​​ We use cookies to enhance your experience on our site. By continuing to use the site you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy & Cookies.​

 
Archaeopress logo
Archaeopress Publishing Ltd, Summertown Pavilion, 18-24 Middle Way, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7LG, England
tel +44 (0) 1865 311914 fax +44 (0) 1865 512231   email: info@archaeopress.com
Monthly AP Alert - join our mailing list today Archaeopress on Facebook Archaeopress on Twitter Archaeopress on Linked In Archaeopress Blog
Home  
|
  Browse by Subject  
|
  Browse by Series  
|
  Catalogues  
|
  Join Our Mailing List  
|
  Visit Our Blog  
|
  Login (Private Customers)  
|
  Login (Institutional Subscriptions)  
|
  View Basket

Search

title, author, ISBN, keyword

Browse for books in the following languages

ARCHAEOPRESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ACCESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ARCHAEOPRESS JOURNALS
DISTRIBUTED
PUBLISHERS
DIGITAL EDITIONS
OPEN ACCESS PLATFORM
Ordering Information
About Us
Publish With Us
Standing Orders
Trade Sales
Contact Us
Request Review Copy

ARCHAEOPRESS DIGITAL
 
LIBRARIES & INSTITUTIONS: For details of our annual Archaeopress Digital Subscriptions Service (ADSS) for institutional subscriptions, providing access to all our digital content (with approx. 6 new titles adding monthly) via our exclusive platform, please contact info@archaeopress.com


VAT: All prices shown for digital versions are VAT inclusive at the current UK rate. Single and multi-user licences available; see individual book pages for a full list of purchasing options.

 
NEW: Archaeological Explorations in Syria 2000-2011 Proceedings of ISCACH-Beirut 2015 edited by Jeanine Abdul Massih and Shinichi Nishiyama in collaboration with Hanan Charaf and Ahmad Deb. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+452 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (124 colour plates). (Print RRP £65.00). 452 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919474. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919481. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Syria has been a major crossroads of civilizations in the ancient Near East since the dawn of human kind. Until the current crisis began in 2011, Syria was one of the foremost pioneers in the investigation of past human knowledge, diversity, and identity. However, due to the ongoing war, archaeological excavations came to an abrupt halt. Since then, there have been countless alarming reports of damage or destruction inflicted on archaeological, historical, and museum sites.

The International Syrian Congress on Archaeology and Cultural Heritage (ISCACH), held December 3-5, 2015 in Beirut, Lebanon, was designed to bring together international scholars who have directed or participated in archaeological expeditions in Syria, and colleagues from Syria. By doing so, not only could the results of years of archaeological investigations and cultural heritage management in Syria be shared and discussed, but also a spirit of friendship and collaboration could be fostered and strengthened during this turbulent period.

The Congress focussed on the scientific aspects of each explored site and region allowing researchers to examine in detail each heritage site, its characteristics and identity. Archaeological Explorations in Syria 2000-2011: Proceedings of ISCACH-Beirut 2015 consists of two parts. The first part presents the results of archaeological investigations conducted between 2000 and 2010. The second part comprises abstracts of papers and posters presented during the Congress. It is hoped that this book will represent an important contribution to the scientific dialogue between international and Syrian scholars, and will appeal to the general public interested in the culture and history of Syria.

About the Editors
JEANINE ABDUL MASSIH is professor in art and archaeology at the Lebanese University. She specializes in Hellenistic and Roman settlements, town planning, and architecture. She co-directed the excavations of Cyrrhus (Aleppo, Syria) on behalf of the Lebanese University and the DGAMS and coordinated many field and research projects in Syria and Lebanon. Since 2014, she has been in charge of the excavations and management of the Quarries of Baalbek (Lebanon) and of a survey project on the Southern Beqaa (Lebanon).

SHINICHI NISHIYAMA is associate professor at Chubu University, Japan. He specializes in the Iron Age culture of the ancient Near East, especially in the northern Levant. He has participated in various archaeological projects in the Near East and Central Asia including Syria, Turkey, Iran, Egypt, Afghanistan, and Tajikistan. He was also involved in the UNESCO-led cultural heritage projects in Afghanistan and Tajikistan. He currently co-directs archaeological projects in Iraqi Kurdistan (Yasin Tepe) and in Lebanon (Southern Beqaa).

HANAN CHARAF is assistant professor in art and archaeology at the Lebanese University. She specializes in Near Eastern history and archaeology during the Bronze and Iron Ages in the central Levant. Her research interests include Bronze Age ceramic production and distribution, Bronze Age Cypriot pottery imported to Lebanon, supra and intraregional trade (exchange commodities and routes) in the Levant during the Bronze Age, and cultural characteristics of the transitional period Late Bronze Age-Iron Age in the central Levant.

AHMAD DEB holds a PhD in archaeology and is currently Head of the Department of the Historical Buildings and Archaeological Documentation at the Directorate General of Antiquities of Syria. He directed the Syrian excavations of Tell Nahr El-Arab (Tell Al-Shamiyeh) between 2011 and 2018. He specializes in Bronze Age settlements and burials in the Near East. Today, he dedicates his time to saving and documenting Syrian endangered cultural heritage.
NEW: When Archaeology Meets Communities: Impacting Interations in Sicily over Two Eras (Messina, 1861-1918) by Antonino Crisà. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+416 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £55.00). 446 . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917913. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917920. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

When Archaeology Meets Communities examines the history of nineteenth-century Sicilian archaeology through the archival documentation for the excavations – official and casual – at Tindari, Lipari and nearby minor sites in the Messina province from Italy’s Unification to the end of the First World War (1861-1918). The area and historical period have been fully neglected by past scholars and need in-depth investigation. The substantial evidence includes sets of approximately six hundred new records and black and white images from Italian and UK archives.

The historical reconstruction, based on analysis of these records, lays the foundations for the entire volume and forms the basis from which the book develops innovative outlines on Sicilian archaeology. The structure follows this central concept. Furthermore, the volume seeks: a) to clarify relationships between the Italian Ministry of Public Education, the Museum of Palermo and local government authorities (‘3-level’ structure of interaction) and to pinpoint contacts with the contemporary social context; b) to compare archaeological research during the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies and the post-Unification period in northern Sicily in terms of methods, history of collecting, antiquities safeguarding and legislation; and c) to contextualise this work in terms of the evolution of archaeology and social change in the wider Italian and European contexts.

About the Author
ANTONINO CRISÀ is an archaeologist, ancient historian and numismatist, and currently research fellow at the University of Warwick, Department of Classics and Ancient History. He studied at the University of Milan (BA 2004, MA 2008) and worked as a ‘Classics Teaching Assistant’ at the University of Leicester (2012-16), where he obtained his PhD in Archaeology (2015). As a field archaeologist, he has excavated in Sicily (Tindari), Sardinia (Nora), northern Italy (Milano, Calvatone, Bagnolo San Vito, Adria, Bergamo, Casale sul Sile) and Syria (Palmyra). His research explores numismatics and the history of archaeology in Sicily between the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries (antiquarianism, coin collectors, nineteenth-century archaeological excavations, archives and museum collection). Dr Crisà has been honoured by the publication of his best numismatic papers within the Italian National Competition for Young Numismatists (Cronaca Numismatica) (2006) and Premio M. Cagiati – XV International Numismatic Congress of Taormina (Accademia Italiana di Studi Numismatici) (2015).
NEW: Travellers in Ottoman Lands The Botanical Legacy edited by Ines Aščerić-Todd, Sabina Knees, Janet Starkey and Paul Starkey. Paperback; 160x230mm; xxii+358 pages; 2 maps, 7 tables, 167 figures (139 plates in colour). (Print RRP £60.00). 438 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919153. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919160. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This collection of around twenty papers has its origins in a two-day seminar organised by the Association for the Study of Travel in Egypt and the Near East (ASTENE) in conjunction with the Centre for Middle Eastern Plants at the Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh (RBGE), with additional support from Cornucopia magazine and the Turkish Consulate General, Edinburgh. This multi-disciplinary event formed part of the Ottoman Horizons festival held in Edinburgh in 2017 and attracted a wide range of participants from around the world, including several from Turkey and other parts of the Middle East.

This splendidly illustrated book focuses on the botanical legacy of many parts of the former Ottoman Empire — including present-day Turkey, the Levant, Egypt, the Balkans, and the Arabian Peninsula — as seen and described by travellers both from within and from outside the region. The papers cover a wide variety of subjects, including Ottoman garden design and architecture; the flora of the region, especially bulbs and their cultural significance; literary, pictorial and photographic depictions of the botany and horticulture of the Ottoman lands; floral and related motifs in Ottoman art; culinary and medicinal aspects of the botanical heritage; and efforts related to conservation.

About the Editors
DR INES AŠČERIĆ-TODD is a Teaching Fellow in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Edinburgh. Her research interests include social and cultural history of the Middle East and the Ottoman Empire, Sufism and dervish orders. She is the author of Dervishes and Islam in Bosnia: Sufi Dimensions to the Formation of Bosnian Muslim Society, in the Brill series ‘The Ottoman Empire and its Heritage’ (Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2015).

DR SABINA KNEES has edited the Flora of the Arabian Peninsula and Socotra, since 2005. Before joining The Centre for Middle Eastern Plants (CMEP) at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE) in 2005, Sabina was a principal editor on the European Garden Flora, and a Stanley Smith Research Fellow based at the RBGE. Sabina is a member of the Horticultural Taxonomy Group (Hortax), the IUCN SSC Arabian Plant Specialist Group and the Executive Committee of the Friends of Socotra.

DR JANET STARKEY has edited the Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies since 2007. A former lecturer at Durham University, she has published extensively on travellers in the Middle East. Her most recent book, The Scottish Enlightenment Abroad: the Russells of Braidshaw in Aleppo and on the Coast of Coromandel (Leiden & Boston: Brill), was published in March 2018.

PROFESSOR PAUL STARKEY, a specialist in Arabic literature and culture, is Emeritus Professor at Durham University and is currently Vice-President of the British Society for Middle Eastern Studies (BRISMES) and Chairman of the Banipal Trust for Arab Literature. His translation of The Book of the Sultan’s Seal by Youssef Rakha won the 2015 Saif Ghobash Banipal Prize for Arabic Literary Translation, and his translation of The Shell by Mustafa Khalifa won a Sheikh Hamad Award for Translation and International Understanding in 2017.
NEW: Reindeer hunters at Howburn Farm, South Lanarkshire A Late Hamburgian settlement in southern Scotland – its lithic artefacts and natural environment by Torben Bjarke Ballin with contributions by Alan Saville, Richard Tipping, Tam Ward, Rupert Housley, Lucy Verrill, Matthew Bradley, Clare Wilson, Paul Lincoln and Alison MacLeod. Hardback; 205x290mm; xx+124 pages; 47 illustrations, 25 tables (13 plates in colour). 433 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919016. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919023. Book contents pageDownload

This volume presents the lithic assemblage from Howburn in South Lanarkshire, Scotland, which at present is the oldest prehistoric settlement in Scotland (12,700-12,000 BC), and the only Hamburgian settlement in Britain. The site also included a scatter from the Late Upper Palaeolithic Federmesser- Gruppen period (12,000-10,800 BC), as well as lithics from the Mesolithic, Neolithic and Early Bronze Age. The book focuses on the Hamburgian finds, which are mainly based on the exploitation of flint from Doggerland, the then dry bed of the North Sea. The Hamburgian tools include tanged arrowheads, scrapers, piercers, burins, and other implement forms which show similarities with tools of the same age on the European continent. The shape of one scatter suggests that the Palaeolithic settlers lived in tent-like structures. The Palaeolithic finds from Howburn shed light on several important general trends, such as the ‘acclimatization’ of pioneer settlers, as well as the development of regional differences following the initial Late Glacial recolonization of Scotland. Palaeo-environmental work focused on whether there was a small lake (‘Loch Howburn’) in front of the terrace on which the camp was situated, and it was concluded that there was indeed a lake there, but it was neither contemporary with the Hamburgian, nor the Federmesser-Gruppen settlement. Most likely, ‘Loch Howburn’ dates to the Loch Lomond stadial.

About the Author
After having worked as a specialist and Project Manager in Denmark, the Faroe Islands and Norway, Torben Ballin relocated to Scotland in 1998. Since that year, he has worked as an independent lithics specialist in Scotland, England, Northern Ireland and Ireland, and he is an Honorary Fellow at the University of Bradford. Torben’s special interests have been lithic terminology and typology, lithic technology, chronological frameworks, raw material studies, intra-site spatial analyses, prehistoric territories and exchange networks, and – not least – Scotland’s Late Upper Palaeolithic (LUP) and Early Mesolithic industries. While still active in Denmark, he briefly worked with Jørgen Holm at the Hamburgian/Federmesser-Gruppen site of Slotseng in Southern Jutland, and one of his academic theses was on the refitting and spatial analysis of the LUP Brommian settlement of Højgård on Zealand. While in Norway, he led the Farsund Project and the Oslofjord Crossing Project, where he analysed a large number of Norwegian Early, Middle and Late Mesolithic sites and assemblages. Since 1998, Torben has dealt with numerous Mesolithic sites and assemblages from all parts of Scotland, and lately he has focused on the discovery of Scottish LUP sites, assemblages, and individual finds and, with the late Alan Saville of National Museums Scotland he published the Federmesser-Gruppen site of Kilmelfort Cave, Argyll; with Hein Bjerck, University of Trondheim, the unique LUP Fosna-Hensbacka point from Brodgar on Orkney; and with Headland Archaeology Ltd. the LUP site of Milltimber, Aberdeenshire. Torben has recently published a number of papers in which he discussed how to recognize individual LUP finds and assemblages on the basis of their technological attributes, when no diagnostic types are present.

The following co-authors took part in the production of the Howburn monograph: The late Alan Saville, National Museums Scotland; Richard Tipping, University of Stirling; Tam Ward, Biggar Archaeology Group; Rupert Housley, Royal Holloway, University of London; Lucy Verrill, University of Stirling; Matthew Bradley, University of Stirling; Clare Wilson, University of Stirling; Paul Lincoln, University of Portsmouth; and Alison MacLeod, University of Reading.
NEW: Egyptian and Imported Pottery from the Red Sea port of Mersa Gawsis, Egypt by Sally Wallace-Jones with contributions from Andrea Manzo, Mary Ownby and Karin Kopetzky. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+186 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (43 colour plates). (Print RRP £32.00). 432 2018 Archaeopress Egyptology 20. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919030. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919047. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The unique site of Mersa Gawasis was a base for seaborne trade along the Red Sea coast during the Middle Kingdom. The Egyptians’ purpose was to trade with Punt for incense and other exotic materials. There is little evidence of any permanent structures at the site apart from man-made caves in which shipping equipment was stored between expeditions. The pottery is, therefore, amongst the most significant evidence for human activity here. Vessel types include many marl C jars, but other kinds of vessels including significant foreign material also occur, some in large quantities. This variety of vessels and the careful reuse of potsherds is central to an understanding of specific and day to day domestic activities and of how the site operated. Mersa Gawasis has many vessel forms of the 12th and Early 13th dynasties. Epigraphic evidence closely dates the site, helping to confirm and underpin an understanding of vessel types and technologies within the ceramic chronology of the period. This volume presents the site’s wide variety of ceramic material, offering also an interpretation of what pottery reveals about activities at the site. The author and excavation photographer have worked together to enhance details of the text with specific photographs.

About the Author
SALLY WALLACE-JONES was born in Norwich, and her interest in archaeology was sparked in childhood by parents who had worked in Egypt and by the Egyptian collection at Norwich Castle Museum where she assisted with the redisplay of the collection. She studied Archaeology and Classics at Manchester University and completed her PhD in the ceramics of Predynastic Egypt. Sally has excavated in many places including Hadrian’s Wall and the Frankish port of Quentovic. She studied with Janine Bourriau and worked for several seasons on the pottery from the Egypt Exploration Society’s Survey of Memphis. She has also worked on the Predynastic pottery at Diospolis Parva for Kathryn Bard’s Boston University excavations, before being asked to take on the ceramic analysis at Mersa Gawasis. She worked as a teacher until 2015 when she began to study for ordination in the Anglican Church, being awarded a BTh degree from Cambridge in 2017. Sally is now part of the clergy team at Hingham in Norfolk. In her spare time, she enjoys continued study of Ancient Egyptian culture as well as travelling, collecting pottery from her travels and playing in a woodwind chamber group. She also speaks on Egyptology to local organisations.
NEW: The Luwians of Western Anatolia Their Neighbours and Predecessors by Fred Woudhuizen. Paperback; 175x245mm; iv+162 pages; 35 illustrations, 11 tables (3 colour plates). 405 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918279. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918286. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £26.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In scholarly literature, there is much attention given to the Hittites and the Mycenaean Greeks, but the Luwians of Western Anatolia are notoriously neglected. Therefore, a study focussing on the latter is desirable. In this book, the presently available information on the western Luwians is assembled. This entails, primarily, the epigraphic evidence in the form of Luwian hieroglyphic inscriptions from the region and the historical information which can be deduced from it, as well as historical Hittite sources. As a prerequisite for the reconstruction of the history of the western Luwians during the Middle and Late Bronze Ages, the thorny question of the geography of their habitat needs to be tackled. This can now be done in an adequate manner owing to the most recent discoveries. Apart from Luwian hieroglyphic, the Luwians of Western Anatolia also used cuneiform script. Based on the linguistic data from both categories of evidence, a sketch of their language is presented. It must be realized, though, that not all inhabitants of Western Anatolia were speakers of the Luwian language. Thus, it will be argued that their northern neighbours in the Troad spoke a different language, of Thraco-Phrygian type. Finally, the Luwians were not autochthonous in the region, but preceded by speakers of a different Indo-European tongue, most adequately defined as Old Indo-European in Hans Krahe’s terms.

About the Author
FRED WOUDHUIZEN, born in 1959, graduated in Mediterranean Pre- and Protohistory at the University of Amsterdam (1985). He earned his PhD in 2006 at Erasmus University, Rotterdam, with a dissertation on ‘The Ethnicity of the Sea Peoples’. As an expert Luwologist, he is well-known for his books and articles on the Luwian dialects of Anatolia and the wider Aegean. Among his books, mention should be made of ‘Luwian Hieroglyphic Monumental Rock and Stone Inscriptions from the Hittite Empire Period’ (2004) and ‘Selected Luwian Hieroglyphic Texts: The Extended Version’ (2011).

Table of Contents
Preface; 1. The Homeland of the Luwians; 2. Geography of Western Anatolia; 3. Origin of the Luwian Hieroglyphic Script; 4. Luwian Hieroglyphic Evidence on the Great Kingdom of Assuwa; 5. Western Anatolia under Hittite Rule; 6. Western Anatolia in the Final Stage of the Bronze Age; 7. Amenhotep III: Historical Background to his Aegean Policy; 8. The Arzawan Language; 9. The Language of the Trojans; 10. Evidence for an Old Indo-European Substrate in Western Anatolia; Bibliography
NEW: La ocupación cazadora-recolectora durante la transición Pleistoceno-Holoceno en el oeste de Rio Grande do Sul - Brasil: geoarqueología de los sitios en la formación sedimentaria Touro Passo by Viviane Pouey Vidal. Paperback; 203x276mm; xviii+238 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text (Print RRP £55.00). 57 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919139. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919146. Book contents pageDownload

This book presents the results obtained during geoarchaeological studies carried out in the locality of Touro Passo, municipality of Uruguaiana, Brazil. There, the Paleoindian sites studied by the team of the PRONAPA-National Archaeological Research Program in the 1960s and 1970s were relocated and others with excellent study potential have been recognized. The archaeological sites are located in the alluvial plains of the Uruguay River and the Touro Passo Stream and correspond to the late Pleistocene-early Holocene transition.

The geoarchaeological approach allowed the understanding of the stratigraphic sequence and the processes of formation and post-depositional disturbance of the archaeological sites in a fluvial environment. Archaeological excavations, soundings, stratigraphic profile surveys, sequence correlations and numerical dates were carried out. The dispersion of artifacts on the surface and cave erosion was recorded, and a lithic taphonomy study was carried out. Four Paleoindian sites located in the Touro Passo Formation were analyzed: Barranca Grande, RS-I-66: Milton Almeida, RS-I-69: Laranjito and Casualidade. The new chronologies obtained for the initial period of human occupation in the region represent a scientific advance for the study of hunter-gatherer occupations during the Late Pleistocene-Early Holocene in the triple border of Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay.

About the Author
Viviane Pouey Vidal has a PhD in Archaeology (Faculty of Social Sciences, UNICEN-National University of the Center of the Province of Buenos Aires-Olavarría). She is a researcher at the GEGAL - Group of Geoarchaeological Studies of Latin America. She was a PhD Fellow abroad by the CAPES - Coordination of Improvement of Higher Level Personnel. She acted as University teacher in the Interdisciplinary Degree Course in Human Sciences at UNIPAMPA - Federal University of Pampa, São Borja Campus / Rio Grande do Sul (2015/2017). She is a member of the Frontier Relations Research Group: History, Politics and Culture in the Triple Frontier Brazil and Uruguay (CNPq-Federal University of Pampa). She is the author of the PPC- Pedagogical Project of the Bachelor's Degree Course in Archaeology that aims to be implemented in the UNIPAMPA. She acts as a consultant in archaeological and patrimonial research in environmental licensing, with experience in Precolonial research and Patrimonial Education.

Spanish Description: Este libro presenta los resultados obtenidos durante los estudios geoarqueológicos realizados en la localidad Touro Passo, municipio de Uruguaiana, Brasil. Alli se reubicaron los sitios paleoindios estudiados por el equipo del PRONAPA-Programa Nacional de Investigaciones Arqueológicas en las décadas de 1960 y 1970 y han sido reconocidos otros con excelente potencial de estudio. Los sitios arqueológicos están situados en las planicies aluviales del Río Uruguay y del Arroyo Touro Passo y corresponden a la transición Pleistoceno tardío-Holoceno temprano.

El enfoque geoarqueológico permitió la comprensión de la secuencia estratigráfica y los procesos de formación y perturbación postdepositacional de los sitios arqueológicos en ambiente fluvial. Fueron realizadas excavaciones arqueológicas, sondeos, relevamiento de perfiles-estratigráficos, correlaciones de secuencias y fechados numéricos. Se registró la dispersión de los artefactos en superficie y en las cárvavas de erosión, y se realizó, un estudio de tafonomía lítica. Se analizaron 4 sitios paleoindios situados en la Formación Touro Passo: Barranca Grande, RS-I-66:Milton Almeida, RS-I-69: Laranjito y Casualidade. Las nuevas cronologías obtenidas para el período inicial de ocupación humana en la región, representan un avance científico para el estudio de las ocupaciones cazadoras-recolectoras durante el Pleistoceno tardío-Holoceno temprano en la triple frontera Brasil, Argentina y Uruguay.

Biografía da autora: Viviane P
NEW: Navigation et installations lacustres dans les hautes terres du Mexique les cas mexica et tarasque by Alexandra Biar. Paperback; 203x276mm; xvi+292 pages; 217 illustrations; 33 tables (119 colour plates). French text with English summary and foreword (Print RRP £60.00). 54 2018 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 50. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919092. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919108. Book contents pageDownload

In a cultural area where geography conspires against ease of exchange, Mesoamerican societies discovered technical answers adapted to their needs. At a time when the exchange of merchandise and goods relied mainly on human transport, some civilizations turned to a mystical aquatic environment: lakes. This research focuses on the practice of lake navigation and specific facilities that are associated with it. Due to the need for a wholistic approach, this research is situated in a multidisciplinary framework that combines archaeology, ethnology and ethnohistory. Its primary objective is to elaborate the framework of a new research field from the analytical and systematic study of a corpus of eclectic data, about the exploitation of water as a means of transport.

In Mesoamerica, the greatest concentration of lake systems lies in the Mexican highlands. However, only the Mexico and Pátzcuaro Basin were converted into real political economic and cultural centres, with the emergence of the Mexica Empire and Tarascan State in the Late Postclassic period (1350-1521). Why then do archaeologists, ethnologists and historians persist in ignoring the true importance of navigation in their study of the formation and organization of these two civilizations? To what extent can we extract, from the study of boats and lake installations, data that can open new research perspectives?

French description: Dans une aire culturelle où la géographie conspire contre la fluidité des échanges, les sociétés mésoaméricaines ont su trouver des réponses techniques adaptées à leurs besoins. À une époque où l’acheminement de marchandises et de biens s’effectue principalement à dos d’homme, certaines civilisations vont se tourner vers un milieu aquatique mythique : les lacs. Ce travail de recherche s’intéresse donc à la pratique de la navigation lacustre et aux installations spécifiques qui lui sont associées. De par la nécessité d’une approche transversale, ce sujet se positionne dans un cadre pluridisciplinaire, entremêlant archéologie, ethnohistoire et ethnologie. Son objectif premier est de délimiter le cadre d’un nouveau champ de recherche à partir d’une étude analytique et systématique d’un corpus de données éclectiques, autour de l’exploitation d’un mode de transport aquatique.

En Mésoamérique, c’est dans les hautes terres mexicaines que seuls les lacs des Bassins de Mexico et de Pátzcuaro ont été convertis en de véritables centres politiques, économiques et culturels à l’origine de l’émergence de l’Empire mexica et du Royaume tarasque à la période Postclassique (1350-1521). Pourquoi archéologues, historiens et ethnologues continuent donc d’ignorer la véritable importance de la navigation dans l’étude de la formation et de l’organisation de ces deux civilisations ? Dans quelle mesure les données que nous pourrons extraire de l’étude des embarcations et des installations lacustres peuvent-elles ouvrir de nouvelles perspectives de recherches ?
NEW: The Population of Tikal: Implications for Maya Demography by David Webster. Paperback; 203x276mm; vi+152 pages; 22 illustrations, 13 tables (Print edition RRP £34.00). 48 2018 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 49. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918453. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918460. Book contents pageDownload

The Classic Maya (AD 250-900) of central and southern Yucatan were long seen as exceptional in many ways. We now know that they did not invent Mesoamerican writing or calendars, that they were just as warlike as other ancient peoples, that many innovations in art and architecture attributed to them had diverse origins, and that their celebrated “collapse” is not what it seems. One exceptionalist claim stubbornly persists: the Maya were canny tropical ecologists who managed their fragile tropical environments in ways that supported extremely large and dense populations and still guaranteed resilience and sustainability. Archaeologists commonly assert that Maya populations far exceeded those of other ancient civilizations in the Old and New Worlds. The great center of Tikal, Guatemala, has been central to our conceptions of Maya demography since the 1960s. Re-evaluation of Tikal’s original settlement data and its implications, supplemented by much new research there and elsewhere, allows a more modest and realistic demographic evaluation. The peak Classic population probably was on the order of 1,000,000 people. This population scale helps resolve debates about how the Maya made a living, the nature of their sociopolitical systems, how they created an impressive built environment, and places them in plausible comparative context with what we know about other ancient complex societies.

About the Author
DAVID WEBSTER received his doctoral degree in anthropology from the University of Minnesota in 1972. He originally intended to become a Near Eastern archaeologist, but he was deflected into Mesoamerican archaeology by the opportunity to work at the fortified site of Becan, Campeche, Mexico. This experience stimulated a long interest in warfare among the Classic Maya and other complex societies. His field work and research included projects in Mexico, Honduras, and Guatemala, and heavily focused on settlement survey, household archaeology, demographic reconstruction, and human ecology. Webster joined the faculty of the Anthropology Department at Penn State University in 1972 and spent his career there until his retirement in 2014. He is now emeritus professor at Penn State, where he continues an active program of writing and research.

Table of Contents
Introduction; A Short History of Maya Demographic Estimates and their Implications; Comparative Demographic Estimates for Other Civilizations; University of Pennsylvania Tikal Project Population Estimates; The “Managed Forest” Model for the Lowland Maya: Implications for Tikal; Biases and Limitations of the Tikal Research and some Comparisons with Copan; How Many Maya Lived in the Central and Southern Lowlands during Late and Terminal Classic Times? ; Discussion and Conclusions; Appendix A: Population Density Calculations; Appendix B: The Big Stuff; Appendix C: Agricultural Intensification; Appendix D: Maya Food Shortfalls and Their Consequences; Appendix E: Agrarian Capital, Land Tenure, Inheritance, Entitlements, and Agency; Appendix F: Classic Maya Political Organization and Institutions; Appendix G: Malthus, Boserup, and the Maya References cited
NEW: Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 48 2018 Papers from the fifty-first meeting of the Seminar for Arabian Studies held at the British Museum, London, 4th to 6th August 2017 edited by Julian Jansen van Rensburg, Harry Munt, Tim Power, and Janet Starkey. ISSN 0308-8421. Paperback; 206x255mm; vi+374 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. PSAS48 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918774. £69.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918781. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £69.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Seminar for Arabian Studies has come a long way since 1968 when it was first convened, yet it remains the principal international academic forum for research on the Arabian Peninsula. This is clearly reflected in the ever-increasing number of researchers from all over the world who come each year to the three-day Seminar to present and discuss their latest research and fieldwork.

The Seminar has covered, and continues to cover, an extensive range of diverse subjects that include anthropology, archaeology, architecture, art, epigraphy, ethnography, history, language, linguistics, literature, numismatics, theology, and more, from the earliest times to the present day or, in the fields of political and social history, to around the end of the Ottoman Empire (1922/1923).

Papers presented at the Seminar have all been subjected to an intensive review process before they are accepted for publication in the Proceedings. The rigorous nature of the reviews undertaken by a range of specialists ensures that the highest academic standards are maintained.

A supplementary volume, ‘Languages, scripts and their uses in ancient North Arabia’ edited by M.C.A. Macdonald (ISBN 9781784918996, Archaeopress, 2018), is also available containing the proceedings from the special session held during the seminar on 5 August 2017.
NEW: Languages, scripts and their uses in ancient North Arabia Papers from the Special Session of the Seminar for Arabian Studies held on 5 August 2017: Supplement to the Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 48 2018 edited by M.C.A. Macdonald. Paperback; 206x255mm; vi+122 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. PSAS. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918996. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919009. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Seminar for Arabian Studies has come a long way since 1968 when it was first convened, yet it remains the principal international academic forum for research on the Arabian Peninsula. This is clearly reflected in the ever-increasing number of researchers from all over the world who come each year to the three-day Seminar to present and discuss their latest research and fieldwork.

Most of the papers published in this volume were presented at a Special Session of the fifty-first Seminar for Arabian Studies, held at the British Museum on 5 August 2017. Its subject was ‘Languages, scripts, and their uses in ancient North Arabia’ and it was held to celebrate the completion in the previous March of Phase 2 of the ‘Online Corpus of the Inscriptions of Ancient North Arabia’ (OCIANA).
NEW: Representations of Animals on Greek and Roman Engraved Gems Meanings and interpretations by Idit Sagiv. Paperback; 175x245mm; vi+198 pages; 98 illustrations (51 plates in colour). (Print RRP £35.00). 439 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918699. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918705. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Whereas animals are a frequent depiction on gemstones within the Greek and Roman periods, and play a key role in symbolic representations on these engraved gems, they have generally been overlooked with little in the way of focussed academic study.

In the present research, a large group of Greek and Roman gems (intaglios) bearing depictions of animals was selected. The gems are presented through a detailed study of the themes described in an attempt to form a comprehensive approach to the depictions of animals and their significance on Greek and Roman gems. The work examines the associations between animal depictions and the type of gemstone and its believed qualities. The study also discusses the changes in representation of animals on gems compared to other, larger media, and questions the significance of these changes. It is concluded here that as far as animal motifs are concerned, the gems could be accorded with a deeper symbolism, such as good luck, abundance and fertility, health, success, and victory. All these motifs are perceived as capable of weakening hostile forces. The animals engraved can also symbolise nature's abundance and fertility, especially when represented along with their offspring, pasturing and grazing, or accompanied by such fertility symbols as cornucopia, ears of corn, and wine goblets. Other animals are related to certain gods, and even comprise their attributes, and thus it was believed that the owner of an engraved gem was accorded divine protection.

About the Author
Dr. Idit Sagiv is a researcher of Classical Art. She completed her MA and PhD studies at Tel Aviv University. Her research and publications focus on Greek and Roman engraved gems. Since 2016, she is an academic member of the History of Art Department, Tel-Aviv University, where she teaches courses on Classical Art.
NEW: Coins in Rhodes From the monetary reform of Anastasius I until the Ottoman conquest (498 - 1522) by Anna-Maria Kasdagli. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+444 pages; 139 figures, 154 plates (7 colour pages). 437 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918415. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918422. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Coins in Rhodes: From the monetary reform of Anastasius I until the Ottoman conquest (498 – 1522) presents the Byzantine and medieval coins collected by Greek archaeologists in Rhodes over a period of more than sixty years. It includes lists of excavated land plots, stray finds, an illustrated catalogue of all the Byzantine and local coins up to 1309, and a representative sample of the Hospitaller petty coins as well as all the Western coins found. Hoard evidence helps sort various emissions and their dates between c. 1320 – c. 1420.

After a chapter introducing the reader to the archaeology of Rhodes, the nature of the material and the way it has been handled, the coins are set against the reconsidered backdrop of local history from 498 to 1522, tracing fluctuations in circulation and attempting to explore their significance. Particular care is taken over the transitional 13th century, when fragmentation of power in the region has made the scanty documentary evidence very hard to assess.

Different approaches have been applied, depending on the available evidence integral to the material and that available from other sources. The archaeology of Rhodes across ten centuries presents all the difficulties of disturbed stratigraphy and recycling of structures expected of an intensively used site. The work aspires to promote a way of dealing with quantities of finds from large-scale rescue excavation that will help other scholars date contexts more accurately and review or compare their own data from this or other sites.

About the Author
ANNA-MARIA KASDAGLI BA (University of Birmingham, UK); MA, PhD (University of Athens, Greece) is an archaeologist, employed by the Greek Ministry of Culture in Rhodes since 1986. She is involved in restoration projects, rescue excavation, heritage protection and heritage awareness promotion. She has published papers on Byzantine and Hospitaller coins, epigraphics, medieval monuments of Rhodes and a volume on Hospitaller architectural sculpture.
NEW: Hercules’ Sanctuary in the Quarter of St Theodore, Pula by Alka Starac. Paperback; vi+126 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (42 colour plates). 431 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 40. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918736. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918743. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Hercules’ Sanctuary in the Quarter of St. Theodore in Pula deals with many aspects of the Roman sanctuary erected at the spring in Pula as well as with objects of cult dated to the Hellenistic period. The site was in use from the late fourth century BC to the fall of the Western Roman Empire, a date that approximately coincides with the demolition of the temple. Research focuses on Roman foundations which trace the ground plan of the temple that was surrounded by portico. Architectural fragments found at the site, as well as those kept in the collection of Pula Museum, were used to form proposals for a hypothetical reconstruction of the temple. The discovery of a relief club is the only reliable link with a particular deity i.e. Hercules. The continuity of the cult of Hercules has been recognised at the spring from the Histrian to Roman periods. Hercules was considered a founder and patron of the Roman colony of Pola. Nearness of the assumed umbilicus of the colony offers additional reasons to reconsider sacred rituals of the foundation of the colony. Traces of ritual desacralization, purification and storing of sacrificial remnants could be recognised at the site. A hypothetical reconstruction of the Roman sanctuary is followed by calculations of construction costs.

About the Author
ALKA STARAC (born 15 April 1966 in Pula) defended PhD thesis Roman Rule in Histria and Liburnia in 1996 at the University of Zagreb, Faculty of Philosophy. During her studies, Alka obtained Rector’s award of the Faculty of Philosophy in Zagreb for year 1986/1987. She was the winner of scholarship of CNRS France for scholarly research (duration six months) at Centre Pierre Paris, Bordeaux, in 1994. She worked as Head of Roman Archaeology Department and was senior curator in the Archaeological Museum of Istria, Pula (Croatia) and at the University of Juraj Dobrila, Pula. She is the author of some eighty scholarly papers published in archaeological journals with international review, as well as of eight monographs and of exhibitions in the field of Roman archaeology, epigraphy, history and economy.
NEW: Estudios sobre el África romana Culturas e Imaginarios en transformación edited by Fabiola Salcedo Garcés with Estefanía Benito Lázaro and Sergio España-Chamorro. Paperback; 205x290mm; xvi+352 pages; illustrated throughout black & white with 2 plates in colour. Spanish text with English preface and abstracts. 430 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 39. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919078. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919085. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £44.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This collective work, carried out by both senior and beginning researchers, is for those scholars who have their gaze fixed on the fascinating mosaic of cultures that was the North-African world from the moment Rome appeared in the region. Even before this date, the arrival of Phoenicians on the continent and their subsequent spread throughout the north of it, initiated a rich process of contacts, interchanges and relations with the Libyan-Berber populations that inhabited the zone from time immemorial. To this scene of ancient cultural diversity –which also included an Egyptian component– Rome brought its own riches, generating in the region new episodes of cultural and religious syncretism.

All these subjects are treated in the present book through some specific scientific contributions whose geopolitical frame is the whole Proconsular Africa. Most of the articles in this volume are dedicated to the world of images, but others also treat many other issues as Historiography, Archaeology of Architecture, Libyan-Berber ethnicities and even cultural parallels between North Africa and the Iberian Peninsula.

About the Editors
FABIOLA SALCEDO GARCÉS is Professor of Classical Archaeology at the Complutense University of Madrid. In 1991 she moved to Rome to write her doctoral thesis about the Iconography of the Roman provinces, in particular, the province of Africa, at the Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología de Roma (EEHAR, CSIC). The result of that research was the book Africa. Iconografía de una provin¬cia romana (Rome-Madrid, CSIC, 1996). During her long stay in Rome, she began to work in the Tusculum project, developed also by the EEHAR, as well as the Soprintendenza Archeologica per il Lazio. In this case, she was specifically devoted to the study of the collection of sculptural materials belonging to the city and to the villas of the Tusculan surroundings. Due to this research she published the volume Tusculana Marmora. Escultura clásica en el antiguo Tusculano (CSIC, Madrid, 2016). She has worked in Pompeii («Casa de la Diana Arcaizante» project) and she currently directs several investigations focusing on Roman Africa studies. Her works have been diffused in prestigious publications, internationally (Ostraka, Antiquités Africaines, LIMC), and nationally (Archivo Español de Arque¬ología, Lucentum, Studia Historica, Iberia, among others).

ESTEFANÍA BENITO LÁZARO is researcher of the Arqueología Africana Group and of others investigation projects developed at the Complutense University of Madrid. She is specialist in the Libyan-Berber world, subject to which she dedicates her current doctoral thesis. She has carried out several stays of research in Tunisia and in relevant scientific European institutions, as the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) and the Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma (EEHAR, CSIC).

SERGIO ESPAÑA CHAMORRO is Doctor in Ancient World Studies by the Complutense University of Madrid. He currently works as postdoctoral researcher at the Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma (EEHAR, CSIC) and Associated Professor of the Isabel I University. His investigations are focused on Landscape Archaeology in the Baetica, Africa and Italy, besides his participation in research projects on domestic spaces in Pompeii and the Roman sculpture of Carthage. He has also worked in prestigious scientific institutions, as the University of Southampton, the centre CIL of the Berlin-Brandenburgischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, the “Aldo Moro” University of Bari and the Musei dei Fori Imperiali-Mercati di Traiano (Rome).

Spanish Description
Esta obra colectiva, llevada a cabo por investigadores seniors y jóvenes, va dirigida a aquellos estudiosos con la mirada puesta en el fascinante mosaico de culturas que fue el mundo norteafricano cuando Roma hizo su aparición en la región. Ya antes de esa fecha, la llegada de fenicios
NEW: The Search for Winchester’s Anglo-Saxon Minsters by Martin Biddle with illustrations by Simon Hayfield. iv+76pp; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £15.00). 420 2018 Winchester Excavations Committee Publication . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918576. £15.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918583. £8.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £15.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The ancient cathedral of Old Minster and the abbey church of New Minster once stood at the heart of Anglo-Saxon Winchester. Buildings of the first importance, honoured by Anglo-Saxon and Norman kings, these great churches were later demolished and their locations lost. Through an extensive programme of archaeological excavation begun in 1961, and as a result of years of research, the story of these lost minsters can now be revealed. Written by Martin Biddle, Director of the Winchester Excavations Committee and Research Unit, and marvellously illustrated by Simon Hayfield, The Search for Winchester’s Anglo-Saxon Minsters traces the history of these excavations from 1961 to 1970 and shows how they led to the discovery of the Old and New Minsters, bringing back to life the history, archaeology and architecture of Winchester’s greatest Anglo-Saxon buildings.

About the Author
PROFESSOR MARTIN BIDDLE is an Emeritus Fellow of Hertford College, Oxford, and Honorary Fellow of Pembroke College, Cambridge. He was the first Lecturer in Medieval Archaeology in England, at the University of Exeter (1963–67) and has held many other distinguished academic positions worldwide. He is the Founder and Director of the Winchester Excavations Committee (1962–present) and the Winchester Research Unit (1968–present). Professor Biddle is also Chairman of the Fabric Advisory Committee (FAC) for Winchester Cathedral, Archaeological Consultant for St Albans Cathedral, and former Archaeological Consultant for Canterbury Cathedral.

SIMON HAYFIELD is an experienced draughtsman who trained as a technical illustrator in the 1970s. He has spent most of his career working as a freelance artist, but has also worked at several top Midland advertising agencies, and lectured part time at the Birmingham College of Art. A love of history led him to archaeological illustration, in which he has worked with a number of senior scholars producing artist’s impressions, finds drawings, elevations and plans for publication. Simon Hayfield began his career in archaeological illustration working with the Winchester Research Unit in 1975 and continues to work with the Unit to this day preparing illustrations for volumes in the series of ‘Winchester Studies’.

Table of Contents
Preface; Introduction; Anglo-Saxon Winchester; Archaeological excavations and finds; Understanding the evidence; Evolution of Old Minster; Destruction of Old Minster; The Royal Quarter; Winchester Studies; Further Reading
NEW: An Intellectual Adventurer in Archaeology: Reflections on the work of Charles Thomas edited by Andy M Jones and Henrietta Quinnell. Paperback; 205x290mm; xiv+286 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 418 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918613. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918620. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £44.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Charles Thomas (1928-2016) was a Cornishman and archaeologist, whose career from the 1950s spanned nearly seven decades. This period saw major developments that underpin the structures of archaeology in Britain today, in many of which he played a pivotal part. He campaigned for the Chair of Cornish Studies at the University of Exeter, which he then held from 1972 until retirement, after teaching archaeology at Edinburgh and Leicester Universities.

The ‘Intellectual Adventure in Archaeology’ was to Charles the mental stimulation of developing narratives for the past, especially in the areas in which he was a leading authority, including the early church in Britain, the early medieval period more generally, and Cornish studies. The contributions to this volume demonstrate the extent to which his scholarship and character has underpinned the work of others, in Cornwall and beyond. Contributions come from life-long friends and from archaeologists at all of stages of their careers. Their subjects are predominantly Cornish, Gwithian, Tintagel and Scilly, but also range from Scotland to Southern France. The whole is brought to life by a series of Charles’ watercolours, previously unpublished.

The volume should appeal to all those interested in the development of archaeology in the later 20th century and of Cornwall from prehistory to its distinctive present.

About the Editors
ANDY JONES BA PhD FSA MCIfA is Principal Archaeologist with the Cornwall Archaeological Unit. His PhD focused on the Earlier Bronze Age barrow and monument complexes in Cornwall and South West Britain. His research interests include the Neolithic and Bronze Age periods, as well as the archaeology of the upland and coastal areas of western Britain. Significant publications include ‘Settlement and Metalworking in the Middle Bronze Age and Beyond’ and ‘Preserved in the Peat: an Extraordinary Bronze Age Burial on Whitehorse Hill, Dartmoor, and its Wider Context’. He recently worked with Charles Thomas on the North Cliffs project.

HENRIETTA QUINNELL BA FSA MCIfA was formerly Lecturer in Archaeology at the Department of Adult Education, Exeter University. Her acquaintance with the late Charles Thomas began in the late 1960s. She has worked in South West Britain ever since, is an authority on the prehistory of the region and has published extensively. She now works as a consultant for the region’s prehistoric ceramics.

Table of Contents
Foreword – by Caroline Dudley
Andy M Jones and Henrietta Quinnell – A miscellany of papers
Nicholas Johnson – Charles Thomas 1928–2016: The sixty-year archaeological adventure of a Cornish polymath
Andy M Jones – To the North Cliffs!
Roger Mercer – Looking at the Cornish Early Neolithic from all directions
Vanessa Straker and Thomas Walker – Gwithian’s environmental history: Landscape change and farming
Henrietta Quinnell – Before the Early Christian cemetery site on Lundy Island
Jacqueline A Nowakowski – Working in the shadows of the giants: Charles Thomas, Courtenay Arthur Ralegh Radford (and King Arthur) – past and current archaeological fieldwork at Tintagel, Cornwall
Charles Thomas† and Charles Johns – Archaeological investigations on Teän, Isles of Scilly, 1956
Ewan Campbell and Adrián Maldonado – Charles Thomas in North Britain: A career in the making
Anna Tyacke – My memorial stone to Charles
Ann Preston-Jones – St Piran’s Cross: A Cornish Icon Re-considered
Thomas Goskar – A little less mute: 3D capture and enhancement of Cornwall's inscribed and decorated stones
Oliver Padel – The name of Annet (Scilly)
Peter Fowler – Deserted Settlement in an Antique land: Elements of a post-Roman field archaeology on le Causee Méjean, Languedoc, France
Martin Bell – Coastal Archaeology in South West England: Charles Thomas and other inspirations
Timothy Darvill – Lift up mine eyes unto the hills: Archaeology and th
NEW: Wealthy or Not in a Time of Turmoil? The Roman Imperial Hoard from Gruia in Roman Dacia (Romania) by Cristian Gazdac and Marin Neagoe. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+182 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 414 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918477. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918484. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Roman imperial hoard from Gruia, Romania (former Roman province of Dacia) is among the largest ever discovered in this part of the Roman Empire. 1,509 silver coins dated from Vespasian to Gordian III were accidentally discovered while digging in a private garden. Wealthy or not in a Time of Turmoil? The Roman Imperial hoard from Gruia in Roman Dacia (Romania) presents a catalogue of each of these coins, photos included, with their complete descriptions. A comparative analysis with other similar hoards throughout the Roman Empire reveals general and specific patterns for hoarding in this period.

At the same time, looking at the prices and salaries around the time the hoard was buried, the authors aim to establish whether such an amount of silver coins could have represented someone’s entire wealth. In addition, analysing the distribution of hoards in the provinces from the Middle and Lower Danube and the history of this area, some possible reasons for concealing and not recovering this hoard are discussed.

One excited aspect emphasised in this book is the presentation of so the called ‘weird’ coins meaning those pieces that have been minted with various errors, by mistake or deliberately, such as engraving errors, coin-die malfunction, plated coins etc.

About the Authors
CRISTIAN GAZDAC is a researcher at the Institute of Archaeology and Art History of the Romanian Academy in Cluj-Napoca. As Associated Professor Habilitus at the University of Cluj-Napoca (Romania), Faculty of History and Philosophy, he teaches on the Roman Economy and Numismatics and on the Analysis of Military Conflicts in Antiquity. Since 2014, he supervises PhD dissertations at the Doctoral School of Security Studies within the same university. In 2017, he joined the team working on the research project Coin Hoards of the Roman Empire at the University of Oxford. He is the editor and the main author of the monographic series Coins from Roman Sites and Collections of Roman Coins from Romania (13 volumes).

MARIN NEAGOE is a researcher and the keeper of the numismatic collection at the Museum of the Iron Gates Region, Drobeta-Turnu Severin (Romania). He has a large experience as a field archaeologist covering the periods from Prehistory to Middle Ages. Among his most important excavations are the Severin Chester (2011-2012) and the amphitheatre near the auxiliary fort of Drobeta (2013-2017). His recently defended PhD dissertation is an archaeological and numismatic monograph on the Chester of Severin and its hinterland during 13th-16th centuries.
NEW: Settlement and Land Use on the Periphery: The Bouros-Kastri Peninsula, Southern Euboia by Jere M. Wickens, Susan I. Rotroff, Tracey Cullen, Lauren E. Talalay, Catherine Perlès, and Floyd W. McCoy. 274pp; illustrated throughout in black & white. 410 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918194. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918200. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Bouros-Kastri peninsula at the south-eastern tip of the Greek island of Euboia has previously been overlooked in the archaeological literature. This survey by the Southern Euboea Exploration Project, conducted under the aegis of the Canadian Institute in Greece, now provides a wealth of intriguing information about fluctuations in long-term use and habitation in this part of the Karystia. While the peninsula is agriculturally poor, its coast is blessed with several small coastal inlets and one important ancient port, Geraistos. These provide access to vital maritime routes and connect the peninsula to Athens and other Aegean ports. The survey revealed modest use of the peninsula during the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age; it was then virtually abandoned for the following two and a half millennia. Occupation resumed in the Late Archaic–Early Classical period, followed by near desertion in the 3rd century BC of all but some coastal sites, a resurgence of activity in the Late Roman period, and modest use in Byzantine and Ottoman times. The authors analyse the ways in which the peninsula's use was connected to that of the main urban centre at Karystos, and how the peninsula and the greater Karystia were integrated into the political, economic, and cultural spheres of Athens and the broader region.

About the Authors
JERE M. WICKENS, a co-director of the Southern Euboea Exploration Project, is interested in the use of rural areas and the use of caves. Outside of the Karystia, he has conducted fieldwork in Albania and Attica, Greece, where he is conducting a diachronic study of the use of caves and rock shelters.

SUSAN I. ROTROFF has published several volumes on the Hellenistic pottery of the Athenian Agora and of Sardis, in Turkey, and is particularly interested in the use of pottery to reconstruct the activities of people of the past. She is a MacArthur Fellow and winner of the Gold Medal of the Archaeological Institute of America.

TRACEY CULLEN is an Aegean prehistorian who has participated in fieldwork in Greece and Cyprus, focusing on the study of early ceramics and funerary customs. She served as Associate Editor of the American Journal of Archaeology and later as Editor of Hesperia, and currently lives in northern Minnesota (USA).

LAUREN E. TALALAY is an Aegean prehistorian who focuses on the Neolithic period of Greece and the Mediterranean. Her research explores the use of the human body as a symbol, figurines, and gender. She also publishes on contemporary issues, particularly on the employment of archaeological and mythical images in modern advertising and political cartoons. The former Associate Director and Curator at the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, University of Michigan, she is currently Curator Emerita and Research Associate at the Kelsey Museum.

CATHERINE PERLÈS is a specialist of Greek Prehistoric stone tools and of the Greek Neolithic. She has worked extensively on trade networks and holds an Honorary degree from Indiana University.

FLOYD W. MCCOY is a geoarchaeologist/geologist with research emphasis on the interaction of volcanism and climate change with ancient and modern cultures both in Hawaii and Greece. He is professor in geology, geophysics, and oceanography at the University of Hawaii.

Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction; Previous Research by SEEP in the Karystia; Archaeological Work on the Bouros-Kastri Peninsula; Goals and Scope of the Bouros-Kastri Survey; Chapter 2: Topography, Geology, and Tectonics; Topography; Geology and Tectonics of Southern Euboia; Geomorphology; Tectonics, Sea-Level Changes, and Palaeoclimates; Paleozoic–Mesozoic Bedrock; Cenozoic Rocks and Sediments; Soils; Natural Resources; Natural Hazards; Chapter 3: Chronological Overview of the Karystia; Prehistory; Late Neolithic; Final Neolithic; Early Bronze Age; Middle Bronze Age; Late Bronze Age; Historical Periods; Early
NEW: Current Research in Egyptology 2017 Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Symposium: University of Naples, “L’Orientale” 3–6 May 2017 edited by Ilaria Incordino, Stefania Mainieri, Elena D’Itria, Maria Diletta Pubblico, Francesco Michele Rega, Anna Salsano. Paperback; 203x276mm; 238 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (75 colour plates). 56 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919054. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919061. Book contents pageDownload

Current Research in Egyptology 2017 presents papers delivered during the eighteenth meeting of this international conference, held at the University of Naples “L’Orientale”, 3–6 May, 2017. Some 122 scholars from all over the world gathered in Naples to attend three simultaneous sessions of papers and posters, focussed on a large variety of subjects: Graeco-Roman and Byzantine Egypt, Nubian Studies, Language and Texts, Art and Architecture, Religion and Cult, Field Projects, Museums and Archives, Material Culture, Mummies and Coffins, Society, Technologies applied to Egyptology, Environment. The participants attended seven keynote presentations given by Rosanna Pirelli (Egyptologist), Irene Bragantini (Roman Archaeologist) and Andrea Manzo (Nubian Archaeologist) from the University of Naples “L’Orientale”; Marilina Betrò (Egyptologist) from Pisa University; Patrizia Piacentini (Egyptologist) from Milan University; Christian Greco (Director of Turin Egyptian Museum) and Daniela Picchi (Archaeological Museum of Bologna). Delegates were able to take advantage of a guided tour of the Oriental Museum Umberto Scerrato (University of Naples “L’Orientale”), access to the National Archaeological Museum of Naples (MANN) and guided tours of the archaeological site of Pompeii and the Gaiola Underwater Park. The editors dedicate this volume to the late Prof. Claudio Barocas who inaugurated the teaching of Egyptology and Coptic Language and Literature in Naples.
FORTHCOMING: A Kerma Ancien Cemetery in the Northern Dongola Reach Excavations at site H29 by Derek A. Welsby. Hardback; 210x297mm; xviii+226 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (103 colour plates). English text with Arabic summary. (Print RRP £58.00). 443 2018 Sudan Archaeological Research Society Publication 22. ISBN 9781784919313. Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is the final report on the excavations of a Kerma Ancien cemetery discovered by the Sudan Archaeological Research Society during its Northern Dongola Reach Survey conducted between 1993 and 1997. It is one of the very few cemeteries of this date to have been fully excavated and provides interesting data on funerary culture as practised in a rural environment, to be compared with the extensive information available from investigations of the cemetery associated with the metropolis of Kerma 100km to the north. It includes a range of specialist reports on all categories of artefacts recovered as well as on the physical anthropology, archaeobotany and archaeozoology.

About the Author
DEREK A. WELSBY has directed excavations and surveys in Sudan since 1982. These have included all-period surveys in the Northern Dongola Reach and at the Fourth Cataract as a component of the Merowe Dam Archaeological Salvage Project. Major excavations have been undertaken within the capital of the medieval kingdom of Alwa at Soba East and in the Kushite town and cemetery at Kawa. Surveys have also been undertaken along Sudan’s first railway between Wadi Halfa and Kerma dating to the late 19th century.
NEW: Late Iron Age and Roman Settlement at Bozeat Quarry, Northamptonshire: Excavations 1995-2016 by Rob Atkins. xiv+186 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (55 colour plates). 429 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918958. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918965. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

MOLA (formerly Northamptonshire Archaeology), has undertaken intermittent archaeological work within Bozeat Quarry over a twenty-year period from 1995-2016 covering an area of 59ha. The earliest archaeological features lay in the extreme northern area where a Bronze Age to Iron Age cremation burial was possibly contemporary with an adjacent late Bronze Age/early Iron Age pit alignment. In the middle to late Iron Age a settlement was established at the southern part of the site over a c170m by 150m area. It was a well organised farmstead, mostly open in plan with two roundhouses, routeway, enclosures, boundary ditches and pits.

In the early 1st century AD, cAD 30, two separate settlements lay c0.5km apart. The former southern Iron Age farmstead had perhaps shifted location c150m to the north-west and a there was new farmstead to the north. Both settlements were located on a west facing slope of a valley side and were sited on sands and gravels at between 64m and 66m aOD. The Northern Settlement was only occupied for about 150 years and was involved in pastoral farming, but local coarseware pottery production was of some importance with a group of 12 pottery kilns dated to the middle to late 1st century AD. This is seemingly the largest number of pottery kilns from a single settlement of this period yet found in the regionally important Upper Nene Valley pottery producing area.

The Southern Settlement was larger and continued to the end of the Roman period. In this area there was a notable scatter of 12 Iron Age and 1st century AD Roman coins as well as 24 contemporary brooches found over an area measuring c170m by c130m. This collection of finds may suggest the presence of a shrine or temple located in the area. It is perhaps significant that in 1964 directly to the west of the excavation, a middle Roman round stone building was found, perhaps an associated shrine. Within the excavation area in the latest Iron Age to early Roman period there was a possible roundhouse, a large oval enclosure and a field system. The latter largely related to pastoral farming including areas where paddocks were linked to routeways suggesting significant separation of livestock had occurred. Four cremation burials, including one deposited in a box, and an inhumation lay in three locations. Pastoral farming was a significant activity throughout the Roman period with enclosures, paddocks and linked routeways uncovered. In the late 2nd to 4th century there were two stone buildings and a stone malt oven at the extreme western extent of the site, within 50m to the east of the probably contemporary shrine recorded in 1964.

There was minor evidence of early to middle Saxon occupation within the area of the former middle to late Iron Age settlement. No structures were found, although a few pits may date to this period and mark short stay visits. A small cemetery of five individuals respected the former Roman field system and probably dated to the late 6th to 7th centuries. The burials included a decapitation and a burial with a knife and a buckle. The site was then not re-occupied and became part of the fields of Bozeat medieval and post-medieval settlements.
NEW: Atlas of Ceramic Fabrics 1 Italy: North-East, Adriatic, Ionian. Bronze Age: Impasto by Valentina Cannavò and Sara Tiziana Levi. Paperback; 175x245mm; viii+142 pages; 25 figures, 16 tables and 16 colour plate section containing 167 illustrations. 427 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918590. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918606. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £29.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Atlas Of Ceramic Fabrics 1. Italy: North-East, Adriatic, Ionian. Bronze Age: Impasto presents and interprets the petrographic composition of Bronze Age Impasto pottery (23rd-10th centuries BCE) found in the eastern part of Italy. This is the first of a series of Atlases organised according to geographical areas, chronology and types of wares. In this book 935 samples from 63 sites are included, which comprise material obtained as a result of almost 30 years of interdisciplinary archaeological, technological and archaeometric research by the authors’ team. 73 petrographic fabrics (the potters’ ‘recipes’) are defined and presented, on their lithological character – a tool that can be used to compare the different components of the ceramic pastes and to check provenance of non-local pots.

The volume is organised in chapters focused on methodology, fabric description and distribution, followed by the archaeological implications and the database, with contributions by Daniele Brunelli and Andrea Di Renzoni. Illustrations and descriptions of the fabrics and a complete list of the samples are included in order to provide a rigorous and transparent presentation of the data. The archaeological implications are discussed within the topics such as technology, variability, standardisation, chronology, function, social organisation, circulation, style, typology and cultural identity. It is hoped that this work will be considered as another stepping-stone in demostrating that, in archaeology, technological variability is as important as morphological and stylistic distinctions.

About the Authors
VALENTINA CANNAVÓ’S research focuses on the archaeometric investigation of ancient pottery. She is a research fellow at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia where she obtained a PhD in archaeological science (2010). Valentina teaches pottery technology (Ferrara University) and applied geoarchaeology (Modena and Reggio Emilia University) to the graduate students. She is in charge of the database of prehistoric pottery and since 2009 she has been the director of the field laboratory of the excavation at San Vincenzo Stromboli (Aeolian Islands).

SARA T. LEVI’S research focuses on the ancient pottery through an integrated archaeological, technological and archaeometric approach, and on the Bronze Age of central Mediterranean. She obtained a PhD in archaeology at Sapienza University in Rome (1996). Her findings have been published in several scientific journals and books, including a volume on the Italo- Mycenaean pottery (2014). Since 2015 she has been teaching archaeology at Hunter College in New York, after spending eight years at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia as professor of archaeological methodology. Since 2009 she leads the interdisciplinary archaeological investigations at San Vincenzo Stromboli (Aeolian Islands) and at Cannatello (Agrigento). Both projects hold international field schools for students as well.
NEW: Buildings in Society: International Studies in the Historic Era edited by Liz Thomas and Jill Campbell. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+150 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (36 colour plates). 426 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918316. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918323. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Buildings in Society: International Studies in the Historic Era presents a series of papers reflecting the latest approaches to the study of buildings from the historic period. This volume does not examine buildings as architecture, but adopts an archaeological perspective to consider them as artefacts, reflecting the needs of those who commissioned them. Studies have often failed to consider the historical contexts in which the buildings were constructed and how they were subsequently used and interpreted. The papers in this volume situate their interpretation in their social context. Buildings can inform us about past cultures as they are responsive and evolve to meet people’s needs over time.

The buildings examined in this volume range from the twelfth to the twenty-first century and cross continents including case-studies from America, Australia and Europe, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Scandinavia and the Mediterranean. Themes include: Approaches to the study of buildings, Buildings of Power, Buildings in Identity, Domestic Space and Urban and Village Spaces. The essays consider building design, role, and how the buildings were altered as their function changed to coincide with the needs and aspirations of those who owned or used the buildings. This collection of papers emphasizes the need for further international multidisciplinary approaches including archaeology, architectural history and art history in order to understand how ideas, styles, approaches and designs spread over time and space. Together, these papers generate valuable new insights into the study of buildings in the historic period.

About the Editors
LIZ THOMAS is a historical-archaeologist and heritage and cultural researcher based at the School of Natural and Built Environment, The Queen’s University of Belfast. She recently completed her British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship, a multidisciplinary study that focused on the docklands of Belfast, Northern Ireland. She specialises in the study of institutions, in particular won policymaking, political environments and human agency. Thomas’ current research is based on Public Heritage.

JILL CAMPBELL is a skilled buildings archaeologist. She has conducted fieldwork in Northern Ireland, England and Scotland and has produced architectural histories for the Northern Ireland Environment Agency. Dr Campbell has several published papers, and has contributed a chapter on medieval manor houses to the Oxford Handbook of Later Medieval Archaeology.
NEW: Composite Artefacts in the Ancient Near East Exhibiting an imaginative materiality, showing a genealogical nature edited by Silvana Di Paolo. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+96 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (19 colour plates). 424 2018 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 3. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918538. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918545. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Composite Artefacts in the Ancient Near East: Exhibiting an imaginative materiality, showing a genealogical nature examines the complex relationship between environment, materials, society and materiality with particular reference to the composite artefacts in the ancient Near East. On the one hand are the objective and natural attributes of materials, possibly exalted from their transformation: a form of fascination immanent in all kind of technical activity which promotes the transition from the ordinary into an ‘extra-ordinary’ realm, imbuing the object with new meaning. On the other hand is the idea that properties of materials are not fixed attributes of ‘matters’, but are processual as well as relational: the qualities of artefacts are subjective and are included in the worldview of artisans making them, as well as in the mind of who observes who appreciate them. Thus, the craftsmanship is oriented towards the achievement of sophisticated products through assemblage techniques and the blending of contrasting properties and qualities of materials. The term ‘composite’ is a combination of the power of technology and the ability to form new images: the strict relationship between creativity, technology and manufacture produces novel interactions and solutions.

Although the primary concern of this volume is to provide specific case studies in which theoretical assumptions and hypotheses can be applied to the ancient evidence, most of the papers take not only the general perspective, such as the relationship between materials and humans, but also a defined body of evidence – material, textual and visual through which they address the issue. This volume represents a first attempt to conceptualise the construction and use of composite artefacts: the richness of approaches, the development of new issues depending on specific case studies, and the overturning of widely accepted ideas, show the interest towards this category of objects and the opportunity to enlarge this field study in the future.

About the Editor
SILVANA DI PAOLO (PhD Rome 2001) is, since 2001, researcher at the Institute for Studies of Ancient Mediterranean of the Italian National Council of Research (CNR). She is the director of the Series Biblioteca di Antichità Cipriote, scientific board member of al-Sharq (published in Paris) and editorial board member of Rivista di Studi Fenici published by ISMA. As CNR researcher she is co-coordinator of different projects in collaboration with European and non-European foreign institutions. She is a co-director of the QANATES project in the Iranian Kurdistan. She has written extensively on the relationship between art and power, location and styles of workshops, social meaning of works of art, as well as on material culture of the 2nd millennium BC. Silvana is currently working on the concepts of similarity in assemblages of artifacts and routinisation of the artisanal production in the ANE, as well as on the applications of the shape and semantic analysis on Mesopotamian glyptics.

NEW: Unearthing Alexandria’s Archaeology: The Italian Contribution by Mohamed Kenawi and Giorgia Marchiori. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+194 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (81 colour plates). 423 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918651. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918668. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Unearthing Alexandria’s Archaeology: The Italian Contribution contains the results of an archival survey, historical research, and archaeological description of the main Italian excavations in Alexandria from the 1890s to the 1950s. The Italian archaeological investigations in the city of Alexandria are presented through unpublished photographs of Evaristo Breccia, Achille Adriani, and some of the glass negatives of the Graeco- Roman Museum of Alexandria.

Various Italians contributed to the fieldwork and the production of drawings and plans, and documenting the majority of the most important sites in Alexandria, on which our archaeological knowledge today is based. But their names have been forgotten compared with Giuseppe Botti, Breccia, and Adriani: Giacomo Biondi, Gino Beghé, Antonio Gentili, Giuseppe Ramacciotti, Mariano Bartocci, Giovanni Dattari, Despina Sinadino, Michele Salvago, Orazio Abate, and Giovanni Peruto. The book gives detailed descriptions of the Italian excavations at Hadra, Chatby, Anfushi, Kom al-Chougafa, the Serapeum, and Kom al-Dikka, accompanied by often unpublished photographs and followed by a catalogue of other rare photographs of different archaeological sites in Alexandria.

About the Authors
MOHAMED KENAWI was Head Researcher (2011–16), followed by Acting Director (2016–17), of the Hellenistic Centre of Bibliotheca Alexandrina, Alexandria. He taught at the American University in Cairo and at Catania University. He has participated in various archaeological missions in Libya, Italy, and Egypt, among them those at Kom al-Ahmer/Kom Wasit, Athribis, and Dionysias. He currently collaborates on projects with Padua University, the City University of New York, and Tübingen University. At present, he is a Researcher and Training Manager at the School of Archaeology, University of Oxford, for the Endangered Archaeology of the Middle East and North Africa project. He has published many articles about his research in the Delta and Fayoum, in addition to his monograph, Alexandria’s Hinterland: Archaeology of the Western Nile Delta, Egypt (2014). He is Egypt Coordinator for the Manar al-Athar open-access photo-archive www.manar-al-athar.ox.ac.uk.

GIORGIA MARCHIORI has worked on a number of archaeological projects in Egypt: the Tell Timai Project of the University of Hawaii, the Dionsyais Archaeological Project of the Siena University, and the Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit Archaeological Project of Padova University and the Centro Archeologico Italo-Egiziano. She has also worked on archaeological expeditions in Mexico. Having completed an MSc in GIS and Spatial Analysis in Archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, she is currently doing her PhD at Durham University on late Roman housing in the Western Nile Delta.
NEW: Cycladic Archaeology and Research: New Approaches and Discoveries edited by Erica Angliker and John Tully. 298pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 417 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918095. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918101. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Cycladic Archaeology and Research: New approaches and discoveries reflects the present exciting times in Cycladic archaeology. New excavations are bringing to light sanctuaries unmentioned by literary sources and inscriptions (e.g., Kythnos, Despotiko); new theoretical approaches to insularity and networks are radically changing our views of the Cyclades as geographic and cultural unit(s). Furthermore, the restoration and restudy of older sites (e.g., Delos, Paros, Naxos) are challenging old truths, updating chronologies and contexts throughout the Mediterranean and beyond. This volume is intended to share these recent developments with a broader, international audience. The essays have been carefully selected as representing some of the most important recent work and include significant previously-unpublished material. Individually, they cover archaeological sites and materials from across the Cycladic islands, and illustrate the diversity of the islands’ material culture across the Geometric, Archaic, Classical, Hellenistic, Roman, and Late Antique periods. Together, they share common themes such as the importance of connectivity, and the role of each island’s individual landscape and its resources in shaping human activity. The work they represent attests the ongoing appeal of the islands and of the islanders in the collective imagination, and demonstrates the scope for still further innovative work in the years ahead.

About the Editors
ERICA ANGLIKER is a PhD student at the University of Zurich, where she is preparing the publication of her monograph on the cults and sanctuaries of the Cycladic islands. She has published on the culture and religion of the Cyclades and is a member of the scientific team at the excavations of the sanctuary of Despotiko, where she has been digging since 2012. Her research focuses on Greek cults and religions in the public and private sphere, from the Geometric to the Hellenistic era. Her special interests include cults practised at natural sites or involving natural elements, as well as topics in island studies, such as insularity, socioeconomic networks, and maritime travel logs.

JOHN TULLY studied Greats at the University of Oxford before writing his doctoral dissertation on the Hellenistic Cyclades at Harvard and Princeton. He is now a principal at Delivery Associates, where he helps governments improve the lives of citizens.
NEW: Estudios para la configuración de las facies cerámicas altoimperiales en el Sur de la Península Ibérica edited by P. Ruiz Montes, Ma. V. Peinado Espinosa and Ma. I. Fernández García. Paperback; 210x297mm; ii+284 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (68 colour plates). Spanish text throughout. 403 2018 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 11. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918118. £39.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918125. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £39.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Estudios para la configuración de las facies cerámicas altoimperiales en el Sur de la Península Ibérica explores economy and trade in the south of the Iberian peninsula during the High Roman Empire. Different methodologies, techniques and approaches to archaeological research are applied in the analysis and study of ceramic contexts in several marketplaces or consumption centres in the area. Special attention is given to ceramic facies predominantly characterised by the presence of fine pottery. In addition, the examination of local ceramics points towards a complexity whose interpretation has been biased until a few decades ago by the presence of wares imported from other Mediterranean regions as a result of the intensity of Roman trade. Furthermore, exploration beyond traditional analytical parameters highlights, for example, the relevance of the phenomenon of pottery vessel imitation.

About the Editors
DR PABLO RUIZ MONTES has a doctorate in History from the University of Granada and is a postdoctoral researcher linked to the Department of Prehistory and Archaeology at the University of Granada. His research focuses on the analysis of ceramic facies of Roman times in the Baetica province, and on the study of technology traditions and production processes, particularly in Red Slip wares, in the Western Roman world. Also, in past years, he has developed his research in Italy, at the University of Siena and in archaeological sites such as the Roman colony of Cosa (Ansedonia).

DR Mª VICTORIA PEINADO ESPINOSA has a doctorate in History from the University of Granada. She has worked as associate researcher for both the University of Granada and the University of Perugia. Her line of research has focused on the analysis of the material culture in Roman times, especially common ware pottery. Her works have contributed to better understand these ceramics both in the South of the Iberian Peninsula and in Central Italy. Currently, she combines teaching with archaeological research, and she is involved in several projects studying the Roman Baetica.

DR Mª ISABEL FERNÁNDEZ GARCÍA is Professor of Archeology at the Department of Prehistory and Archeology at the University of Granada. One of her main areas of expertise and focus of her research is the analysis of the production and marketing structures in pottery workshops from Roman times, with special emphasis in the Baetica province. She is a specialist in pottery productions in Hispanic terra sigillata.
NEW: Visualizing cityscapes of Classical antiquity: from early modern reconstruction drawings to digital 3D models With a case study from the ancient town of Koroneia in Boeotia, Greece by Chiara Piccoli. Paperback; 203x276mm; xiv+314 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (100 colour plates). 53 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918897. £59.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918903. Book contents pageDownload

The amount of 3D modelling applications in archaeology has increased enormously over the last decade. 3D recording techniques allow researchers to quickly and accurately document archaeological evidence, and 3D reconstructions have created new possibilities to communicate the results to a larger public. In this latter case, however, numerous scholars have expressed their concern regarding the ethics of such digital representations, since they give prominence to a crystallized image of the past and do not account for the complexity of the archaeological record. The study presented here aims to make a practical contribution to a new understanding and use of 3D reconstructions, namely as ‘laboratories’ to test hypotheses and visualize, evaluate and discuss alternative interpretations.

In order to do so, an analysis of visual reconstructions of the early and late modern period is presented first, followed by a discussion of current applications of 3D digital reconstructions, with a special focus on cityscapes. Lastly, a practical implementation of a research-driven, intellectually transparent and GIS-based 3D reconstruction is proposed for the urban site of Koroneia, in Boeotia, Central Greece. Specifically, the methodology developed in this work uses tools that are employed in geo-design and modern urban planning in an innovative way, integrating GIS with a rule-based modelling approach. With a strong focus on the automation and iteration of the reconstruction process, our 3D visualization provides an intuitive insight into hidden relationships and associations among data, and allows the creation and evaluation of alternative reconstruction hypotheses.

About the Author
CHIARA PICCOLI is an Italian archaeologist currently employed as a staff member of the Digital Archaeology Research group at the Faculty of Archaeology in Leiden, The Netherlands. Her expertise lies in the applications of 3D modelling techniques and 2D-3D GIS to visualize and analyse archaeological evidence. Her research interests include urban studies, visual studies, and the exploitation of digital tools and new technologies for documentation, visualization, analysis and dissemination. She has participated in several excavations and surveys in Italy, Greece and Morocco. Chiara holds a BA in Cultural Heritage (University of Trento), an MA in Greek and Roman Archaeology (University of Siena) and an MA in Book and Digital Media Studies (Leiden University). She received the Tiele-Stichting Thesis Prize 2011 for the best MA dissertation in the field of Book History in the Netherlands.
Archaeopress Digital Subscription Service: Institutional eBook Subscription Package 12 month subscription package for 2017/2018. Price listed without VAT. VAT may be applicable, please contact info@archaeopress.com to learn more. Only available as e-version. Institutional Price £1,250.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now


• 6-12 new eBooks each month
• 280+ backlist titles immediately available (plus over 200 open access eBooks and academic papers)
• No limits to concurrent users
• No limits to number of downloads
• IP Authentication, no username/password
• View online or download for offline access
• MARC / excel data for all titles


Our institutional digital subscription service is the most cost-effective way to access our complete range of eBook content saving over 50% on purchasing individual licences or the equivalent print editions each year.

A 12-month subscription to our complete list beginning in 2017/2018 costs £1,250 (+VAT, if applicable). Please note price below includes UK VAT but final VAT total may vary dependent on your location. If you are VAT exempt please contact our office and we can issue an invoice separately.

Click the Contents button above to download a short introduction and guide to the service.

Subscribe online using the institutional purchase option below. Please include all relevant contact details when making your purchase. A short user guide will be available to download immediately on completion of your order and we will contact you shortly thereafter to set-up online access for all eBook content.

For more information or to request a 30 day, no-cost and no-obligation trial, please contact Patrick Harris: patrick@archaeopress.com