​​ We use cookies to enhance your experience on our site. By continuing to use the site you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy & Cookies.​

 
Archaeopress logo
Archaeopress Publishing Ltd, Summertown Pavilion, 18-24 Middle Way, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7LG, England
tel +44 (0) 1865 311914 fax +44 (0) 1865 512231   email: info@archaeopress.com
Monthly AP Alert - join our mailing list today Archaeopress on Facebook Archaeopress on Twitter Archaeopress on Linked In Archaeopress Blog
Home  
|
  Browse by Subject  
|
  Browse by Series  
|
  Catalogues  
|
  Join Our Mailing List  
|
  Visit Our Blog  
|
  Login (Private Customers)  
|
  Login (Institutional Subscriptions)  
|
  View Basket

Search

title, author, ISBN, keyword

Browse for books in the following languages

ARCHAEOPRESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ACCESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ARCHAEOPRESS JOURNALS
DISTRIBUTED
PUBLISHERS
DIGITAL EDITIONS
OPEN ACCESS PLATFORM
Ordering Information
About Us
Publish With Us
Standing Orders
Trade Sales
Contact Us
Request Review Copy
NEW: Performing the Sacra: Priestly roles and their organisation in Roman Britain by Alessandra Esposito. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+174 pages; 27 figures, 19 tables (21 plates in colour). 523 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 53. ISBN 9781789690972. £34.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Performing the Sacra: Priestly roles and their organisation in Roman Britain addresses the range of cultural responses to the Roman conquest of Britain with regards to priestly roles. The approach adopted is based on current theoretical trends focussing on dynamics of adaptation, multiculturalism, and appropriation characterising the continuity and emergence of these roles in the province. The book investigates three main themes: a model of priesthoods organisation in Britain, the embodiment of priestly authorities in a provincial environment, and how the different depositional contexts of priestly regalia contribute to our understanding of these roles. The methodical investigation of published and unpublished objects identifiable as priestly regalia is integrated into an assessment of historical, epigraphic, and iconographic sources mapped via the creation of a Geographic Information System. Highlighting the continuity of use of British priestly regalia between the Iron Age and the Roman period and contextualising this phenomenon in a wider provincial panorama from Spain to Syria, the regalia become crucial to mark the presence of priestly roles and their evolution. The biographical analysis of the regalia, especially when found in structured deposit, allows consideration on the organisation of cults, while their geographical distribution suggests different patterns of priestly organisation across different regions. After crossing this information with the epigraphic evidence for priestly titles, the result is a mosaic of engagements with priestly authority, particularly by elite or near-elite individuals, ultimately illustrating a fluid provincial culture behind the religious organisation of the ritual landscape of Britain.
NEW: Recommendations for best practices in data acquisition methods for natural and cultural heritage management of Moroccan coastal wetlands Recommandations pour les bonnes pratiques en matière de méthodes d’acquisition de données pour la gestion du patrimoine naturel et culturel des zones humides côtières marocaines by Athena Trakadas and Nadia Mhammdi. Paperback; 170x240mm; vi+92 pages; full colour throughout. (Print RRP £25.00). 522 2019. ISBN 9781789691504. £25.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

As part of the CBDAMM Project (Capacity Building of Data Acquisition Methods with a view to promoting natural and cultural heritage management practices in Morocco), a set of recommendations for the processes of acquiring data in marine environments and coastal wetlands has been established for Moroccan stakeholders.

Recommendations for best practices in data acquisition methods for natural and cultural heritage management of Moroccan coastal wetlands aims to outline the functional procedures for conducting scientific coastal marine surveys in the Moroccan context. It outlines the requirements, methods, and practices of the four scientific fields that rely on shared data from such surveys: hydrography, marine geology, marine biology and toxicology, and maritime archaeology and heritage management. The content is derived from workshops, study visits, and fieldwork surveys carried out during the CBDAMM Project, utilising the specific case-study of the Oued Bouregreg, a tidal river and wetland that runs between the urban centres of Rabat and Salé, on the Atlantic coast of Morocco.

Dans le cadre du projet CBDAMM (Renforcement des capacités des méthodes d’acquisition de données en vue de promouvoir les pratiques de gestion du patrimoine naturel et culturel au Maroc), un ensemble de recommandations pour les processus d’acquisition de données dans les milieux marins et les zones humides côtières a été établi pour les parties prenantes marocaines.

Cette brochure, intitulée Recommandations pour les bonnes pratiques en matière de méthodes d’acquisition de données pour la gestion du patrimoine naturel et culturel des zones humides côtières marocaines, vise à décrire les procédures fonctionnelles pour mener des études côtières scientifiques dans le contexte marocain. Cette brochure décrit les exigences, les méthodes et les pratiques des quatre domaines scientifiques qui reposent sur des données partagées provenant de ces investigations: hydrographie, géologie marine, biologie marine et toxicologie, archéologie maritime et gestion du patrimoine. Le contenu résume les ateliers, les séjours scientifiques et les recherches sur le terrain menées au cours du projet CBDAMM, avec pour étude de cas spécifique: Oued Bouregreg, une rivière à marée semidiurne de type mésotidal et une zone humide qui s’étend entre les centres urbains de Rabat et Salé, sur la Côte Atlantique du Maroc.
NEW: Egitto, Iraq ed Etruria nelle fotografie di John Alfred Spranger Viaggi e ricerche archeologiche (1929-1936) by Stefano Anastasio and Barbara Arbeid. Paperback; 205x290mm; 178 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Italian text with English summary. 512 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691269. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691276. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume – in Italian, with an English summary – presents the 1930s archaeological photo-albums of John Alfred Spranger (1889-1968). Engineer, topographer, mountain climber, archaeologist, art collector and photographer, Spranger traveled extensively – in the Balkans, Greece, Egypt and the Near East, Canada, Central Asia – and left several photo albums detailing archaeological explorations as well as travel memories. In the 1920s-1930s, he took part in a number of Etruscan excavations in Tuscany, together with Harry Burton, the photographer of the Tomb of Tutankhamun. With a pioneering approach, they used the photo-camera to document the excavation work in progress. The albums are dedicated to a trip to Egypt in 1929, a trip to Mesopotamia (Iraq) in 1936 and some surveys and excavations carried out in Etruria (Tuscany, Italy) in 1929-1935. Spranger’s photos are particularly meaningful, especially because he combined his skills in using the camera with a great expertise in archaeology and topography. His photos make it possible to understand, after almost a century, how many Egyptian, Mesopotamian and Etruscan sites appeared at the time of their first excavations.

About the Authors
STEFANO ANASTASIO has carried out archaeological researches in Italy (Sardinia, Tuscany), Syria, Turkey, Jordan and currently works at the Archaeological Photo Archive of the Superintendency of Florence. His main research interests are the Mesopotamian Iron Age pottery and architecture, the building archaeology and the use of the early photo archives for the study of the Near Eastern archaeology.

BARBARA ARBEID is an archaeologist at the Superintendency of Florence, appointed to the archaeological heritage protection service. Her main research interests are the archaeology of Norther Etruria, the Etruscan bronze craftsmanship, the archaeological collecting and photography.

Italian Description
Il volume – in italiano con riassunto in inglese – è dedicato agli album fotografici realizzati negli anni Trenta del Novecento da John Alfred Spranger (1889-1968): fu ingegnere, topografo, alpinista, archeologo, collezionista e fotografo. Viaggiò molto – nei Balcani, in Grecia, in Egitto e nel Vicino Oriente, in Canda e in Asia centrale – lasciandoci molti album fotografici dedicati ai suoi viaggi e alle sue ricerche archeologiche. Negli anni Venti e Trenta partecipò a ricognizioni e scavi archeologici in Toscana, assieme a Harry Burton, il fotografo della Tomba di Tutankhamun. Con un approccio pionieristico, ambedue sperimentarono l’uso della macchina fotografica per documentare lo scavo archeologico. Gli album presentati sono dedicati a due viaggi, uno in Egitto nel 1929 e l’altro in Mesopotamia (Iraq) nel 1936, e a ricognizioni e scavi condotti in siti etruschi della Toscana tra 1929 e 1935. Le fotografie di Spranger sono particolarmente significative perché riflettono sia la competenza del fotografo che quella del topografo e dell’archeologo, e ci permettono di capire, a quasi un secolo di distanza, quale fosse l’aspetto di numerosi siti egizi, mesopotamici ed etruschi, al momento della loro prima indagine archeologica.

Biografia
STEFANO ANASTASIO, archeologo, ha svolto ricerche in Italia (Sardegna, Toscana), Siria, Turchia e Giordania. Attualmente lavora all’Archivio Fotografico Archeologico della Soprintendenza di Firenze. Si interessa soprattutto di ceramica e architettura dell’età del Ferro in Mesopotamia, di Building archaeology e dell’uso delle fotografie antiche per lo studio dell’archeologia vicinorientale.

BARBARA ARBEID è archeologa presso la Soprintendenza di Firenze, con incarichi di tutela del patrimonio. Il suo ambito di studio principale è la civiltà dell'Etruria settentroinale, con particolare interesse per la bronzistica, ma ha svolto anche ricerche riguardanti la storia del collezionismo e della fotografia in ambito archeologico.
NEW: Stone Tools in the Ancient Near East and Egypt Ground stone tools, rock-cut installations and stone vessels from Prehistory to Late Antiquity edited by Andrea Squitieri and David Eitam. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+360 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (89 plates in colour). 511 2019 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 4. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690606. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690613. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Stone Tools in the Ancient Near East and Egypt: Ground stone tools, rock-cut installations and stone vessels from Prehistory to Late Antiquity is about groundstone tools, stone vessels, and devices carved into rock throughout the Near East and Egypt from Prehistory to the late periods. These categories of objects have too often been overlooked by archaeologists, despite their frequent occurrence in the archaeological record. Most importantly, a careful study of these tools reveals crucial insights into ancient societies. From the procuring of raw materials to patterns of use and discard, they provide us with a wealth of information about the activities they were involved in and how these activities were organised. These tools reveal patterns in the trade of both raw materials and finished products, inform us about economic aspects of food production and consumption, cast light on industrial activities, help establish intercultural connections, and offer hints about the relationship between sites and their environment. The aim of this book is to explore all aspects of these ubiquitous tools and to stimulate debate about the new methodologies needed to approach this material.

About the Editors
ANDREA SQUITIERI is a post-doctoral researcher working for the Peshdar Plain Project, based at Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich, focussing on the study of the eastern border of the Neo-Assyrian Empire. He obtained his PhD at University College London (UCL) in 2015 with a thesis titled Stone Vessels in the Near East during the Iron Age and the Persian Period, published with Archaeopress. He is also the co-author, with Mark Altaweel, of Revolutionising a World: From Small States to Universalism in the Pre-Islamic Near East, published by UCL Press.

DAVID EITAM is an archaeologist focussing on the study of stone tools and their implications for prehistory and the history of the ancient Near East. His investigations have revealed the Iron Age period oil industry in the Kingdoms of Israel and Philistine Ekron, and the first systematic production of bread by the Natufians 12,500 years ago. He obtained his PhD at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem (HUJ) with a dissertation on Late Epipaleolithic rock-cut installations and ground stones in the Southern Levant, partly published on PLoS ONE 10(7): e0133306.
NEW: Profane Death in Burial Practices of a Pre-Industrial Society: A study from Silesia by Paweł Duma. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+122 pages; 66 figures, 6 tables (31 plates in colour). 506 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690897. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690903. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Profane Death in Burial Practices of a Pre-Industrial Society: A study from Silesia discusses phenomena characteristic of the funeral practices of the pre-industrial society of Silesia (Poland). The author explores specific groups of people: unbaptised children, women who died in childbirth, suicides, convicts and those who perished in epidemics, who were refused an honorary burial in consecrated land or had ceremonies conducted on special terms. Also discussed are the places where the bodies of these excluded individuals were interred. The study is supplemented by an analysis of the results of archaeological research, which mainly involved fieldwork carried out at former execution sites. The skeletal remains of numerous convicts were discovered during these investigations, together with the remnants of stonebuilt gallows. This analysis is especially relevant for interpreting selected funeral finds, socalled ‘vampire burials’, and the general question of atypical treatment of bodies perceived as unworthy, badly-deceased or ‘unclean’. The research subject is novel, as no similar synthetic studies on unusual funerary practices have yet been conducted in Polish archaeology for this particular era and territory. The author is primarily concerned with cases mentioned in historical and archaeological sources from the region of Silesia, but evidence from beyond this area is also presented. Chronologically the study covers the period between the 15th and early 19th centuries.

About the Author
PAWEŁ DUMA is Assistant Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, University of Wroclaw, Poland. His main interests concern historical archaeology, profane death, late medieval and post-medieval material culture. Has excavated historical execution sites in Silesia both as team member and as a supervisor. He is author and co-author of several articles published in Polish and international scholarly journals.
NEW: Taymāʾ I: Archaeological Exploration, Palaeoenvironment, Cultural Contacts edited by Arnulf Hausleiter, Ricardo Eichmann, Muhammad al-Najem. Hardback; 210x297mm; xii+268 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (66 plates in colour). 499 2018 Taymāʾ: Multidisciplinary Series on the Results of the Saudi-German Archaeological Project 1. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690439. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690446. Book contents pageDownload

Archaeological investigations in the north-western part of the Arabian Peninsula has increased during the last 15 years. One of the major sites in the region is the ancient oasis of Taymāʾ, known as a commercial hub on the so-called Incense Road connecting South Arabia with the Eastern Mediterranean. In the context of this new research a multidisciplinary project by the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) and the Orient Department of the German Archaeological Institute (DAI) has been investigating the archaeology and ancient environment of Taymāʾ since 2004. A major aim of this project was the development of new perspectives of the site and the region, characterised by elaborating the local socio-cultural and economic contexts. So far, Taymāʾ has been known mainly through exogenous sources.

The present volume is the first of the publication series of the Saudi-German archaeological project and focuses on three fundamental aspects of research at Taymāʾ: the current archaeological exploration of the oasis is contextualised with previous and ongoing research within the region, while at the same time offering a first overview of the settlement history of the site, which may have started as early as more than 6000 years ago. New information on the palaeoenvironment has been provided by multiproxy- analysis of sediments from a palaeolake immediately north of the settlement. The results indicate an Early Holocene humid period in the region that is shorter than the so-called African Humid Period. The abrupt aridification at around 8 ka BP, known from other regions in the Near East, is also attested in north-western Arabia. The reconstruction of the past vegetation of the site and its surroundings demonstrates that oasis cultivation at Taymāʾ started during the 5th millennium BCE with grapes and figs, rather than with the date palm. According to hydrological investigations on water resources, groundwater aquifers provided the main source of local water supply. These were exploited through wells, some of which have been identified in the area of the ancient oasis. Finally, since the time of early travellers to Northwest Arabia evidence of cultural contacts has been observed in the records from the site, which had been occupied by the last Babylonian king, Nabonidus (556–539 BCE) for ten years. A historical-archaeological essay on Egypt and Arabia as well as a study on the ambiguous relationship between Assyria and Arabia – characterised by conflict and commerce – shed new light on the foreign relations of ancient Taymāʾ.

About the Editors
ARNULF HAUSLEITER is researcher at the DAI’s Orient Department for the Taymāʾ project, funded by the German Research foundation (DFG). He has been field director of the excavations at Taymāʾ since 2004 and has co-directed the project with Ricardo Eichmann.

RICARDO EICHMANN is director of the Orient Department at the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin. He is the head of the German component of the Taymāʾ project and has co-directed it with Arnulf Hausleiter.

MUHAMMAD AL-NAJEM is head of the Antiquities Office of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) and director of the Museum of Archaeology and Ethnography at Taymāʾ, Province of Tabuk, Saudi Arabia.
NEW: Cultural Interactions during the Zhou Period (c. 1000-350 BC) A study of networks from the Suizao corridor by Beichen Chen. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+140 pages; 77 figures, 6 tables (31 plates in colour). 488 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690545. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690552. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Cultural Interactions during the Zhou Period (c. 1000-350 BC): A study of networks from the Suizao corridor examines cultural interactions during the Zhou period of China (c. 1000- 350 BCE) between the Suizao corridor (near the present-day Yangtze River region) and its contemporaries within or outside the Zhou realm. It concentrates mainly, but not exclusively, on bronze ritual vessels from the Suizao corridor, and discusses the underlying social and political relations between the dominant cultures and the regional ones in this particular area (the Zeng state for example), which are central to understanding the ways in which the dominant cultures joined their disparate territories into a whole. Newly excavated archaeological evidence show that there were at least three periods when people in the corridor learned about the current traditions employed elsewhere, which are: 1) Yejiashan period (from the 11th to the 10th century BCE); 2) post-Ritual Reform period (from the mid-9th to the mid-7th century BCE); and 3) Marquis Yi’s period (from the mid- 6th to the mid-4th century BCE). In these periods, local people were involved in networks of enormous and constantly changing complexity, in which people, objects, practices, and ideas were mixed together through inter-regional contacts. The choices of local people in adopting foreign materials and ideas from either the dominant cultures or other places depended heavily on the subjective view of their social identity, which can be constructed, maintained, or transited to adapt to different social and political environments.

About the Author
BEICHEN CHEN is a lecturer at Capital Normal University, Beijing. He graduated from Merton College, University of Oxford in 2017 with a Doctor of Philosophy in Archaeology, supervised by Professor Dame Jessica Rawson, and Professor Mark Pollard. His academic interest lies in the study of China’s bronze ritual vessels from the second to the first millennium BCE, including change of ritual performance, trade and exchange network, and development of casting technology. He is also working on digital methods and practices in Archaeology, Museology, and Cultural Heritage.
NEW: Rethinking the Concept of ‘Healing Settlements’: Water, Cults, Constructions and Contexts in the Ancient World edited by Maddalena Bassani, Marion Bolder-Boos and Ugo Fusco. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+176 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 15 plates in colour. (Print RRP £35.00). 483 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 52. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690378. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690385. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Rethinking the Concept of ‘Healing Settlements’: Water, Cults, Constructions and Contexts in the Ancient World brings together papers dealing with therapeutic aspects connected to thermomineral sites both in Italy and in the Roman Provinces, as well as cultic issues surrounding health and healing. The first part of the book consists of contributions that are focused on the numerous problems concerning the exploitation of curative springs and the settlement patterns at spa sites in terms of topography, infrastructure, architecture, cult, society and economy, emphasizing the particularities accompanying the use of beneficial sources and comparing them to that of common freshwaters. The papers in the second part of the volume concentrate on religious aspects connected to health, fertility and healing, focussing especially on sites located at particular natural surroundings such as caves and water sources. Together, the contributions in this book give us an idea of the amount and quality of research currently being undertaken in different parts of the Roman world (and complemented by one paper on the Greek world) on the topic of health and healing associated with cults and salutiferous waters.

About the Author
MADDALENA BASSANI graduated with distinction in Classical Literature with archaeology specialization at Padua University. She is the author of approximately seventy publications and is a member of the editorial boards for Antenor Quaderni, Hesperìa. Studi sulla Grecità d'Occidente and Venetia/Venezia. Quaderni adriatici di storia e archeologia lagunare. In 2014 she obtained the National Scientific Qualification to function as Associate Professor.

MARION BOLDER-BOOS studied Classical Archaeology, Assyriology and Prehistory at the universities of Heidelberg and Cambridge, attaining her MA in 2005 and her PhD in 2010 from Heidelberg University. She has participated in various excavations (Phylakopi in Greece, Magdalensberg in Austria and Carthage in Tunisia) and has publishing on a wide range of subjects, such as Roman sanctuaries and deities, Roman urbanism, history of archaeology, ancient colonisation and Phoenician and Punic archaeology. Since 2006 she has been Assistant Professor in Classical Archaeology at Technical University Darmstadt.

UGO FUSCO has a BA in Classics and a MA in Classical Archaeology from Sapienza University of Rome, as well as a PhD in Classical Archaeology from the University of Pisa. He has excavated in Italy (Volterra, Rome, Veii and Grumento) and abroad (in London), investigating urban and rural sites. He has worked on various themes including: Roman architecture, prosopography, Latin epigraphy, topography of the suburbs of Rome, Roman archaic history and cults relating to water and mystery. He recently expanded his interests to include Greek architecture, considering the subject of double temples in Greece.
NEW: The Pioneer Burial: A high-status Anglian warrior burial from Wollaston Northamptonshire by Ian Meadows. Paperback; viii+70 pages; 56 illustrations (27 plates in colour). 510 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691191. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691207. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

With contributions by Rob Atkins, Alison Draper, J N James, Lloyd Laing, Matthew Ponting, Anthony Read, Jenny Wakely, Penelope Walton-Rogers, and Jacqui Watson.

Illustrations by Olly Dindol, Jacqueline Harding and James Ladocha

MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) undertook evaluation and subsequent excavation at Wollaston Quarry, near Wellingborough through the 1990s. These excavations took place in advance of gravel extraction on land to the north and south of Hardwater Road, Wollaston. The archaeological work found Iron Age and Roman farms arranged along a single routeway and the remains of at least two Roman vineyards.

A single late 7th century grave, the Pioneer burial, lay alongside a long-lived routeway at the southern end of the quarry, close to the floodplain and any burial mound would have overlooked the River Nene. The burial was an isolated feature; the only other Saxon artefacts recovered from other parts of the quarry were limited to two scatters of pottery and two fragments of small long brooch recovered by metal detection. All were located some distance from the grave.

The Pioneer burial was adjacent to the south-western corner of the later Saxon Higham Hundred boundary where it meets the River Nene. It is probable the burial had originally been within a barrow, but no evidence was found for it. Within the grave there was an individual adult of slender build probably in their early to middle 20s equipped with a boar-crested iron helmet, a pattern-welded sword, a copper alloy hanging bowl with enamelled escutcheon, an iron knife, a copper alloy clothing hook and three iron buckles. The burial contained artefacts indicative of very high status, with the early to middle Saxon helmet being at the time only the fourth to have been recovered from a burial in England.
From Cambridge to Lake Chad: Life in archaeology 1956–1971 by Graham Connah. Paperback; 175x245mm; xxii+270 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 9 colour plates. 505 2019 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919580. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919597. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is about how the author became an archaeologist at a time when opportunities for employment were rare and how he worked as a field researcher in West Africa and wrote about his work there. It traces his archaeological training and employment at Cambridge and his practical experience on British excavations and explains how he became one of the pioneers of Nigerian archaeology during a decade in that country. It is not so much a study of the archaeology that was done, as an account of how it was done; its circumstances, organization, and economic and social and cultural context. As a result, it is both a professional and personal account, for these two aspects of life were inseparably intertwined, his wife Beryl becoming an integral part of the story. Other archaeologists and many non-archaeologists also feature in the account. The period in Nigeria from 1961 to 1971 included the Nigerian Civil War from 1967 to 1970, when archaeological work continued with difficulty. Both circumstances and preference meant that the author always worked with a labour team of Nigerians and with Nigerian assistants, of whom few had any experience in archaeology and none had any formal training; there were no postgraduates or others from outside the country. Success in excavations in Benin City, in the south of the country, and in Borno, in its far north-east, was as much the achievement of those Nigerians as it was the author’s.

About the Author
GRAHAM CONNAH was born in Cheshire, educated at the Wirral Grammar School, served on a destroyer in the Mediterranean, read history and archaeology at Cambridge University, and worked there as a Research Assistant. After experience on numerous excavations in Britain, including assistant director and director, in 1961 he went to Nigeria, where he spent ten years excavating and on fieldwork, the subject of this book. In 1971 he moved to the University of New England, in Australia, founding the Archaeology Department there and later becoming its Foundation Professor. He returned to Nigerian fieldwork in 1978 and 1981, and subsequently excavated in Egyptian Nubia and Uganda. He also contributed to Australian historical archaeology and founded the journal Australasian Historical Archaeology. He is a Fellow of the Royal Anthropological institute, a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Humanities, MA (Cantab), D.Litt (UNE), and holds the Order of Australia, and the Australian Centenary Medal. He is currently a Visiting Fellow in Archaeology and Anthropology at the Australian National University, Canberra.
NEW: Thurrock’s Deeper Past: A Confluence of Time The archaeology of the borough of Thurrock, Essex, from the last Ice Age to the establishment of the English kingdoms by Christopher John Tripp. Paperback; 148x210mm; vi+200 pages; 65 figures, 6 maps (36 plates in colour). 504 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691115. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691122. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Thurrock’s Deeper Past: A Confluence of Time looks at the evidence for human activity in Thurrock and this part of the Thames estuary since the last Ice Age, and how the river crossing point here has been of great importance to the development of human settlement and trade in the British Isles. It is a book about the archaeology of Thurrock. It takes in all periods and most of the sites which have been excavated in the borough of Thurrock over the last sixty or more years.

The account opens at a time when Britain is still joined to the continent and the inhabitants are using flint tools and weapons. The author follows through the impact of the succeeding ages on the locality: the melting of the ice, the Neolithic period bringing the farming of crops and stockholding, the first appearance of worked metal in the Bronze Age, through the widespread use of iron in the Iron Age; and then the dramatic impact of Rome and its gradual dissolution to the English kingdoms whose traces are still recognisable today. All is set in the context of the author’s lasting interest in the subject, first nurtured at his Tilbury school.

About the Author
Thurrock was home to Chris Tripp for much of his early life. He attended St Chad’s Secondary Modern School in Tilbury and then Palmer’s Sixth Form College. After years spent in retail he became an archaeologist, graduating from the Institute of Archaeology (UCL) in 1986. He took up his first archaeological post in 1990 at the Passmore Edwards Museum, Plaistow, after which he worked for the Museum of London Archaeology Service and the Essex County Field Unit between 1995 and 2002. During this time he gained his masters degree in public archaeology at UCL.

For the next four years Chris worked on various excavations and community archaeology projects including ‘The Dig’ for the Museum of London, and ‘The Big Dig’ for Time Team/Channel 4 among many others. Moving to Dorset in 2006, he continued in archaeology and, inter alia established the ‘Dorset Diggers Community Archaeology Group’ to bring people closer to their local archaeological heritage.

It is in this spirit that he began research for this book in 1997, and his labours have been sustained by his passion for the past of his home borough of Thurrock and of the majestic Thames.
NEW: The Politics of the Past: The Representation of the Ancient Empires by Iran’s Modern States by Maryam Dezhamkhooy, Leila Papoli-Yazdi. Illustrations by Ali Roustaeeyanfard. Paperback; 175x245mm; viii+148 pages; 15 figures, 1 table (8 plates in colour). 503 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690934. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690941. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Politics of the past: The Representation of the Ancient Empires by Iran’s Modern States examines the highly problematic politics of the past surrounding the archaeology of ancient empires in Iran. Being indigenous, the authors regard the relations between archaeological remains, (negative) heritage, and modern strategies of suppression. The chapters provide a detailed analysis of how the practice of archaeology could be biased and ideologically charged. Discussing their own personal and professional experiences, the authors exemplify the real (ethical) dilemmas that archaeologists confront in the Middle East, calling for reflectivity and awareness among the archaeologists of the region. The text is accompanied by visual deconstruction of ancient rock reliefs to indicate the possibility of alternative histories.

About the Authors
MARYAM DEZHAMKHOOY is Alexander von Humboldt alumna. She was assistant professor in archaeology at University of Birjand. She is a historical archaeologist with broad interest in theory. Since 2003 she has concentrated on the ‘archaeology of recent past’ with emphasis on political archaeology as the main theme, including conflicts, colonialism, gender, nationalism, etc. Maryam published mostly in scholarly anthropological and archaeological journals such as Archaeologies, International Journal of Historical Archaeology, World Archaeology, and Sexuality & Culture as well as chapters in edited volumes. She is a member of Gap End, a working group for Iranian-engaged archaeologists. Interested in gender and sexuality, she is also a member of AGE, Archaeology and Gender in Europe. Her work on gender in Sasanian Iran can be considered as pioneering in Iran. Her last publication, with Leila Papoli-Yazdi, was a monograph on gender, in Persian.

LEILA PAPOLI-YAZDI is Alexander von Humboldt alumna. In 2010, due to political issues, Leila was suspended of her post as assistant professor in archaeology at University of Neyshabour. She is an archaeologist of recent past. Starting in 2003 she has concentrated on disaster archaeology of Bam, a city located in southeastern Iran which was dramatically damaged by an earthquake. Afterwards she directed several projects in Pakistan, Kuwait and Iran. The main themes of all of her projects are oppression, gender, colonialism, nationalism, etc. Her work on political opposition and nationalism from an archaeological viewpoint can considered as pioneering in Iran. Leila published mostly in scholarly anthropological and archaeological journals such as World Archaeology, Archaeologies and International Journal of Historical Archaeology and also as well as chapters in edited volumes or as monographs in Persian. She is a member of Gap End, a working group for Iranian-engaged archaeologists. She is also a member of AGE, Archaeology and Gender in Europe. She is the co-author of a monograph on gender and hegemony in Persian.
NEW: Hellenistic Alexandria: Celebrating 24 Centuries Papers presented at the conference held on December 13–15 2017 at Acropolis Museum, Athens edited by Christos S. Zerefos and Marianna V. Vardinoyannis. Hardback; 205x290mm; xx+296 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (56 plates in colour). 493 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690668. £68.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690675. Book contents pageDownload

Hellenistic Alexandria: Celebrating 24 Centuries presents the proceedings of a conference held at the Acropolis Museum in Athens, on December 13–15, 2017, and includes high-level dialogues and philosophical discussions between international experts on Hellenistic Alexandria. The goal was to celebrate the 24 centuries which have elapsed since its foundation and the beginning of the Library and the Museum of Alexandria. The conference was divided into two parts, to include in the first part archaeology, history, philosophy, literature, art, culture and legal issues and in the second part science, medicine, technology and environment. A total of 28 original and peer-reviewed articles point to the importance of the brilliantly-original ideas that emerged during the Hellenistic age and the curious modernity of the whole atmosphere of the time. The range of presented topics covers a variety of new data on the foundation of Alexandria to comparison between Ptolemaic Alexandria and Ptolemaic Greece through philosophy, culture and drama to the forgotten revolution of science, medicine and the prevailing climatological and geophysical conditions throughout the Hellenistic Period. The conference and its proceedings were co-sponsored by the Μarianna V. Vardinoyannis Foundation, the Acropolis Museum, the Alexandria Center for Hellenistic Studies at Bibliotheca Alexandrina and the Mariolopoulos-Kanaginis Foundation for the Environmental Sciences.

The Publication also celebrates the 10th anniversary of the Alexandria Center for Hellenistic Studies, a joint collaboration between the Bibliotheca Alexandrina, the Vardinoyannis Foundation and the University of Alexandria. Scholars from around the world follow the Center’s programme in various specialisations, ranging from historyliterature- art, to archaeology and architecture-philosophy, and science.

About the Editors
Christos Zerefos is Head of Research Centre for Atmospheric Physics and Climatology, Academy of Athens and president-elect of the General Assembly of the Hellenic Foundation for Research and Innovation; Professor of Atmospheric and Environmental Physics at the Universities of Athens and Thessaloniki; Visiting Professor, Universities of Minnesota and Boston; Samarbeidspartnere (Scientific Collaborator), University of Oslo. He is known for his research into ozone, UV, ozone-climate interactions and climate-extreme events. He is member of the Academy of Athens, Academia Europaea, Norwegian Academy of Sciences and Letters, European Academy of Sciences, Russian Academy of Natural Sciences and other distinguished scientific societies. He is recipient of the UNEP Global Ozone Award, 1997 and of a number of distinctions, awards and medals from WMO/UNEP, and various scientific societies (e.g. Blaise Pascal Medal, European Academy of Sciences; AGU Kaufman Award; European and Balkan Physics Societies’ Award; European Union Prize for Cultural Heritage-Europa Nostra Award, and others). He received the Award Certificate and Letter from UNEP and IPCC for substantial contribution to the reports of IPCC, which shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with the former Vice President of USA, Al Gore (December 2007). He is honorary professor, Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki; has an honorary doctoral degree from the Physics Department, University of Patras; honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters, university division of the American College ANATOLIA, Thessaloniki. He has supervised 50 MSc and 30 PhD degrees and has originated eight international research centres. His research work in peer-reviewed scientific journals is acknowledged widely by the scientific community. (For more see www.christoszerefos.com/)

Marianna V. Vardinoyannis is a Goodwill Ambassador of UNESCO for the protection of children, founder and president of the ‘Marianna V. Vardinoyannis Foundation’, of the ‘ELPIDA Friends’ Association of Children with cancer
NEW: Art of the Ancestors: Spatial and temporal patterning in the ceiling rock art of Nawarla Gabarnmang, Arnhem Land, Australia by Robert G. Gunn. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+902 pages; illustrated in full colour throughout. 492 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690705. £150.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690712. Book contents pageDownload

This volume presents a new systematic approach to the archaeological recording and documentation of rock art developed to analyse the spatial and temporal structure of complex rock art panels. Focusing on the ceiling art at Nawarla Gabarnmang, one of the richest rock art sites in Arnhem Land the approach utilised DStretch-enhanced photographs to record 1391 motifs from 42 separate art panels across the ceiling. Harris Matrices were then built to show the sequence of superimpositions for each art panel. Using common attributes, including features identified by Morellian Method (a Fine Art method not previously employed in archaeological rock art studies), contemporaneous motifs within panels were then aggregated into individual layers. The art layers of the various panels were then inter-related using the relative and absolute chronological evidence to produce a full relative sequence for the site as a whole. This provided a story of the art that began some 13,000 years ago and concluded around 60 years ago, with a major change identified in the art some 450 years ago. The method was shown to be invaluable to the resolution of many difficult issues associated with the identification of motifs, their superimpositions and the development of art sequences.

About the Author
Dr Robert Gunn is a consultant archaeologist with over 35 years’ experience and who specialises in the recording and management of Australian Aboriginal rock art. He has published over 50 papers and monographs, mostly on areas of rock art research. He has worked throughout Australia with research interests in Arnhem Land, Central Australia, Western Victoria, south-western regions of Western Australia, and Far Western NSW. This work has involved the collection of both archaeological and ethnographic information and, consequently, he has worked closely with senior Aboriginal custodians and traditional owners. Robert completed his PhD at Monash University, Australia, in 2007. He is currently a Research Fellow affiliated with Monash Indigenous Study Centre, Monash University, and the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage.
NEW: The Hypogeum of the Aurelii A new interpretation as the collegiate tomb of professional scribae by John Bradley. Paperback; 205x290mm; xiv+192 pages; 4 tables, 136 figures (81 plates in colour). (Print RRP £38.00). 486 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 50. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690477. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690484. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Hypogeum of the Aurelii: A new interpretation as the collegiate tomb of professional scribae examines the frescoes of one of the most enigmatic funerary monuments of ancient Rome. The three chambers of the Hypogeum of the Aurelii, so-named from an mosaic inscription in one of the surviving chambers, contain a varied series of images that have long been considered an example of early Christian or Gnostic iconography. One hundred years after the monument’s discovery Dr Bradley challenges earlier theories and concludes that far from having religious significance the pictures reveal a world of professional pride among a group of what we might today call ‘white collar workers’. Although not among the rich and famous of Imperial Rome, the deceased nevertheless rose from a state of slavery to positions within the bureaucracy at the centre of an empire at its height. Although part of a strictly hierarchical, and male-dominated, society the community to which the Aurelii belonged provided an environment of comparative equality: a community that acknowledged the contribution and expertise of both women and children in their profession. The pride in their achievement is reflected in the decoration of the tomb in which they expected to spend eternity. This study, the first in modern times to examine all the extant images in detail, will be of interest, not only to historians of ancient Roman art, but also to social historians who wish to more fully understand the lives of those who helped support the running of an empire.

About the Author
JOHN W. BRADLEY was born in Birmingham in 1956. He graduated with a degree in Construction and Economics before embarking on a thirty year career in the construction industry primarily in London and the Middle East. During the 1990s he was also involved in environmental politics using his background in industry to challenge the conventional rationale behind many of today’s political and economic decisions. Changing profession in 2005 Dr Bradley gained a first-class degree and Masters in Classics at Royal Holloway College, University of London with dissertations on early Christian art and republican Roman religion. In 2011 he commenced his PhD at the same college, initially under the supervision of Professor Amanda Claridge then Dr Zena Kamash. An initial project on the broader aspects of the evolution of art in the catacombs of Rome ultimately focused on the frescoes that make up the subject of this book when existing theories and explanations appeared unsatisfactory. In addition to his interest in the art of ancient Rome his interests include classical music, military history and environmentalism. He has lived in Brentford, west London for thirty years where he shares a home and allotment with his wife Susan.
NEW: Popular Religion and Ritual in Prehistoric and Ancient Greece and the Eastern Mediterranean edited by Giorgos Vavouranakis, Konstantinos Kopanias and Chrysanthos Kanellopoulos. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+170 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (30 plates in colour). 481 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690453. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690460. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume features a group of select peer-reviewed papers by an international group of authors, both younger and senior academics and researchers. It has its origins in a conference held at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, which aimed to bring up the frequently-neglected popular cult and other ritual practices in prehistoric and ancient Greece and the eastern Mediterranean. The topics covered by the chapters of the volume include the interplay between elite and popular ritual at cemeteries and peak sanctuaries just before and right after the establishment of the first palaces in Minoan Crete; the use of conical cups in Minoan ritual; the wide sharing of religious and other metaphysical beliefs as expressed in the wall-paintings of Akrotiri on the island of Thera; the significance of open-air sanctuaries, figurines and other informal cult and ritual paraphernalia in the Aegean, Cyprus and the Levant from the late bronze age to the archaic period; the role of figurines and caves in popular cult in the classical period; the practice of cursing in ancient Athens; and the popular element of sports games in ancient Greece.

About the Editors GIORGOS VAVOURANAKIS is Assistant Professor in Prehistoric Aegean: Theoretical Archaeology at the Department of History and Archaeology of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. He studied at the same university and did his MA and PhD at the University of Sheffield. He has worked as a contract archaeologist for the Hellenic Ministry of Culture, as a post-doctoral researcher at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens and as adjunct faculty at the Universities of Crete and the Peloponnese, and the Hellenic Open University. His research interests include archaeological theory, especially landscape archaeology and funerary archaeology, but also the history of archaeological research. He has directed field projects in Cyprus and Crete and is currently the deputy director of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens excavation at Marathon.

KONSTANTINOS KOPANIAS is Assistant Professor of Ancient Civilizations of the Eastern Mediterranean at the Department of History and Archaeology of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. He studied at the same university and also at the Paris-Lodron University of Salzburg and the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen. He has worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Athens, as adjunct faculty at the University of Crete and as Allgemeiner Referent at the German Archaeological Institute in Athens. Since 2011 he has been the director of the University of Athens excavaton in Tell Nader and Tell Baqrta in the Kurdistan Region in Iraq.

CHRYSANTHOS KANELLOPOULOS is an archaeologist specializing in classical architecture. He is Assistant Professor at the Department of History and Archaeology of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. He was employed for a number of years as a historical architect at the American Center of Oriental Research in Amman, Jordan, where he worked on the buildings of both Amman and Petra. His PhD thesis treated the classical and Hellenistic phases of ancient Karthaia on the island of Kea. He is the author of Amman: The Great Temple (Amman 1996) and the Late Roman Temenos Wall at Epidauros (Athens 1999), co-author of the Petra Church (Amman 2001), The Thymele at Epidauros (Fargo 2017) and The North Ridge in Petra (Amman 2018). During recent years, Dr Kanellopoulos’ work has focussed on the architecture of the Library of Hadrian in Athens and of the temple of Zeus Basileus in Levadeia.
FORTHCOMING: Artistic Practices and Archaeological Research by Dragoş Gheorghiu and Theodor Barth. Paperback; 205x290mm; ii+184 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (79 plates in colour). (Print RRP £40.00). 524 2019. ISBN 9781789691405. Book contents pageBuy Now

Artistic Practices and Archaeological Research aims to expand the field of archaeological research with an anthropological understanding of practices which include artistic methods. The project has come about through a collaborative venture between Dragoş Gheorghiu (archaeologist and professional visual artist) and Theodor Barth (anthropologist).

This anthology contains articles from professional archaeologists, artists and designers. The contributions cover a scale ranging from theoretical reflections on pre-existing archaeological finds/documentation, to reflective field-practices where acts of ‘making’ are used to interface with the site. These acts feature a manufacturing range from ceramics, painting, drawing, type-setting and augmented reality (AR). The scope of the anthology – as a book or edited whole – has accordingly been to determine a comparative approach resulting in an identifiable set of common concerns.

Accordingly, the book proceeds from a comparative approach to research ontologies, extending the experimental ventures of the contributors, to the hatching of artistic propositions that demonstrably overlap with academic research traditions, of epistemic claims in the making. This comparative approach relies on the notion of transposition: that is an idea of the makeshift relocation of methodological issues – research ontologies at the brink of epistemic claims – and accumulates depth from one article to the next as the reader makes her way through the volume.

However, instead of proposing a set method, the book offers a lighter touch in highlighting the role of operators between research and writing, rather entailing a duplication of practice, in moving from artistic ideas to epistemic claims. This, in the lingo of artistic research, is known as exposition. Emphasising the construct of the ‘learning theatre’ the volume provides a support structure for the contributions to book-project, in the tradition of viewing from natural history. The contributions are hands-on and concrete, while building an agenda for a broader contemporary archaeological discussion.

About the Editors
DRAGOŞ GHEORGHIU is an historical anthropologist/archaeologist (PhD) and professional visual artist (BA Arch. and BA/MA Design) whose studies focus on the process of cognition, material culture and art. He began to produce works of art-and-archaeology starting in 1980, a concept he developed into artchaeology, and worked as a land-artist to reveal prehistoric monuments in Romania, Wales, Portugal and Sardinia. His recent research deals with the problem of immersion in reconstructed contexts in Augmented and Mixed Reality. Professor Gheorghiu is on the board of the UISPP Neolithic Commission, and is a member of the European Association of Archaeologists. He is a Paul Mellon Fellow at the Centre of Advanced Studies in the Visual Arts, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

THEODOR BARTH (Dr. Philos. Social Anthropology) works as a professor of theory and writing at the Oslo National Academy of the Arts (KHiO). His fieldwork is from Sarajevo and Zagreb in the mid-nineties. At the academy he works to involve writing in artistic practice, and to develop an experience-based understanding of artistic research and practice as a field, in aspects that resemble what anthropologists understand as fieldwork. He is involved in the development of the field of artistic research, publication as making and making public. His professional background: he has worked as a scientific researcher at the Norwegian Foundation of Research in Science and Technology (SINTEF), and as a research fellow at the University of Oslo. He is currently a member of the European Association of Archaeologists.
FORTHCOMING: Dhofar Through the Ages An Ecological, Archaeological and Historical Landscape by Lynne S. Newton and Juris Zarins. Paperback; 210x297mm; xvi+132 pages; 61 figures, 47 tables (colour throughout). (Print RRP £35.00). 521 2019 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 1. ISBN 9781789691603. Book contents pageBuy Now

Dhofar, the southern governorate of Oman, lies within a distinctive ecological zone due to the summer Southwest Monsoon. It is home to numerous indigenous succulent plants, the most famous of which is frankincense (Boswellia sacra). The region, tied in the past to both Oman and Yemen, has a long and distinguished archaeological past stretching back to the Lower Paleolithic ca. 1.5 my BP. Dhofar is also home to a distinctive people, the Modern South Arabian Languages speakers (MSAL) since at least the last 15,000 years. Ancient Zafar (Al-Habudi), now called Al-Baleed, and its successor Salalah was and is the province’s largest city. From the seventh century onwards until the arrival of the Portuguese in 1504 AD Al-Baleed dominated the central southern Arabian coastline politically and economically. Archaeological surveys and excavations in the governorate, beginning in 1954, have brought to light Dhofar’s ancient past.

About the Authors
LYNNE S. NEWTON received her doctorate from the University of Minnesota with research on the Iron Age and Islamic periods in the Mahra Governorate of Yemen. Since 2007, she has co-directed excavations at the Medieval port of Al-Baleed and the general archaeological survey of Dhofar. Between 2011 and 2014, she was Curator of Maritime History at the National Museum of Qatar. The author published numerous research articles on Dhofar and the Mahra Governate, including also her doctorate A Landscape of Pilgrimage and Trade in Wadi Masila Yemen (2009) and is co-author of the Atlas of Archaeological Survey in Governorate of Dhofar, Sultanate of Oman (2013).

JURIS ZARINS is retired Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology at Missouri State University. He has excavated sites from the Lower Paleolithic to the Ottoman period in Mesopotamia (Turkey and Iraq) and more recently in the Arabian Peninsula, with a specific focus on the development of pastoral nomadism in Arabia and the origins of the Bedouin. Between 1992 and 2011, he worked in the Sultanate of Oman to uncover the Medieval port of al-Baleed and to conduct a general archaeological survey of Dhofar. The author has published many scientific research articles, including Dhofar: The Land of Incense (2001) and The Domestication of Equids in Ancient Mesopotamia (2014).
FORTHCOMING: Tentsmuir: Ten Thousand Years of Environmental History by Robert M. M. Crawford. Paperback; 254x203mm; vi+190 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. (Print RRP £24.99). 519 2019. ISBN 9781789691245. Buy Now

Tentsmuir has been a scene of human activity for over 10,000 years. It witnessed one of the earliest known occurrences in Scotland of Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and has supported human activities throughout the Neolithic and Iron Age. In medieval times it was a home for the Norman nobility, and then a royal hunting forest with highly-valued fishing rights for Scottish Kings.

Tentsmuir is prone to flooding in winter due to the front line of dunes blocking drainage to the sea. It provides a natural refuge for a wide range of plants, as well as resident and migrating birds, and other animals, including outstanding populations of butterflies and moths. Consequently, this led to the creation in 1954 of a National Nature Reserve at the north-eastern end of the Tentsmuir Peninsula. Initially, an active period of coastal accretion more than trebled the size of the reserve. Now, however, Tentsmuir is eroding in places. The probability of rising sea levels and increasing exposure to storms may cause a level of destruction such that the physical existence and biological future of Tentsmuir cannot be guaranteed.

This book is an attempt to record how even within a limited geographical area, such as this peninsula on the east coast of Scotland, plant and animal communities are constantly reacting to environmental change. Frequently, it is difficult to decide whether or not these changes should be resisted, encouraged, or ignored. Examples are provided of instances where human intervention to counteract change has resulted in negative as well as positive consequences for biodiversity.

About the Author
ROBERT M. M. CRAWFORD is a graduate of the Universities of Glasgow and Liège. Postdoctoral years were spent at the Bakh Institute of Biochemistry in Moscow and at the biochemistry and botany departments of the Universities of Freiburg, Munich, and Oxford. From 1962 – 1999 he taught and researched at the University of St Andrews, pursuing in particular the study of the physiological ecology of plants in a wide range of habitats in Scotland, Scandinavia, North and South America, and the Arctic. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the Linnean Society of London, and an associate member of the Belgian Royal Academy of Sciences.
FORTHCOMING: Archaic and Classical Harbours of the Greek World The Aegean and Ionian Sea contexts by Chiara Maria Mauro. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+116 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £30.00). 516 2019. ISBN 9781789691283. Book contents pageBuy Now

Archaic and Classical Greek Harbours in the Aegean and Ionian Seas explores the archaeology and history of ancient harbours and focuses on the Greek world during the Archaic and Classical eras. Its objective is to establish a consensus on three fundamental questions: What locations were the most propitious for the installation of harbours? What kinds of harbour-works were built and for what purpose? What harbour forms were documented? These subjects have been addressed by evaluating multiple forms of evidence (archaeological, geographical, nautical, textual, iconographic and geological) in the context of the Aegean and eastern Ionian maritime settings.

About the Author
CHIARA MARIA MAURO gained an MA in Classical Archaeology at the University of Pisa (Italy) in 2012 with a dissertation on Phoenician seafaring in the Archaic period, and in 2014 she completed a master’s degree in Teaching History, Geography and History of Art at the Autonomous University of Madrid (Spain). In 2016 she obtained a PhD in Studies on the Ancient World from the Complutense University of Madrid (Spain). In 2015 she was Visiting Research Student at the University Alma Mater (Bologna, Italy); in October 2017 she was awarded an Irish Research Council Postdoctoral Fellowship to work on the project ‘Ancient Harbours in the Greek World: A study of Aegean and eastern Ionian Sea harbours from the dawn of the city-state to the Classical period’. She is currently Postdoctoral Fellow at the Haifa Center for Mediterranean History in the Department of Maritime Civilizations.
FORTHCOMING: Aesthetics, Applications, Artistry and Anarchy: Essays in Prehistoric and Contemporary Art A Festschrift in honour of John Kay Clegg, 11 January 1935 – 1 March 2015 edited by Jillian Huntley and George Nash. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+170 pages; 100 figures, 5 tables (42 plates in colour). (Print RRP £35.00). 496 2019. ISBN 9781784919986. Book contents pageBuy Now

Scholar and artist John Clegg made a pioneering contribution to the study of rock art. He was the first in the Australian academy to teach rock art research as a dedicated subject (Sydney University 1965-2000), supervising the first graduate students with such specialty, subsequently supporting their careers. He is honoured here for much more than his novelty and the contributions in this monograph pay homage to the late John Kay Clegg’s diverse influence. Rock art researchers from around the globe traverses topics such as aesthetics, the application of statistical analyses, frontier conflict and layered symbolic meanings, the deliberate use of optical illusion, and the contemporary significance of ancient and street art. They cover rock art assemblages from Columbia, South Africa, Europe and across Clegg’s beloved Australia. They interrogate descriptive and analytic concepts such as repainting, memorialisation and graffiti, as well as questioning the ethical impactions of research practices touching rock art as a part of its study.

The tributes in this book are necessarily as individual as the man they honour, and John Clegg was certainly an individual. The longevity of ideas and perspectives Clegg brought to the pursuit of rock art research is demonstrated in this collection of works. Clegg’s continued relevance is testament to the value and magnitude of his contribution. He is a deserving subject for a Festschrift.

About the Editors
Dr JILLIAN HUNTLEY is a Research Fellow at the Place Evolution Rock Art Heritage Unit in the Centre for Social and Cultural Research at Griffith University, Australia. She specialises in the physiochemical characterization of rock art and other archaeological pigments and has been privileged in recent years to work on high-profile Australasian finds. A field archaeologist by trade, Jillian has 15 years experience in public archaeology and has worked with Aboriginal peoples across Australia since 2001 recording rock art as part of both research and commercial projects. Best known as an archaeological scientist, Jillian has published on diverse topics relating to rock art from the complex impacts of mining to pseudoarchaeology.

Dr GEORGE NASH is an Associate Professor at the Museum of Prehistoric Art, Quaternary and Prehistory Geosciences Centre, Maçao, Portugal. George has been a professional archaeologist for the past 25 years and has undertaken extensive fieldwork on prehistoric rock-art and mobility art in Chile, Denmark, Indonesia, Malaysia, Norway, Sardinia, Spain and Sweden. Between 1994 and 1997 he directed excavations at the La Hougue Bie passage grave on Jersey, one of Europe’s largest Neolithic monuments and has also directed preliminary excavations at Westminster Hall, London. He has also written, edited and co-edited many books on prehistoric art and monumentality including the most recent book entitled Archaeologies of Rock Art: South American Perspectives (2018). In the past George has been involved in a number of major rock-art recording and interpretation projects, the most recent being in the Central Negev region of southern Israel and in central Andean Chile. In his native Wales, he is convener for the Welsh Rock art Organisation (WRAO). In addition to fieldwork, he has also written and presented programmes on European rock-art and contemporary graffiti for the BBC.
FORTHCOMING: Greek Art in Motion Studies in honour of Sir John Boardman on the occasion of his 90th Birthday edited by Rui Morais, Delfim Leão, Diana Rodríguez Pérez with Daniela Ferreira. Paperback; iv+510 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (230 colour plates). 485 2018. ISBN 9781789690231. Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication on Greek Art gathers a large number of studies presented at the International Congress ‘Greek Art in Motion’. Held in honour of Sir John Boardman’s 90th birthday, the congress took place at the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, 3-5 May, 2017.

The volume first presents eight contributions by the keynote speakers who, as friends and students of Sir John, present a debate and a problematisation of Greek Art from the archaeological and historical point of view.

Thereafter, 45 papers are divided into the different themes considered during the congress, all of which have greatly benefited from Sir John's researches throughout his long and distinguished academic career: Sculpture, Architecture, Terracotta and Metal, Greek Pottery, Coins, Greek History and Archaeology, Greeks Overseas, Reception and Collecting, Art and Myth.

About the Editors
RUI MORAIS was born in Porto in 1969 and has a degree in History, variant of Archaeology from the University of Coimbra. He has a Masters in Urban Archaeology, PhD in Archaeology, Technology and Materials from University of Minho. He was Professor at Minho University and is currently an Assistant Professor with Aggregation at the Faculty of Arts, Oporto University. Among his research, he has dedicated special attention to the study of trade in antiquity, with numerous published works, individually or with other national and foreign authors. He is researcher in the Classical and Humanistic Centre at Coimbra University (CECH). He was a consultant of the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation for antiques. He is a member of the Scientific Committee of the IBERIA GRAEGA Project.

DELFIM LEÃO is a Professor at the Institute of Classical Studies and a researcher at the Center for Classical and Humanistic Studies, University of Coimbra. His main areas of interest are ancient history, law and political theory of the Greeks, theatrical pragmatics, and the ancient novel. He also has a strong interest in digital humanities. Among his main recent works are D. F. Leão and P. J. Rhodes, ‘The Laws of Solon. A new Edition, with Introduction, Translation and Commentary’ (London, I. B. Tauris, 2015), and a second revised edition in 2016; D. F. Leão and G. Thür (Hrsg.) ‘Symposion 2015. Vorträge zur griechischen und hellenistischen Rechtsgeschichte’ (Wien, Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2016). Along with Lautaro Roig Lanzillotta, he is the editor of Brill’s ‘Plutarch Studies’.

DIANA RODRÍGUEZ PÉREZ is a Junior Research Fellow at Mougins Museum in Classical Art and Material Culture at Wolfson College, University of Oxford, and was previously the Research Assistant for the Beazley Archive Pottery Database at the Classical Art Research Centre. Before moving to Oxford, she held a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Edinburgh (FECYT). She received a PhD (Doctor Europaea) from the University of León, Spain (The Snake in the Ancient Greek World: Myth, Rite and Image), an MPhil in History of Art from the University of León, and an MPhil in Archaeology and Heritage from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. From 2010 to 2011 she worked as a translator at the European Parliament in Luxemburg, and was a DAAD Fellow at the Institut für klassische Archäologie of the University of Heidelberg from 2008 to 2009. In the summer of 2017 she was Tytus Scholar at the Department of Classical Studies of the University of Cincinnati (US).

DANIELA FERREIRA is currently a PhD student at the Department of Prehistory, Ancient History and Archeology of Complutense University of Madrid, Spain, and a researcher at UI&D CITCEM - Transdisciplinary Research Centre «Culture, Space and Memory», Portugal. She is also a recipient of a FCT (Portuguese national funding agency for science, research and technology) grant since 2015. Daniela holds a Master’s degree in Archaeology from the University of Oporto (Portugal), with a focus
FORTHCOMING: Early Farming in Dalmatia Pokrovnik and Danilo Bitinj: two Neolithic villages in south-east Europe by Andrew Moore and Marko Menđušić. Paperback; 175x245mm; ix+110 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £26.00). 532 2019. ISBN 9781789691580. Buy Now

With contributions by Lawrence Brown, Sue Colledge, Robert Giegengack, Thomas Higham, Vladimir Hršak, Anthony Legge†, Drago Marguš, Sarah McClure, Carol Palmer, Emil Podrug, Kelly Reed, Jennifer Smith, and Joško Zaninović.

The origins and spread of farming are vital subjects of research, notably because agriculture makes possible our modern world. The Early Farming in Dalmatia Project is investigating the expansion of farming from its centre of origin in western Asia through the Mediterranean into southern Europe. This multidisciplinary ecological project combines comprehensive recovery of archaeological materials through excavation with landscape studies. It addresses several key questions, including when and how farming reached Dalmatia, what was the nature of this new economy, and what was its impact on the local environment. Excavations at Danilo Bitinj and Pokrovnik have demonstrated that their inhabitants were full-time farmers. The two sites were among the largest known Neolithic villages in the eastern Adriatic. A comprehensive program of AMS dating indicates that together they were occupied from c. 8,000 to 6,800 cal BP. Our research has begun to illuminate the details of their farming system, as well as the changes that took place in their way of life through the Neolithic. Their economy was derived from western Asia and it is likely that their ancestors came from there also. It was these people who brought agriculture and village life to the Adriatic and to the rest of the central and western Mediterranean. Once in place, this farming economy persisted in much the same form from the Neolithic down to the present.

About the Authors

ANDREW MOORE’s archaeological interests span the Middle East, the Mediterranean, and Europe. His principal research focus is the beginning of agriculture and sedentary life in the Middle East and their spread to Africa and Eurasia. Moore has conducted field research in Syria, Iraq, Palestine, Croatia and other countries. In the 1970s Moore excavated the site of Abu Hureyra in the Euphrates Valley in Syria threatened by the construction of a new dam. The site was significant because it documented the transition from foraging to farming 13,000 years ago, much earlier than had been suspected. Moore is currently investigating the spread of farming around the Mediterranean and into southern Europe. He is co-director with Marko Menđušić of the Early Farming in Dalmatia Project. The project has demonstrated that agriculture reached the Adriatic region as a mature mixed farming system 8,000 years ago, brought in from farther east by migrating farmers. Moore’s M.A. and D.Phil. degrees are from the University of Oxford. He has taught archaeology at the University of Arizona and Yale University. Past President of the Archaeological Institute of America, Moore is currently Professor and Dean Emeritus at Rochester Institute of Technology.

MARKO MENĐUŠIĆ is a prehistoric archaeologist specializing in the Neolithic of Croatia. He was born in the village of Pokrovnik near Šibenik, in a farming family that traces its roots as far back as the seventeenth century. After graduating from the University of Zagreb he became Curator for Archaeology in the Šibenik City Museum and, in time, head of the Archaeological Department there. Menđušić has excavated numerous prehistoric and later sites in northern Dalmatia and on the offshore islands. He has also organized many exhibitions in museums in Croatia. In 2000 Menđušić invited Andrew Moore to join him in developing the Early Farming in Dalmatia Project, and has been co-director of the project since its inception. Menđušić became head of the Conservation Department of the Ministry of Culture in Šibenik in 2004. His responsibilities included preservation of historic buildings in the region at a time of rapidly increasing development. A long-standing membe
FORTHCOMING: The Poole Iron Age Logboat edited by Jessica Berry, David Parham and Catrina Appleby. Paperback; 205x290mm; 120pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £30.00). 531 2019. ISBN 9781789691443. Buy Now

The Poole Iron Age logboat, one of the largest prehistoric watercraft to survive in Britain, is today imposingly displayed in the entrance to Poole Museum in Dorset. But the vessel faced a difficult journey from its first discovery to the amazing artefact we can now see.

Recovered from Poole Harbour in 1964, it is impossible to overestimate the international significance of this vessel. But until now, the vessel had never been fully recorded and very little was known about it – except that it was large. Its size and shape, which would have meant it was inherently unstable, suggest it was designed for use in Poole Harbour.

This book is the culmination of significant multi-disciplinary work carried out by a variety of specialists, from conservators to woodworking and boatbuilding experts, exploring not only the craft’s history but also its functionality – or lack of – as a vessel. Digital recording, using the latest technology, has made it possible to test its capabilities. For the first time, prehistorians, nautical archaeologists and lay people alike can understand the story of one of Britain’s oldest boats—the archaeological and historical background, the environmental context, the timber and ship science, and the challenges of conserving such an important vessel.

About the Editors
JESSICA BERRY is an award-winning maritime archaeologist, a diver, and founder and CEO of MAST. She is a maritime archaeologist MA (Hons) MA ACIfA and a former journalist with UK broadsheets. Since completing her Masters at Flinders University in Australia, she has worked on a number of major maritime archaeological projects both in the UK and internationally whilst growing and developing MAST into an internationally respected organisation that is changing the ways in which underwater cultural heritage is perceived and how it can be better protected.

DAVE PARHAM is a Professor in Maritime Archaeology at Bournemouth University. He is an experienced archaeologist and diver / diving supervisor who has directed maritime archaeological projects that range in date from the Bronze Age to the Second World War and in scope from strategic studies to extensive field investigations. He has worked extensively throughout the British Isles as well as the Baltic, Mediterranean, Indian Ocean, South China Sea and Arabian Sea. His research interests focus on the archaeology of seafaring and ship construction of all periods but can extend into underwater cultural heritage management on occasions.

CATRINA APPLEBY has been working in archaeology for 40 years. She studied at Durham and Birmingham universities and has wide experience in many types of archaeology, from excavation and field survey to HERs and planning. She has worked for a variety of organisations in England and Scotland. She is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries and a Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists. For the past 20 years her work has focused on editing archaeological and heritage publications, including nine years as the Publications Manager for the Council for British Archaeology, during which time CBA titles won several awards. She now works as a freelance editor for a number of publishers.

Table of Contents
List of figures
List of tables
List of contributors
Acknowledgements
Foreword – Professor Seán McGrail
Chapter 1: Introduction - Keith Jarvis†
Chapter 2: Environmental and archaeological background to prehistoric Poole Harbour – Eileen Wilkes
Chapter 3: Evidence for the building of the Poole logboat – Damian Goodburn
Chapter 4: The Poole logboat: digital comparisons – Pat Tanner
Chapter 5: The conservation of the Poole logboat – Jeremy Hutchings and James A. Spriggs
Chapter 6: The display and interpretation of the Poole logboat – Katie Morton and David Watkins
Bibliography
Index
FORTHCOMING: Conflict Landscapes: An Archaeology of the International Brigades in the Spanish Civil War by Salvatore Garfi. Paperback; 175x245mm; 220pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £35.00). 530 2019. ISBN 9781789691344. Buy Now

This book is an archaeological exploration of the conflict landscapes encountered by volunteers of the International Brigades in the Spanish Civil War of 1936-39. A great deal is known about the Brigades in terms of inter-world war geopolitics, their history and make-up. But less is known about the materiality of the landscapes in which they lived, fought, and died.

The Spanish Civil War was a relatively static conflict. As in the First World War, it consisted of entrenched Republican government lines facing similarly entrenched Nationalist (rebel) lines, and these ran north to south across Spain. Fighting was intermittent, so the frontline soldiers had to settle in, and make what was an attritional war-scape, a place to live in and survive. This research examines one such war-scape as a place of ‘settlement’, where soldiers lived their daily lives as well as confronting the rigours of war – and these were the volunteers of the International Brigades, both foreign and Spanish, who occupied a section of lines southeast of Zaragoza in Aragón in 1937 and 1938.

This research draws, not only on the techniques of landscape archaeology, but also on the writings of international volunteers in Spain – in particular, George Orwell – and it incorporates historical photography as a uniquely analytical, archaeological resource.

About the Author
SALVATORE GARFI has been a professional archaeologist since 1974, working on a range of projects from the prehistoric to the contemporary. Besides working in Britain, he has worked in Egypt, Southern Arabia, and elsewhere in the Middle East. Since 2010, he has specialised in the archaeology of modern conflict, and his doctoral research was on the late 20th Century conflict in Western Sahara. He was a post-doctoral Leverhulme Fellow in the School of Cultures, Languages and Area Studies, University of Nottingham (2015-2018), and co-founder of the International Brigades Archaeological Project (IBAP), which ran from 2014 to 2015.

Table of Contents

List of Figures
Acknowledgements
PART ONE
Chapter 1: Introduction
Chapter 2: The Spanish Civil War
PART TWO
Chapter 3: On Trenches and Field Fortifications
Chapter 4: Trench Systems as Settlement Archaeology: The Salient at Mediana de Aragón
PART THREE
Chapter 5: Experiencing the Mediana Lines
Chapter 6: An Archaeology from Photographs: Imaging the Aragón Front Lines
Chapter 7: History in ‘Three Dimensions’
Appendix: Tables
Bibliography
FORTHCOMING: The Middle Stone Age of Nigeria in its West African Context by Philip Allsworth-Jones. Paperback; 205x290mm; 262pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £44.00). 529 2019. ISBN 9781789691382. Buy Now

This book provides a fully up-to-date account of the evidence relating to the Middle Stone Age in Nigeria and the other countries of West Africa. It relies upon the author’s own fieldwork and extensive personal knowledge of the region and its archaeology. It is abundantly illustrated with maps, photographs, and drawings. The emphasis is on stratigraphy, chronology, site situation, and artefact characteristics, with such general background information about the countries concerned as is required. A summary account is also provided of the current situation in relation to this topic (covering climate, archaeology, and human evolution) in the African continent as a whole, so that a judgement can made as to how the West African evidence fits in with the rest. As general accounts of the African Palaeolithic record to date have tended to neglect West Africa, this volume helps fill a gap in the available literature.

About the Author
After completing his PhD on the European Palaeolithic at Cambridge, Philip Allsworth-Jones served as a staff member of the Department of Archaeology in Nigeria for a number of years, during which time much of the fieldwork described in this book was carried out. He subsequently held an analogous appointment at the University of the West Indies in Jamaica, but he has continued to take an interest in West Africa ever since. He is currently an Honorary Research Fellow at the Department of Archaeology of the University of Sheffield, and while holding this appointment he has in recent years published a number of works on Nigeria, including the results of his excavations at the rock shelter sites of Itaakpa and Kariya Wuro. This is his first attempt to tell the whole story of the Middle Stone Age in West Africa in book form.

Table of Contents (Provisional):
List of Figures
List of Tables
Preface
Chapter 1: The Middle Stone Age in West Africa: Introduction
Chapter 2: The Middle Stone Age of Nigeria
Chapter 3: The Middle Stone Age in West Africa
Chapter 4: West Africa: regional summary
Chapter 5: A wider perspective
FORTHCOMING: Tanbûr Long-Necked Lutes along the Silk Road and Beyond by Hans de Zeeuw. Paperback; 205x290mm; 218pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £40.00). 528 2019. ISBN 9781789691696. Buy Now

The diffusion of the tanbûr into musical cultures along the Silk Road resulted in a variety of instruments with two or more, occasionally doubled or tripled courses, and a varying number and variously tuned frets, each having its own characteristic sound, playing technique, and repertory. Since the last century, tanbûrs have spread beyond the Silk Road, and new versions continue to appear due to changing musical and tonal demands required from them. Similar or identical instruments are also known by other names, such as saz or bağlama, dotâr or dutâr, setâr, dömbra, and dambura.

This book is divided into two main parts: ‘The Tanbûr Tradition’ which discusses the origin, history, construction and playing techniques of tanbûrs; and ‘The Tanbûr Family’ which focusses on the long-necked lutes of the tanbûr, dotâr, saz, setâr, dömbra, and dambura family of instruments. After a short introduction, the construction, playing technique, and musical traditions are briefly discussed. The book concludes with a glossary of musical instruments, discography, bibliography, illustration credits and index.

About the Author
While working at the Vrije University in Amsterdam, Hans de Zeeuw began studying at the Open University. At around the same time, he started taking lessons in the Turkish bağlama and became interested in the long and fascinating history of the instrument. It was not long before he decided to break off his studies and focus, for many years, on the research of the bağlama. He executed this research and writing under the supervision of Dr L.J. Plenckers of the Department of Musicology of the University of Amsterdam and Dr Okan Murat Öztürk of the Devlet Konservatuvarıof the Başkent Üniversitesi in Ankara. Since then, he has presented many lectures and published various studies and articles on the subject of this family of lutes, most recently on the Ottoman tanbûr.

Table of Contents
Preface and Acknowledgements
The Tanbûr Tradition
General Introduction
Chapter 1: Historical background
Chapter 2: Construction
Chapter 3: Playing technique
Chapter 4: Tanbûr
Chapter 5: Dotâr
Chapter 6: Saz
Chapter 7: Setâr
Chapter 8: Dömbra
Chapter 9: Dambura
Glossary of Musical Instruments
Discography
Bibliography
Illustration Credits
Index
FORTHCOMING: La raccolta e la distribuzione dell’acqua a Ventotene in età romana Ricerche archeologiche nell’isola di Ventotene 2 by Giovanni Maria De Rossi. Paperback; 205x290mm; 380pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Italian text. (Print RRP £65.00). 527 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . ISBN 9781789691467. Buy Now

La raccolta e la distribuzione dell’acqua a Ventotene in età romana is presented in two parts. The first examines the topographical and technical problem of the water supply on the island of Ventotene, where there is an absence of natural springs. The second, consisting of separate entries, analyses the individual components of the water supply system built by the Romans on the island. The Roman installation developed in two phases alongside changes in life at the villa located at Ventotene: the first connected to a residence used for otium, the second to an official site of relegatio ad insulam.

The Roman architect exploited the island’s natural slope to collect rainwater in a large initial reservoir, later known as the ‘Cistern of the Prisoners’, surmounted by a vast catchment basin: from here a conduit departed which, through various branches, reached the ‘heart’ of the villa extending over the promontory of Punta Eolo and the port facilities. The water was channelled from the cistern by an extensive network of tunnels, dug, depending on the height, either wholly or partially into the tufa or built on the surface.

Even during the second phase, when the villa was turned into a large and elaborate residential complex used throughout the year, it could rely only on rainwater as a resource. The Roman architect was thus forced to increase the collection areas, attempting to capture as much water as possible. This was achieved by increasing the number of large initial collection tanks, dislocating them strategically around the island to ensure that each of the sectors with the highest residential density and main infrastructure installations had its own independent resource alongside the standard existing resources. The number of catchment basins also multiplied considerably along the route of the main conduit and its branches.

About the Author
GIOVANNI MARIA DE ROSSI (Rome 1942), Full Professor of Topography of Ancient Italy at the University of Salerno, has published many articles and books on ancient and medieval topography. He has directed archaeological excavations in Italy, and he conceived and designed the Archaeological park and Historical-Archaeological museum at Ventotene island, where he has been director for over twenty years.

Italian Description
Il volume si compone di due parti. Nella prima viene esaminato il problema topografico e tecnico relativo all’approvvigionamento idrico dell’isola di Ventotene, in rapporto alla sostanziale assenza di sorgenti d’acqua. Nella seconda, composta di schede, si analizzano le singole componenti del sistema idrico costruito dai Romani nell’isola. L’impianto romano va inserito nelle due fasi di vita della villa realizzata a Ventotene: la prima legata a una residenza per l’otium, la seconda a una sede ufficiale per la relegatio ad insulam.

L’architetto romano sfruttò il naturale pendio dell’isola per raccogliere acqua piovana in un grande serbatoio iniziale, poi detto “Cisterna dei Carcerati”, sormontato da un vastissimo compluvio di raccolta: da qui partiva un condotto che raggiungeva, con varie diramazioni, il “cuore” della villa distesa sul promontorio di Punta Eolo e gli impianti portuali. Lo smistamento dell’acqua dal serbatoio venne affidato a una capillare rete di cunicoli, scavati, a seconda delle quote, interamente o parzialmente nel tufo oppure costruiti in superficie. Per aumentare notevolmente la quantità d’acqua messa a disposizione dell’impianto, si realizzarono lungo i condotti abbinamenti formati da compluvi di superficie e cisterne di raccolta.

Potendo contare, anche per la seconda fase, in cui però la villa erta stata trasformata in un grande e articolato complesso residenziale da utilizzarsi per tutto l’anno, sulla sola risorsa delle piogge, all’architetto romano di turno non rimase che l’espediente di aumentare i punti di raccolta, cercando così di captar
FORTHCOMING: Excavation of Later Prehistoric and Roman Sites along the Route of the Newquay Strategic Road Corridor, Cornwall by Andy M. Jones. Paperback; 205x290mm; 144pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 526 2019. ISBN 9781789691528. Buy Now

With contributions by Ryan S Smith, Dana Challinor, Julie Jones, Graeme Kirkham, Anna Lawson-Jones, Henrietta Quinnell and Roger Taylor.

During November and December 2014, the Cornwall Archaeological Unit undertook a programme of archaeological excavation in advance of construction of a road corridor to the south of Newquay. Evidence for Middle Bronze Age occupation took the form of a hollow-set roundhouse; however, the majority of the excavated features have been dated to the Iron Age and Roman periods. The area was enclosed as fields associated with extensive settlement activity throughout the last centuries cal BC into the third century AD.

The excavations revealed the character of settlement-related activity during the later prehistoric and Roman periods. The evidence strongly suggests growing intensification of agriculture, with ditched fields and enclosures appearing in the landscape from the later Iron Age and into the Roman period.

The results shed light on later prehistoric and Roman practices involving the division of the landscape with ditched fields and enclosed buildings. Many of the structures and pits were found to be set within their own ring-ditched enclosures or hollows, and the field system ditches were in some instances marked by ‘special’ deposits. As has previously been demonstrated for Middle Bronze Age roundhouses, structures could be subject to formal abandonment processes. Gullies and hollows were deliberately infilled, so that they were no longer visible at surface. However, unlike the abandoned Bronze Age roundhouses, the later structures appear to have been flattened and not monumentalized. In other words, buildings could be both etched into and subsequently erased from the landscape and thereby forgotten.

This volume takes the opportunity presented by investigations on the Newquay Strategic Road to discuss the complexity of the archaeology, review the evidence for ‘special’ deposits and explore evidence for the deliberate closure of buildings especially in later prehistoric and Roman period Cornwall. Finally, the possible motives which underlie these practices are considered.

About the Author
ANDY M. JONES is Principal Archaeologist with the Cornwall Archaeological Unit. His research interests include the Neolithic, Bronze Age periods, as well as the archaeology of the uplands and coastal areas of western Britain. His recent research includes the log coffin dating project and the publication of the Whitehorse Hill cist, Preserved in the Peat: An Extraordinary Bronze Age Burial on Whitehorse Hill (2016). In 2017 he co-edited An Intellectual Adventurer in Archaeology: Reflections on the work of Charles Thomas. Other recent publications include Settlement and Metalworking in the Middle Bronze Age and Beyond: New evidence from Tremough, Cornwall (2015) and Archaeology and Landscape at the Land’s End, Cornwall (2016).
FORTHCOMING: Atlas of Ceramic Fabrics 2 Italy: Southern Tyrrhenian. Neolithic – Bronze Age by Sara T. Levi, Valentina Cannavò and Daniele Brunelli with contributions by Andrea Di Renzoni. Paperback; 175x245mm; 160pp; 40 figures, 17 tables and 16-page colour plate section containing 163 illustrations. (Print RRP £35.00). 525 2019. ISBN 9781789691177. Buy Now

Atlas of Ceramic Fabrics 2. Italy: Southern Tyrrhenian. Neolithic – Bronze Age presents and interprets the petrographic composition of pre and protohistoric pottery (6th-1st mill. BCE) found in the southwestern part of Italy. It is the second in a series of atlases organized according to geographical areas, chronology and types of wares. In this book, 890 samples from 29 sites are discussed, as a result of more than 50 years of interdisciplinary archaeological, technological and archaeometric research by the author’s team. 90 petrographic fabrics (the potters’ ‘recipes’) are defined and presented based on their lithological character - a tool that can be used to compare the different components of the ceramic pastes and to check possible provenance of non-local pots.

The volume is organized in chapters focused on methodology, fabric description and distribution, followed by the archaeological implications and the database, with contributions by Andrea Di Renzoni (CNR-ISMA, Roma). Illustrations and descriptions of the fabrics and the list of samples provide a rigorous and transparent presentation of the data. The archaeological implications are discussed, cross-correlating the origin with technology, variability, standardization, chronology, function, social organization, circulation, style, typology and cultural identity. The volume aims to demonstrate that technological variability is as important as stylistic distinctions.

About the Authors
SARA T. LEVI research focuses on the ancient pottery through an integrated approach, and on the archaeology of central Mediterranean. She obtained a PhD in Archaeology at the Sapienza University in Rome (1996). Her findings have been published in scientific journals and books, including a volume on the Italo-Mycenaean pottery (2014). Since 2015 she has been teaching at Hunter College in New York, after teaching eight years at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia. Since 2009 she leads the interdisciplinary archaeological investigations at Stromboli (Aeolian Islands) and at Cannatello (Agrigento). Both projects hold international field school for students in a multidisciplinary environment.

VALENTINA CANNAVÒ research focuses on the archaeometric investigation of ancient pottery. She is a research fellow at University of Modena and Reggio Emilia where she obtained the PhD in Archaeological Science (2010). Valentina teaches pottery technology (Ferrara University) to the graduate students, she is in charge of the database of prehistoric pottery and is the director of the field laboratory at Stromboli (Aeolian Islands).

DANIELE BRUNELLI research focuses on the petrography, geochemistry and tectonics of oceanic ridges. He obtained his PhD at the University of Bologna (2002). Since 2007 he has been teaching at the University of Modena, associated research at CNR-ISMAR, invited professor at the University of Brest and the Institute de Physique du Globe de Paris. He supports the development of the petrographic and geochemical approach of the archaeo-team by bringing the expertise of the geological exploration of the volcanic terrains and the availability of cutting-edge analytical approaches.

Table of Contents (Provisional)
1. Introduction: Q&A
2. Fabrics
2.1. Classification
2.2. Lithology
2.3. Geographical areas and sites
2.4. Comparison with Northern Tyrrhenian
2.5. Comparison with other Sicilian areas
3. Archaeological implications
3.1. Chronological and functional trends
3.2. Raw materials and paste preparation
3.3. Circulation
3.4. Social organization of production
3.5. Stylistic and technological interactions
4. Databases
DB1 Samples by fabric
DB2 Samples by site
DB3 Fabrics (description)
DB4 Fabrics (microscope images)
5. Bibliography