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Archaeopress: Publishers of Academic Archaeology
Communicating the researches of thousands of archaeologists worldwide since 1991

Archaeopress is an Oxford-based publisher specialising in academic archaeology.
 
 
NEW: Artemis and Her Cult by Ruth M. Léger. vi+178 pages; thirteen colour plates. 316 2017. ISBN 9781784915506. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Greek sanctuaries are among the best known archaeological sites in ancient Greece. However, after over 150 years of excavations and research we know surprisingly little about some of their aspects, such as the rituals enacted in the sanctuary, the nature of original local deities and how aspects of their character were assimilated into those of the Olympians, why sanctuaries were established in certain places, and how to determine who the sanctuary was established for when no epigraphical material is present.

Artemis and Her Cult provides a first attempt to bring together archaeological and literary sources from two main Artemis sanctuaries, hoping to contribute to a clearer picture of her cult. An account of Artemis’ different characters describes her as a mother of gods, a goddess of wilderness, animals and hunt; a goddess of birth, infants and children (and young animals); as well as a goddess of youth and marriage and rites of passage.

These descriptions are followed by an up-to-date account of the archaeological record of the sanctuaries of Artemis Orthia at Sparta and Artemis Ephesia at Ephesus. For the comparison the site of Athena Alea at Tegea is examined. The three accounts offer a full study of the architectural development and the range of artefacts made of different materials. The varied character is Artemis are further analysed by looking at the archaeology relating to the cult and the rites of passage taking place at the sites. The rites of passage are reconstructed by using the literary accounts.

About the author:
Ruth Léger's love for ancient culture started with the subjects of Latin and Greek at secondary school. After a BA and MA degrees at the Universiteit Utrecht, she moved to Birmingham to pursue her PhD. This book is the result of her research in the Department of Classics, Ancient History and Archaeology under supervision of Dr K.A. Wardle, and is a starting point for mapping out sanctuaries and their history throughout the Greek world.
NEW: Due antiche diocesi dello stretto di Messina Insediamento, manufatti, infrastrutture e produzione nell’eparchia delle Saline e nelle isole Eolie tra Tardoantico e alto Medioevo by Francesca Zagari. iv+186 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. Italian text with English abstract. 322 2017. ISBN 9781784915681. £33.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This monograph is a comparative study of the Saline area and of the Aeolian Islands dioceses’ settlement in Late Antiquity and in the Early Middle ages. Both regions overlook the Straits of Messina, between Calabria and Sicily. The Saline area is located in Southern Tyrrhenian Calabria, and in the Middle Ages it is mentioned as an “Eparchy”, a Byzantine administrative division. The Aeolian archipelago is in the Tyrrhenian Sea off the North-Eastern coast of Sicily. It includes seven islands, the biggest of which is Lipari.

The aim of the book is to reconstruct the settlement layout of these areas in an historical period that has been studied relatively little in Southern Italy. The settlement reconstruction was carried out by examining topographical features, patterns and dynamics, material culture, degree of continuity and discontinuity – especially compared to the Roman habitat – as well as agricultural and manufacturing systems and the road network.
NEW: Late Roman to Late Byzantine/Early Islamic Period Lamps in the Holy Land The Collection of the Israel Antiquities Authority by Varda Sussman. iv+635 pages; highly illustrated throughout in black and white with 10 colour plates. 321 2017. ISBN 9781784915704. £65.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume illustrates lamps from the Byzantine period excavated in the Holy Land and demonstrates the extent of their development since the first enclosing/capturing of light (fire) within a portable man-made vessel. Lamps, which held important material and religious functions during daily life and the afterlife, played a large role in conveying art and cultural and political messages through the patterns chosen to decorate them. These cultural, or even more their religious affinities, were chosen to be delivered on lamps (not on other vessels) more than ever during the Byzantine period; these small portable objects were used to ‘promote’ beliefs like the ‘press’ of today. Each cultural group marked the artifacts / lamps with its symbols, proverbs from the Old and New Testaments, and this process throws light on the deep rivalry between them in this corner of the ancient world.

The great variety of lamps dealt with in this volume, arranged according to their various regions of origin, emphasizes their diversity, and probably local workshop manufacture, and stands in contrast to such a small country without any physical geographic barriers to cross, only mental ones (and where one basket of lamps could satisfy the full needs of the local population). The lamps of the Byzantine period reflect the era and the struggle in the cradle of the formation of the four leading faiths and cultures: Judaism (the oldest), Samaritanism (derived from the Jewish faith), newly-born Christianity – all three successors to the existing former pagan culture – and the last, Islam, standing on a new threshold.

Unlike during the former Greek and Roman periods of rule, the land of Israel during the Byzantine period did not really have a central government or authority. The variety of the oil lamps, their order and place of appearance during the Byzantine period can be described as a ‘symphony played by a self-conducted orchestra, where new soloists rise and add a different motet, creating stormy music that expresses the rhythm of the era’.

This volume, like the author’s earlier books on this subject, is intended to create a basis for further study and evaluation of the endless aspects that lamps bring to light and which are beyond the capacity of any single scholar.

About the Author:
Varda Sussman was born in Palestine (now Israel) and graduated from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem (BA and MA) in the faculties of Prehistory and Archaeology. She majored in prehistory with Professor M. Stekelis, in Classical archaeology with Professor M. Avi Yonah, and in ancient history with Professor B. Mazar. She studied for one year in the Oriental Institute in Chicago (USA). From 1950, while studying and working at the Department of Antiquity (now the Israel Antiquities Authority), she participated in various archaeological excavations. In 1964 she became curator / keeper of all treasures (finds) discovered since 1948 and developed the system of storage which enabled students and scholars to obtain, examine and study the material which she had catalogued. Among the catalogued finds were many oil lamps which were objects of artistic and historical significance. Two exhibitions were held of the material: the first on Decorated Jewish Oil Lamps (with catalogue) in 1972 in The Israel Museum, the second illustrating the regional lamps of the northern part of the country in the University of Haifa Museum. These established the recognition of typical workshops which had fashioned special lamps for the use of the Jewish and Samaritan populations. The author’s Ornamented Jewish Oil Lamps from the Fall of the Second Temple through the Revolt of Bar Kochba was published in Hebrew by Mosad Bialik and the Israel Exploration Society in 1972; it was translated into English and published by Aris & Phillips Ltd in 1982. She has also published other articles concerning various aspect of art derived from oil lamps, and a num
NEW: Stone Vessels in the Near East during the Iron Age and the Persian Period (c. 1200-330 BCE) by Andrea Squitieri. iv+284 pages; illustrated throughout with 50 plates in colour. 318 2017 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 2. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915520. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915537. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book focuses on the characteristics and the development of the stone vessel industry in the Near East during the Iron Age and the Persian period (c. 1200 – 330 BCE). Three main aspects of this industry are investigated. First, the technology behind the manufacture of stone vessels, the tools and techniques, and how these changed across time. Second, the mechanisms of exchange of stone vessels and how these were affected by the changing political landscape through time. Third, the consumption patterns of stone vessels in both elite and non-elite contexts, and how these patterns changed through time. The aim is to evaluate how the formation of new regional states, occurred in the Iron Age I-II, and their subsequent inclusion within large-scale empires, in the Iron Age III and Persian period, transformed the Near Eastern societies by exploring how the stone vessel industry was affected by these transformations. For the period and area under analysis, such a comprehensive study of stone vessels, covering a wide area and connecting this industry to the broader socioeconomic and political landscapes, has never been attempted before.

About the Author:
Andrea Squitieri obtained BA (2006) and MA (2008) at the University of Torino (Italy) in Archaeology of the Near East, with a final dissertation on alabaster vessels in the Mediterranean during the 1st millennium BC. He continued his academic career at the University College, London, where he completed the PhD in 2015 with a thesis on stone vessels in the Iron Age and the Persian period. Andrea has participated in excavation projects in Turkmenistan (Parthian Nisa), Sardinia (Tharros), Syria (Tell Afis), Turkey (Tell Atchana), Israel (Tell es-Safi/Gath) and in Iraqi Kurdistan (Gird-i Bazar and Qalat-i Dinka). Since 2015, he has been a member of the Peshdar Plain Project directed by prof. K. Radner of the Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich (Germany). He is also involved in the project for the study of the stone materials from Shahr-i Sokhta (east Iran), held in the Museum of Oriental Art of Rome (Italy).
NEW: Ländliche Siedlungsstrukturen im römischen Spanien Das Becken von Vera und das Camp de Tarragona –zwei Mikroregionen im Vergleich by Jan Schneider. vi+214 pages; illustrated throughout with 35 plates in colour. German text; concluding chapter in German and English. 317 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 22. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915544. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915551. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The present study deals with the comparison of rural settlements, aiming to compare developments in various settlements of the Iberian Peninsula during the Roman era. This is to show to what extent structures in the hinterland show parallels or are different from one another and to explore the causes of these similarities and differences. Aspects of the Roman economy must be taken into account as well as the micro-regional influences of pre-Roman settlement or topographical conditions. To achieve this goal, various aspects of rural settlements such as the dating, size or status of a place and its location and environmental conditions are analyzed and related. Archaeological, geographic and statistical methods of investigation are used. These methods, along with the complete resulting data, are fully disclosed in order to allow the comparison to be extended to other regions. The Vera basin and the Camp de Tarragona were chosen as study areas. The former is located in the south-east of the Iberian Peninsula on the Spanish Mediterranean coast, and was seen in the Roman period as the hinterland of the city of Baria, today's Villaricos. Also on the Mediterranean coast of Spain, but in the north, is Camp de Tarragona. The name refers to the surrounding area of the Roman city of Tarraco, capital of the Hispania Tarraconensis province of the same name.

German Description: Die vorliegende Untersuchung beschäftigt sich mit dem Vergleich ländlicher Siedlungsstrukturen. Ziel der Arbeit ist es, die Entwicklungen in verschiedenen Siedlungskammern der Iberischen Halbinsel während der römischen Epoche einander gegenüberzustellen. Dies soll zeigen, inwieweit Strukturen im Hinterland Parallelen aufweisen oder voneinander abweichen und worin die diese Gemeinsamkeiten und Unterschiede begründet sind. Dabei sind Aspekte des römischen Wirtschaftswesens ebenso zu berücksichtigen, wie mikroregionale Einflüsse der vorrömischen Besiedlung oder topographische Gegebenheiten. Um dieses Ziel zu erreichen, werden verschiedene Aspekte ländlicher Siedlungsstrukturen wie Datierung, Größe oder Status eines Platzes und dessen Standort- und Umgebungsbedingungen analysiert und in Beziehung zueinander gesetzt. Dabei kommen archäologische, geographische und statistische Untersuchungsmethoden zum Einsatz. Diese werden ebenso wie sämtliche Daten und Ergebnisse innerhalb der Arbeit vollständig offengelegt, um eine Ausweitung des Vergleichs auf weitere Regionen zu ermöglichen. Als Untersuchungsgebiete wurden das Becken von Vera und das Camp de Tarragona ausgewählt. Ersteres liegt im Südosten der Iberischen Halbinsel an der spanischen Mittelmeerküste und war in römischer Zeit als Hinterland der Stadt Baria, dem heutigen Villaricos, anzusehen. Ebenfalls an der Mittelmeerküste Spaniens, jedoch in dessen Norden, liegt das Camp de Tarragona. Der Name bezeichnet das Umland der römischen Stadt Tarraco, Hauptstadt der gleichnamigen Provinz Hispania Tarraconensis.
Jan Schneider studierte Klassische Archäologie und Alte Geschichte an der Justus-Liebig-Universität in Gießen. Bereits in seiner Magisterarbeit 2010, die in Kooperation zwischen der Universität Gießen und dem Deutschen Archäologischen Institut Madrid betreut wurde, beschäftigte er sich mit dem römischen Spanien. Darauf aufbauend folgte seine Dissertation Ländliche Siedlungsstrukturen im römischen Spanien. Untersuchungen im Becken von Vera und dem Camp de Tarragona die 2015 an der Universität Gießen eingereicht wurde. Er ist seit seinem Studium aktives Mitglied im Netzwerk zur Erforschung der Iberischen Halbinsel (TOLETUM) und arbeitet derzeit als Archäologe in Deutschland.
NEW: La Cerámica Común romana en la Bahía Gaditana en Época romana Alfarería y centros de producción by Lourdes Girón Anguiozar. xxii+424 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English introduction. 315 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 21. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915360. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915377. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volumes examines Roman pottery and production centers in modern-day Cádiz.

The innovative aspects of this research are several but we will limit them to three: the typological classification from a closer perspective to the mentality of the old potter; the concept of ‘social measure’, which connects the dimensions of the containers with the type of consumer and social group; and, the ethnoarchaeological aspects applied to the construction of a furnace, which have enabled to better specify various aspects relating to the manufacture of common Roman ceramics.

From a methodological point of view, it is proposed a debate about the concept of ‘common pottery’, which is defined as ceramics intended for a common and multipurpose use, more practical than aesthetic. Likewise, it is exposed the great problem of the typologies, seeking not only a logical classification into types and variants, but also a reference to the artisan work. The theme of the ancient name of Roman ceramic forms is faced in order to call by the old names to the Roman pottery forms found today. The concept of ‘social measure’, unprecedented in this type of analysis, pretends to reach a social accepted measure, obtained with a statistical study. This measure is that one around which the values are concentrated.
NEW: Recent Investigations in the Puuc Region of Yucatán edited by Meghan Rubenstein. viii+164 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 8 papers in English, 3 in Spanish. Abstracts in English and Spanish. 312 2017 Archaeopress Pre-Columbian Archaeology 8. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915445. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915452. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The scholarship assembled in this volume was first presented at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology (SAA) in Austin, Texas, in April 2014. Some of the authors have chosen to publish their conference papers while others have expanded their topics. As a collection, the papers demonstrate a myriad of approaches to understanding the history of the Puuc region, incorporating archaeological, architectural, epigraphic, and iconographic studies. The geographic scope is also broad. Many of the recent and ongoing archaeological projects in the eastern Puuc region and its periphery are represented, including Dzehkabtún, H’wasil, Kabah, Kiuic, Labná, Sayil, Uxmal, and Xcoch, as well as the Chocholá ceramic tradition from the western Puuc. The projects are at various stages—some preliminary, others a portion of a larger investigation, while still others are revisiting older data—all with the aim to advance our field of study.

It has been more than 10 years since a volume dedicated solely to the Puuc region has been published. While Puuc research frequently appears in collected volumes on the Yucatán peninsula or the Terminal Classic period, we are pleased to offer this representative example of ongoing work.
NEW: Portuguese Intervention in the Manila Galleon Trade The structure and networks of trade between Asia and America in the 16th and 17th centuries as revealed by Chinese Ceramics and Spanish archives by Etsuko Miyata. iv+94 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 310 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915322. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915339. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In this study of the Portuguese intervention in the Manila Galleon Trade, Etsuko Miyata explores its history through a new approach: the examination of Chinese ceramics. The excavated Chinese ceramics from Mexico City shed light on the nature of Portuguese involvement in this huge sixteenth-century maritime trade network, and also help to clarify the relationship between the Portuguese and the Chinese merchants, who were considered to be rivals.

The book analyzes the change of types and quantity of excavated Chinese ceramics from Mexico City over time. It references the trade depression during the mid seventeenth century, when the ceramic finds from Mexico City suddenly decreased, and the trade between Asia and America seemed to slow down; and it seeks to understand the effect on people from various social backgrounds in both regions.

The study also considers the Atlantic coastal trade in Spain; this featured Chinese ceramic finds from Galician excavation sites. The author postulates a hypothesis that these ceramics did not come into Spain through the Manila Galleon Trade or via Atlantic trade with America, but from Lisbon where the coastal trade route powered a large amount of diverse commerce.
NEW: Sweet Waste: a view from the Mediterranean and from the 2002 excavations at the Tawahin es-Sukkar (Safi), Jordan by Richard E. Jones and contributors. 245pp; Illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Published by Potingair Press.ISBN 9780956824035. £45.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

The history of cane sugar from its origins in the east to its status as a luxury foodstuff and even medicine in the medieval period to a commodity produced and consumed globally in today’s world is well known. Yet archaeologically, sugar is an invisible commodity, its presence usually being inferred from the humble sugar pots used in the last stages of its sophisticated production process. This book attempts to redress the imbalance between history and archaeology by reporting on the excavation of a medieval sugar refinery, Tawahin es-Sukkar near Safi, situated south of the Dead Sea in Jordan. There it was possible to explore many of the steps in the sugar-making process. The book’s title refers to the industrial waste whose study has shed light on those steps. To place this refinery in chronological and economic context, excavation was extended to the adjacent ‘support town’ of Khirbet Shaykh ‘Isa; the book presents its results.

The available archaeological evidence for sugar production across the Mediterranean is reviewed. There is particular emphasis on the sugar vessels and the light they can shed on the poorly understood relationship between primary production centres, refining, storage and consumption centres. The book, which is fully illustrated, can be profitably read by archaeologists, archaeological scientists, historians and visitors to Jordan alike.

About the Author: Richard Jones has wide-ranging experience in archaeological science in the Mediterranean and especially in Greece and Italy The production and distribution of pottery is one of his main interests. Until recently he was Senior Lecturer in archaeological science at the University of Glasgow.
NEW: Amphorae from the Kops Plateau (Nijmegen) Trade and supply to the Lower-Rhineland from the Augustan period to AD 69/70 edited by C. Carreras and J. van den Berg. x+404 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 314 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 20. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915421. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915438. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In the year 19 BC, Roman legions arrived in Nijmegen with the aim of conquering the Rhenish territories from the local populations. In addition to the legionaries themselves, the Roman army required a regular provision of staple supplies in order to keep such a war machine in top condition. The archaeological evidence for this provision is a myriad of organic remains (i.e. seeds, bones, pollen) as well as ceramic containers such as amphorae.

One of the first military camps at Nijmegen, together with that on the Hunerberg, was Kops Plateau. This timber fortress – the most northerly military site of the Julio-Claudian period – dating from 12 BC to AD 69, has provided an extraordinary amphora assemblage. At a time when most Roman roads were still only projects, this distant military outpost received amphora products from all over the Mediterranean basin – from Palestine to Greece in the east to Baetica and northern Africa in the west as well as from the Italian core. In addition to amphorae, Kops Plateau also provided a wide repertory of regional vessels whose contents are unknown.

The amphorae from Kops Plateau represent a singular example of Roman military supply in northern Europe at a very early date. Their analysis sheds light on trading routes in the Atlantic regions, and from Gaul to Germany; indeed also on the Claudian invasion of Britain.
NEW: Suyanggae and Her Neighbours in Haifa, Israel Proceedings of the 20th (1) Congress June 21–28, 2015 edited by Sharon Gonen and Avraham Ronen. 156 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 313 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915384. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915391. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Proceedings of the 20th symposium: Suyanggae and Her Neighbours. The 20th symposium took place across two meetings, the first in Haifa, Israel and the second in Danyang, Republic of Korea. This proceedings volume gathers papers, abstracts and posters from the meeting in Haifa, which took place from 21–28 June 2015.
NEW: Percy Manning: The Man Who Collected Oxfordshire edited by Michael Heaney. xviii+314pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 311 2017 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915285. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915292. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Percy Manning (1870-1917) was an Oxford antiquary who amassed enormous collections about the history of Oxford and Oxfordshire, which now constitute a valuable resource in Oxford University’s libraries and museums.

Manning was interested in all periods of history and prehistory, collecting Stone Age tools, Roman coins, medieval tiles, and relics of ways of life that were disappearing in his own day, such as decorated police truncheons and local pottery. He methodically documented and explored the archaeology of the county. He collected literally thousands of prints depicting Oxford and places throughout Oxfordshire as records of changes in the built environment, and moved beyond material objects to uncover and document superstitions, folklore and customs, especially where he thought they were disappearing. He sought out May songs and morris dancers, reviving the Headington Quarry Morris Dancers in 1899. There is scarcely a community in the county which is not reflected somewhere in his collections.

This volume provides the first detailed biography of Manning, together with studies examining specific parts of his collections in greater detail. Other chapters demonstrate how the collections can be used as springboards for in-depth study and for fresh approaches to the history of Oxfordshire. Particular emphasis is placed on Manning’s ground-breaking research into the folklore of the county in conjunction with its material culture.

About the Editor:
Michael Heaney, the editor of and main contributor to the volume, is a respected researcher into folk music and folklore who has published widely on the subject. He combines this with extensive knowledge of the collections in the Bodleian Library where he spent his professional career. He is a past Editor of Folk Music Journal (and continues on its board) and acts as adviser to and a Trustee of the country’s leading research library in the field, the Vaughan Williams Memorial Library. His colleagues bring their professional expertise from the Ashmolean and Pitt Rivers Museums, the University’s Music Faculty and Research Laboratory for Archaeology and the History of Art, and beyond.
NEW: Atlas of Mammal Distribution through Africa from the LGM (~18 ka) to Modern Times The zooarchaeological record by Hélène Jousse. 316 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 309 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915407. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915414. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This work provides the first overview of mammal species distributions in Africa since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 18 ky) to modern time. It is derived from data published mainly in the zooarchaeological literature until 2009. During a post-doctoral project hosted in the zoological department of mammal collection at the Naturhistoriches Museum in Vienna (Austria), the occurrences of taxa in archaeological sites on the African continent were recorded in a database, integrating geographical and chronological information. This record offers the opportunity to produce a chronological atlas of mammalian distributions by presenting their occurrences on successive maps over the last 18 ky.

This work is useful for zooarchaeologists dealing with one particular species by providing a bibliographical work that documents its past locations. It must be noted that fauna are mainly documented through their presence at archaeological sites and are therefore tied to the presence of humans and their activities. This may only partially reproduce their true past distribution. However, the sites offer a good coverage throughout space and time and generally reflect the extent of mammalian distributions, although the limits of their distributions may be further refined. The atlas will aid in the investigation of palaeoecological issues, such as the capacity of mammals to adapt to climatic change and respond to human disturbance in the recent past of Africa.

The database also provides information that is fundamental to a better understanding of what influenced the present-day distribution, dynamism and structure of mammalian communities in Africa. By incorporating a larger temporal scale to modern ecological studies, it may help control their conservation since desiccation and human disturbance in Africa is still a worrying question for their future.
NEW: Iron Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon Settlement along the Empingham to Hannington Pipeline in Northamptonshire and Rutland by Simon Carlyle, Jason Clarke and Andy Chapman. xii+132 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 308 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915346. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915353. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Between January 2008 and July 2009, Northamptonshire Archaeology, now part of MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology), carried out a series of excavations along the route of a new water pipeline being constructed by Anglian Water Services as part of a major project to increase the supply of water to new homes and businesses in the south-east Midlands region. Nineteen sites were investigated, dating primarily to the Iron Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods.

The earliest remains were a late Bronze Age/early Iron Age pit alignment near Seaton, Rutland. The Iron Age and Roman sites were small rural settlements comprising ditched enclosures, the remains of roundhouses and pits. Settlements were located near Seaton and Caldecott in Rutland and in Northamptonshire at Swinawe Barn near Corby, Thorpe Malsor, White Hill Lodge, Great Cransley and Willows Nursery. A Roman site near Rushton, Northamptonshire may be associated with a villa estate. Other sites included part of a Roman field system at Violet Lane, near Corby, and Roman cremation burials near Gretton, Northamptonshire. The settlements mainly date from the late middle Iron Age, 2nd century BC, through to the 4th century AD, although there was little evidence for direct continuity of settlement between the Iron Age and Roman periods.

An Anglo-Saxon cremation cemetery dated to the late 5th century to mid-7th century AD, at Glaston, Rutland, contained 16 cremation burials deposited in decorated and plain urns along with small assemblages of grave goods, often also burnt on the pyre, and including a brooch, glass beads, and fragments of a bone comb and mount.

Later features generally comprised medieval and post-medieval furrows from ridge and furrow field systems and field boundary ditches.
NEW: The Nature and Origin of the Cult of Silvanus in the Roman Provinces of Dalmatia and Pannonia by Ljubica Perinić. vi+126 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 306 2016 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 19. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915124. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915131. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Nature and Origin of the Cult of Silvanus in the Roman Provinces of Dalmatia and Pannonia deals with the cult of Silvanus and presents the evidence and current state of research of the cult in Dalmatia and Pannonia to the wider scholarly community. New perceptions on the subject are proposed and a fresh standpoint from which certain problems may be (re)addressed is presented.

About the Author:
Ljubica Perinić studied Archaeology at the University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Department of Archaeology, where she defended her PhD thesis in 2008. She works at the Division of Archaeology at the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts. She is particularly interested in Roman religion, Roman army, and epigraphy. She lives and works in Zagreb.
NEW: Dress and Identity in Iron Age Britain A study of glass beads and other objects of personal adornment by Elizabeth M. Foulds. xiv+338 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 16 colour plates. 301 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915261. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915278. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Studies of Iron Age artefacts from Britain tend to be dominated either by the study of metalwork, or pottery. This book presents a study not only of a different material, but also a different type of object: glass beads. These are found in a range of different sizes, shapes, colours, and employ a variety of different decorative motifs.

Through an analysis of glass beads from four key study regions in Britain, the book aims not only to address regional differences in appearance and chronology, but also to explore the role that this object played within the networks and relationships that constructed Iron Age society. It seeks to understand how they were used during their lives and how they came to be deposited within the archaeological record, in order to establish the social processes that glass beads were bound within.

The results indicate that glass beads were a strongly regionalised artefact, potentially reflecting differing local preferences for colour and motif. In addition, glass beads, in combination with several other types of object, were integral to Middle Iron Age dress. Given that the first century BC is often seen as a turning point in terms of settlements and material culture, this supports the possibility of strong continental exchange during an earlier period for either glass beads or raw materials. However, by the Late Iron Age in the first century BC and early first century AD, their use had severely diminished.

NEW: Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 1 2016 edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). vi+498 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available both in printed and e-versions. 1 2016 Journal of Greek Archaeology . ISBN 2059-4674-1-2016. Book contents pageBuy Now


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Early bird rates for subscriptions to Volume 2 2017 and special offers for subscriptions to Volumes 1 & 2 (2016-2017) are available via a downloadable order form. Offers end 30/11/2016 and 31/12/2016 respectively.

A free 70+ page sampler is available to download in our Open Access section designed to act as an introduction and taster to the scope and style of this new journal. It includes one complete paper and two review articles as well as full contents listings for Volume 1.

About JGA:
An annual, international peer-reviewed English-language journal specializing in synthetic articles and in long reviews. The scope of this journal is Greek archaeology both in the Aegean and throughout the wider Greek-inhabited world, from earliest Prehistory to the Modern Era. Thus we include contributions not just from traditional periods such as Greek Prehistory and the Classical Greek to Hellenistic eras, but also from Roman through Byzantine, Crusader and Ottoman Greece and into the Early Modern period. Outside of the Aegean contributions are welcome covering the Archaeology of the Greeks overseas, likewise from Prehistory into the Modern World. Greek Archaeology for the purposes of the JGA thus includes the Archaeology of the Hellenistic World, Roman Greece, Byzantine Archaeology, Frankish and Ottoman Archaeology, and the Postmedieval Archaeology of Greece and of the Greek Diaspora. the Editorial Board is headed by Professor John Bintliff (Edinburgh University, U.K. and Leiden University, The Netherlands).

For a full mission statement and information on the editorial and advisory board please visit the JGA page of our website.
NEW: Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 1 2016 edited by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph (Heads of Editorial Board). xiv+212 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available in print and Open Access. 1 2016. ISBN 2399-1844-1-2016. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

ISSN 2399-1844 (Print)
ISSN 2399-1852 (online)

Table of Contents:
A Fill from a Potter’s Dump at Morgantina – by Shelley Stone
Trade in Pottery within the Lower Adriatic in the 2nd century BCE – by Carlo De Mitri
Hellenistic Ash Containers from Phoinike (Albania) – by Nadia Aleotti
Pottery Production in Hellenistic Chalkis, Euboea. Preliminary Notes – by Yannis Chairetakis
A Terracotta Figurine of a War Elephant and Other Finds from a Grave at Thessaloniki – by Eleni Lambrothanassi & Annareta Touloumtzidou
Moldmade Bowls from Straton’s Tower (Caesarea Maritima) – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom
Greco-Roman Jewellery from the Necropolis of Qasrawet (Sinai) – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom

ARCHAEOLOGICAL NEWS AND PROJECTS
Panathenaic Amphorae of Hellenistic and Roman Times – by Martin Streicher

BOOK REVIEWS
Shelley C. Stone, Morgantina Studies 6. The Hellenistic and Roman Fine Wares – by Peter J. Stone
Pia Guldager Bilde & Mark L. Lawall (eds.), Pottery, Peoples and Places, BSS 16 – by Kathleen Warner Slane
Susan I. Rotroff, Hellenistic Pottery. The Plain Wares, Agora 33 – by Patricia Kögler

2016 PRINT SUBSCRIPTION RATES (1 issue in 2016):

Institutions (please order via the downloadable form - click here to follow the link):
£50.00 (plus standard shipping rates)
Agents will receive 25% discount on institutional print price including shipping rates as stated

Individuals (please order via the website using the 'Buy Now' button below):
£30.00 (plus standard shipping rates)

Complete eJournal available to download now in Open Access - click here to follow the link
FORTHCOMING: The Resurgam Submarine ‘A Project for Annoying the Enemy’ by Peter Holt. xiv+118 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 327 2017. ISBN 9781784915827. £18.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

For centuries inventors have been dreaming up schemes to allow people to submerge beneath the waves, stay a while then return again unharmed. The Resurgam was designed for this purpose, as a stealthy underwater weapon which was the brainchild of an eccentric inventor realised in iron, timber, coal and steam. The inventor was George William Garrett, a curate from Manchester who designed and built the Resurgam submarine in 1879 using the limited technology available to a Victorian engineer on a small budget. This is not the story of Garrett himself as this story has already been told, instead this book tells the story how the Resurgam was built, how she may have worked and what happened to her. The book introduces Garrett the inventor then puts the creation of Resurgam in context by considering similar submarines being developed at the end of the 19th century. Garrett’s relationship with the Royal Navy is related here as they were his intended client and the tale continues with a description of how the submarine was built and how it may have worked. The end of the story relates how the Resurgam came to be lost in 1880 pieced together from documents and newspaper reports. Curiously, aspects of the tale do not fit with what was found by underwater archaeologists recording the wreck so other ideas are explored about how and why the submarine was lost.
FORTHCOMING: Interpreting the Seventh Century BC Tradition and Innovation edited by Xenia Charalambidou and Catherine Morgan. viii+460pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 326 2017. ISBN 9781784915728. £65.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This book has its origin in a conference held at the British School at Athens in 2011 which aimed to explore the range of new archaeological information now available for the seventh century in Greek lands. It presents material data, combining accounts of recent discoveries (which often enable reinterpretation of older finds), regional reviews, and archaeologically focused critique of historical and art historical approaches and interpretations. The aim is to make readily accessible the material record as currently understood and to consider how it may contribute to broader critiques and new directions in research. The geographical focus is the old Greek world encompassing Macedonia and Ionia, and extending across to Sicily and southern Italy, considering also the wider trade circuits linking regional markets. The book does not aim for the pan- Mediterranean coverage of recent works: given that much of the latest innovative and critical scholarship has focused on the western Mediterranean in particular, it is necessary to bring old Greece back under the spotlight and to expose to critical scrutiny the often Athenocentric interpretative frameworks which continue to inform discussion of other parts of the Mediterranean.
FORTHCOMING: Romano-Celtic Mask Puzzle Padlocks A study in their Design, Technology and Security by Jerry Slocum and Dic Sonneveld. Hardback; 144 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. 325 2017. ISBN 9781784915643. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This book presents a little-known and ingenious artefact of the Roman world: a small puzzle padlock whose font plate bears a face or ‘mask’ of ‘Celtic’ style. The padlocks were designed to secure small bags or pouches and their distribution extended across Europe with the majority found in the Danubian region and in the vicinity of Aquileia.

The authors examine the cultural context, the origins and uses of the padlocks, and provide detailed solutions to the puzzle mechanisms. The publication provides a fully-illustrated catalog of the known 156 examples, categorises their types according to construction and style, and explores the technicalities of the subject by the process of constructing replica mask puzzle padlocks.

About the authors:
Jerry Slocum, a retired Aerospace executive, is an historian, collector and author specialising in the field of mechanical puzzles. His personal collection of over 40,000 mechanical puzzles is believed to be the world’s largest. It includes hundreds of puzzle padlocks including 34 Roman mask puzzle padlocks. He is the author of 16 earlier books on puzzles and their history including Puzzles Old and New in 1986, The 15 Puzzle, The Cube (about Rubik’s Cube), and The Tangram Book. In 2006, Slocum donated his entire puzzle collection and library of over 5,000 puzzle books to the Lilly Library at Indiana University, marking the first time a major collection of mechanical puzzles was made available to the public in an academic setting. He also founded The International Puzzle Collectors’ Party in 1978 that organises annual gatherings in Asia, Europe and the USA of as many as 450 serious puzzle collectors from all over the world.

Until his retirement in 2011, Dic Sonneveld was an Information and Computer Technology (ICT) professional at Leiden University. Jerry knew him as designer of a type of mechanical puzzles, using partly self-written software. In 1997 Jerry asked him to contribute to the research for the history of the Chinese Puzzle, better known as Tangram (which was an international puzzle rage in the early 19th century). From that time on he assisted Jerry with literature research, library research and Internet research, which resulted in The 15 Puzzle book (about the worldwide puzzle craze in 1880) and several others. All these experiences and knowledge now have culminated in the research for this book about Roman-Celtic mask puzzle padlocks. It all started in January 2013, as always, with a simple inquiry from Jerry; he wanted to know more about these “ancient trick locks”.

FORTHCOMING: The Archaeology of Kenilworth Castle’s Elizabethan Garden Excavation and Investigation 2004–2008 by Brian Dix, Stephen Parry and Claire Finn. iv+76 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 324 2017. ISBN 9781784915742. £22.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

As part of the Property Development Programme for Kenilworth Castle in Warwickshire, English Heritage created an ambitious reconstruction of the Elizabethan garden which formerly stood on the north side of the castle keep. In order to achieve a reliable representation of the original garden, a programme of archaeological trenching, open area excavation and watching brief was carried out by Northamptonshire Archaeology (now MOLA) from 2004 to 2008.

This report discusses the results of the excavations which uncovered for the first time the foundation and culverts of an octagonal fountain basin, described by Robert Langham in a contemporary letter relating to Queen Elizabeth I’s visit in 1575. The results of the excavation also clarified to some extent the original dimensions of the garden and the foundation level upon which the fine surfacing detail would have been applied. Contributions to understanding the geometry of the garden’s architectural features are made by the identification of a series of rubble-and-mortar-filled pits, which probably formed bases for plinths for structures or other structural elements. The terrace which formed a viewing promenade over the garden was shown to have undergone substantial alteration. The impact of Civil War defences and slighting on the north of the keep and outer bailey wall were investigated. Following this, the area was subsequently cultivated as a kitchen garden and orchard from at least the beginning of the eighteenth century. Twentieth-century activity included consolidation of the castle fabric, the construction of paths and the remodelling of the terrace, and the remains of an ornamental knotwork garden created in 1975. The archaeology of the garden and its surroundings are discussed from the remnants of medieval features through to the present day.
FORTHCOMING: Coventry’s Medieval Suburbs Excavations at Hill Street, Upper Well Street and Far Gosford Street 2003-2007 by Paul Mason, Danny McAree and Iain Soden. xii+196 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 323 2017. ISBN 9781784915629. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Hill Street, Upper Well Street and Far Gosford Street comprise three suburban streets which stood directly outside the city gates of Coventry for much of the medieval period. As a result of the 2003-2007 excavations an extensive body of archaeological, environmental and documentary evidence has been brought together to allow comparison in terms of land planning, construction methodologies, character and relative fluctuations in the long-term economy of two of the city’s medieval and post-medieval suburbs.

As well as evidence for street frontage occupation, the sites contain substantial portions of the city’s defences, never before looked at in such detail. The new data is of great value in comparing the results with those previously gained from a variety of smaller sites in Coventry and comparable sites elsewhere in the country. The work has, in some detail, married up excavated data and documentary sources for the working of the defences over a period of 250 years. In addition the immediate suburban environment has come under scrutiny and an unprecedented level of botanical data has come to light in a programme of sampling for both seeds and pollens as a guide to the changing character of the suburbs.

At Hill Street, excavation uncovered two medieval and post-medieval frontage properties 50m wide and their rear yards adjacent to the city ditch. While upstanding structural remains were scant, analysis of contemporary pits has highlighted mainly domestic but also some industrial aspects of the properties and given an insight into the diet, economy and changing face of suburban Hill Street from the 13th to 19th centuries. Excavation also uncovered some 55m of the city ditch adjacent to Bond Street, into which four large sections were cut, three close to Hill Street and one at the junction with Upper Well Street. The excavations highlight the huge investment made in digging and maintaining the ditch as a defensive line for the first half of the 15th century before it was gradually misused for fly-tipping and eventually lost beneath a welter of dumping by the later 17th century. It was probably indefensible long before the Civil War. A varied and rich environmental profile of the site has been constructed, which paints a picture of a suburban, semi-rural habitat which was increasingly spoiled in the 16th and 17th centuries by unrestricted dumping of refuse and cess. A wide variety of finds was recovered, indicative of both domestic and industrial occupation and use. This range was dominated by a large group of well-preserved late medieval leather shoes.

The Far Gosford Street excavations revealed evidence for some 800 years of human activity. The earliest remains comprised a solid timber post, possibly related to a bridge over the River Sherbourne, for which tree-ring dating established a felling date of 1162-1212. A frontage was first occupied in the early 14th century when buildings were laid out along the street. A hoard of silver pennies found buried beneath the floor of one of the buildings probably represents the savings of one of the street’s earliest residents. These structures were replaced in the first half of the 15th century, probably at the same time as the city wall was built a short distance to the west. A second medieval frontage lasted until 1643 when it was again dismantled during the Civil War. Entrenchments dating to this period were also excavated. In the 18th century a third frontage was built, replaced in the 19th century and finally demolished to make way for Singer Motors car showroom after they acquired the site in 1926.
FORTHCOMING: Saxa loquuntur: Roman Epitaphs from North-Western Croatia/Rimski epitafi iz sjeverozapadne Hrvatske by Branka Migotti. vi+126 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Full text presented in English and Croatian. 320 2017. ISBN 9781784915667. £20.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This book examines Roman funerary material from three Roman cities of the south-western regions of the Roman province of Pannonia (modern-day north-western Croatia): Andautonia (Ščitarjevo near Zagreb), Siscia (Sisak), and Aquae Balissae (Daruvar).

The material chosen reflects the potential of Roman funerary monuments and gravestones for gaining an insight into the historical, social and psychological aspects of Roman provincial society. It enables a perception of the gradual development of the Romano-Pannonian milieu from the 1st to the 4th centuries in its various social aspects: civilian, military, and religious. Within this frame, the focus is on the interaction between the individual and the community as reflected in monologues or even dialogues between the deceased and the living, conveyed through epitaphs and depictions. The deceased more often than not strove to represent themselves on their monuments in a ‘wished-for’ rather than a realistic manner. All of the examples illustrated here reflect in one way or another the Roman obsession with the eternal preservation of the deceased’s memory.

This volume is one of the ‘deliverables’ (dissemination of the results prevalently among the non-professional readers) of the project entitled: Roman funerary monuments of south-western Pannonia in their material, social, and religious context (IP-2014-09-4632), headed by B. Migotti. Its publication was partly supported by the Croatian Science Foundation.

Branca Migotti was born in Zagreb in 1954 and took the following degrees from the Faculty of Philosophy of the Zagreb University: BA in Archaeology and the English Language in 1978, MA in 1985 and PhD in 1992, both in the field of the early Christian archaeology of Dalmatia. She is currently employed at the Division of Archaeology of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts in Zagreb as a scholarly consultant and Head of the Division, and she is a regular collaborator in the postgraduate study programme ‘Roman and Early Christian Archaeology’ at the Faculty of Philosophy in Zagreb. Her main fields of scholarly interests are early Christianity and the funerary archaeology of Pannonia, with a stress on funerary monuments as evidence for social, material and religious aspects of life in the Roman province.
FORTHCOMING: Cloth Seals: An Illustrated Guide to the Identification of Lead Seals Attached to Cloth by Stuart F. Elton. iv+410 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 319 2017. ISBN 9781784915483. £60.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

We are very lucky to have small, contemporary records of history scattered throughout our soil in the form of lead seals. With a couple of notable exceptions, they have largely been ignored by archaeologists and historians, but the recent explosion in the numbers found and recorded has helped to bring their importance and potential to the attention of those interested in our heritage.

This book is intended to be a repository of the salient information currently available on the identification of cloth seals, and a source of new material that extends our understanding of these important indicators of post medieval and early modern industry and trade. It is, primarily, a guide to help with the identification of cloth seals, both those found within and those originating from the United Kingdom.

Most of the extra examples, referenced beneath the images, can be quickly located and viewed through access to the internet.

About the author:
After thirty years as a Government scientist, early retirement allowed the author to indulge his hobby of metal detecting. This soon evolved into a passion for recording and researching the lead seals he and his fellow detectorists discovered. After setting up his own web site, which now contains thousands of such seals, he progressed to helping local museums and then the Museum of London with the re-cataloguing of their cloth seals. Over ten years of this experience and world-wide correspondence with other enthusiasts and experts has led to the production of this book.
FORTHCOMING: The Archaeology of Time Travel Experiencing the Past in the 21st Century edited by Bodil Petersson and Cornelius Holtorf. viii+206 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 303 2017. ISBN 9781784915001. £38.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume explores the relevance of time travel as a characteristic contemporary way to approach the past. If reality is defined as the sum of human experiences and social practices, all reality is partly virtual, and all experienced and practiced time travel is real. In that sense, time travel experiences are not necessarily purely imaginary. Time travel experiences and associated social practices have become ubiquitous and popular, increasingly replacing more knowledge-orientated and critical approaches to the past. Papers discuss the implications and problems associated with the ubiquity and popularity of time travelling and whether time travel is inherently conservative because of its escapist tendencies, or whether it might instead be considered as a fulfilment of the contemporary Experience or Dream Society. Whatever position one may take, time travel is a legitimate and timely object of study and critique because it represents a particularly significant way to bring the past back to life in the present.

About the Editors:
Bodil Petersson is an archaeologist teaching and researching archaeology and heritage studies at Linnaeus University, Sweden. Her research concerns archaeology and time travel, experimental heritage, history of archaeology, the role of archaeology in society, archaeology/heritage and identity, archaeology/heritage and communication, heritage on display, digital heritage and digital archaeology. During the years 2013–2016 she conducted research in a Swedish Science Council-funded project called ArkDIS, Archaeological Information in the Digital Society. Since autumn 2014, she has been Program Director of the Bachelor’s Programme in Heritage in Present and Future Society at Linnaeus University.

Cornelius Holtorf gained his PhD at the University of Wales, UK, in 1998 and was subsequently employed at the University of Gothenburg, the University of Cambridge, the Swedish National Heritage Board in Stockholm, and the University of Lund. Since 2008 he has lived in Kalmar, Sweden, where he is currently a Professor of Archaeology at Linnaeus University, Director of the Graduate School in Contract Archaeology (http://lnu.se/grasca) and the spokesperson of the Centre for Applied Heritage. He is also o-Investigator in the major AHRC funded project on ‘Heritage Futures’ (2015–2019).
FORTHCOMING: Cedar Forests, Cedar Ships Allure, Lore, and Metaphor in the Mediterranean Near East by Sara A. Rich. x+280 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 249 2016. ISBN 9781784913656. £36.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

It is commonly recognized that the Cedars of Lebanon were prized in the ancient world, but how can the complex archaeological role of the Cedrus genus be articulated in terms that go beyond its interactions with humans alone? And to what extent can ancient ships and boats made of this material demonstrate such intimate relations with wood? Drawing from object-oriented ontologies and other ‘new materialisms,’ Cedar Forests, Cedar Ships constructs a hylocentric anti-narrative spreading from the Cretaceous to the contemporary. With a dual focus on the woods and the watercraft, and on the considerable historical overlap between them, the book takes another step in the direction of challenging the conceptual binaries of nature/culture and subject/object, while providing an up-to-date synthesis of the relevant archaeological and historical data.

Binding physical properties and metaphorical manifestations, the fluctuating presence of cedar (forests, trees, and wood) in religious thought is interpreted as having had a direct bearing on shipbuilding in the ancient East Mediterranean. Close and diachronic excavations of the interstices of allure, lore, and metaphor can begin to navigate the (meta) physical relationships between the forested mountain and the forest afloat, and their myriad unique realities.
FORTHCOMING: Eastern Sudan in its Setting The archaeology of a region far from the Nile Valley by Andrea Manzo. viii+82 pages; illustrated throughout with 38 colour plates. Available both in print and Open Access. Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 94. ISBN 9781784915582. £25.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Eastern Sudan, like other regions far away from the Nile valley, has often been overlooked historically on account of a kind of prejudice towards areas lacking in monumental or urban remains or evidence of any literary production. Despite the relevance of the deserts and marginal areas becoming increasingly evident in the last year or so, in Sudan only a few research projects have been conducted in these regions. The ongoing research project in Eastern Sudan by the University ‘L’Orientale’ has provided a preliminary reconstruction of the history of the region from c. 6000 BC to AD 1500. This publication outlines this reconstruction and also considers the more general setting known for the other regions of northeastern Africa. Several issues remain to be clarified and understanding of some phases is still limited, nevertheless it can be safely stated that Eastern Sudan, was in ancient times, as it is now, a crossroads between the Nile basin, Eastern Desert, the Ethio-Eritrean highlands and the Red Sea, represented a crucial region in several respects: the spread of domestic crops and animals towards the Ethio-Eritrean highlands, the spread of the Sahelian crops towards India via the Red Sea and Arabia, as well as the long-distance trade network characterizing northeastern Africa in the 3rd and 2nd millennia BC.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
FORTHCOMING: Continuity and Change in Etruscan Domestic Architecture by Paul M. Miller. xv+272 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 9 colour plates. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784915803. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Etruscan architecture underwent various changes between the later Iron Age and the Archaic period (c. 800-500 BC), as seen in the evidence from several sites. These changes affected the design and style of domestic architecture as well as the use of raw materials and construction techniques. However, based on a supposed linear progression from inferior to superior building materials, explanations and interpretations often portray an architectural transition in Etruria from ‘prehistoric’ to ‘historic’ building types. This perspective has encouraged a rather deterministic, overly simplified and inequitable view of the causes of change in which the replacement of traditional materials with new ones is thought to have been the main factor.

This book aims to reconsider the nature of architectural changes in this period by focussing on the building materials and techniques used in the construction of domestic structures. Through a process of identification and interpretation using comparative analysis and an approach based on the chaîne opératoire perspective, changes in building materials and techniques are examined, with special reference to four key sites: San Giovenale, Acquarossa, Poggio Civitate (Murlo) and Lago dell’Accesa. It is argued that changes occurred in neither a synchronous nor a linear way, but separately and at irregular intervals. In this monograph, they are interpreted as resulting mainly from multigenerational habitual changes, reflecting the relationship between human behaviour and the built and natural environments, rather than choices between old and new materials. Moreover, despite some innovations, certain traditional building techniques and their associated materials continued into the Archaic period, indicating that Etruscan domestic architecture did not undergo a complete transformation, as sometimes asserted or implied in other works. This study of building techniques and materials, while not rejecting the widely held view of a significant Etruscan architectural transition, argues for a more nuanced reading of the evidence and greater recognition of the nature of behavioural change during the period in question.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
FORTHCOMING: L’arte rupestre dell’età dei metalli nella penisola italiana: localizzazione dei siti in rapporto al territorio, simbologie e possibilità interpretative edited by Renata Grifoni Cremonesi & Anna Maria Tosatti. 276 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Italian text. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784915568. £38.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents the proceedings of the conference “L’arte rupestre dell’età dei metalli nella penisola italiana: localizzazione dei siti in rapporto al territorio, simbologie e possibilità interpretative” that took place in Pisa at the Cantiere delle Navi di Pisa under the aegis of the Soprintendenza Archeologica della Toscana and of the University of Pisa on 15th June 2015. The addressed issues were related to the Post-Pleistocene rock art along the Apennine ridge; in recent years more and more evidence has been identified, which is different from the magnificent evidence found in the Alps such as, for example, the well-known Monte Bego and Val Camonica. This evidence, despite various and peculiar features, can be all related to the iconographic field whose main expressions are anthropomorphic figures, weapons, daggers, halberds and several other symbols, all similarly stylised. A peculiarity of these manifestations is their location in small shelters inappropriate for habitation or in places suitable for supervising mountain and territory roads, bearing comparison to evidence from Western Mediterranean coastal areas. An interpretative possibility has emerged: these sites could have been not only ceremonial places, but also spaces linked to the socio-economic fields or perhaps to the power of communities that occupied these territories.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.