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L’arte rupestre dell’età dei metalli nella penisola italiana: localizzazione dei siti in rapporto al territorio, simbologie e possibilità interpretative edited by Renata Grifoni Cremonesi & Anna Maria Tosatti. 276 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Italian text. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784915575. Book contents pageDownload

This volume presents the proceedings of the conference “L’arte rupestre dell’età dei metalli nella penisola italiana: localizzazione dei siti in rapporto al territorio, simbologie e possibilità interpretative” that took place in Pisa at the Cantiere delle Navi di Pisa under the aegis of the Soprintendenza Archeologica della Toscana and of the University of Pisa on 15th June 2015. The addressed issues were related to the Post-Pleistocene rock art along the Apennine ridge; in recent years more and more evidence has been identified, which is different from the magnificent evidence found in the Alps such as, for example, the well-known Monte Bego and Val Camonica. This evidence, despite various and peculiar features, can be all related to the iconographic field whose main expressions are anthropomorphic figures, weapons, daggers, halberds and several other symbols, all similarly stylised. A peculiarity of these manifestations is their location in small shelters inappropriate for habitation or in places suitable for supervising mountain and territory roads, bearing comparison to evidence from Western Mediterranean coastal areas. An interpretative possibility has emerged: these sites could have been not only ceremonial places, but also spaces linked to the socio-economic fields or perhaps to the power of communities that occupied these territories.

This book is also available to buy in paperback priced £38.00.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

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Archival Theory, Chronology and Interpretation of Rock Art in the Western Cape, South Africa by Siyakha Mguni. vi+156 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available both in print and Open Access. Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 93. ISBN 9781784914479. Book contents pageDownload

Since absolute dating of rock art is limited, relative chronologies remain useful in contextualising interpretations of ancient images. This book advocates the archival capacity of rock art and uses archival perspectives to analyse the chronology of paintings in order to formulate a framework for their historicised interpretations. The Western Cape painting sequence is customarily accepted to include the hunter-gatherer phase from c. 10,000 BP, pastoralism from c. 2,000 BP and finally the historical-cum-colonial period several centuries ago. Painting traditions with distinct depiction manners and content are conventionally linked to these broad periods. This study evaluates this schema in order to refine the diverse hunter-gatherer, herder and colonial era painting contexts and histories. Using superimpositions as one analytical tool, the notion of datum aided the referencing and correlation of layered imagery into a relative sequence. Although broad differences separate painting traditions, and these variations are generally indistinguishable within a single tradition, it is clear that the long-spanning hunter-gatherer segment of painting in this region reflects a hitherto unrecognised sub-tradition. Some painted themes such as elephants, fat-tailed sheep, handprints and possibly finger dots occur within various levels of the sequence, which this study views as shared graphic fragments occurring between and across traditions and sub-traditions. Through the archival concept of respect des fonds such observable complexities were clarified as coherent graphic narratives that run through the entire chronological sequence of the Western Cape rock paintings. Probing archaeological, ethnographic and historical sources revealed that while these themes remained fundamentally consistent throughout the stratigraphic sequence as preferred subject matter, their meanings might have transformed subliminally from earlier to later periods, possibly reflecting layered shifts in the socio-economic, cultural and political circumstances of the region. Fundamentally, the framework of image histories shown by the choice and sustenance of specific themes is understood to mean that their significance and specific graphic contexts throughout the chronological sequence are pivoted and mirrored through the long established hunter-gatherer rock paintings which predate periods of contact with other cultures. The resulting sequence and interpretation of these painted themes is a descriptive and organisational template reflecting the original organic character in the creation of the paintings and ordered cultural continuities in the use of animal/human symbolism. This book’s agenda in part involves reviewing the Western Cape’s changing social and historical landscape to show variation in painting over time and to project possible interpretative transformations. Painting sequences and cultural (dis)continuities are thus intricately entwined and can be disentangled through a recursive analytical relationship between archaeology, ethnography and history. This amalgamated analytical approach produces historicised narratives and contextual meanings for the rock paintings.

This book is also available to buy in paperback priced £40.00.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point.

North American Rock Art Research 2010-2014 by Reinaldo Morales Jr. Taken from Rock Art Studies: News of the World V edited by Paul Bahn, Natalie Franklin, Matthias Strecker and Ekaterina Devlet. Pages 225-243.Download

North American rock art research since 2010 includes many familiar approaches, some modified to meet contemporary needs, and a few innovations that are maturing into standard research tools. The living voices of descendant communities are more important than ever to many researchers, who acknowledge that our enterprise is essentially one of outsiders looking in. Still others choose to begin on the inside, with the shared structures of human cognition, and approach the visible results (the rock art) as the gestural evidence of lost communicative acts. We even see some studies trying to reinforce one approach with the other—hybrid solutions in an increasingly pluralist endeavour. The information we gather is coming more and more from once invisible views of rock art: GIS-enabled distribution models of select data over more detailed landscapes; portable spectroscopy, microscopy, two- and three-dimensional extreme-resolution imaging; and drone-assisted photography and video (shared with more curious eyes through the explosion of rock art on social media). The last five years of rock art research in North America reflect the contributions of established academics and their students (off the lapel pin and into the lecture notes, to modify an old phrase), and the contributions of volunteers and avocationalists whose tireless dedication and unbridled enthusiasm remain infectious.
Post-Palaeolithic Filiform Rock Art in Western Europe edited by Fernando Coimbra and Umberto Sansoni. vi+88 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. 6 papers in English, 1 in French, all papers with abstracts in English and French. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784913687. Book contents pageDownload

Filiform rock art appears as a spontaneous technique, more simple and immediate than pecking, good either for autonomous strands of expression, or for sketches and first drafts regarding works of painting or pecking. According to the order of presentation of the session’s papers during the XVII IUPPS (UISPP) Conference in Burgos, the articles published here are the following: Late prehistoric incised rock art in southern Europe: a contribution for its typology, by Fernando A. Coimbra, where the author presents a preliminary typology of this kind of rock art, divided in two groups (geometric and figurative), approaching not only common themes to several countries, but also some examples that have only a regional character; Filiform rock art in mount Bego (Tende, Maritime Alps, France), by Nicoletta Bianchi, which analyses some cases where pecked carvings overlap filiforms, therefore pre-dating pecked engravings and studies the interaction of the two carvings tradition; Filiform figures in the rock art of Valcamonica from Prehistory to the Roman age, by Umberto Sansoni, Cinzia Bettineschi and Silvana Gavaldo, that provides a general corpus of the figurative incised rock art of Valcamonica with a quantitative and qualitative approach, by considering the typological variety, the long-lasting chronological dating and the strong relation with the local pecked rock art of the Camunian filiforms; Threadlike engravings of historical period on the rocks and plaster of churches and civic buildings. Some comparisons and proposals of interpretation, by Federico Troletti, which presents the incised engravings exclusively of historical time located in some sites of Valcamonica – the area of Campanine di Cimbergo and Monticolo di Darfo; The rock art from Figueiredo (Sertã, Portugal): typology, parallels and chronology, by Fernando A. Coimbra and Sara Garcês, focusing vi on the description of the engravings from three carved rocks with incised motives from the place of Figueiredo, in central Portugal, which were studied during different fieldworks. Two other papers of researchers that couldn’t attend the Conference were also presented: The filiform rock art from Kosovo, by Shemsi Krasniqi, which presents recent findings from Kosovo with a similar typology of figures from other European countries; The filiform rock engravings of the Parete Manzi of Montelapiano (Chieti, Italy), by Tomaso Di Fraia, which analyses the problematic of incised rock art from a rock shelter in the centre of Italy.
Public Images, Private Readings: Multi-Perspective Approaches to the Post-Palaeolithic Rock Art Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain) Volume 5 / Session A11e edited by Ramón Fábregas Valcarce and Carlos Rodríguez-Rellán. vi+70 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. All papers in English, abstracts in English and French. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784912901. Book contents pageDownload

A significant number of Holocene societies throughout the world have resorted at one time or another to the making of paints or carvings on different places (tombs, rock-shelters or caves, openair outcrops). The aim of the session A11e. Public images, private readings: multi-perspective approaches to the post-Palaeolithic rock art, which was held within the XVII World UISPP Congress (Burgos, September 1-7 2014), was to put together the experiences of specialists from different areas of the Iberian Peninsula and the World. The approaches ranged from the archaeological definition of the artistic phenomena and their socioeconomic background to those concerning themselves with the symbolic and ritual nature of those practices, including the definition of the audience to which the graphic manifestations were addressed and the potential role of the latter in the making up of social identities and the enforcement of territorial claims. More empirical issues, such as new recording methodologies and data management or even dating were also considered during this session.

This book is also available to buy in paperback priced £22.00.

Quality Management of Cultural Heritage: problems and best practices Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September, Burgos, Spain). Volume 8 / Session A13 edited by Maurizio Quagliuolo and Davide Delfino. 80 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784912963. Book contents pageDownload

From Lascaux to Shanidar caves, from Malta temples to Stonenge (and the ‘new’ one...), from Serra da Capivara to Foz Coa park, from Australia to North Africa’s Rock Art, from Pechino to Isernia excavations, from the Musée de l’Homme in Paris to the Museum of Civilization in Quebéc, from Çatal Hüyük to the Varna village, from the Rift Valley to the Grand Canyon, most problems have to be fronted in a common perspective. But which perspective? Is it possible to have a common point of view on different values, different sites, different methodologies? The Scientific Commission for the Quality Management of Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sites, Monuments and Museums© set up at UISPP by initiative of the author (UISPP-PPCHM) is aimed to examine these issues and propose solutions acceptable to all those who want to contribute to common understanding of our past history.

The only certainty in fact is our Past. It is undoubted that it happened, it is undoubted that its consequences are in place today, it is undoubted that it is affecting persons, social groups or larger structures in some ways also when it is disregarded. The help of specialists from different Countries and the exchange of opinions with other colleagues from other fields and/or organizations is then needed in order to: discuss the reasons and possibilities for preservation and use of Sites, Monuments and Museums; let the management of Rock Art Sites and Parks, Prehistoric excavations, Museums and Interpretations Centres and related structures open to the public to be made according to criteria agreed at an International level, both in normal and critical conditions; enhance standards in preserving, communicating and using Sites, Monuments and Museums; involve the public and diffuse awareness; analyse tourism benefits and risks at these destinations; introduce new opportunities for jobs and training; develop networks on these topics in connection with other specialized Organizations.

This session aimed to ask: what is your experience? Which problems would you like to address? What solutions can be considered?

This book is also available to buy in paperback priced £22.00.

Intellectual and Spiritual Expression of Non-Literate Peoples Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September, Burgos, Spain): Volume 1 / Session A20 edited by Emmanuel Anati. xiv+386 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. Available both in print and Open Access. 212 2016. ISBN 9781784912826. Book contents pageDownload

This volume presents the proceedings of the session ‘Intellectual and Spiritual Expression of Non-literate Peoples’ part of the XVII World UISPP Congress, held in Burgos (Spain), the 4th September 2014. The session brought together experts from various disciplines to share experience and scientific approaches for a better understanding of human creativity and behaviour in prehistory.

This book is also available to buy in paperback priced £55.00.

Ritual Landscapes and Borders within Rock Art Research Papers in Honour of Professor Kalle Sognnes edited by Heidrun Stebergløkken, Ragnhild Berge, Eva Lindgaard and Helle Vangen Stuedal. i-viii, 1-188 pages, illustrated in colour throughout.ISBN 9781784911591. Download

Ritual landscapes and borders are recurring themes running through Professor Kalle Sognnes' long research career. This anthology contains 13 articles written by colleagues from his broad network in appreciation of his many contributions to the field of rock art research. The contributions discuss many different kinds of borders: those between landscapes, cultures, traditions, settlements, power relations, symbolism, research traditions, theory and methods. We are grateful to the Department of Historical studies, NTNU; the Faculty of Humanities; NTNU, The Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters and The Norwegian Archaeological Society (Norsk arkeologisk selskap) for funding this volume that will add new knowledge to the field and will be of importance to researchers and students of rock art in Scandinavia and abroad.
To See the Invisible Karelian Rock Art by Arsen Faradzhev. iv+19 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white.ISBN 9781784911249. Book contents pageDownload

This contribution considers 25 years of discovery of the possible origins and development of the Rock Art Tradition to create Karelian Rock Art images under the open sky through the analysis of different types of intercessions into the horizontal surface of granite rocks.

Karelian petroglyphs are located-at the eastern bank of the Onega Lake and 300 km to the north, close to the southern bank of the White Sea. One of them, the “New Zalavruga,” was discovered by the expedition of U.Savvateev under the Neolithic cultural layer and sterile sand layer in 1963-1968. This is a great and very rare opportunity to obtain direct dating of the end of the tradition to create Karelian Rock Art images around 5-6 ka ago. Therefore, the task was to find the “Invisible” evidences of the tradition’s origins and development similar to both regions via the different use of context.
Neolithic rock-art in the British Isles: retrospect and prospect Chapter 4 from Art as Metaphor: The Prehistoric Rock-Art of Britain by Clive Waddington. 49-68.Download

Although an increasingly popular topic of study, rock-art in Britain is still poorly understood by the wider archaeological community who frequently find the myriad of publications and varying views somewhat confusing. The reality today is that there are emerging areas of consensus and evidencebased conclusions about aspects of the cup-and-ring and passage grave art traditions, though of course much else also remains conjectural and contested. This chapter, although it attempts to treat the subject in an objective manner, is of course coloured by the author’s own views about British rock-art and this brings in an inevitable degree of subjectivity into the treatment of the subject, though I have sought to reflect others’ views fairly and accurately. The paper has been structured so as to provide an initial overview before proceeding to discuss the key areas of debate. There then follows a summary of what is currently known with confidence about various aspects of British rock-art, a section deliberately included in order to dispel some of the myths and misunderstandings that have arisen over recent years. Finally the paper deals with the research agenda and the possibilities of future fieldwork. Such a structure has led to a degree of repetition throughout the chapter but it is considered worthwhile as it has the advantage of separating out what is conjecture and debate from what is generally acknowledged fact – an important distinction as some commentators prefer to view the whole rock-art phenomenon as being ‘up for grabs’ thereby justifying ill-informed guesswork. By anchoring the known within the structure of this chapter a platform is created from which the research community can move forward, and this structure has the added benefit of helping the general reader to avoid misunderstandings over current knowledge and the state of the art. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device.
Rock-art and art mobilier of the British Upper Palaeolithic Chapter 2 from Art as Metaphor: The Prehistoric Rock-Art of Britain by Paul Pettitt and Paul Bahn. 10-38.Download

Where does functionality end and ‘art’ begin? However one looks at it the number of examples of rockart unequivocally dating to the British Palaeolithic is, as yet, small. Given that this small record – restricted at present to two caves in the same gorge, is limited in heuristic potential, we include in this consideration artefacts such as engraved bones, sagaies and bâtons percés. We hope to show that the consideration of interpretation of all categories of Late Pleistocene art from Britain repays effort, in that the resulting canon is there, and bears strong similarities to contemporary Upper Palaeolithic art on the continent. We believe that the British art is best seen in the context of infrequent and temporary use of areas of the British landscape by Upper Palaeolithic groups deriving culturally from areas to the south and east of Britain. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device.
A Coming of Age Chapter 1 from Art as Metaphor: The Prehistoric Rock-Art of Britain by Aron Mazel, George Nash and Clive Waddington. 1-8.Download

The last two decades has witnessed a remarkable growth of interest in British rock-art and this has been accompanied by an increase in the volume of people studying the subject. More than ever, there are large numbers of people engaged in the recording, researching and publishing of rock-art and this has given rise to an expanding corpus of data, as well as new knowledge and insights. These people are drawn from diverse backgrounds, notably academia, heritage agencies, research consultancies, the amateur and independent archaeological communities, as well as members of the public who have contributed their time and effort to the discovery and recording of rock-art. This busy community of researchers and enthusiasts have pushed forward our understanding in relation to: the chronology of rock-art; the variety and frequency of rock-art; its landscape setting; the relationship of different panels to each other; the variety and types of motifs; possible explanations as to why the rock-art was made; and, the challenges facing the effective management of these vulnerable resources. In many respects the study of British rock-art has finally come of age and these developments have seen it take its fitting place amongst the worldwide corpus of rock-art research. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device.
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