​​ We use cookies to enhance your experience on our site. By continuing to use the site you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy & Cookies.​

 
Archaeopress logo
Archaeopress Publishing Ltd, Summertown Pavilion, 18-24 Middle Way, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7LG, England
tel +44 (0) 1865 311914 fax +44 (0) 1865 512231   email: info@archaeopress.com
Monthly AP Alert - join our mailing list today Archaeopress on Facebook Archaeopress on Twitter Archaeopress on Linked In Archaeopress Blog
Home  
|
  Browse by Subject  
|
  Browse by Series  
|
  Catalogues  
|
  Join Our Mailing List  
|
  Visit Our Blog  
|
  Login (Private Customers)  
|
  Login (Institutional Subscriptions)  
|
  View Basket

Search

title, author, ISBN, keyword

Browse for books in the following languages

ARCHAEOPRESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ACCESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ARCHAEOPRESS JOURNALS
DISTRIBUTED
PUBLISHERS
DIGITAL EDITIONS
OPEN ACCESS PLATFORM
Ordering Information
About Us
Publish With Us
Standing Orders
Trade Sales
Contact Us
Request Review Copy
Sources of Han Décor: Foreign Influence on the Han Dynasty Chinese Iconography of Paradise (206 BC-AD 220)
Author: Sophia-Karin Psarras. Paperback; 175x245mm; x+138 pages; 4 maps, 69 figures. 591 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693256. Epublication ISBN 9781789693263.
Book contents page
Sources of Han Décor: Foreign Influence on the Han Dynasty Chinese Iconography of Paradise (206 BC-AD 220) uses archaeological data to examine the development of Han dynasty Chinese art (206 BC-AD 220), focussing on three major iconographies (the animal master, the tree of life, and animal predation), together with a series of minor motifs (particularly the griffin and several vegetal forms). All of these are combined in what may be considered the most important iconographic creation of the Han: images of paradise. While influence from the Chinese Bronze Age (especially, c. the 14th-3rd centuries BC) on Han art is expected, a surprisingly profound debt to Greece, the Near East, and the steppe is evident not only in the art of the Han era, but in that of the preceding Eastern Zhou (c. 771-221 BC). Initial Eastern Zhou incorporation of this largely-Western influence appears concentrated in chronological parallel to the Orientalization of Greek art (c. the 7th century BC) and the eastern spread of Hellenism (c. the 4th century BC), followed by repeated introduction of foreign motifs during the Han, when these influences were fully integrated into Chinese art.

About the Author
Sophia-Karin Psarras is a specialist of the archaeology and political history of China and the non-Chinese during the Han dynasty (206 BC-AD 220). Much of her work focuses on retracing intercultural exchange through material culture, together with an exploration of how that culture reflects the past. Her work has appeared in journals such as Monumenta Serica, Early China, and Central Asiatic Journal; her research on Han dynasty Chinese archaeology was published in Han Material Culture: An Archaeological Analysis and Vessel Typology (Cambridge University Press, 2015).



View Reviews


NB: This publication is available as an electronic download or printed publication.
If you choose electronic download you will be able to download the publication immediately payment has been confirmed.
Warning - the download size may be over 100MB.

 
Quantity Required  


The epublication is available in PDF format.

 
Private customers
(including academics purchasing for personal use):
Printed Price £30.00 (No VAT). EPublication Price £16.00 (Exc. UK VAT).
Libraries & Institutional customers:
Printed Price £30.00 (No VAT). EPublication Price £30.00 (Exc. VAT)
Print / EPublication Bundle Price £34.50 (Exc. VAT)
Buy Printed Publication - with free EPublicationBuy EPublication
By purchasing an EPublication you are agreeing to our standard single-user eBook licence available to read in full here. Please note this does not affect your statutory rights.
Buy Printed PublicationBuy Institutional EPublicationBuy Institutional Printed & EPublication Bundle
All EPublications purchased via www.archaeopress.com grant permanent access to a PDF file for self-hosting. Our multi-user licence grants limitless downloads with no restriction to concurrent users. Restrictions may apply to printing, copy/paste etc., please contact info@archaeopress.com.
By purchasing an EPublication you are agreeing to our standard multi-user licence available to read in full here.

For help and information please email info@archaeopress.com