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NEW: AEGIS Essays in Mediterranean Archaeology: Presented to Matti Egon by the scholars of the Greek Archaeological Committee UK edited by Zetta Theodoropoulou Polychroniadis and Doniert Evely. vi+242 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 196 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912000. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912017. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The honorand of this volume, Matti Egon, has been a great benefactor to museums, schools, universities and hospitals in the UK and also in Greece: all areas that her background and life’s interests have made dear to her. One of these is the Greek Archaeological Committee UK, that she helped found in 1992: an organization dedicated to informing academe and the public in Britain of archaeological work carried out in Greece, and of enabling the ‘brightest minds’ of Greece and Cyprus to pursue post-graduate research at British institutions, to the mutual enrichment of both. Some fifty-five graduates have so benefited.

This volume offers essays by a good half of those so assisted: roughly split between the sexes, they range between post-graduates still completing their studies in the UK, up to those with doctorates, almost half the group, now successfully in employment at Universities and similar Institutions in the UK, Greece, Cyprus and the USA, with rather fewer working in Museums, within the Greek Ephorates and even at a Foreign School in Athens.

The hugely varied topics they offer cover the entire range of prehistory and history down to the modern day on Greek and Cypriot soil. Neolithic animal butchery rubs shoulders with regional assessments of the end of the Mycenaean era, investigations into Hellenistic sculptors and lamps, life in Byzantine monasteries and the politics behind modern exhibitions; the Phoenicians and even an Islamic general make cameo appearances. This startling range of subjects accurately reflects the depth of scholarship Matti Egon has nurtured into being; the affection and gratitude expressed by the graduates equally mirrors the deep appreciation they acknowledge for the opportunities so given.
FORTHCOMING: The Enigmatic World of Ancient Graffiti Rock Art in Chukotka. The Chaunskaya Region, Russia by Margarita Kir’yak (Dikova). Translated by Richard L. Bland. vi+160 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 7 colour plates. 194 2015. ISBN 9781784911881. £32.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This monograph is devoted to small forms of engraving on stone. It summarizes the archaeological material obtained during the course of excavations at the Rauchuvagytgyn I site (dated to 2500 years ago) in northern Chukotka. The book analyzes the content and semantics of the pictorial resources, and ethnic identification is made. The interpretive part of the study raises issues of an ideological character and brings one closer to the inaccessible realm of ideas and concepts of the ancients. This well-illustrated book is directed primarily toward archaeologists, ethnographers, historians, and fine art experts but will also be of interest to a broad range of readers.

About the author:
Dr Margarita Kiry’ak is one of the foremost archaeologists of far Northeast Asia (Chukotka). She has been conducting archaeological research in Chukotka for more than 30 years, during which time she has published four books in Russia, Great Britain, and the U.S., and 115 scholarly articles in Russia, the U.S., Italy, and Korea.

This book is scheduled for publication in November 2015, priced £32.00. To register your interest please email info@archaeopress.com.
NEW: Homines, Funera, Astra 2 Life Beyond Death in Ancient Times (Romanian Case Studies) edited by Raluca Kogălniceanu, Mihai Gligor, Roxana-Gabriela Curcă and Susan Stratton. viii+124 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Nine papers in English, one in French. 182 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912062. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912079. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Proceedings of the International Symposium on Funerary Anthropology 23-26 September 2012 ‘1 Decembrie 1918’ University (Alba Iulia, Romania)

The present volume reunites most of the papers that were presented at the second meeting of the Homines, Funera, Astra Symposium on Funerary Anthropology that took place at ‘1 Decembrie 1918’ University, Alba Iulia, between 23rd and 26th September 2012.

The theme of the volume is Life beyond Death in Ancient Times. The intention was to create a forum for discussing Prehistoric, Roman and Migration Period burial practices from Central and South-Eastern Europe, focusing on elements that might suggest belief in afterlife.

The interdisciplinary character of the volume is provided by the varied approaches to the archaeology by the contributors, resulting in exploring the subject from multiple perspectives: archaeological, anthropological, geological, architectural, landscape, and epigraphic. Seven studies are dedicated to prehistoric burial practices, discussing discoveries dating from the Palaeolithic (one study), Neolithic and Copper Age (four studies), and Bronze Age (one study). A study focusing on methodology proposes a non-invasive method of analysis for burial mounds, with examples from the Bronze and Iron Ages. Two studies focusing on the Roman Period and another on the Migration Period complete our vision of funerary archaeology for this part of Europe.

We want to express joy that our editorial project, which started with the publication of the first HFA volume (R. Kogălniceanu, R.-G. Curcă, M. Gligor and S. Stratton (eds.), Homines, Funera, Astra. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Funerary Anthropology, 5-8 June 2011, ‘1 Decembrie 1918’ University, Alba Iulia, Romania. Oxford, Archaeopress, BAR International Series 2410) , is followed by the present book. The basis for the series dedicated to burial archaeology with the intention to be a useful, modern, interdisciplinary instrument, is thus laid.
The Circle of God An archaeological and historical search for the nature of the sacred: A study of continuity by Brian Hobley. 820 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 163 2015. ISBN 9781784911379. £110.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Symbolism was endemic in the ancient world as a visual language, with its interpretation one of the most important challenges, especially in the realm of the divine and sacred, to today’s cognitive archaeology and Classical Studies. This study is focussed on circular solar/cosmic symbolism which has endured for seven millennia in the European and Mediterranean worlds. The potency of the solar/cosmic circle should not be understated, as this study will demonstrate, with its worldwide affiliation. For all humankind is aware of the sun’s benefits of light and warmth, and of the seasons which needed in the ancient world to be sustained by heavenly harmony through ritual, sacrifice and worship; hence the introduction of sympatheia, i.e. ‘as above so below’ thus satisfying society’s need for a relationship with the natural world of the universe/sun. To that end, Bronze Age people created circular landscapes such as Stonehenge with circular henges and burial monuments (barrows). In the Classical Greco-Roman world, kingship required emperors to play a cosmocrator role acting as a beneficial solar/cosmic earthly filter for their people. Thus Augustus adopted the primary solar Greek god Apollo as his patron, for he commanded prophecy and divination integral in the ancient world. Divination and fate belonged to the Gods, with ancient astrology not just fortune telling but projecting the divine will and workings of the circular living orderly universe with the Sun the centre of Divine intelligence. The pagan world inter-religious toleration was exchanged for Christian universalist monotheism which needed the solarisation of Christ by early Christian fathers to gain followers and permanent converts. Such was the strength of solar tradition that the Emperor Constantine remained loyal nearly unto death, and up to medieval times Christ in Europe was still known as Sol Resurrectionus.

FORTHCOMING: Argonauts of the Stone Age Early maritime activity from the first migrations from Africa to the end of the Neolithic by Andrzej Pydyn. viii+255 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 11 colour plates.ISBN 9781784911430. £36.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This is an important book. Too often in the past archaeologists have ignored or underestimated sea travel in early prehistory but the evidence has been growing and now it is presented to us in full in this thought provoking study. No longer can those interested in the human achievement neglect to take into account the astonishing achievements of our palaeolithic, mesolithic and neolithic ancestors.

This book gives a full account of stone age seafaring presenting the archaeological evidence in the context of the changing world environment and uses ethnographic sources to broaden the readers understanding of the worlds earliest sea craft. It is essential reading for all concerned to understand the human condition. – Professor Sir Barry Cunliffe, Oxford

The book is a comprehensive study of early navigation and its place in the development of human culture from the earliest times to the late Stone Age. This subject is very timely in light of increasing archaeological and palaeoanthropological evidence that the maritime environment had been mastered in prehistory. As the author rightly points out at the beginning of his book, the maritime environment can no longer be marginalised when portraying both hunter-gatherer and early agrarian prehistoric communities.

The book is a valuable and inspiring work on a subject which had hitherto not enjoyed such in-depth treatment. It greatly enhances our perception of the beginnings of human culture and enriches it with comprehensive, convincing arguments that the maritime environment had been mastered by early humans. I congratulate the author on the effect he has achieved and on unearthing so many chronologically, geographically and thematically diverse sources. – Prof. Paweł Valde-Nowak, Jagiellonian University, Krakow

The title of the book intrigues the reader and promises a fascinating read about issues approached from an innovatively broad perspective. Both the global territorial scope and the chronological range covering almost two million years of human cultural development are worthy of note. What we have here is an aspect of human activity which is often neglected and marginalised in scientific research, which is that directly related to the sea. The fact that up to 90% of Pleistocene coasts, which were after all heavily populated in the Stone Age, have been flooded in modern times is not conducive to large-scale research, as underlined by the author in the Introduction.

The beginnings of human activity on the high seas are the subject of research in numerous scientific disciplines, all of which are discussed here. In writing this book the author has drawn on an exceptionally wide range of literature, mostly in English, owing to which the author’s own views, as well as those of other researchers whom he cites, are credible and convincing. – Dr hab. Krzysztof Cyrek, professor of Nicolaus Copernicus University, Toruń

This book is scheduled for publication in June 2015, priced £36.00. To register your interest please email info@archaeopress.com.
Evolution of a Community: The Colonisation of a Clay Inland Landscape Neolithic to post-medieval remains excavated over sixteen years at Longstanton in Cambridgeshire by Samantha Paul and John Hunt. xii+245 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 139 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910860. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910877. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The movement of people from the fen edge and river valleys into the clay lands of eastern England has become a growing area of research. The opportunity of studying such an environment and investigating the human activities that took place there became available 9 km to the north-west of Cambridge at the village of Longstanton. The archaeological excavations that took place over a sixteen year period have made a significant contribution to charting the emergence of a Cambridgeshire clayland settlement and its community over six millennia.

Evolution of a Community chronologically documents the colonisation of this clay inland location and outlines how it was not an area on the periphery of activity, but part of a fully occupied landscape extending back into the Mesolithic period. Subsequent visits during the Late Neolithic became more focused when the locality appears to have been part of a religious landscape that included a possible barrow site and ritual pit deposits. The excavations indicate that the earliest permanent settlement at the site dates to the Late Bronze Age, with the subsequent Iron Age phases characterised as a small, modest and inward-looking community that endured into the Roman period with very little evidence for disjuncture during the transition. The significant discovery of a group of seventh-century Anglo-Saxon burials which produced rare evidence for infectious deceases is discussed within the context of ‘final phase’ cemeteries and the influence of visible prehistoric features within the local landscape. The excavation of the Late Anglo-Saxon and medieval rural settlement defined its origins and layout which, alongside the artefactual and archaeobotanical assemblages recovered creates a profile over time of the life and livelihood of this community that is firmly placed within its historical context.
Archeologia a Firenze: Città e Territorio Atti del Workshop. Firenze, 12-13 Aprile 2013 edited by Valeria d'Aquino, Guido Guarducci, Silvia Nencetti and Stefano Valentini. iv+438 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Italian text. Abstracts for all papers in Italian & English.. 135 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910587. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910594. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents the proceedings of the workshop ‘Archeologia a Firenze: Città e territorio’, organized by CAMNES, Centre for Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Studies, in collaboration with the Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici della Toscana, in April 2013. This event experienced an extraordinary participation by experts in the field, and resulted also in a significant success in terms of public archaeological awareness. Almost twenty years after the exhibition ‘Alle origini di Firenze’ and the publication of its Catalogo, which is considered a signal point in Florentine archaeology, the workshop provided an opportunity for discussion between all those who conducted research, protection and enhancement of the archaeological heritage of Florence thanks to the presentation of the most recent excavations. Moreover, the origins of the city that took the leading role during the Renaissance were discussed, finding in its roots the very reasons for its glorious destiny. The sessions, organized in chronological order – from prehistoric to medieval topics – were supplemented by contributions concerned with conservation and enhancement of the historic landscape whose reconstruction through research and excavation activities constantly requires new discussions and often additional reflections.
From Cave to Dolmen Ritual and symbolic aspects in the prehistory between Sciacca, Sicily and the central Mediterranean edited by Domenica Gullì. vi+308 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Papers in English and Italian. 123 2014. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910389. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910396. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book brings together the scientific contributions of a wide panel of Sicilian and mainland Italian specialists in prehistory. Taking inspiration from a conference organised by the Soprintendenza ai Beni Culturali e Ambientali of Agrigento and by the municipal council of Sciacca in November 2011, the decision was taken to broaden and deepen some of the main themes discussed on that occasion. Therefore this book focuses on the Sciacca region and its landscape which is extraordinarily rich in natural geological phenomena and associated archaeological activity, for example the Grotta del Kronio and the numerous dolmens present nearby. This volume seeks to explore the various aspects – habitational or ritual – of the prehistoric use of the numerous caves present in the region and to analyse the many features of the island’s megalithic architecture. The text includes an historical review of the processes of discovery of the archaeological evidence, also an account of the current research projects and research activities.
Fractures in Knapping by Are Tsirk. xii+261 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 117 2014. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910228. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910235. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is for students and practitioners of not only knapping, lithic technology and archaeology, but also of fractography and fracture mechanics. At conferences on fractography of glasses and ceramics, the author has often been asked to demonstrate knapping as well as provide overviews of fractography learned from it. The first part of the book is intended to stimulate such interests further, in order to solicit contributions from a largely untapped pool of experts. Such contributions can advance significantly our understandings of knapping as well as fractography. In Part II of the book, fracture markings as the tools of fractography are introduced, with their formation, meaning and utility explained. Observations on the presence or absence of the markings in knapping are considered in Part III, along with a number of interpretations of fracture features.

The basic principles and concepts of fracture mechanics and fractography apply to fractures produced in any cultural context. This volume therefore addresses most questions on fracture in a generic sense, independent of cultural contexts. In general, understanding of fractures provides a sounder basis for lithic analysis, and use of more recent scientific tools opens new avenues for lithic studies.

“Tsirk understands lithic fracture mechanics better than anyone. … This his latest work will stand as his testament of a lifetime of critically important research in archeology.” –Errett Callahan, Consultant in Reconstructive Archeology, Lynchburg, VA

“For more than 40 years, Are Tsirk has developed interdisciplinary research on the physical phenomena in knapping, combining his experience in knapping with his longstanding interest in fracture. The work is enhanced by his curiosity and the minute observational ability of a natural scientist. It is the most complete monograph on the subject. It will be of interest to all amateurs in knapping and useful, if not indispensible, to fractographers as well as all archaeologists in the study of lithics.” –Jacques Pelegrin, Lab. “Préhistoire et Technologie” CNRS, Paris

“The book…is a delight to read. It contains information of interest and importance to the knapper, fractographer and anyone interested in flint knapping or finding out about knapping. It contains so much material in one place that it becomes an invaluable resource. It is easy to read and many of the sections are self-contained….The pictures are marvelous and very descriptive. If you have an interest in history, art, anthropology, fractography or knapping in any aspect, you will enjoy and appreciate this book.” –John J. Mecholsky, Jr., Materials and Engineering Department, University of Florida, Gainesville
The Prehistoric Burial Sites of Northern Ireland by Harry and June Welsh. xi+478 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. 106 2014. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910068. £63.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910075. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Much has been written about the history of Northern Ireland, but less well-known is its wealth of prehistoric sites, particularly burial sites, from which most of our knowledge of the early inhabitants of this country has been obtained. This work brings together information on all the known sites in Northern Ireland that are in some way associated with burial. It has been compiled from a number of sources and includes many sites that have only recently been discovered. A total of 3332 monuments are recorded in the inventory, ranging from megalithic tombs to simple pit burials. In addition to providing an inventory of all known sites, along with a selection of photographs and plans, the work also includes an introduction to the prehistory of Northern Ireland, an explanation of terms and a full bibliography. The aim is to provide a foundation for more specific research projects, based on a standardised information format of this largely untapped resource. For example, the work highlights several large and previously unrecognised clusters of prehistoric burial monuments, some located at unusual landscape features. Hopefully, further analysis will lead to a greater understanding of why this should be and stimulate a renewed interest in the prehistory of Northern Ireland. Enhanced awareness of this should complement knowledge of the historical period to provide a more balanced picture of human activity here.
Copper Shaft-Hole Axes and Early Metallurgy in South-Eastern Europe: An Integrated Approach by Julia Heeb. viii+167 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white with some colour. With CD. 97 2014. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781905739837. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781905739905. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Although the copper axes with central shaft-hole from south-eastern Europe have a long history of research, they have not been studied on a transnational basis since the 1960s. What has also been missing, is trying to use as many methods as possible to better understand their production, use and context. A database was compiled to find answers to questions regarding patterns of distribution, context, fragmentation and deformation. Aspects of production were considered through experimental archaeology, metallographic analysis and a re-discovered axe blank with missing shaft-hole. The typology was re-evaluated and modified to ensure comparability across modern national boundaries. The integration of these approaches yielded some interesting results. The great variability in shape clearly shows that a variety of production techniques were used, but it is difficult to relate these to specific geographic areas. In fact the typology as well as the practice of marking the axes indicate that traditional archaeological ‘cultures’ rarely correspond to axe types and marking practices. Instead there were different spheres of influence, some more localised and others much larger than specific ceramic traditions. These different levels of belonging show that it was a period of complex cultural patterns and interactions. The axes were part of these networks of daily life on many different levels from the utilitarian to the ritualised placement in burial contexts.
A Distant Prospect of Wessex: Archaeology and the Past in the Life and Works of Thomas Hardy. by Martin J. P. Davies. Viii+218 pages; illustrated throughout, paperback. Was £15.99. 62 2011. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781905739417. £5.95 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910792. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Special Offer: £5.95 (RRP: £15.99): 'If the real Wessex, with its counties, towns, villages and topography, was no mere readily available template upon which Hardy could carve a fictional pattern, Dorchester provided a very different model, though at the level of local colour and detail, Casterbridge really is Dorchester 'by any other name.'' In this study, Martin Davies examines the role which Thomas Hardy’s involvement with the past plays in his life and literary work. Hardy’s life encompasses the transformation of archaeology out of mere antiquarianism into a fully scientific discipline. Hardy – once described as ‘a born archaeologist’ – observed this process at first hand, and its impact on his aesthetic and philosophical scheme was profound. Dr Davies’ study offers a different route to a fuller understanding of Hardy’s novels, poems, and short stories. How much was Hardy concerned with archaeology per se amongst his plethora of interests? How much did he actually know about it? Did his Classical education, architectural training, and visit to Italy impinge on his perception of the mysterious traces of British prehistory and the Roman occupation with which he had grown up? How does reference to archaeology fit in with his overall narrative, aesthetic, and philosophical scheme? These are the questions posed by Martin Davies in his study of the role played by archaeology and the past in the life and works of Thomas Hardy. The answers are far reaching and profound.
Targumic Manuscripts in the Cambridge Genizah Collections Genizah Series No. 8 (2006 reprint of 1992 first edition). 136 pages with 24 b/w plates; softcover. 22 2007. ISBN 9781905739035. £30.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

This volume, originally published by Cambridge University Press and now reprinted by Archaeopress, is an essential research tool for scholars studying the Jewish Aramaic translations of the Bible. It provides a description for every Targum manuscript in the Cambridge Genizah Collections, 1600 fragments in all, from every targumic genre and type, ranging in date from the earliest known manuscripts of the Palestinian Targum to late Yemenite versions of Onqelos, including a great many previously unidentified manuscripts. The late Michael Klein, who died in 2000, was the leading authority on the targumic manuscripts in the Genizah. Reviews of the first edition:‘[a] magnificent volume, absolutely indispensable for all who are interested in targumic literature’ (F. García Martínez, Journal for the Study of Judaism 24 (1993)) Originally published by C.U.P.
Stonehenge Landscapes Journeys through real-and-imagined worlds by Sally Exon, Vince Gaffney, Ann Woodward, Ron Yorston. Paperback, 139 pages, black & white and colour photographs, CD included. 2000. 20 2000. Only available as e-version. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Buy Now

"Stonehenge Landscapes" is the largest digital analysis of the archaeological landscape and monuments of Stonehenge ever attempted. The study uses data from more than 1200 monuments. The contents of the Stonehenge barrows are collated for the first time and presented in a series of appendices. The result of this endeavour is a major phenomenological study of the development of the Stonehenge landscape from the Mesolithic to the Early Bronze Age. The authors explain how the landscape emerged over time, the developing relationships between the public monuments, and how these monuments created new spaces for social action in prehistory. The way monuments were used and perceived is discussed and the results are demonstrated through interactive software which displays GIS data, animations of movement along monuments and through the landscape, as well as 3-dimensional views of the landscape, panoramic photographs and videos. Uniquely, the reader can access all the data through their web browser, permitting them to perform their own studies and produce their own reading of the landscape of Stonehenge. "Stonehenge Landscapes" is a radical step forward in archaeological publishing, integrating computing and phenomenological study: permitting new insights into a well-known landscape and allowing the reader to participate in the study and interpretation of the results. ‘Stonehenge Lanscapes’ CD includes a software program to display various data sets. The copyright owner of this program is Ronald Yorston. Archaeopress holds a licence to distribute the program as part of the electronic version of ‘Stonehenge Landscapes’.
Open Access: Die Anfänge des kontinentalen Transportwesens und seine Auswirkungen auf die Bolerázer und Badener Kulturen by Tünde Horváth. iv+77 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. German text. Exclusive to Open Access.ISBN 9781784910839. Buy Now

The earliest finds of wheeled vehicles in northern and central Europe date to 3900-3600 BC. However finds (3400–3300 BC) from the Boleráz sites of Arbon/Bleiche 3 and Bad Buchau/Torwiesen II, linked to pile-dwelling settlements, indicate methods of transport typical for higher altitudes (slides, sleds, etc.). The Boleráz and Baden cultures overlap in the Carpathian Basin between 3300–3000 BC and this period seems to have produced transport models that parallel finds in today’s Austria, Slovakia, Hungary, and other regions. These suggest that generally the Boleráz settlers inside the Carpathian Basin did not know, or use, the wheel in the fullest sense. Cart and wheel forms are indicated only from Grave 177 at Budakalász (2800–2600 BC). The Hungarian Baden finds follow the Danube and to the East there are no certain vehicle remains. It is difficult to tell whether the Boleráz finds are linked to the wider Alpine zone, and the Baden finds are perhaps associated with the mixed-culture sites along the eastern slopes of the Carpathians. The four-wheeled wagon was a development linked to the plains and the Steppes (Cucuteni–Tripolje, Pre-Yamnaja, Yamnaja). The nature of the finds relating to vehicles associated with lake and riverine settlements reveal technical and material features: there is evidence of a high degree of carving, if not decoration, and these communities pointed the way for future skills and developments in wheel and cart/wagon manufacture.

Exclusive to Open Access. Download the free Open Access PDF here.

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