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Large Scale Rhodian Sculpture of Hellenistic and Roman Times Η ΜΕΓΑΛΗ ΡΟΔΙΑΚΗ ΠΛΑΣΤΙΚΗ ΤΩΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΣΤΙΚΩΝ ΚΑΙ ΡΩΜΑΪΚΩΝ ΧΡΟΝΩΝ by Kalliope Bairami. xviii+864 pages; 222 plates, 23 in colour. Greek text with 19 page English summary. 25 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784915766. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915773. Book contents pageDownload

The Hellenistic society of the Rhodian metropolis, a naval aristocracy (Gabrielsen), dedicated bronze statues of their members in the sanctuaries and public buildings and used marble and -occasionally-lartios lithos to carve portrait-statues originally for funerary use and in a later period also for honorific purposes, figures of deities and decorative sculpture for the houses and the parks. The artists, local and itinerant, from Athens, the islands and the Asia Minor, established artistic workshops on Rhodes, some of them active for three centuries and for more than one generation. The impact of Rhodian art is evident on the islands of the Aegean and the cities of Asia Minor, due to the expansion of the Rhodian Peraia. Together with Pergamon, Rhodes emerges as a productive artistic centre of the Hellenistic era, creating statuary types and combining them with landscape elements. The radiance of its art is evident in the late Hellenistic period in Rome, the new capital of the world, where the Rhodian artists create mythological statuary groups set in grottoes.

This volume presents the large-scale Rhodian sculpture of the Hellenistic and Roman period through the publication of sixty unpublished sculptures of life size or larger than life size, together with forty-five sculptures already published. The sculptures are grouped according to their statuary type (gods, mortals and portraits), while those unable to be firmly identified due to their fragmentary condition are grouped under the category ‘uncertain identification’. The presentation of the sculptures is further supplemented by a technical description and an analysis of stylistic characteristics according to chronological development. Excavation data, wherever available, are also provided.

This book is also available to buy in paperback priced £80.00.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

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Reprinting: An Illustrated Companion to Japanese Archaeology edited by Werner Steinhaus and Simon Kaner. v+344 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. *eBook version coming soon*. 273 2016 Comparative and Global Perspectives on Japanese Archaeology 1. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914257. Epublication ISBN 9781784914264. Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Buy Now

The Illustrated Companion to Japanese Archaeology provides, for the first time a comprehensive visual introduction to a wide range of sites and finds from the earliest occupation of the Japanese archipelago prior to 35,000 years ago to the early historical periods and the establishment of the Chinese-style capital at Heijō, modern-day Nara, in the 8th century AD.

The volume originated in the largest ever exhibition of Japanese archaeological discoveries held in Germany in 2004, which brought together over 1500 exhibits from 55 lenders around Japan, and research by over 100 specialists. The Illustrated Companion brings the fruits of this project to an English-reading audience and offers an up-to-date survey of the achievements of Japanese archaeology.

About the Editors:
Werner Steinhaus is Lecturer in Archaeology at Hiroshima University in Japan. After graduating from Freiburg University in Germany he undertook postgraduate research at Osaka University in Japan, specializing in the archaeology of the Kofun period. He spearheaded the largest overseas exhibition of Japanese archaeology ‘Die Zeit der Morgenröte’, which was held in Germany in 2004/2005. His recent publications include the Online Dictionary of Japanese Archaeology (www.wakoku.eu). He is currently developing a new program of research on the ancient mounded tombs of the Kofun period.

Simon Kaner is Head of the Centre for Archaeology and Heritage at the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures (www.sainsbury-institute.org) and Director of the Centre for Japanese Studies at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK. While Studying for his PhD in Jōmon settlement archaeology at the University of Cambridge, he undertook research based at Kyōto University in Japan. His publications include The Power of Dogū: ceramic figures from Ancient Japan (London, British Museum) and the Online Resource for Japanese Archaeology and Cultural Heritage (www.orjach.org). He currently directs the Shinano-Chikuma River Project, investigating the development of historic landscapes along the longest river drainage in Japan.

Table of Contents:
Introduction and Acknowledgements
Map of Japan
Paleolithic period (c. 35,000 – 13,000 BC)
Jōmon period (c. 13,000 – 300 BC)
Yayoi period (c. 900 BC – 250 AD)
Kofun period (c. 250 AD – 710 AD)
Asuka and Nara periods (c. 538 AD – 794 AD)
Accessories and Ornaments
Archaeology in Japan: the past in the present
List of Sites
Bibliography
Further Reading
Figure Credits
Plates images list


Please note this book is reprinting. To be informed when this title is available to order please contact info@archaeopress.com.

History of Archaeology: International Perspectives Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain). Volume 11 / Sessions A8b, A4a and A8a organised by the History of Archaeology Scientific Commission edited by Géraldine Delley, Margarita Díaz-Andreu, François Djindjian, Victor M. Fernandez, Alessandro Guidi and Marc-Antoine Kaeser. viii+237 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Papers in English and French. 253 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784913977. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913984. Book contents pageDownload

The present volume gathers the communications of the three sessions organized under the auspices of the Commission ‘History of Archaeology’ at the XVII UISPP World Congress, Burgos 2014. The first part deals precisely with ‘International relations in the history of archaeology’. The eleven contributions tackle a particularly productive topic in the field today. In actual fact, this seminal research field currently echoes in a way the strong trend of scholarship about the influence of nationalism on the discipline, which since the end of the 1980s, has greatly contributed to the takeoff and overall recognition of the history of archaeology. The second part, entitled ‘The Revolution of the Sixties in prehistory and protohistory’, is the outcome of a partnership with the Commission ‘Archaeological Methods and Theory’. The seven contributions strive to document and analyse a recent past, which is still often burdened with the weight of teleological and presentist appraisals. The inclusion in this volume of this session significantly dedicated to the genealogy of schools of thought and to the study of complex methodological and technical issues illustrates the editors’ commitment to tackling historical issues as well, which are closely linked to current theoretical debates within archaeology. Such is also the aim of the third part, which addresses ‘Lobbying for Archaeology’. As shown by the five contributions of this session, archaeology has not only been instrumentalised by political powers and ideological interests. It has also found fruitful alliances with economic agents or bodies, where mutual advantages were gained on practical, technical bases. This volume suggests a reflexive, critical approach to these various forms of lobbying should ensure a useful awareness regarding the structural problems archaeology faces today, regarding its funding methods.

About the Editors:

Géraldine Delley (Dr. phil.) is a historian of archaeology. She published Au-delà des chronologies. Des origines du radiocarbone et de la dendrochronologie à leur intégration dans les recherches lacustres suisses (2015). She works in the project History of motorway archaeology in Switzerland (1958-2010) at the University of Neuchâtel. Her research interests concern the history of collaborations between archaeology and laboratory sciences, the epistemology and the politics of archaeology in the 20th century.

ICREA Professor, Margarita Díaz-Andreu is a prehistoric archaeologist based at the University of Barcelona (Spain), where she moved in 2012 after 16 years at Durham University (UK). She has been teaching, supervising PhD thesis and researching on history of archaeology for two decades. Her research interests lay on the relationship between nationalism and archaeology, the history of archaeological tourism and international relations in the history of archaeology.

Professor of prehistory at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Víctor M. Fernández has directed several archaeological excavations: Nubia (1978-1981), Spanish region of La Mancha (1984-1991), Central Sudan (1989-2000), Western Ethiopia (2001-2005) and Central Ethiopia (2006-2014). He published: Early Meroitic in Northern Sudan (1984), The Blue Nile Project (2003), Schematic rock art, rain-making and Islam in the Ethio-Sudanese borderlands (2011), Una arqueología crítica (2006), Los años del Nilo (2011). He is co-author of The archaeology of the Jesuit missions in Ethiopia, 1557-1632 (Brill, in press).

Alessandro Guidi is Professor of Prehistory at Roma Tre University. His research interests include the origin of the State in protohistoric Italy and the history of prehistoric archaeology. In 2011 he organized a congress on the history of Italian prehistoric archaeology whose proceedings are now published (A. Guidi ed., 150 anni di Preistoria e Protostoria in Italia, Istituto Italiano di Preistoria e P
The Dodecanese: Further Travels Among the Insular Greeks Selected Writings of J. Theodore & Mabel V.A. Bent, 1885-1888 edited by Gerald Brisch. xiv+194 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 3rdguides 143 2015 3rdGuides - Archaeopress Travel 8. ISBN 9781784910969. £15.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

A sequel to The Cyclades, a compilation of late-19th-century travel writings (with an archaeological/ethnographical bias) centred on the Greek Dodecanese islands (including Rhodes, Nissiros, Tilos, Karpathos, Patmos, and Astypalea).

The authors are the British explorer J. Theodore Bent (1852-1897), devotedly supported by his wife Mabel Virginia Anna (1847-1929). Theodore met Mabel shortly after coming down from Oxford in 1875 and they married two years later. They were of independent character and means and spent the too few years until Theodore’s early death on a breathless sequence of annual travels to the Eastern Mediterranean, Africa, and Southern Arabia. Theodore’s publications are referenced still by archaeologists and scholars working on sites or regions such as ‘Great Zimbabwe’, Aksum, the Wadi Hadramaut, the Cilician littoral, and, of course, the Greek islands.

Bent’s first successful monograph was based on two winters spent in the Cycladic isles (1882/3 and 1883/4). From the start the couple kept notebooks from which all Theodore’s later lectures and literature sprang. His The Cyclades, or Life Among the Insular Greeks was published in 1885 and has been rarely out of print since. It remains one of the most delightful accounts in English of the region, and few serious travellers and tourists to these islands fail to discover it.

In the year The Cyclades was published the Bents moved a little east and explored the islands now commonly referred to as the Greek Dodecanese. Unforeseen circumstances obliged the explorers to curtail their activities before Theodore’s writings on the area could be edited into a monograph to complement his earlier bestseller. Theodore’s Dodecanesian output was channelled instead into a wide range of articles, while Mabel completed three volumes of her personal Chronicles on their daily travels and travails.

Bent never presented his Dodecanese researches to the public in a compendium, the way he had, so brilliantly, for the Cyclades. Now, 130 years later, his The Dodecanese can appear for the first time: a collection of reminiscences and studies on these sunny, blue-surrounded, and delightful islands.

Contents: ‘Preface’ by Marc Dubin; ‘Introduction’ by Gerald Brisch; ‘J.T. Bent: Selected Writings on the Dodecanese 1885-1888’; ‘M.V.A. Bent: Travel Chronicles for the years 1885-1888’. Fully illustrated with maps and photographs.

'Mr. Bent’s book deserves all success, for it is the result of researches pursued in the most laudable manner…[and] a unique description of the life and ideas of a people, which renders it a very storehouse of facts for the student of customs and myths. And in this respect its value will be permanent. Other travellers may follow in Mr. Bent’s footsteps, and fill up what is wanting in his archaeological information; but in a few years’ time, if any traveller be found so enduring as to attempt once more the task which he has so well performed, it is highly probable that a great part of these interesting customs and ideas will have disappeared.' (Henry Fanshawe Tozer (1885), on The Cyclades by J.T. Bent)

Reviews:
'The modern reader of Theodore’s and Mabel’s travels in the Dodecanese is surely to find something of interest to him or her... Their sentiments as reflected in this collection of writings surely rested well with their intended audience, and thus their candid accounts provide quite an informative, as well as entertaining, vestige of the 19th-century British imperial mindset and its approaches to the antiquities and local people they encountered.' (Review in Journal of Greek Archaeology 2016, Vol. 1, p. 470)

'The book under review is essentially the second installment of the Cyclades book, as it is based on Bent's travels, along with his wife Mabel, to the Dodecanese in 1885-1888. Yet, Bent himself never publis
Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 43 2013 Papers from the forty-sixth meeting, London, 13–15 July 2012 edited by Lloyd Weeks and Janet Watson. 361 pages; illustrated in colour and black and white. PSAS43 2013. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781905739653 . £65.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Contents: 1) Abdullah al-Ghafri et al.: Timing water shares in Wādī Banī Kharūs, Sultanate of Oman; 2) Valentina Azzarà: Architecture and building techniques at the Early Bronze Age site of HD-6, Rā’s al-Hadd, Sultanate of Oman; 3) Soumyen Bandyopadhyay et al.: In times of war: typological and morphological characteristics of dwellings in Hārat al-Yemen in Izkī, Oman; 4) Anne Benoist: A green paradise. Economic strategies, collective practices, and local ancestors of the Iron Age community of Masāfī (Emirate of Fujairah, UAE); 5) Lucy Blue et al.: Developing an integrated policy for the maritime and coastal heritage of the UAE: a collaborative approach; 6) Manfred Böhme: The ‘petrographic-polychrome style’ and the symbolic meaning of white stones in Hafit grave architecture (poster); 7) Vincent Charpentier et al.: Conquering new territories: when the first black boats sailed to Masirah Island; 8) Richard Cuttler et al.: Typological and chronological variation of burial in Qatar: ‘Ubaid to late pre-Islamic (poster); 9) Hans Georg K. Gebel: Arabia’s fifth-millennium BCE pastoral well cultures: hypotheses on the origins of oasis life; 10) Julie Goy et al.: Archaeometallurgical survey in the area of Masafi (Fujairah, UAE): preliminary data from an integrated programme of survey, excavation, and physicochemical analyses; 11) Hanadi Ismail: Communities of healing practice on al-Batinah coast of Oman; 12) Carine Juvin: Calligraphy and writing activities in Mecca during the medieval period (twelfth–fifteenth centuries); 13) Moritz Kinzel et al.: Conserving Zubarah: towards a conservation strategy for Al Zubarah Archaeological Site, Qatar (poster); 14) Adelina Kutterer & Sabah A. Jasim: An infant burial from late pre-Islamic Mleiha (Sharjah, UAE) (poster); 15) Johannes Kutterer et al.: Second report on the copper smelting site HLO1 in Wādī al-Hilo (Sharjah, UAE); 16) Marion Lemée et al.: Jabal al-ΚAluya: an inland Neolithic settlement of the late fifth millennium BC in the Ādam area, Sultanate of Oman; 17) Romolo Loreto: New Neolithic evidence from the al-Jawf region: an outline of the historical development of Dūmat al-Jandal; 18) Gen Mitsuishi & Derek Kennet: Kiln sites of the fourteenth–twentieth-century Julfar ware pottery industry in Ras al-Khaimah, UAE; 19) Miranda J. Morris: The use of ‘veiled language’ in Soqotri poetry; 20) Andrew Petersen & Faisal al-Naimi: Qal‘at Ruwayda and the fortifications of Qatar; 21) Valeria Fiorani Piacentini: The eleventh–twelfth centuries: an ‘Umān–Kīj–Kirmān/Harmuz axis?; 22) Hannah Russ & Andrew D. Petersen: Fish and fishing during the late Islamic period at Rubayqa, northern Qatar: preliminary results (poster); 23) Jérémie Schiettecatte et al.: The oasis of al-Kharj through time: first results of archaeological fieldwork in the province of Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); 24) Julie Scott-Jackson & William Scott-Jackson: Route planning in the Palaeolithic? (poster); 25) Juan Manuel Tebes: Investigating the painted pottery traditions of first-millennium BC north-western Arabia and southern Levant; 26) Emma Tetlow et al.: Landscape visualization, sea-level change, and human occupation in Wādī Debayān, north-western Qatar (poster); 27) Yosef Tobi: The Jews of Yemen in light of the excavation of the Jewish synagogue in Qanī’.
Open Access: Roman Barrows by Velika Gorica, Croatia, and Pannonian Glazed and Samian Pottery Production by Rajka Makjanić and Remza Koščević. 39pp. Exclusive to Open Access.Buy Now

Description of Roman Barrows from the first and second centuries AD excavated in the 1980s in the forest of Turopoljski Lug near Velika Gorica (Zagreb), Croatia. Special attention is given to a luxurious lead-glazed relief bowl found on the funeral pyre of Barrow V, probably from a local Pannonian workshop, with decoration inspired by western Samian ware.

Exclusive to Open Access. Download the free Open Access PDF here.

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