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Open Access: Proceedings of the 17th Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology. SOMA 2013 Moscow, 25-27 April 2013 edited by Sergei Fazlullin, Mazlum Mert Antika. 262 pages.Buy Now

Papers from the 17th Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology, SOMA 2013 held in Moscow, 25-27 April 2013.

Download the free Open Access PDF here.

Open Access: Etudes sur la céramique romaine tardive d’Afrique by Michel Bonifay. viii+525 pages; 269 figures, maps, plans, drawing, photographs; 3 colour plates; 4 tables. Typological Index. French text.ISBN 9781784912109. Buy Now

The subject of this work is the pottery (amphorae, vessels, lamps, small objects and architectural ceramic) of Roman Africa from the 2nd to the 7th century. It is based on a large assemblage from several settlements in south of France (Marseilles), in Tunisia (Nabeul, Hammamet/Pupput, Sidi Jdidi, Oudhna, Carthage, Thuburbo Majus, El Jem) and in the Eastern Mediterranean (Alexandria, Beirut). In the first part, the author examines different aspects of production (epigraphy, petrography, workshops, technology). The second part is devoted to the typology and the chronology of amphorae, red slip ware, cooking wares, coarse ware, handmade wares, lamps, figurines and moulds, tiles and vaulting tubes, with some new proposals for classification and dating. Economic patterns are discussed in the third part, including the processes of commercialisation (outside and inside Africa), the contents of amphorae and the historical interpretations of the large diffusion of African pottery.

Originally published in print as British Archaeological Reports International Series 1301. (Archaeopress, Oxford, 2004). Print version available here.

Download the free Open Access PDF here.

The Dodecanese: Further Travels Among the Insular Greeks Selected Writings of J. Theodore & Mabel V.A. Bent, 1885-1888 edited by Gerald Brisch. xiv+194 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 3rdguides 143 2015 3rdGuides - Archaeopress Travel 8. ISBN 9781784910969. £15.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

A sequel to The Cyclades, a compilation of late-19th-century travel writings (with an archaeological/ethnographical bias) centred on the Greek Dodecanese islands (including Rhodes, Nissiros, Tilos, Karpathos, Patmos, and Astypalea).

The authors are the British explorer J. Theodore Bent (1852-1897), devotedly supported by his wife Mabel Virginia Anna (1847-1929). Theodore met Mabel shortly after coming down from Oxford in 1875 and they married two years later. They were of independent character and means and spent the too few years until Theodore’s early death on a breathless sequence of annual travels to the Eastern Mediterranean, Africa, and Southern Arabia. Theodore’s publications are referenced still by archaeologists and scholars working on sites or regions such as ‘Great Zimbabwe’, Aksum, the Wadi Hadramaut, the Cilician littoral, and, of course, the Greek islands.

Bent’s first successful monograph was based on two winters spent in the Cycladic isles (1882/3 and 1883/4). From the start the couple kept notebooks from which all Theodore’s later lectures and literature sprang. His The Cyclades, or Life Among the Insular Greeks was published in 1885 and has been rarely out of print since. It remains one of the most delightful accounts in English of the region, and few serious travellers and tourists to these islands fail to discover it.

In the year The Cyclades was published the Bents moved a little east and explored the islands now commonly referred to as the Greek Dodecanese. Unforeseen circumstances obliged the explorers to curtail their activities before Theodore’s writings on the area could be edited into a monograph to complement his earlier bestseller. Theodore’s Dodecanesian output was channelled instead into a wide range of articles, while Mabel completed three volumes of her personal Chronicles on their daily travels and travails.

Bent never presented his Dodecanese researches to the public in a compendium, the way he had, so brilliantly, for the Cyclades. Now, 130 years later, his The Dodecanese can appear for the first time: a collection of reminiscences and studies on these sunny, blue-surrounded, and delightful islands.

Contents: ‘Preface’ by Marc Dubin; ‘Introduction’ by Gerald Brisch; ‘J.T. Bent: Selected Writings on the Dodecanese 1885-1888’; ‘M.V.A. Bent: Travel Chronicles for the years 1885-1888’. Fully illustrated with maps and photographs.

Mr. Bent’s book deserves all success, for it is the result of researches pursued in the most laudable manner…[and] a unique description of the life and ideas of a people, which renders it a very storehouse of facts for the student of customs and myths. And in this respect its value will be permanent. Other travellers may follow in Mr. Bent’s footsteps, and fill up what is wanting in his archaeological information; but in a few years’ time, if any traveller be found so enduring as to attempt once more the task which he has so well performed, it is highly probable that a great part of these interesting customs and ideas will have disappeared. (Henry Fanshawe Tozer (1885), on The Cyclades by J.T. Bent)

Open Access: Setting the Scene: The deceased and regenerative cult within offering table imagery of the Egyptian Old to Middle Kingdoms (c.2686 – c.1650 BC) by Barbara O’Neill. 123 pages. Exclusive to Open Access. Archaeopress Egyptology . Buy Now

Ancient Egyptian offering table scenes have been explored from chronological and art historical perspectives over the past century of Egyptological research. This descriptive overview has usually centred on the diachronic evolution of philology and food offerings, focussing less frequently on offering table images as discrete elements of highly codified information. The exploration into offering table imagery presented in this study examines two key elements: gender and the performance of ritual incorporated within scene structure. Latent and hidden potential of life within the ancient Egyptian tomb was subject to a complex process of metaphysical transformation achieved through external cult and provisioning provided by the family of the deceased, and through internalised cult present in ritually charged texts and imagery. The hypothesis that the offering table depiction functioned as an influential element in this transformational continuum will be explored in this work. This study investigates gender-based and ritual-dependent afterlife expectations of the deceased over a key phase in Egyptian history from the latter part of the Old Kingdom to the end of the Middle Kingdom Period, c.2686 BC - c.1650 BC. Conclusions indicate that the transformational journey to the afterlife can be understood through a meaningful synthesis of people, produce and ritual embedded within offering table depictions.

Exclusive to Open Access. Download the free Open Access PDF here.

Open Access: To See the Invisible: Karelian Rock Art by Arsen Faradzhev. ISBN 9781784911249. Buy Now

This contribution considers 25 years of discovery of the possible origins and development of the Rock Art Tradition to create Karelian Rock Art images under the open sky through the analysis of different types of intercessions into the horizontal surface of granite rocks.

Karelian petroglyphs are located-at the eastern bank of the Onega Lake and 300 km to the north, close to the southern bank of the White Sea. One of them, the “New Zalavruga,” was discovered by the expedition of U.Savvateev under the Neolithic cultural layer and sterile sand layer in 1963-1968. This is a great and very rare opportunity to obtain direct dating of the end of the tradition to create Karelian Rock Art images around 5-6 ka ago. Therefore, the task was to find the “Invisible” evidences of the tradition’s origins and development similar to both regions via the different use of context.

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Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 43 2013 Papers from the forty-sixth meeting, London, 13–15 July 2012 edited by Lloyd Weeks and Janet Watson. 361 pages; illustrated in colour and black and white. PSAS43 2013. ISBN 9781905739653 . £65.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Contents: 1) Abdullah al-Ghafri et al.: Timing water shares in Wādī Banī Kharūs, Sultanate of Oman; 2) Valentina Azzarà: Architecture and building techniques at the Early Bronze Age site of HD-6, Rā’s al-Hadd, Sultanate of Oman; 3) Soumyen Bandyopadhyay et al.: In times of war: typological and morphological characteristics of dwellings in Hārat al-Yemen in Izkī, Oman; 4) Anne Benoist: A green paradise. Economic strategies, collective practices, and local ancestors of the Iron Age community of Masāfī (Emirate of Fujairah, UAE); 5) Lucy Blue et al.: Developing an integrated policy for the maritime and coastal heritage of the UAE: a collaborative approach; 6) Manfred Böhme: The ‘petrographic-polychrome style’ and the symbolic meaning of white stones in Hafit grave architecture (poster); 7) Vincent Charpentier et al.: Conquering new territories: when the first black boats sailed to Masirah Island; 8) Richard Cuttler et al.: Typological and chronological variation of burial in Qatar: ‘Ubaid to late pre-Islamic (poster); 9) Hans Georg K. Gebel: Arabia’s fifth-millennium BCE pastoral well cultures: hypotheses on the origins of oasis life; 10) Julie Goy et al.: Archaeometallurgical survey in the area of Masafi (Fujairah, UAE): preliminary data from an integrated programme of survey, excavation, and physicochemical analyses; 11) Hanadi Ismail: Communities of healing practice on al-Batinah coast of Oman; 12) Carine Juvin: Calligraphy and writing activities in Mecca during the medieval period (twelfth–fifteenth centuries); 13) Moritz Kinzel et al.: Conserving Zubarah: towards a conservation strategy for Al Zubarah Archaeological Site, Qatar (poster); 14) Adelina Kutterer & Sabah A. Jasim: An infant burial from late pre-Islamic Mleiha (Sharjah, UAE) (poster); 15) Johannes Kutterer et al.: Second report on the copper smelting site HLO1 in Wādī al-Hilo (Sharjah, UAE); 16) Marion Lemée et al.: Jabal al-ΚAluya: an inland Neolithic settlement of the late fifth millennium BC in the Ādam area, Sultanate of Oman; 17) Romolo Loreto: New Neolithic evidence from the al-Jawf region: an outline of the historical development of Dūmat al-Jandal; 18) Gen Mitsuishi & Derek Kennet: Kiln sites of the fourteenth–twentieth-century Julfar ware pottery industry in Ras al-Khaimah, UAE; 19) Miranda J. Morris: The use of ‘veiled language’ in Soqotri poetry; 20) Andrew Petersen & Faisal al-Naimi: Qal‘at Ruwayda and the fortifications of Qatar; 21) Valeria Fiorani Piacentini: The eleventh–twelfth centuries: an ‘Umān–Kīj–Kirmān/Harmuz axis?; 22) Hannah Russ & Andrew D. Petersen: Fish and fishing during the late Islamic period at Rubayqa, northern Qatar: preliminary results (poster); 23) Jérémie Schiettecatte et al.: The oasis of al-Kharj through time: first results of archaeological fieldwork in the province of Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); 24) Julie Scott-Jackson & William Scott-Jackson: Route planning in the Palaeolithic? (poster); 25) Juan Manuel Tebes: Investigating the painted pottery traditions of first-millennium BC north-western Arabia and southern Levant; 26) Emma Tetlow et al.: Landscape visualization, sea-level change, and human occupation in Wādī Debayān, north-western Qatar (poster); 27) Yosef Tobi: The Jews of Yemen in light of the excavation of the Jewish synagogue in Qanī’.
Open Access: La necropoli protostorica di Montagna di Caltagirone by Davide Tanasi. 451 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Praehistorica Mediterranea 1, first published by Polimetrica in 2008. Exclusive to Open Access. 1 2008. ISBN 9788876991158. Buy Now

Il sito della Montagna di Caltagirone (CT), indagato per la prima volta in modo sistematico da Paolo Orsi nel 1903, rappresenta un importante caso studio per la pre e protostoria siciliana e costituisce un osservatorio privilegiato per un’analisi delle problematiche legate all’interrelazione tra popolazioni autoctone e straniere. Dalla metà del II millennio a.C. fino alla colonizzazione greca, infatti, la Montagna ha svolto un ruolo fondamentale nei fenomeni d’aggregazione della popolazione del territorio calatino. Nell’età del Bronzo Tardo (XIII-XI secolo a.C.), il suo insediamento ha raggiunto il momento di maggiore splendore, con l’impianto della grande necropoli, ponendosi, insieme a Pantalica, come principale centro produttore di cultura della Sicilia Orientale.

Exclusive to Open Access. Download the free Open Access PDF here.

Open Access: Ostentazione di rango e manifestazione del potere agli albori della società micenea by Federica Gonzato. 262 pages; black & white illustrations. Italian text. 4 2012. ISBN 9788876992278. Buy Now

Le manifestazioni materiali del potere sono una caratteristica fondamentale delle società umane e costituiscono pertanto, per lo studioso delle culture antiche, una delle chiavi di lettura più ricche e promettenti. In questo volume, l’autrice propone una interpretazione delle prime fasi di formazione (XVII-XV secolo a.C.) dell’organizzazione sociale della cultura micenea attraverso l’esame degli attributi di potere (insignia dignitatis) trovati nelle sepolture di questo periodo in Argolide, culla della civiltà micenea in Grecia. Lo sviluppo della realtà micenea precedente la grande fase palaziale del XIV-XIII secolo a.C. viene analizzato da un punto di vista etnoantropologico e storico, introducendo una fondamentale distinzione fra beni di prestigio ed attributi di potere (spesso effimeri e polisemantici, in quanto soggetti ad una continua variazione della nozione di valore), ma ponendo anche attenzione alle storia delle dinamiche sociali e alle strategie per il mantenimento della leadership attraverso la manipolazione di una ideologia di cui gliinsignia dignitatis rappresentano la materializzazione.

Exclusive to Open Access. Download the free Open Access PDF here.

Open Access: Site, Artefacts and Landscape: Prehistoric Borġ in-Nadur, Malta by Davide Tanasi and Nicholas C. Vella. 450 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Praehistorica Mediterranea 3, first published in 2011 by Polimetrica. Exclusive to Open Access. 3 2011. ISBN 9788876992230. Buy Now

The Bronze Age of the Maltese archipelago has long been overlooked by archaeologists whose attention has mostly been focused on the Late Neolithic temples. This book attempts to understand the islands’ Bronze Age society in the course of the second millennium BC by exploring the history of Borg in-Nadur in south-east Malta. The site of a megalithic temple and re-used in later periods when a fortified settlement was built on the plateau, Borg in-Nadur was visited by travellers and antiquarians in the course of the Early Modern period, and was investigated by archaeologists in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. This collection of essays discusses the early attempts to understand the site, and presents a comprehensive catalogue of the finds that have never been properly published. It also considers the site in its local landscape setting and in its regional south-central Mediterranean context, and explores issues related to past and present public outreach and site management.

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Open Access: Arqueología y Tecnologías de Información Espacial Una perspectiva ibero-americana by Alfredo Maximiano and Enrique Cerrillo-Cuenca. vi+279 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text. Exclusive to Open Access..ISBN 9781784911539. Buy Now

Papers from the First Iberoamerican Conference on Spatial Archaeology held in 2013 at the University of Cantabria, Spain. The subjects include theoretical contexts of spatial archaeology, relationship between archaeological and ethnographical research, micro-site studies and the interpretation of the environment from archaeo-historical contextualization.

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Open Access: Arthur Evans in Dubrovnik and Split (1875-1882) by Branko Kirigin. ii+14 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Exclusive to Open Access..Buy Now

Thanks to the biography by Joan Evans, sister of Arthur Evans, the research of John J. Wilkes and the new biography by Silvia L. Horwitz, we know much about Arthur Evans’s work in the Balkans prior to his discoveries on Crete. This work will not repeat here the achievements Evans has made for archaeology, ethnography and cultural history of the region including his remarkable journalistic work where he showed deep knowledge of regional politics and admiration towards the Slav freedom movement ‘against Turks, Austrians, Russians, or any others – including Englishmen – who refused them their right to self-determination’. This work presents some details on the everyday life of Arthur Evans in Dubrovnik and Split as seen by the local people who wrote about him in newspapers, journals or books, material that is not easily available to those interested in Evans’s pre-Knossos period.

Exclusive to Open Access. Download the free Open Access PDF here.

Open Access: Die Anfänge des kontinentalen Transportwesens und seine Auswirkungen auf die Bolerázer und Badener Kulturen by Tünde Horváth. iv+77 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. German text. Exclusive to Open Access.ISBN 9781784910839. Buy Now

The earliest finds of wheeled vehicles in northern and central Europe date to 3900-3600 BC. However finds (3400–3300 BC) from the Boleráz sites of Arbon/Bleiche 3 and Bad Buchau/Torwiesen II, linked to pile-dwelling settlements, indicate methods of transport typical for higher altitudes (slides, sleds, etc.). The Boleráz and Baden cultures overlap in the Carpathian Basin between 3300–3000 BC and this period seems to have produced transport models that parallel finds in today’s Austria, Slovakia, Hungary, and other regions. These suggest that generally the Boleráz settlers inside the Carpathian Basin did not know, or use, the wheel in the fullest sense. Cart and wheel forms are indicated only from Grave 177 at Budakalász (2800–2600 BC). The Hungarian Baden finds follow the Danube and to the East there are no certain vehicle remains. It is difficult to tell whether the Boleráz finds are linked to the wider Alpine zone, and the Baden finds are perhaps associated with the mixed-culture sites along the eastern slopes of the Carpathians. The four-wheeled wagon was a development linked to the plains and the Steppes (Cucuteni–Tripolje, Pre-Yamnaja, Yamnaja). The nature of the finds relating to vehicles associated with lake and riverine settlements reveal technical and material features: there is evidence of a high degree of carving, if not decoration, and these communities pointed the way for future skills and developments in wheel and cart/wagon manufacture.

Exclusive to Open Access. Download the free Open Access PDF here.

Open Access: Roman Barrows by Velika Gorica, Croatia, and Pannonian Glazed and Samian Pottery Production by Rajka Makjanić and Remza Koščević. 39pp. Exclusive to Open Access.Buy Now

Description of Roman Barrows from the first and second centuries AD excavated in the 1980s in the forest of Turopoljski Lug near Velika Gorica (Zagreb), Croatia. Special attention is given to a luxurious lead-glazed relief bowl found on the funeral pyre of Barrow V, probably from a local Pannonian workshop, with decoration inspired by western Samian ware.

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Open Access: Terra Sigillata / Samian Ware found in Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) now at the Archaeological Museum in Zagreb by Rajka Makjanić. 82pp.Buy Now

Publication of Samian ware from the Archaeological Museum in Zagreb, found in Roman Siscia. The assemblage includes Italian, Gaulish, African, Pannonian, Moesian and other pottery. It also incorporates a study on some types of North Italian Sigillata and their distribution in Pannonia. First published in BAR S621.

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Open Access: The Barracks of the Roman Army from the 1st to 3rd Centuries A.D. A comparative study of the barracks from fortresses, forts and fortlets with an analysis of building types and construction, stabling and garrisons. 940 pages. Exclusive to Open Access..Buy Now

A comparative study of the barracks from fortresses, forts and fortlets with an analysis of building types and construction, stabling and garrisons. Originally published as BAR S472 in 1989.

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