background and an interest in shipbuilding and ports. He started as a conservator, completing two bachelor's degrees, one in Fine Arts Restoration and the other in Archaeological Conservation. He also completed a Master of Arts degree in Nautical Archaeology from Texas A&M University, worked as a project director and research associate at the Institute of Nautical Archaeology (INA), and a received a DPhil in Archaeology at the University of Oxford.

Regarding the study of ancient ships, Dr Cabrera conducted the study of the Mazarrón 1 timber remains, the only known example of hull-remains from the 7th century BC. He also completed a post-doctoral research study, at the University of Oxford, on the hull of Ship 11, a 5th–4th century BC boat excavated in the Grand Canal of Thonis-Heracleion (Egypt). Included among Dr Cabrera's on-going international collaborations is a project with the Soprintendenza Archeologia, Belle Arte e Paesaggio per le Province di Pisa, where he is responsible for studying and publishing the naval architecture of five Roman vessels excavated at the Pisa-San Rossore train station.
FORTHCOMING: Urbanisation in the Time of Claudius in the Western Provinces of the Empire by Erika Cappelletto. Paperback; 205x290mm; 314pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £50.00). 487 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . ISBN 9781789690507. Buy Now

This volume analyses Claudius’ activities in the provinces of the western Empire in order to get an idea of his political attitude in a broader context and see how his interests in the provinces influenced the urban works.

The first aim of the project was to find structures, urban development and changes in the cities which were directly connected to Claudius; the second was to reflect on planning issues and strategies adopted by the emperor. A comprehensive examination of new buildings, or additions to prior ones (with statues, for example), was conducted in order to understand the underlying intentions, as well as how, and in which way, the prototypes in Italy influenced construction in the provinces. The final aim was connected to Venturi’s work, who deals with Claudius’ activities in Italy and in particular at Rome and Ravenna. The question was whether the trends found by Venturi can also be applied to the provinces. As a result of these investigations, the author has been able to propose new trends which might explain the emperor’s political actions.

About the Author
ERIKA CAPPELLETTO received a degree from the University of Venice with a thesis about the representation of spinning implements on gravestones. She gained her Masters from the same university with a study of the black glazed pottery from Pompeii. During this period, she participated in different projects in Italy and studied for six months at Ankara with the Erasmus project. Later, she moved to Heidelberg where she completed her PhD. She has participated in international projects and conferences, frequented workshops and undertaken an internship in digital archaeology (3d reconstruction and modelling). She currently works in cultural heritage in Germany.
FORTHCOMING: Imágenes, lengua y creencias en Lusitania romana edited by Jorge Tomás García and Vanessa Del Prete. Paperback; 203x276mm; illustrated throughout (51 pages in colour). 94 2019. ISBN 9781789692945. Buy Now

This publication considers the visual, linguistic and religious culture of the Roman province of Lusitania. Roman influence was especially notable in religion and artistic manifestations. It was in the cities where the Lusitanians acquired Roman civilization: they learned Latin, the Frankish language of the peninsula; they were introduced to the Roman administration and religion; and in the third century, when Rome converted to Christianity, so did the Lusitanians. The Latin language was imposed as the official language, functioning as a binding factor and communication between different peoples. Being a fairly large area and lacking a unified state that promoted a particular language in administration or education, different languages coexisted simultaneously in Hispania. The subjects continued to use their native languages, although official business was conducted in Latin or Greek. Indigenous religions persisted, although sacrifices were offered everywhere for the emperor and the gods of the Roman pantheon. Visual culture also reflected the hybrid character of provincial civilization. Images of a Roman style and subject matter circulated widely, and yet the craftsmen and consumers of the provinces maintained their own traditions, adopting Roman techniques and tastes as they pleased. The papers in this volume establish a broad and generous view of the relationship between images, languages and religious culture within Lusitanian society.

La presente publicación pretende suponer un acercamiento transversal y generoso a la cultura visual, lingüística y religiosa de la provincia romana de Lusitania. La influencia romana fue especialmente notable en la religión y en las manifestaciones artísticas. Las ciudades fueron una de las instituciones más importantes impuestas a Lusitania durante la ocupación romana. Fue en las ciudades donde los lusitanos adquirieron la civilización romana: aprendieron latín, la lengua franca de la península; fueron introducidos a la administración y religión romanas; y en el siglo III, cuando Roma se convirtió al cristianismo, también lo hicieron los lusitanos. La lengua latina se impuso como la lengua oficial, funcionando como factor vinculante y comunicación entre los diferentes pueblos. Al ser un área bastante grande, y al carecer de un estado unificado que promoviera un idioma determinado en la administración o la educación, en Hispania convivieron diferentes lenguas simultáneamente. Los sujetos siguieron usando sus idiomas nativos, aunque los negocios oficiales se realizaron en latín o griego. Las religiones indígenas persistieron, aunque los sacrificios se ofrecían en todas partes para el emperador y los dioses del panteón romano. La cultura visual también reflejó el carácter híbrido de la civilización provincial. Las imágenes del estilo y el mensaje romanos circulaban ampliamente y, sin embargo, los artesanos y los consumidores de las provincias mantenían sus propias tradiciones, adoptando las técnicas y los gustos romanos como les convenía. Este y otros problemas están recogidos en los capítulos de esta obra, que permite establecer una mirada amplia y generosa sobre la relación entre las imágenes, la lengua y la visión religiosa y cultural de la sociedad lusitana. Los autores de este volumen tratan así de entender este panorama tan complejo, utilizando con gran énfasis las imágenes y el lenguaje, fuentes de relevancia para acometer una visión transversal de la cultura y religión de Lusitania.

About the Editors
Jorge Tomás García PhD (Murcia, 2010) is Professor of Ancient Art at the Autonomous University of Madrid (Art History Department).

Vanessa Del Prete Mainer PhD (Madrid, 2016), is Chief Editor of the academic journal Gods and Men (interdisciplinary studies regarding the sciences of religions), launched in 2018.
NEW: Par la bêche et le stylet! Cultures et sociétés syro-mésopotamiennes Mélanges offerts à Olivier Rouault edited by Philippe Abrahami and Laura Battini. Paperback; 205x290mm; 300 pages; 139 figures; 18 tables (39 colour pages). 564 2019 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 5. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692822. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692839. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is a tribute to the career of Professor Olivier Rouault who has conducted extensive research in the fields of both Assyriology and Ancient Near Eastern archaeology. The book is composed of 25 papers written by his colleagues, friends and former students from Belgium, France, Great Britain, Italy, Israel, Japan, The Netherlands, Poland, Syria and the United States. The contributions presented here combine archaeological, iconographic and Assyriological studies from the Neolithic to the 1st millennium BC, covering whole of Mesopotamia and regions of Anatolia and the Levant. Nine papers deal with the data of Terqa, Mari and Qasr Shemamok, sites close to Professor Olivier Rouault’s main field of research. He published cuneiform tablets from Mari and Terqa and worked as a director of archaeological missions at Terqa and Qasr Shemamok. The book is divided into six main topics: Palace and Administration, Temples and Cults, Families and Societies, Literatures and Historiography, Representation and Symbolic Aspects, Cultural Markers and Stratigraphy – all the topics that attracted Professor Olivier Rouault during his fruitful career. More intimate texts recounting memories of moments shared with Olivier punctuate the reading of these contributions.

About the Editors
Philippe Abrahami is an Assyriologist, Professor of History and Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Lille, France (CNRS Laboratory HALMA UMR 8164).

Laura Battini is an archaeologist specialised in the Ancient Near East. She is currently a researcher at the French National Centre of Scientific Research (Laboratory PROCLAC, UMR 7192, directed by Thomas Römer). Laura created a new journal for the Ancient Near East (Ash sharq, Archaeopress), and is the editor of the archaeological series Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology.
NEW: Culture and Society at Lullingstone Roman Villa by Caroline K. Mackenzie. Paperback; 205x255 pages; viii+50 pages; 40 figures (colour throughout). 563 . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692907. £14.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692914. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £14.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Culture and Society at Lullingstone Roman Villa paints a picture of what life might have been like for the inhabitants of the villa in the late third and fourth centuries AD. The villa today, in the Darent Valley, Kent, has an unusual amount of well-preserved evidence for its interior decoration and architecture. Seventy years on from the commencement of the excavation of the site, this study draws on the original reports but also embraces innovative approaches to examining the archaeological evidence and sheds new light on our understanding of the villa’s use. For the first time, the site of Lullingstone Roman Villa is surveyed holistically, developing a plausible argument that the inhabitants used domestic space to assert their status and cultural identity.

An exploration of the landscape setting asks whether property location was as important a factor in the time of Roman Britain as it is today and probes the motives of the villa’s architects and their client. Lullingstone’s celebrated mosaics are also investigated from a fresh perspective. Why were these scenes chosen and what impact did they have on various visitors to the villa? Comparison with some contemporary Romano-British villas allows us to assess whether Lullingstone is what we would expect, or whether it is exceptional. Examples from the wider Roman world are also introduced to enquire how Lullingstone’s residents adopted Roman architecture and potentially the social customs which accompanied it.

About the Author
Caroline K. Mackenzie read Classics at Pembroke College, Cambridge. As an undergraduate she gained a place to study for a month at the British School at Athens. After Cambridge, she continued her studies at law school where she was awarded a distinction and then practised as a Private Client solicitor in London for over a decade. Caroline subsequently pursued a teaching career, first as a law lecturer and then as Head of Classics at a preparatory school in Sevenoaks, Kent. In 2018 Caroline was awarded a Master of Arts with distinction in Classical Art and Archaeology at King’s College London.

Caroline’s current work includes private tutoring in Latin and Greek, providing workshops for schools and leading short courses in Classical Art and Archaeology as well as Classical literature. She also teaches on the annual Summer School in Homer at University College London. Caroline writes regularly for Argo, a journal of the Hellenic Society, and various other Classical publications. She has lectured for English Heritage who invited her to deliver a study day including a private tour of Lullingstone Roman Villa. Her website is: www.carolinetutor.co.uk
NEW: Tracing Pottery-Making Recipes in the Prehistoric Balkans 6th–4th Millennia BC edited by Silvia Amicone, Patrick Sean Quinn, Miroslav Marić, Neda Mirković-Marić and Miljana Radivojević. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+182 pages; 109 figures; 19 tables. 562 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692082. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692099. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Tracing Pottery-Making Recipes in the Prehistoric Balkans 6th–4th Millennia BC is a collection of twelve chapters that capture the variety of current archaeological, ethnographic, experimental and scientific studies on Balkan prehistoric ceramic production, distribution and use. The Balkans is a culturally rich area at the present day as it was in the past. Pottery and other ceramics represent an ideal tool with which to examine this diversity and interpret its human and environmental origins. Consequently, Balkan ceramic studies is an emerging field within archaeology that serves as a testing ground for theories on topics such as technological know-how, innovation, craft tradition, cultural transmission, interaction, trade and exchange. This book brings together diverse studies by leading researchers and upcoming scholars on material from numerous Balkan countries and chronological periods that tackle these and other topics for the first time. It is a valuable resource for anyone working on Balkan archaeology and also of interest to those working on archaeological pottery from other parts of the world.

Silvia Amicone, lead editor, is a scientific researcher at the University of Tübingen within the Competence Centre Archaeometry Baden-Württemberg (CCA-BW), and an Honorary Research Fellow at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London (UCL). She completed an AHRC-funded doctoral research at the Institute of Archaeology, UCL, as member of the cutting-edge international project ‘The Rise of Metallurgy in Eurasia’. Her research focuses on archaeomaterials, particularly on the analysis of pottery technology in contexts of intense socio-cultural innovation.
NEW: Stamps on Terra Sigillata Found in Excavations of the Theatre of Aptera by Martha W. Baldwin Bowsky. Paperback; 175x245mm; ii+208 pages; 98 colour figures. 560 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 54. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692389. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692396. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Stamps on Terra Sigillata Found in Excavations of the Theatre of Aptera presents a group of stamped fragments of Italian and eastern sigillata found in excavations of the Theatre of Aptera (Crete). A total of 258 stamped sherds have been discovered and identified: 28 already published by the author and another 230 included here. Aptera now yields more stamped fragments of terra sigillata than any other Cretan city to date, including Knossos.

The sigillata stamps from the Theatre of Aptera can be analysed so as to address a series of fundamental questions. Three of these constitute traditional uses of the evidence available from an analysis of terra sigillata: which potters supplied the Theatre of Aptera and its environs; where these potters were active; when these potters were active and therefore what production centres supplied the Theatre of Aptera and its area over time. Two more questions go further, in an effort to take advantage of this kind of material’s ability to testify to patterns of contact and exchange, as well as to details of life within the Roman imperial system: what distribution patterns might have brought terra sigillata to the Theatre of Aptera and its vicinity; and whether we can suggest how terra sigillata was consumed in Aptera’s Theatre and its environs.

Aptera’s Theatre was a venue not only for performances but for drinking, eating, and serving, on the part of theatregoers, spectators, actors and other performers. These activities took place during a period of prosperity for Roman Aptera in the first and second centuries, a period that coincides nicely with the production and distribution of terra sigillata. The people of Aptera and the surrounding area took full advantage of Crete’s strategic position amid crossroads of transit and exchange as well as integration into the Roman economy, to display their prosperity and status in public and in private.

About the Author
Martha W. Baldwin Bowsky is a Professor Emerita of Classical Studies, retired from the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California; she now lives and pursues research from a base in High Point, North Carolina. She graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and The University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. She began her career as an epigraphist when she was involved in field research on Crete in 1979 and 1980, while preparing a doctoral dissertation on the Julio-Claudian governors of the province of Creta-Cyrenae. After a year at the University of California at Davis, she enjoyed a full career of teaching and research at University of the Pacific; she remains an active scholar and participant in international conferences. Throughout her career she has been active in epigraphical research on the archaeological sites and in the storerooms and museums of Crete, with a particular interest in the Roman period on the island. Her focus has turned from top-down studies of provincial administration to bottom-up studies of the material culture of the island as an active participant in the Roman empire. She has authored a significant number of articles both publishing new inscriptions – on stone and on pottery – and also setting these and other Cretan inscriptions into their historical and archaeological contexts.
NEW: Megaliths of the Vera Island in the Southern Urals by Stanislav Grigoriev and Yulia Vasina . Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+284 pages; 223 figures; 34 tables (110 pages in colour). 559 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692426. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692433. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Megaliths of the Vera Island in the Southern Urals presents the results of the study of the largest megalithic complex in the Urals, located on Vera Island. The complex is represented by three chambered megaliths and sanctuaries dated to the Eneolithic period (mid-4th - 3rd millennium BC). The book discusses the features of the architecture and building technologies, their astronomical orientation, chronology, religious context, and explores their relation to social organisation and the possible migration of peoples. Small finds – especially the ceramic assemblages – are presented. The authors discuss problems associated with the origin of megaliths, the approaches of European researchers and the possibilities of applying these approaches to the Ural megaliths. Against the background of the lack of agriculture – in contrast to Europe – there was no demographic basis in the Urals for the emergence and existence of the megalithic phenomenon.

In addition to the megalithic complex, there are many unexplored objects on the island, the purpose of which remain, as yet, unclear. Ancient settlements of the same period have also been discovered on the island. The complex on Vera Island is unique precisely due to the combination of objects with so many different functions found within a relatively small area (6 ha).

About the Authors
Stanislav Grigoriev graduated from Chelyabinsk University in 1982. He began his scientific career at the same university, and since 1989 has been working at the Institute of History and Archaeology, Ural Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences. He studied ancient metallurgy and the Bronze Age, and for many years participated in the excavations of such famous settlements as Sintashta and Arkaim. Since 2004, he has headed the research project of the megalithic complex on the Vera Island. His books Ancient Indo-Europeans, Metallurgical Production in Northern Eurasia in the Bronze Age and Holy Lalish are published in English.

Julia Vasina graduated from Chelyabinsk Pedagogical University, Faculty of History. Since 2003, she has led archaeological expeditions studying archaeological sites in the Urals. She is a leading expert in archaeology of the Ural cities and is the author of 38 works on archaeology, the history of the Urals and cultural studies. In 2004-2007, she was one of the leaders of the archaeological team on Vera Island. Based on this research, the island obtained the status of an object of cultural heritage. In 2014-2015, she was the scientific leader of the project for the restoration of the megalithic monuments of Vera Island.