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NEW: Different Times? Archaeological and Environmental Data from Intra-Site and Off-Site Sequences
Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 4, Session II-8 edited by Zoï Tsirtsoni, Catherine Kuzucuoğlu, Philippe Nondédéo, Olivier Weller. Paperback; 205x290mm; 136 pages; 39 figures, 10 tables (colour throughout). Papers in English and French. Print RRP: £32.00. 642 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696516. Epublication ISBN 9781789696523.
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Different Times? Archaeological and environmental data from intra-site and off-site sequences brings together seven papers from Session II-8 of the XVIII UISPP Congress (Paris, 4-9 June 2018). The session questioned temporal correlations between intra-site and off-site data in archaeology-related contexts. The word ‘site’ describes here archaeological sites or groups of sites – usually settlements – that have undergone research in recent years and produced information on the duration and timing of human presence. Comparison with evidence from geomorphological and paleoenvironmental research conducted at various distances from settlements gives some interesting results, such as ‘missing’ occupation periods, distortions in human presence intensity through space as well as time, variability in explanations concerning the abandonment of settlements, etc. Examples presented here highlight: first, discrepancies between time records within built areas used for living and the surrounding lands used for other activities (cultivation, herding, travelling, etc); second, discrepancies produced by the use of different ‘time markers’ (ie. chronostratigraphy of archaeological layers or pottery evolution on the one hand, sedimentary or pollen sequences on the other hand). Although improving the resolution of individual data is essential, the authors argue that the joint and detailed examination of evidence produced together by human and natural scientists is more important for reaching a reliable reconstruction of past people’s activities. Both the session and the volume stem from the Working Group ‘Environmental and Social Changes in the Past’ (Changements environnementaux et sociétés dans le passé) in the research framework of the Cluster of Excellence ‘Dynamite’ (Territorial and Spatial Dynamics) of the University Paris 1-Panthéon-Sorbonne (ANR-11-LABX-0046, Investissements d’Avenir).

About the Editors
Zoï Tsirtsoni is an archaeologist and researcher at CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique), currently in position at the laboratory Archéologies et Sciences de l’Antiquité at Nanterre. She is a specialist in Aegean and Balkan prehistory and co-director, since 2008, of the Greek-French research project at the tell settlement of Dikili Tash in Greek Eastern Macedonia. Concerned with relative and absolute chronology, crafts (especially pottery), settlement, and problems of archaeological visibility, she has coordinated or participated in several collaborative interdisciplinary research projects (e.g. ANR ‘Balkans 4000’, ERC ‘PlantCult’), already published or in progress.

Catherine Kuzucuoğlu is a geomorphologist at CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique). Working in the fields of physical geography, geoarchaeology, volcanism and reconstruction of past climates and environments, she develops collaboration research programs with Turkish and international teams in Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Anatolia, investigating (1) Pleistocene and Holocene evolution of valleys and lakes, (2) geomorphological records of recent volcanic activity and landscape evolution, (3) reconstructions of climate and environment from lake and marsh records, and their impacts on past civilizations. She has been Deputy Director in charge of Archaeology at French Institute for Anatolian Studies in Istanbul (2000- 2003), and Director of Laboratory of Physical Geography (2009-2013).

Philippe Nondédéo is currently an investigator at the CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique) laboratory ‘Archéologie des Amériques’. He earned his PhD at the Université de Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne and has worked in the Maya area for 25 years in Mexico (Balamku and Río Bec) and Guatemala (Naachtun). Since 2010 he has directed the Naachtun archaeological project in Northern Petén, Guatemala. He has authored and co-authored over 110 articles and book chapters as well as four books. He is particularly interested in settlement pattern studies, spatial analyses (LiDAR surveys), architecture, and political systems.

Olivier Weller is a researcher at the CNRS (Laboratory Trajectoires¸ CNRS-Pantheon-Sorbonne University, Paris, France). His research concerns the archaeology of salt, specifically the origins of salt production in Europe in terms of exploitation techniques, uses and socio-economic implications during the Neolithic. The approaches he has developed are both technological (ceramic), ethnoarchaeological, as well as paleoenvironmental, chemical or geomatic. His study area extends from Europe (France, Spain, Germany, Poland, Romania, Moldavia, Bulgaria) to Oceania (New Guinea, Tonga). He is currently Director of the laboratory Trajectoires (2019-2023).


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