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Archaeopress: Publishers of Academic Archaeology
Communicating the researches of thousands of archaeologists worldwide since 1991

Archaeopress is an Oxford-based publisher specialising in academic archaeology.
 
 
NEW: Myths about Rock Art by Robert G. Bednarik. ii+218 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 278 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914745. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914752. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Rather than considering the myths supposedly depicted in the world’s rock art, this book examines the myths archaeologists and others have created about the meanings and significance of rock art. This vast body of opinions dominates our concepts of the principal surviving cultural manifestations of early worldviews. Here these constructs are subjected to detailed analysis and are found to consist largely of misinterpretations. From the misidentification of natural rock markings as rock art to mistaken interpretations, from sensationalist claims to pareidolic elucidations of iconographies, the book presents numerous examples of myths researchers have created about pre-Historic ‘art’. The claims about a connection between rock art and the neuropathologies of its producers are assessed, and the neuroscience of rock art interpretation is reviewed. The book presents a comprehensive catalogue of falsities claimed about palaeoart, and it endeavours to explain how these arose, and how they can be guarded against by recourse to basic principles of science. It therefore represents a key resource in the scientific study of rock art.

About the Author:
Robert G. Bednarik is the Convener and Editor-in-Chief of the International Federation of Rock Art Organisations and is affiliated with Hebei Normal University, China. His principal research interests are the origins of the human ability to create constructs of reality, the evolution of humans, and in a variety of fields providing supplementary information in that quest, including the world’s rock art. He has produced more than 1350 academic publications.
NEW: Bearsden: The Story of a Roman Fort by David Breeze. vi+124 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 296 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914905. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914912. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Roman fort at Bearsden and its annexe, together with areas beyond its defences, were extensively excavated from 1973 to 1982. The report on these excavations was published in 2016. This ‘popular’ account of the discoveries looks at the material recovered from the site in a different way, examining the process of archaeological excavation, the life of the soldiers at the fort based on the results of the excavation as well as material from elsewhere in the Roman Empire, the presentation and interpretation of the bath-house and latrine, and a discussion of possible future work arising out of the excavation. The excavation report was well illustrated with reconstruction drawings and the process of creating these is also discussed.

About the author:
David Breeze excavated Bearsden while working as an inspector of ancient monuments; he later served as Chief Inspector of Ancient Monuments for Scotland. He also led the team which successfully nominated the Antonine Wall as a World Heritage Site in 2008. David Breeze has excavated on both Hadrian’s Wall and the Antonine Wall and written several books on these frontiers, on frontiers elsewhere in the Roman Empire and on the Roman army. He has served as Chairman of the International Congress of Roman Frontier and President of several archaeological societies.
NEW: Statio amoena Sostare e vivere lungo le strade romane edited by Patrizia Basso and Enrico Zanini. viii+264 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. All papers in Italian with English abstracts. Available both in print and Open Access. 295 2016. ISBN 9781784914981. £40.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Roman road system was the main service infrastructure for administrative management, economic operation and defense of the empire.

Along with roads, a key element of this infrastructure were the resting places more or less directly linked with vehiculatio / cursus publicus, or with a system run or controlled by the state to ensure essential services (safe stop, supplies, maintenance of horses and other animals) to those traveling on behalf of the public administration.

New archaeological research and new studies on a rich and diverse body of extra-archaeological sources have recently reported the attention of the international scientific community on the subject of parking places, within the more general theme of the smaller settlements in the Roman world and their evolution in late antiquity and early medieval times.

This volume brings together contributions from scholars from three different generations, starting from different sources and methodological approaches, converging towards the construction of an area of common reflection on a theme still relatively underdeveloped. The goal is to lay the foundation for a deepening of the interdisciplinary debate and to develop new research projects.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Italian description:
Il sistema stradale romano rappresentava la principale infrastruttura di servizio per la gestione amministrativa, il funzionamento economico e la difesa dell’impero.

Insieme con le strade, elemento fondamentale di questa infrastruttura erano i luoghi di sosta più o meno direttamente legati con la vehiculatio/cursus publicus, ovvero con il sistema gestito o controllato dallo stato per assicurare i servizi indispensabili (sosta sicura, rifornimenti, cambio dei cavalli, manutenzione di animali e mezzi) a chi viaggiava per conto della pubblica amministrazione.

Nuove ricerche archeologiche e nuovi studi su un ricco e variegato corpus di fonti extra-archeologiche hanno recentemente riportato l’attenzione della comunità scientifica internazionale sul tema dei luoghi di sosta, all’interno della tematica più generale degli insediamenti minori nel mondo romano e della loro evoluzione in epoca tardoantica e altomedievale.

Questo volume raccoglie contributi di studiosi di tre diverse generazioni che, partendo da sistemi di fonti e da approcci metodologici differenti, convergono verso la costruzione di un terreno di riflessione comune su un tema ancora relativamente poco frequentato. L’obiettivo è quello di gettare le basi per un approfondimento del dibattito interdisciplinare e per lo sviluppo di nuovi progetti di ricerca, più organici e specificamente mirati.
NEW: Parcours d’Orient Recueil de textes offert à Christine Kepinski edited by Bérengère Perello et Aline Tenu. xiv+242 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 9 colour plates. Papers in French and English; all abstracts in both French and English. 294 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914585. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914592. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume contains 23 articles written by 26 authors in order to express the extent of their respect and friendship for Christine Kepinski. The topics addressed in their papers reflect the scientific work of Christine Kepinski, who always promoted interdisciplinary approaches and developed multi-scale analysis from the object itself to regional study. Several papers are directly connected to fieldwork she conducted in Iraq and in Turkey: Haradum and the Middle Euphrates area, Tilbeshar and Kunara. Others are devoted to material study, notably glyptic, seals and sealing practices. Others evoke Syria: she never directed archaeological excavation there but she always integrated Syria in her studies. Finally, some are inspired by Christine Kepinski’s interest for urban life. The chronological time span of the book as well as the various specialisations of the authors clearly show the great value of her scientific background guided by her taste for the Orient.
NEW: Archaeology with Art edited by Helen Chittock and Joana Valdez-Tullett. xx+176 pages; illustrated in black & white throughout with 7 colour plates. 293 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914929. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914936. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Archaeology with Art is the result of a 2013 Theoretical Archaeology Group (TAG) conference session that aimed to merge the perspectives of artists and archaeologists on making art. It explores the relationship between archaeology and art practice, the interactions between materials and practitioners, and the processes that result in the objects and images we call ‘art’. The book offers new approaches to the study of creative practices in archaeology, ranging from experimental investigations to philosophical explorations and contains a diverse set of papers that use insights from contemporary art practice to examine the making of past artworks.

About the editors:
Joana Valdez-Tullett is an archaeologist currently finishing a PhD thesis at the University of Southampton, funded by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT). She has been studying prehistoric art since 2003 in several countries and is currently interested in the social and cultural connections of late prehistoric Atlantic façade, which led to the widespread phenomenon of Atlantic Rock Art.

Helen Chittock is an archaeologist, who has recently finished writing a PhD thesis on decorative practices in Iron Age Britain as the holder of an AHRCfunded Collaborative Doctoral award with the British Museum and University of Southampton. Her wider research interests encompass the study of Celtic Art across northwest Europe.
NEW: Les sépultures mésolithiques de Téviec et Hoedic: révisions bioarchéologiques by Bruno Boulestin. 292 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914967. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914974. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The sites of Teviec and Hoedic, located in Brittany and excavated from 1928 to 1934 by Marthe and Saint-Just Péquart, have yielded twenty-odd graves dating to the end of the Mesolithic and containing almost forty individuals. Nearly a century later, they remain the most important funerary groups ever discovered in France for this period, and two major French Mesolithic sites. Until these days though, despite previous re-examinations of part of the unearthed material, no general review of the field data or of the human remains had ever been carried out, and all the debates concerning the functioning of both cemeteries relied on the interpretations once made by the Péquart and on the anthropological studies by Marcellin Boule and Henri Victor Vallois. This book presents the long lacking bioarchaeological review study of the Teviec and Hoedic graves: the field data have been reconsidered, relying in particular on a large series of pictures taken by the excavators, and the number of dead individuals, their age and sex have been reevaluated using anthropological techniques in accordance with our current knowledge. This review also gives us the occasion to carry out a global reflection on the circumstances under which the dead were grouped during the Mesolithic period and on the society of Atlantic Europe’s last hunters-gatherers as perceived through the filter of their funerary practices.

About the author:
Bruno Boulestin is an anthropologist at the University of Bordeaux, France, member of the research unit “De la Préhistoire à l’Actuel : Culture, Environnement, Anthropologie” (PACEA, UMR 5199 of the CNRS). He is working on the diachronic study of practices around death in ancient societies from both archaeological, bioarchaeological and socio-anthropological data and is specialized in the study of bone modifications and corpse treatments.

French Description:
Fouillés entre 1928 et 1934 par Marthe et Saint-Just Péquart, Téviec et Hoedic, en Bretagne, ont livré une vingtaine de tombes datant de la fin du Mésolithique et contenant près de quarante individus. Presque un siècle plus tard, ils demeurent les ensembles funéraires les plus importants de cette période découverts en France, et parmi les sites majeurs du Mésolithique français. Mais jusque-là, si une partie des matériels mis au jour avaient été réexaminés, ni les données de terrain ni les restes humains n’avaient fait l’objet d’une révision générale, et toutes les discussions sur le fonctionnement des deux cimetières s’appuyaient sur les anciennes interprétations des Péquart et sur les études anthropologiques de Marcellin Boule et Henri Victor Vallois. Cet ouvrage présente le travail de révision bioarchéologique des sépultures de Téviec et Hoedic qui faisait jusqu’à présent défaut : les données de terrain y sont reconsidérées, en s’appuyant en particulier sur une importante série de photographies prises par les fouilleurs, et le nombre de morts, leur âge et leur sexe y sont réévalués en utilisant des techniques anthropologiques conformes au savoir actuel. Cette révision est également l’occasion d’une réflexion générale sur les regroupements des morts au Mésolithique, ainsi que sur la société des derniers chasseurs-cueilleurs d’Europe atlantique telle qu’elle est perçue à travers le filtre de leurs pratiques funéraires.

Bruno Boulestin est anthropologue à l’Université de Bordeaux, France, membre de l’UMR 5199 du CNRS PACEA, « De la Préhistoire à l’Actuel : Culture, Environnement et Anthropologie ». Ses recherches portent sur l’étude diachronique des pratiques autour de la mort dans les sociétés anciennes, à partir à la fois des données archéologiques, bioarchéologiques et de l’anthropologie sociale, et il est spécialisé dans l’étude des modifications osseuses et des traitements du cadavre.
NEW: The White Lady and Atlantis: Ophir and Great Zimbabwe Investigation of an archaeological myth by Jean-Loïc Le Quellec. x+320 pages; highly illustrated in colour throughout. 291 2016. ISBN 9781784914707. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This meticulous investigation, based around a famous rock image, the ‘White Lady’, makes it possible to take stock of the mythical presuppositions that infuse a great deal of scientific research, especially in the case of rock art studies. It also highlights the existence of some surprising bridges between scholarly works and literary or artistic productions (novels, films, comic strips, adventure tales).

The examination of the abbé Breuil’s archives and correspondence shows that the primary motivation of the work he carried out in southern Africa like that of his pupil Henri Lhote in the Tassili was the search for ancient, vanished ‘white’ colonies which were established, in prehistory, in the heart of the dark continent. Both Breuil and Lhote found paintings on African rocks that, in their view, depicted ‘white women’ who were immediately interpreted as goddesses or queens of the ancient kingdoms of which they believed they had found the vestiges. In doing this, they were reviving and nourishing two myths at the same time: that of a Saharan Atlantis for Henri Lhote and, for the abbé, that of the identification of the great ruins of Zimbabwe with the mythical city of Ophir from which, according to the Bible, King Solomon derived his fabulous wealth.

With hindsight we can now see very clearly that their theories were merely a clumsy reflection of the ideas of their time, particularly in the colonial context of the Sahara and in the apartheid of South Africa. Without their knowledge, these two scholars’ scientific production was used to justify the white presence in Africa, and it was widely manipulated to that end. And yet recent studies have demonstrated that the ‘White Lady’ who so fascinated the abbé Breuil was in reality neither white nor even a woman. One question remains: if such an interpenetration of science and myth in the service of politics was possible in the mid-20th century, could it happen today?
NEW: Ceramiche vicinorientali della Collezione Popolani by Stefano Anastasio and Lucia Botarelli. vi+200 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Italian text with English summary. 282 2016 La Collezione Orientale del Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Firenze 3. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914646. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914653. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The volume – in Italian, with an English summary – illustrates the Popolani Collection, that was donated to the Archaeological Museum of Florence by Carlo Popolani, a physician who lived in Damascus in the early 20th century. The collection consists of ancient pottery vessels, terracotta oil-lamps, glazed Islamic tiles, Romano-Byzantine glassware, as well as various objects from the Damascene antique market. In particular, the rich group of glazed tiles is very representative of the typical Mamluk and Ottoman production that flourished in Damascus between the XV and XVIII century.

Italian Description:
Il volume – in italiano con un riassunto in inglese – illustra la Collezione Popolani, donata al Museo Archeologico di Firenze da Carlo Popolani, un medico vissuto a Damasco agli inizi del Novecento. La collezione è composta da vasellame ceramico, lucerne in terracotta, mattonelle invetriate islamiche, vetri di età romana e bizantina, cui si aggiungono vari oggetti acquistati sul mercato antiquario damasceno. Il ricco gruppo di mattonelle invetriate, in particolare, è rappresentativo della produzione mamelucca e ottomana che fiorì a Damasco tra XV e XVIII secolo.

Stefano Anastasio, archeologo, è stato uno dei curatori del primo volume della collezione orientale del Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Firenze. Ha svolto ricerche archeologiche in Siria, Turchia, Giordania. Si occupa in particolare di ceramica di età del Ferro, archeologia dell’architettura, storia della ricerca archeologica nel Vicino Oriente fino alla seconda guerra mondiale.

Lucia Botarelli, archeologa, ha conseguito il titolo di dottore di ricerca presso l’Università di Siena nel 2006, con una tesi sulla ceramica romana e protobizantina da Efestia (Lemnos), proseguendo gli studi con borse presso la Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Atene, l’Università di Heidelberg, la Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa. Ha svolto ricerche in Italia, in Grecia e Giordania.
NEW: Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 1 2016 edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). vi+498 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available both in printed and e-versions. 1 2016 Journal of Greek Archaeology . ISBN 2059-4674-1-2016. Book contents pageBuy Now


Volume 1 2016 Available Now

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Early bird rates for subscriptions to Volume 2 2017 and special offers for subscriptions to Volumes 1 & 2 (2016-2017) are available via a downloadable order form. Offers end 30/11/2016 and 31/12/2016 respectively.

A free 70+ page sampler is available to download in our Open Access section designed to act as an introduction and taster to the scope and style of this new journal. It includes one complete paper and two review articles as well as full contents listings for Volume 1.

About JGA:
An annual, international peer-reviewed English-language journal specializing in synthetic articles and in long reviews. The scope of this journal is Greek archaeology both in the Aegean and throughout the wider Greek-inhabited world, from earliest Prehistory to the Modern Era. Thus we include contributions not just from traditional periods such as Greek Prehistory and the Classical Greek to Hellenistic eras, but also from Roman through Byzantine, Crusader and Ottoman Greece and into the Early Modern period. Outside of the Aegean contributions are welcome covering the Archaeology of the Greeks overseas, likewise from Prehistory into the Modern World. Greek Archaeology for the purposes of the JGA thus includes the Archaeology of the Hellenistic World, Roman Greece, Byzantine Archaeology, Frankish and Ottoman Archaeology, and the Postmedieval Archaeology of Greece and of the Greek Diaspora. the Editorial Board is headed by Professor John Bintliff (Edinburgh University, U.K. and Leiden University, The Netherlands).

For a full mission statement and information on the editorial and advisory board please visit the JGA page of our website.
NEW: Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 1 2016 edited by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph (Heads of Editorial Board). xiv+212 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available in print and Open Access. 1 2016. ISBN 2399-1844-1-2016. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

ISSN 2399-1844 (Print)
ISSN 2399-1852 (online)

Table of Contents:
A Fill from a Potter’s Dump at Morgantina – by Shelley Stone
Trade in Pottery within the Lower Adriatic in the 2nd century BCE – by Carlo De Mitri
Hellenistic Ash Containers from Phoinike (Albania) – by Nadia Aleotti
Pottery Production in Hellenistic Chalkis, Euboea. Preliminary Notes – by Yannis Chairetakis
A Terracotta Figurine of a War Elephant and Other Finds from a Grave at Thessaloniki – by Eleni Lambrothanassi & Annareta Touloumtzidou
Moldmade Bowls from Straton’s Tower (Caesarea Maritima) – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom
Greco-Roman Jewellery from the Necropolis of Qasrawet (Sinai) – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom

ARCHAEOLOGICAL NEWS AND PROJECTS
Panathenaic Amphorae of Hellenistic and Roman Times – by Martin Streicher

BOOK REVIEWS
Shelley C. Stone, Morgantina Studies 6. The Hellenistic and Roman Fine Wares – by Peter J. Stone
Pia Guldager Bilde & Mark L. Lawall (eds.), Pottery, Peoples and Places, BSS 16 – by Kathleen Warner Slane
Susan I. Rotroff, Hellenistic Pottery. The Plain Wares, Agora 33 – by Patricia Kögler

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Complete eJournal available to download now in Open Access - click here to follow the link
FORTHCOMING: The Black Sea in the Light of New Archaeological Data and Theoretical Approaches Proceedings of the 2nd International Workshop on the Black Sea in Antiquity held in Thessaloniki, 18-20 September 2015 edited by Manolis Manoledakis. viii+290 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. 301 2016. ISBN 9781784915100. £50.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Black Sea in the Light of New Archaeological Data and Theoretical Approaches contains 19 papers on the archaeology and ancient history of the Black Sea region, covering a vast period of time, from the Early Iron Age until the Late Roman – Early Byzantine Periods. The majority of papers present archaeological material that has come to light during the last few years, in excavations that have been taking place in several parts of Pontus. Additionally, there are papers that present theoretical approaches to historical issues concerning the Black Sea, its local peoples, cultural aspects or specific sites, while at the end there is as well as a section on the connections between the Black Sea and northern Greece. Thus, the reader of this volume will have the opportunity to be informed about new archaeological results from excavators of some very important Black Sea sites, focus on specific categories of excavation finds or constructions, but also encounter new theories and ideas about social aspects of life in the Black Sea in ancient times. All these indicate once again the impressive acceleration of the archaeological and historical research that is being conducted in the last few decades in the Black Sea littoral, which continues to attract the unfailing interest of scholars from around the world.

About the author: Manolis Manoledakis is Assistant Professor of Classical Archaeology at the International Hellenic University in Thessaloniki. He has also taught at the University of Ioannina, the Democritus University of Thrace and the Hellenic Open University. He has participated in various research programmes and is the director of the International Hellenic University’s excavation in Neo Rysio, Thessaloniki. His research work concentrates on the archaeology and ancient history of the Black Sea as well as central Macedonia, ancient topography and geography of these areas, ancient Greek religion, Greek mythology in its historical context, and ancient Greek painting and vase-painting. He is the director of the two post-graduate programmes of the International Hellenic University’s School of Humanities, the MA in Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean Studies and the MA in the Classical Archaeology and the Ancient History of Macedonia, funded by the Alexander S. Onassis Public Benefit Foundation. Every three years he organizes the International Workshop on the Black Sea in Antiquity at the International Hellenic University.
FORTHCOMING: Social complexity in early medieval rural communities The north-western Iberia archaeological record by Juan Antonio Quirós Castillo. vi+134 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 18 colour plates. 300 2016. ISBN 9781784915087. £32.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This book presents an overview of the results of the research project DESPAMED funded by the Spanish Minister of Economy and Competitiveness. The aim of the book is to discuss the theoretical challenges posed by the study of social inequality and social complexity in early medieval peasant communities in North-western Iberia. Traditional approaches have defined these communities as poor, simple and even nomadic, in the framework of a self-sufficient economy that prioritised animal husbandry over agriculture. This picture has radically changed over the last couple of decades as a result of important research on the archaeology of peasantry and the critical analysis of ninthand tenth-century documentary evidence that show the complexity of these rural societies. These new records are discussed in the light of a new research agenda centred on the analysis of the emergence of villages, the formation of local elites, the creation of socio-political networks and the role of identities in the legitimation of local inequalities. The nine chapters of this book explore the potential and the limits of the archaeological record to tackle social inequality in rural communities. Those considerations have a wider theoretical and methodological potential and are applicable to other regions and chronologies. The different chapters explore local societies through different methodologies and approaches such as food, settlement patterns, social exclusion, consumption patterns and social practices.

In addition, the book introduces some of the most relevant topics studied currently by Iberian Medieval archaeologists, which are not always accessible to an international audience.
FORTHCOMING: Social Identity and Status in the Classical and Hellenistic Northern Peloponnese The Evidence from Burials by Nikolas Dimakis. x+358 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 4 colour plates. 299 2016. ISBN 9781784915063. £40.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Classical and Hellenistic cemeteries can give us more than descriptions and styles of pottery, art and burial architecture; they can speak of people, societies, social conventions as well as of social distinctions. This book aims to employ and illustrate the unique strengths of burial evidence and its contribution to the understanding of social identity and status in the Classical and Hellenistic Northern Peloponnese. By thoroughly reviewing published burials from the regions of Achaia, Arcadia, the Argolid and Cynouria, Corinthia, Elis and Triphylia, spatial and temporal variations which led to a change in definitions of ‘society’ and perceptions of ‘community’ on the basis of shifting reactions to death and the dead are demonstrated. Social roles of men, women, children, elite and non-elite individuals as expressed or negotiated in the mortuary record are explored. Preconceived ideas and stereotypes within and about the Classical and Hellenistic burials are challenged. In spite of the many constraints imposed by the limited previous research, what clearly emerges from this study is the wide degree of variation in what are often loosely termed ‘customary’ or unappealing Classical and Hellenistic burial practices in the Northern Peloponnese. If death was indeed an occasion or ‘opportunity’, then the meaning of this opportunity varied along the shifting dimensions, in time and space, of identity and status.

About the Author: Dr Nikolas Dimakis is a RCH Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. His research on ‘The Archaeology of Child Death: child burials in Classical and Hellenistic Attica’, funded by the Research Centre for the Humanities, examines the interplay of identity, status and emotions within the context of child burials in Attica. He is also a Research Associate inw the ‘THALES – University of Athens – Apollo’s Sanctuary at ancient Halasarna on Kos’ project of excellence. Nikolas received a thorough classical education at the University of Athens, and further pursued postgraduate studies at the University of Nottingham where he obtained his PhD, on prestigious studentships and awards. He has published on Classical and Hellenistic burial customs, deathscapes and terracotta lamps. He has coordinated and participated in international meetings and in many archaeological projects in the Peloponnese, Attica and the Dodecanese.
FORTHCOMING: Epigraphy of Art Ancient Greek Vase-Inscriptions and Vase-Paintings by Dimitrios Yatromanolakis. x+206 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 298 2016. ISBN 9781784914868. £36.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Ancient Greek vase-paintings offer broad-ranging and unprecedented early perspectives on the often intricate interplay of images and texts. By bringing together, for the first time, an international group of leading scholars in classical art and archaeology who have worked on vase-inscriptions, this book investigates both epigraphic technicalities of Attic and non-Attic inscriptions, and their broader, iconographic and sociocultural, significance. The ten chapters in this book propose original and expert methodological approaches to the study of vase-inscriptions and vase-paintings, while also foregrounding the outstanding but not fully examined importance of the area of vase-inscriptions for current research on ancient Greek visual representations. Epigraphy of Art: Ancient Greek Vase-Inscriptions and Vase-Paintings constitutes a major contribution to the fields of Greek epigraphy and classical art and archaeology, and will prove significant for epigraphists, archaeologists, and art-historians interested in the complexities of the interaction of art and text.
FORTHCOMING: Archaeological Research at Caution Bay, Papua New Guinea Cultural, Linguistic and Environmental Setting edited by Thomas Richards, Bruno David, Ken Aplin and Ian J. McNiven. x+200 pages; illustrated throughout with 26 plates in colour. 297 2016. ISBN 9781784915049. £42.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

In 2008 intensive archaeological surveys began at Caution Bay, located 20km to the northwest of Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. This was followed by the excavation of 122 stratified sites in 2009-2010, and detailed analysis of the well preserved and abundant faunal, ceramic and lithic finds has continued ever since. The Caution Bay Archaeology Project is providing new and exciting contributions to western Pacific prehistory. It has radically expanded the known geographic distribution of the Lapita Cultural Complex to include, for the first time, the southern coast of Papua New Guinea; it has established the relationship of Lapita to later cultural expressions in this area; it has pinpointed the time of arrival of domesticated animals along the southern coast of Papua New Guinea and, by inference, on the larger island of New Guinea; it has provided new insights into the impact of resident populations on local terrestrial and marine environments over a 5000 year time period; and perhaps of greatest significance, it has provided a unique opportunity to document, using multiple strands of archaeological evidence, interactions between resident and colonizing populations at a time of cultural transformation c. 2900 years ago.

The first volume of the Caution Bay monographs is designed to introduce the goals of the Caution Bay project, the nature and scope of the investigations and the cultural and natural setting of the study area. To this end a series of chapters are included on the ethnographic and linguistic setting, the present and past natural environment, archaeological surveys of the study area and investigative and analytical methods. These background chapters will be repeatedly referred to in all the other monographs, as foundational reference materials for the broader study.
FORTHCOMING: Castles, Siegeworks and Settlements Surveying the Archaeology of the Twelfth Century edited by Duncan W. Wright Oliver H. Creighton. xii+180 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 288 2016. ISBN 9781784914769. £45.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

This volume comprises thirteen reports detailing fieldwork undertaken by a research project which sought to assess the archaeological evidence of the period of conflict that took place in mid-twelfth-century England popularly known as ‘the Anarchy’. The reign of King Stephen (ad 1135– 54) was characterised by a protracted struggle for power between forces loyal to the crown and those who supported the Angevin claim of his cousin and rival, the Empress Matilda. Alongside a succession of bitter rebellions the war also saw large-scale Scottish invasions into, and occupation of, large parts of northern England as well as border warfare on the marches between England and Wales and a struggle for control of Normandy. While the period is infamous for the proliferation of conflict, castle-building and siege warfare, and for a breakdown of royal government, its characterisation as ‘the Anarchy’ is now challenged by historians, however.

As previous understanding of this tumultuous period had rested almost entirely upon interpretation of written sources, Anarchy? War and Status in Twelfth-Century Landscapes of Conflict was a programme of research which systematically studied the archaeology of mid-twelfth century England for the first time. A major component of the project was the targeted archaeological investigation of selected case study locations across England. Geophysical and topographic surveys were supplemented with archival, documentary and cartographic analyses in order to reveal the character and chronological development of a sample of potential Anarchy-period sites and landscapes. The current volume represents the product of these endeavours, presenting self-contained reports of the sites where these investigations took place, arranged alphabetically.
FORTHCOMING: Stone Carving of the Hospitaller Period in Rhodes: Displaced pieces and fragments by Anna-Maria Kasdagli. ii+212 pages; illustrated through in black & white with 1 colour plate. 287 2016. ISBN 9781784914783. £35.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The work presents 230 stone carvings of the Hospitaller period in Rhodes (1309-1522), which for various reasons are no longer in their original setting. Most of them are cut in local stone or reused antique marble and belong to three broad groups: decorative architectural elements, funerary slabs and markers, and heraldry from secular and religious buildings and fortifications.

Their architectural, artistic, inscriptional and social significance are discussed, providing insights into the way cultural influences from different parts of Western Europe were introduced, maintained and adapted in an Eastern Mediterranean context by the Knights of Saint John, other Westerners the presence of the Order encouraged to travel to Rhodes and even live there and, occasionally, by wealthy Greeks. The study includes a full catalogue and touches upon recent archaeological activity in the historic centre of the town of Rhodes.
FORTHCOMING: Hillforts of the Cheshire Ridge by Dan Garner et al. xx+263 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 277 2016. ISBN 9781784914660. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Cheshire hillforts are some of the most conspicuous features of the prehistoric landscape in Cheshire. Outside of archaeological circles, however, they have almost become ‘lost’ in the landscape and in the awareness of the wider community, due to land use changes in the centuries following their construction. Various studies have been undertaken on the hillforts of Cheshire (see Chapter 2), but even so, there is limited information about these sites in terms of chronology, function, occupation history, economy and status. Considering that these hillforts stand as such important elements of the prehistory of the region, the lack of information about them is a major gap in our understanding.

The Habitats and Hillforts of Cheshire’s Sandstone Ridge Landscape Partnership Project was focussed on six of the Cheshire hillforts and their surrounding habitats and landscapes. It aimed to develop understanding of the chronology and role of the hillforts, raise awareness of these special assets and the issues affecting them, improve their condition and their physical linkages with the surrounding landscape and encourage more people to enjoy them and to take an active role in their management.

The Habitats and Hillforts Project was funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund through the Landscape Partnership Scheme programme, which focusses on areas of distinctive landscape character. The Project was based on the Cheshire Sandstone Ridge, which runs north to south in Central Cheshire and has been identified as a distinct character area by the Countryside Character volume for the Northwest of England (Countryside Commission 1998: 145–152). This area formed the limits for an EU LIFE ECOnet network which was given the title of the Sandstone Ridge ECOnet Partnership (SREP), formed as part of an initiative by Cheshire County Council (CCC) in 2005.
FORTHCOMING: Brochs and the Empire: The impact of Rome on Iron Age Scotland as seen in the Leckie broch excavations by Euan W. MacKie. +122 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 274 2016. ISBN 9781784914400. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The excavation of the Leckie Iron Age broch in Stirlingshire, Scotland, took place during the 1970’s after the author had been asked to organise the work by a local archaeological society. At that stage the author did not consider – despite its location – that the site might vividly reflect the expansion of the Roman Empire into southern Scotland in the late first century AD. For various reasons the final report was not written until about thirty years after the fieldwork finished and by then the quality and significance of the Roman finds was much better understood, thanks to the analysis of them by experts. Many of them seemed like gifts to the broch chief, despite the clear evidence of the violent destruction of the broch at a later date. The Roman author Tacitus gave a detailed account of Governor Agricola’s campaigns in southern Scotland and pointed out that he sometimes tried to make friends with local chiefs before invading their territories, to avoid un-necessary casualties. This also applied to the first Roman naval excursion up the west coast and explains the evidence from Dun Ardtreck, Skye, excavated in the 1960’s. This site was also destroyed later and this could reflect the later hostile voyage of the navy after the battle of Mons Graupius which occurred after a few years of campaigning. Thus Rome’s accounts can allow one to understand the history of some native sites much more vividly.
FORTHCOMING: Cedar Forests, Cedar Ships Allure, Lore, and Metaphor in the Mediterranean Near East by Sara A. Rich. x+280 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 249 2016. ISBN 9781784913656. £36.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

It is commonly recognized that the Cedars of Lebanon were prized in the ancient world, but how can the complex archaeological role of the Cedrus genus be articulated in terms that go beyond its interactions with humans alone? And to what extent can ancient ships and boats made of this material demonstrate such intimate relations with wood? Drawing from object-oriented ontologies and other ‘new materialisms,’ Cedar Forests, Cedar Ships constructs a hylocentric anti-narrative spreading from the Cretaceous to the contemporary. With a dual focus on the woods and the watercraft, and on the considerable historical overlap between them, the book takes another step in the direction of challenging the conceptual binaries of nature/culture and subject/object, while providing an up-to-date synthesis of the relevant archaeological and historical data.

Binding physical properties and metaphorical manifestations, the fluctuating presence of cedar (forests, trees, and wood) in religious thought is interpreted as having had a direct bearing on shipbuilding in the ancient East Mediterranean. Close and diachronic excavations of the interstices of allure, lore, and metaphor can begin to navigate the (meta) physical relationships between the forested mountain and the forest afloat, and their myriad unique realities.
FORTHCOMING: Disponibilidad y explotación de materias primas líticas en la costa de Norpatagonia (Argentina) Un enfoque regional by Jimena Alberti. xxii+196 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text. Available both in print and Open Access. South American Archaeology Series 27. ISBN 9781784914806. £40.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The present book aims to study the use of lithic raw materials on the coast of the San Matías gulf (Río Negro, Argentina) during the middle and late Holocene. The understanding of this aspect of human group technology is of fundamental importance as the main archaeological materials recovered at the surface sites of the study area are lithic artefacts made from different types of rock. Thus, understanding how these were selected, reduced and finally discarded will contribute to the understanding of the way of life of the hunter-gatherer groups that inhabited the area during this period.

Spanish Description:
El presente libro tiene como objetivo estudiar el uso de las materias primas líticas en la costa del golfo San Matías (Río Negro, Argentina) durante el Holoceno medio y tardío. El entendimiento de este aspecto de la tecnología de los grupos humanos es de fundamental importancia ya que los principales materiales arqueológicos recuperados en los sitios de superficie del área de estudio son los artefactos líticos fabricados a partir de diferentes tipos de rocas. Así, entender la forma en que éstas fueron seleccionadas, reducidas y finalmente descartadas aportará a la comprensión del modo de vida de los grupos cazadores-recolectores que habitaron el área en el período mencionado.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
NEW: Managing Archaeological Collections in Middle Eastern Countries A Good Practice Guide by Dianne Fitzpatrick. x+115 pages; black & white throughout. 290 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914882. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914899. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Collections management practice is an often ignored aspect of archaeological research and salvage activities in many Middle Eastern countries, yet literally thousands of artefacts are recovered every year with no real strategies for managing them sustainably into the future. In this guide, archaeologist Dianne Fitzpatrick sees archaeological collections management not in terms of a last-ditch effort to solve on-site storage crises and preservation problems at the end of a project, but as a means of integrating achievable good-practice strategies into research designs and site management plans from the start, or for that matter, at any time that assist project directors and local Antiquities Directorates.

Strategies designed to protect and preserve ensure the cultural significance and research potential of artefacts is maintained throughout the archaeological process and encourages those creating, managing and preserving archaeological collections to work toward the same goals. Merging together conservation-led principles with current on-site practice in a practical manner, Managing Archaeological Collections in Middle Eastern Countries aims to be a good practice standard or checklist.

About the Author:
Dianne Fitzpatrick completed her Bachelor of Archaeology at La Trobe University in Melbourne. Her studies allowed her to explore the discovery of the historic and prehistoric past by studying archaeological objects created by our ancestors. To better engage in the archaeological process she studied contemporary field archaeology at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, zooarchaeology and ancient technologies. Her studies also focused on the archaeology of ancient civilizations examining the methods and theories used to generate archaeological knowledge. The skills she developed allowed her to critically evaluate the way to set up research projects for collecting, analysing artefacts and interpreting material remains which underpinned her doctoral research at the University of Melbourne completed in 2015. She has worked as an excavator and independent researcher at Neolithic, Neo-Assyrian, Hellenistic and Bronze Age/Iron Age archaeological sites in Israel, Jordan, Syria and Turkey.
NEW: Forensic Archaeology The Application of Comparative Excavation Methods and Recording Systems by Laura Evis. viii+240 pages; illustrated in black & white throughout. 289 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914844. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914851. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Archaeological excavation has been widely used in the recovery of human remains and other evidence in the service of legal cases for many years. However, established approaches will in future be subject to closer scrutiny following the announcement by the Law Commission in 2011 that expert evidence will in future be subject to a new reliability-based admissibility test in criminal proceedings. This book evaluates current archaeological excavation methods and recording systems – focusing on those used in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australasia, and North America – in relation to their use in providing forensic evidence, and their ability to satisfy the admissibility tests introduced by the Law Commission, and other internationally recognised bodies.

In order to achieve this aim, two analyses were undertaken. First, attention was directed to understanding the origins, development, underpinning philosophies, and current use of archaeological excavation methods and recording systems in the regions selected for study. A total of 153 archaeological manuals/guidelines were examined from archaeological organisations operating in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Northern Ireland, Scotland, the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. This research indicated that the Stratigraphic Excavation method and Single Context Recording system, the Demirant Excavation method and Standard Context Recording system, the Quadrant Excavation method and Standard Context Recording system, and the Arbitrary Level Excavation method and Unit Level Recording system were the approaches most often used to excavate and record graves.

Second, the four defined methodological approaches were assessed experimentally, using a grave simulation of known properties to test the excavation, recording, and interpretation of material evidence, the definition of stratigraphic contexts, and understanding of stratigraphic relationships. The grave simulation also provided opportunities to measure archaeologists’ narratives of the grave formation process against the known properties of the grave simulation, and to assess whether archaeological experience had any impact on evidence recovery rates.

Fifty repeat excavations were conducted. The results obtained from this experimental study show that the Quadrant Excavation method and Standard Context Recording system was the most consistent, efficient, and reliable archaeological approach to use to excavate and record clandestine burials and to formulate interpretation-based narratives of a grave’s formation sequence. In terms of the impact that archaeological experience had on evidence recovery rates, archaeological experience was found to have little bearing upon the recovery of evidence from the grave simulation.

It is suggested that forensic archaeologists use the Quadrant Excavation method and Standard Context Recording system to excavate and record clandestine burials. If this approach is unable to be used, the Demirant Excavation method and Standard Context Recording system, or the Stratigraphic Excavation method and Single Context Recording system should be used. Both of these aforementioned techniques proved to be productive in terms of material evidence recovery and the identification and definition of stratigraphic contexts. The Arbitrary Level Excavation method and Unit Level Recording system should not be used, as this method proved to have an extremely poor evidence recovery rate and destroyed the deposition sequence present within the simulated grave.
NEW: The Maritime Traditions of the Fishermen of Socotra, Yemen by Julian Jansen van Rensburg. x+186 pages; illustrated in black & white throughout. 286 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914820. £33.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914837. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Socotra archipelago lies approximately 135 nautical miles (Nm) northeast of Cape Guardafui, Somalia and 205Nm south of Rās Fartaq, Yemen. The archipelago is made up of four main islands, Socotra, cAbd al-Kūri, Samḥa and Darsa, of which Socotra is the largest and most densely populated. The population of Socotra is divided between the interior pastoralists and the coastal fishermen and traders. While scholarly studies concerning the interior population abound, the fishermen of Socotra have received comparatively less attention and little about them or their traditions is known. This research seeks to address this balance by analysing the Socotri maritime traditions and addressing the question as to how social, environmental and technological influences have shaped the maritime traditions of the fishermen of Socotra. The primary data forming the basis of this book is author’s ethnographic fieldwork carried out on the islands of Socotra and Samḥa between 2009 and 2010. This data is incorporated within a transdisciplinary framework that looks at some of the essential factors of historical, archaeological and environmental evidence to gain a holistic insight into the spatial and temporal factors affecting the maritime traditions of the fishermen.

About the author: Julian Jansen van Rensburg received his doctorate in September 2013 from the Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies at the University of Exeter. His thesis examined how local, regional and global influences have, over time, influenced the traditions and technologies of the maritime communities on the island of Socotra, Yemen. This research formed part of the MARES Project, a multi-disciplinary, multi-period project focusing on the maritime traditions of the peoples of the Red Sea and Arabian-Persian Gulf. Following his doctorate he was awarded funding from the Honor Frost Foundation to undertake research into the tangible and intangible maritime heritage of the fishing communities in Anfeh, Lebanon. This research project included a maritime ethnographic workshop for Lebanese students and members of local NGOs. The workshop was used to train the participants in quantitative and qualitative techniques of maritime ethnography and traditional vessel recording. This research formed a part of the wider Anfeh Project being run by the University of Balamand. Subsequently, Julian received a National Geographic grant to study rock art on Socotra, the results of which are part of his current research as a Dahlem Research School POINT Fellow within the Excellence Cluster Topoi. He holds positions on the steering committee for the British Foundation for the Study of Arabia and the Executive Committee of the Friends of Socotra. He is also an Assistant Editor of the Proceedings for the Study of Arabia. His research interests include underwater archaeology, maritime ethnography and the typology of traditional boats of the Near East, rock art studies, GIS applications in archaeology, landscape archaeology, island and coastal archaeology, Indian Ocean trade networks in Antiquity and the Islamic Period, and cultural heritage management.
NEW: Le décor architectural artuqide en pierre de Mardin placé dans son contexte regional: contribution à l’histoire du décor géométrique et végétal du Proche-Orient des XIIe-XVe siècles by Deniz Beyazit. xx+552 pages; illustrated throughout with 302 colour plates. French text. 285 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911225. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911232. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Artuqids were one of the successor dynasties that rose to power in the aftermath of the eleventh-twelfth century invasion of Western and Central Asia by the Seljuq Turks. While the political power of the Artuqids was limited to the Diyar Bakr, a small region in northern Jazira corresponding to Southeastern Turkey, their artistic legacy is noteworthy. The many surviving Artuqid monuments, built over three hundred years (early 12th – early 15th century), and their decoration exemplify the mastery of stone carving which is reflected in intricate designs and motifs. Mardin, alongside other Artuqid centers such as Amid, Mayyafariqin and Hisn Kayfa, was set within a larger zone of diverse Christian and Islamic artistic traditions.

This book defines Mardin’s artistic context in relation to the other Artuqid centers, as well as the neighboring zones that encompass Anatolia, the Caucasus, Iran, Iraq, Syria and Egypt. During the Artuqid period an original style developed in Mardin and the Diyar Bakr, which itself was rooted in a well-established local school of stone carving. Connected with Christian traditions found in the Syriac Tur ‘Abdin and in Late Antique Syria, the decoration also compares with that of monuments in Armenia and Georgia, and resonates with artistic practices seen in areas controlled by the regional Muslim powers of the time: the Zangids, Ayyubids, Mameluks, Great and Anatolian Seljuqs and the Ilkhanids. The Artuqid buildings reflect the spirit of the time, when the Jazira served as an artistic platform, fostering the circulation of ideas that led to new inspiration, and open-minded rulers and patrons, curious and receptive to new creations, stimulated the creative efforts of architects, stone carvers and craftsmen. The decorated monuments also attest to the existence of significant economic wealth and the need to commission sophisticated buildings that magnified the political and social status of the ruling elite’s.

French description:
Les Artuqides comptaient parmi les nombreuses dynasties successeurs (« successor states ») qui sont arrivées simultanément au pouvoir à la suite de l’invasion des Turcs Seljuqides dont les armées avaient conquis, au cours des XIe et XIIe siècles, de vastes territoires s’étendant des limites de la Chine occidentale à la Méditerranée orientale. Bien que le pouvoir politique des Artuqides fût limité à une petite région, le Diyar Bakr – au nord de la Jazira correspondant à la Turquie du sud-est – l’héritage artistique qu’ils ont légué est pourtant remarquable. Les nombreux monuments artuqides et leur décor architectural, créés sur une période de trois siècles (du début du XIIe au début du XVe siècle), témoignent de la maîtrise de la sculpture et de la taille de pierre qui se reflète dans des motifs et compositions complexes. Mardin, à l’instar des autres centres artuqides d’Amid, Mayyafariqin et Hisn Kayfa, se situe dans une zone englobant diverses traditions artistiques chrétiennes et musulmanes.

Ce livre détermine le contexte artistique de Mardin par rapport aux autres centres artuqides, ainsi qu’aux zones voisines comprenant l’Anatolie, le Caucase, l’Iran, l’Iraq, la Syrie et l’Egypte. Durant la période artuqide, un style original se développe à Mardin ainsi qu’au Diyar Bakr. Ce style puise lui-même sa source dans une école locale bien établie de tailleur de pierre. Bien qu’étant liée aux précédentes traditions chrétiennes du Tur ‘Abdin syriaque et à la Syrie de l’Antiquité tardive, la décoration se compare également avec les monuments de l’Arménie et de la Géorgie, et résonne avec les traditions artistiques observées dans les régions contrôlées par les pouvoirs régionaux musulmans de l’époque : les Zangides, Ayyubides, Mamelukes, Grands Seldjuqides, Seldjuqides d’Anatolie et les Ilkhanides. Les monuments artuqides reflètent l’esprit d’une époque durant laquelle la Jazira était une sorte de plateforme artistique qui favorisait la circul
NEW: An Urban Geography of the Roman World, 100 BC to AD 300 by J. W. Hanson. vii+818 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 284 2016 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 18. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914721. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914738. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Although there have been numerous studies of individual cities or groups of cities, there has never been a study of the urbanism of the Roman world as a whole, meaning that we have been poorly informed not only about the number of cities and how they were distributed and changed over time, but also about their sizes and populations, monumentality, and civic status. This book provides a new account of the urbanism of the Roman world between 100 BC and AD 300. To do so, it draws on a combination of textual sources and archaeological material to provide a new catalogue of cities, calculates new estimates of their areas and uses a range of population densities to estimate their populations, and brings together available information about their monumentality and civic status for the first time. This evidence demonstrates that, although there were relatively few cities, many had considerable sizes and populations, substantial amounts of monumentality, and held various kinds of civic status. This indicates that there was significant economic growth in this period, including both extensive and intensive economic growth, which resulted from an influx of wealth through conquest and the intrinsic changes that came with Roman rule (including the expansion of urbanism). This evidence also suggests that there was a system that was characterized by areas of intense urban demand, which was met through an efficient system for the extraction of necessity and luxury goods from immediate hinterlands and an effective system for bringing these items from further afield. The disruption of these links seems to have put this system under considerable strain towards the end of this period and may have been sufficient to cause its ultimate collapse. This appears to have been in marked contrast to the medieval and early modern periods, when urbanism was more able to respond to changes in supply and demand.

About the author:
J. W. Hanson is a historian and archaeologist specialising in the urbanism and economy of the Greek and Roman world. He holds a B.A. in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History from the University of Oxford, as well as an M.St. in Classical Archaeology and a D.Phil in Archaeology from the same institution. He is now a Research Associate at the University of Colorado, Boulder, working for the Social Reactors project.
NEW: The Small Finds and Vessel Glass from Insula VI.1 Pompeii: Excavations 1995-2006 by H.E.M. Cool. xii+304 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 283 2016 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 17. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914523. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914530. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This report presents the vessel glass and small finds found during the excavations between 1995 and 2006 that took place in Insula VI.1, Pompeii (henceforth VI.1). More than 5,000 items are discussed, and the size of the assemblage has meant that the publication is in two parts. The book you are reading consists of the discussion with associated illustrations and the catalogue entries for a subset of the data. The other half is available digitally on the Archaeological Data Service. That part contains the full catalogue of the material recorded, additional contextual information, and details about the initial excavations of the insula during the eighteenth century.
NEW: Studies on the Vignettes from Chapter 17 of the Book of the Dead I: The Image of mś.w Bdšt in Ancient Egyptian Mythology by Mykola Tarasenko. viii+151 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 281 2016 Archaeopress Egyptology 16. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914509. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914516. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Among the numerous deities in the ancient Egyptian mythology, whose nature and function are still vague and obscure, are mś.w Bdšt – ‘Children of Weakness’. These beings are twice mentioned in the Book of the Dead chapter 17. The text fragments contain two local versions of the myth with mś.w Bdšt – Hermopolitan (Urk. V: Abs. 1), and Heliopolitan (Urk. V: Abs. 22). Since the last text describes the combat between Re and the ‘Children of Weakness’, the same is likely to be reflected on the vignette, which depicts the battle of Re against mmś.w Bdšt, metaphorically shown in the form of a serpent. This book is a comprehensive study of the ‘Children of Weakness’ myth and the scene depicting the cat, cutting off the head of the serpent under the branches of the išd-tree found on the number of Book of the Dead chapter 17 vignettes.

About the Author:
Dr Mykola Tarasenko is a Senior Fellow at the А. Yu. Krymskyi Institute of Oriental Studies of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyev. His research area is focused on the studies of illustrative tradition of the Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, and specifically the vignettes of spell 17. In 2007 he was awarded the fellowship grant of the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst (DAAD) for the study course at the ‘Bonn Book of the Dead Project’ (Bonn Totenbuchprojekt). In 2014 he won the fellowship grant of the Stiftungsfonds für Postgraduates der Ägyptologie (Vienna, Austria). The current book is the result of his work within these Fellowships Projects.
NEW: Robert Adam’s London by Frances Sands. xviii+142 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 279 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914622. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914639. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The iconic eighteenth-century architect Robert Adam was based in London for more than half of his life and made more designs for this one city than anywhere else in the world. This book reviews a wide variety of his designs for London, highlighting lesser-known buildings as well as familiar ones. Each of Adam’s projects explored in this book is plotted on Horwood’s map of London (1792-99), enabling the reader to recognise Adam’s work as they move around the city, as well as to envisage London as if more of his ingenious designs had been executed or survived demolition.

About the Author:
Dr Frances Sands is Curator of Drawings and Books at Sir John Soane’s Museum.
NEW: Archaeological excavations in Moneen Cave, the Burren, Co. Clare Insights into Bronze Age and post-medieval life in the west of Ireland by Marion Dowd. x+98 pages; illustrated throughout with 39 colour plates. 276 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914547. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914554. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In 2011, cavers exploring a little-known cave on Moneen Mountain in County Clare in the west of Ireland discovered part of a human skull, pottery and an antler implement. An archaeological excavation followed, leading to the discovery of large quantities of Bronze Age pottery, butchered animal bones and oyster shells. The material suggests that Moneen Cave was visited intermittently as a sacred place in the Bronze Age landscape. People climbed the mountain, squeezed through the small opening in the cave roof, dropped down into the chamber, and left offerings on a large boulder that dominates the internal space. The excavation also resulted in the recovery of the skeletal remains of an adolescent boy who appears to have died in the cave in the 16th or 17th century. Scientific analyses revealed he had endured periods of malnutrition and ill health, providing insight into the hardships faced by many children in post-medieval Ireland.

About the author:
Dr. Marion Dowd is a Lecturer in Prehistoric Archaeology at the Institute of Technology Sligo, Ireland. For two decades her research has focussed on the human use of caves in Ireland, and specifically the role of caves in prehistoric ritual and religion. She has directed numerous archaeological excavations in Irish caves, and has lectured and published widely on the subject. Her first book, The Archaeology of Caves in Ireland (Oxbow Books, 2015), won the Tratman Award 2015 and the Current Archaeology Book of the Year 2016. This current book is the result of excavations she directed in Moneen Cave, with a team composed of both archaeologists and cavers.