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Archaeopress: Publishers of Academic Archaeology
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All titles published by Archaeopress in the British Archaeological Reports Series are available to order from Hadrian Books Ltd.

NEW: Once upon a Time in the East The Chronological and Geographical Distribution of Terra Sigillata and Red Slip Ware in the Roman East by Philip Bes. viii+196 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 158 2015 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 6. ISBN 9781784911201. £40.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

In this book Philip Bes summarises the results of his PhD thesis (Catholic University of Leuven) on the analysis of production trends and complex, quantified distribution patterns of the principal traded sigillatas and slipped table wares in the Roman East, from the early Empire to Late Antiquity (e.g. Italian Sigillata, Eastern Sigillata A, B and C, Çandarli ware, Phocean Red Slip Ware/LRC, Cypriot Red Slip Ware/LRD and African Red Slip Wares). He draws on his own work in Sagalassos and Boeotia, as well as an exhaustive review of archaeological publications of ceramic data. The analysis compares major regional blocks, documenting coastal as well as inland sites, and offers an interpretation of these complex data in terms of the economy and possible distribution mechanisms.
NEW: Du Mont Liban aux Sierras d’Espagne Sols, eau et sociétés en montagne: Autour du projet franco-libanais CEDRE “Nahr Ibrahim” edited by Romana Harfouche and Pierre Poupet. ii+284 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. French text. 157 2015. ISBN 9781784911355. £44.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Soil and water management is a major stake for the current Mediterranean countries. It was also an important challenge for past societies, especially since the Neolithic and the early well-established farming communities. the mastery of these vital resources accompanied the complexification of social organization. It also widely contributed, if not to impulse it, at least to structure it. This volume presents the results of the CEDRE multidisciplinary project NAHR IBRAHIM that was led on the Lebanese mountain centered around the Nahr Ibrahim valley (the famous Adonis valley in Antiquity), in the hinterland of the ancient city of Byblos. the mountain has been under-researched by archaeology and history due to the attractiveness of the prestigious coastal phoenician cities. The history of settlement patterns and the construction of agricultural mountainous landscapes since the Early Bronze Age is examined with comparisons from other regions surrounding the Mediterranean Basin.

French description:
En préambule à la publication d’un travail collectif international, franco-libanais, qui a été conduit pendant deux années (2010-2012), il faut replacer ce travail dans un monde en évolution constante et accélérée, où les sociétés sont de plus en plus exclusives. En entreprenant une recherche sur la construction des paysages ruraux et sur la maîtrise des sols et de l’eau, au cours de l’histoire, l’équipe internationale a voulu montrer la richesse des savoirs et des pratiques de sociétés agricoles qui, loin d’être immobiles et repliées sur elles-mêmes dans leurs montagnes, sont innovantes par bien des aspects, capables d’effectuer des progrès réfléchis.

Le projet dans son ensemble devait satisfaire à trois questions : quel projet global a été élaboré et avec quels partenaires ? quelles disciplines spécialisées choisies parmi les Sciences naturelles (Sciences de la Terre et de la Vie) ainsi que parmi les Sciences humaines (Sciences de l’Homme et des Sociétés) ont été sollicitées en fonction des objectifs fixés ? quel périmètre a été défini pour l’étude et selon quels critères ?

Au regard des recherches qui ont été conduites, des stratégies et des missions, nous devons expliciter les résultats obtenus et les évolutions remarquables par rapport à l’état des lieux précédent de la connaissance, mais aussi les perspectives scientifiques pour l’avenir, dans le contexte régional et national du Liban, mais aussi au niveau international. C’est pourquoi, dans le cadre de la publication des résultats de l’équipe franco-libanaise, nous avons fait appel à des équipes et à des chercheurs oeuvrant dans d’autres espaces montagnards, proches de la Méditerranée et comparables sur bien des points à la montagne libanaise, ainsi qu’à des chercheurs travaillant plus spécifiquement sur l’histoire des sols et de l’exploitation de l’eau.
NEW: Prepared for Eternity A study of human embalming techniques in ancient Egypt using computerised tomography scans of mummies by Robert Loynes. xx+249 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 7 colour plates. 156 2015 Archaeopress Egyptology 9. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911102. £43.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911119. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication brings together personal analyses of sixty CT scans of ancient Egyptian human mummies collected from many museums throughout the UK and continental Europe. The effect is that of performing ‘virtual autopsies’ (‘virtopsies’) allowing techniques of mummification to be examined. The historical age of the mummies ranges from the Middle Kingdom to the Roman Period. Several new observations are made regarding the preparation of mummies and confirmation of previously described themes is tempered by the observation of variations probably indicating individual workshop practices. The work presents a springboard for further detailed research on the subject.

About the Author:
Robert Loynes is an Orthopaedic Surgeon who, after retirement, carried out the research described in this publication and was subsequently awarded a PhD in Egyptology. His lifelong interest in Egyptology and a lifetime career using medical images fired his passion for the subject of mummy research specifically using CT scans as a tool.
NEW: The late prehistory of Malta: Essays on Borġ in-Nadur and other sites edited by Davide Tanasi and Nicholas C. Vella. vii+199 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 155 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911270. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911287. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Borġ in-Nadur, on the south-east coast of the island of Malta, is a major multi-period site, with archaeological remains that span several thousand years. In the course of the Late Neolithic, the steep-sided ridge was occupied by a large megalithic temple complex that was re-occupied in the succeeding Bronze Age. In the course of the second millennium BC, the ridge was heavily fortified by a massive wall to protect a settlement of huts. Excavations were carried out here in 1881 and again in 1959. This volume brings together a number of contributions that report on those excavations, providing an exhaustive account of the stratigraphy, the pottery, the lithic assemblages, the bones, and the molluscs. Additional studies look at other sites in Malta and in neighbouring Sicily in an effort to throw light on the late prehistory of the south-central Mediterranean at a period when connections with regions near and far were increasing. The volume forms a companion to another monograph which concentrated on the temple remains at Borġ in-Nadur (D. Tanasi and N. C. Vella (eds), Site, artefacts and landscape: prehistoric Borġ in-Nadur, Malta. Praehistorica Mediterranea 3. Monza: Polimetrica, 2011).

About the Editors:
Davide Tanasi (Ph.D.) is Professor of Archaeology at Arcadia University, The College of Global Studies - Arcadia Sicily Center. His research interests include Mediterranean prehistory, island archaeology, archaeometry of ancient ceramics, computer graphics in archaeology, and digital communication of cultural heritage. He has authored a hundred scientific papers in these fields and produced 3D documentaries about Sicilian archaeology and cultural heritage. His publications include La Sicilia e l’arcipelago maltese nell’eta del Bronzo Medio (Palermo, 2008) and Site, Artefacts and Landscape: Prehistoric Borġ in-Nadur, Malta with Nicholas C. Vella (Monza, 2011). He is editor of the international scientific journal Open Archaeology (De Gruyter) and since 2012, he has been directing the Field School in Archaeology of Arcadia University in Sicily.

Nicholas C. Vella is Senior Lecturer and Head of the Department of Classics and Archaeology at the University of Malta, and works on Mediterranean history and archaeology. He has co-edited another volume of essays on Malta’s late prehistory called Site, Artefacts and Landscape: Prehistoric Borġ in- Nadur, Malta with Davide Tanasi (Monza, 2011) and contributed, with him, to the Cambridge Prehistory of the Bronze and Iron Age Mediterranean edited by P. van Dommelen and B. Knapp (Cambridge, 2014). He edits the Malta Archaeological Review, and co-directs excavations at the Żejtun Roman Villa (Malta). He is also co-investigator of the FRAGSUS project, funded by the European Research Council, that is examining the environmental and cultural background of prehistoric Malta.
NEW: 'Middle Saxon' Settlement and Society: The Changing Rural Communities of Central and Eastern England by Duncan Wright. vi+205 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 154 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911256. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911263. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book explores the experiences of rural communities who lived between the seventh and ninth centuries in central and eastern England. Combining archaeology with documentary, place-name and topographic evidences, it shows the way in which the settlements in which people lived provide a unique insight into social, economic and political conditions in ‘Middle Saxon’ England. The material derived from excavations within currently-occupied rural settlements represents a particularly informative dataset, and when combined with other evidence illustrates that the seventh to ninth centuries was a period of fundamental social change that impacted rural communities in significant and lasting ways. The transformation of settlement character was part of a more widespread process of landscape investment during the ‘Middle Saxon’ period, as rapidly stratifying social institutions began to manifest power and influence through new means. Such an analysis represents a significant departure from the prevailing scholarly outlook of the early medieval landscape, which continues to posit that the countryside of England remained largely unchanged until the development of historic villages from the ninth century onward. In this regard, the evidence presented by this book from currently-occupied rural settlements provides substantial backing to the idea that many historic villages emerged as part of a two-stage process which began during the ‘Middle Saxon’ period. Whilst it was only following subsequent change that recognisable later village plans began to take shape, key developments between the seventh and ninth centuries helped articulate the form and identity of rural centres, features that in many instances persisted throughout the medieval period and into the present day.
NEW: Quarrying in Western Norway An archaeological study of production and distribution in the Viking period and Middle Ages by Irene Baug. xii+176 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 8 colour plates. 153 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911027. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911034. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The theme of this study is the large-scale exploitation of different stone products that took place in Norway during the Viking Age and the Middle Ages (c. AD 800–1500). The research is based on analyses of two different quarry landscapes in Western Norway: the quernstone quarries in Hyllestad, Sogn og Fjordane, and the bakestone quarries in Ølve and Hatlestrand, Hordaland. The centre of attention is the production of utility artefacts: quernstones, millstones and bakestones, and more symbolic products such as stone crosses. The production landscapes are also assessed within wider socio-economic perspectives related to organisation, control and landownership. Following the different products, from production in the quarries to their distribution and use in both urban and rural contexts in Northern Europe, questions regarding trade and networks are addressed. The material is also discussed and assessed in wider methodological and theoretical contexts, and an aim is to illuminate the control and right of use related to the quarrying, also to examine the groups of actors behind production as well as distribution and trade.
NEW: Romans, Rubbish, and Refuse The archaeobotanical assemblage of Regione VI, insula I, Pompeii by Charlene Alexandria Murphy. xii+137 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 1 colour plate. 152 2015 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 8. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911157. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911164. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Although world-renowned, Pompeii, the first Roman site to be excavated and one of the most visited and best-studied archaeological sites in the world, still has unanswered questions to yield, especially in terms of its long-term development from pre-Roman times. The extensive excavations (1995–2006) by the Anglo-American Project in Pompeii (AAPP) has provided a rare insight into chronological change within the city of Pompeii. This research was significant as an insula block within the city of Pompeii had never previously been excavated in its entirety. The analysis of all the recovered seeds, fruits and cereal remains has provided a unique research opportunity to undertake a diachronic study of urban Roman plant food consumption and discards. Over the past two centuries of excavations at Pompeii only a handful of published works dealing with botanical evidence have been published. The results from this study demonstrate a standard Mediterranean archaeobotanical assemblage recovered from Insula VI.1 which included wheat, barley, legumes, olives, grapes and figs. A wider diversity of fruits, pulses, and additional cereals, especially broomcorn millet were also found. These results support the established view that Pompeii was a fully urbanised city in the 1st century B.C.
The 1927–1938 Italian Archaeological Expedition to Transjordan in Renato Bartoccini’s Archives by Stefano Anastasio and Lucia Botarelli. i+242 pages; extensively illustrated throughout in black & white. 151 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911188. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911195. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents the results of the Italian excavations and surveys carried out in Transjordan between 1927 and 1938. After a first excavation campaign conducted in 1927 on the Amman Citadel by Giacomo Guidi, the excavations were resumed in 1929 by Renato Bartoccini (Rome 1893–Rome 1963), who carried out four campaigns on the Citadel in 1929, 1930, 1933 and 1938. He also travelled across modern Jordan, Syria and Lebanon, taking photos and writing reports on several archaeological sites. Bartoccini published a few notes and reports, but almost all the original documentation of his work was still unpublished at the time this study was conducted. The main source of data is the Fondo Renato Bartoccini, i.e. the private archive of Bartoccini, today held by the University of Perugia, while other useful documents are kept in other archives in Macerata and in Rome. Furthermore, some decorated Islamic pottery from the excavations on the Citadel is held at the Museo Internazionale delle Ceramiche in Faenza. The retrieved photos, excavation journals, letters, and administrative documents make it possible to understand, after almost a century, how the Citadel of Amman appeared at the time of its first excavation.
An Anatomy of a Priory Church: The Archaeology, History and Conservation of St Mary’s Priory Church, Abergavenny edited by George Nash. x+203 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 150 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911089. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911096. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Based on documentary evidence, the Priory Church of St Marys in Abergavenny has been a place of worship since the late 11th century; archaeological evidence though suggests that the site has a much earlier period of use. Over the past 1000 years the church has been radically altered to reflect its wealth, status and sometimes, its decline. During the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries a number of drastic alterations were made that included the complete demolition and rebuild of the nave. This wholesale change, coupled with the Reformation of 1536 and the vandalism of the mid- to late 17th century by Cromwell's troops did not deter the people of Abergavenny from using this most beautiful of spaces. In the recent past, the late Jeremy Winston did much to add his signature onto the priory's fabric making St Mary a most splendid place of worship. This book, comprising twelve thoughtprovoking chapters traces the archaeology, history and conservation of this most impressive building, delving deep into its anatomy.
Isles of the Dead? The setting and function of the Bronze Age chambered cairns and cists of the Isles of Scilly by Katharine Sawyer. viii+175 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 2 colour plates. 149 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911133. £33.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911140. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The number and density of megalithic chambered cairns in the Isles of Scilly, a tiny archipelago that forms the most south-westerly part of the British Isles, has been remarked upon since the 18th century. Isles of the Dead? examines these sites, generally known as entrance graves, and the associated cist graves. Their physical structure and contents, as well as their landscape setting, orientation and inter-visibility, are discussed. The origins and functions of the monuments and their significance to the communities that built and used them are also considered.

The findings indicate that the entrance graves were indeed used for burial and that a wide range of grave goods, including prestige items, were placed in them. The pottery, in particular, shows the development of a specific island identity. The first radiocarbon determinations from the graves suggest a period of use between c2000 and 1250 cal BC. This coincides with the inundation of large areas of low-lying land in the islands and suggests that the construction of entrance graves may have been regarded as a way of ‘holding the line’ against the depredations of the sea.
Aegean Mercenaries in Light of the Bible Clash of cultures in the story of David and Goliath by Simona Rodan. iv+112 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 148 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911065. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911072. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The story of the duel of David and Goliath, the Philistine champion, is narrated in the Bible in several versions. While its symbolic importance in Judaism and later in Christianity gradually came to represent the battle between good and evil, true faith and paganism, attempts were made since ancient times to solve its ambiguities. In modern research, the story arouses many disputes. There is controversy about the degree of realism and fantasy in it and there is also no agreement as to the time it was composed. Some claim that this was close to the time when the event occurred at the beginning of the monarchy period. Others postpone the time of its writing to the end of the Judaean monarchy and even to Second Temple times by pointing out its similarities to Greek literature and the characteristics of Goliath as an Aegean hoplite.

The purpose of the study is not only to shed light on the enigmas about the protagonists and the time of the story, but also to understand why the importance of its message did not lessen and in what circumstances the interest in it was prolonged. The study employs a textual analysis (literary and philological) of the story together with its comparison to Greek, Egyptian and Mesopotamian literary sources, historical analysis, and also a comparative analysis with archaeological findings. It examines sources which until now have not been included in research and suggests a new date, place and motive for the compilation of the duel story.
The Traditio Legis: Anatomy of an Image by Robert Couzin. vi+140 pages; extensively illustrated with 56 plates, 3 in colour. 147 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910815. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910822. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The bearded and mature figure of Christ stands majestically raising his right hand, open palm facing the viewer. In his left he holds an unfurled scroll. Saints Peter and Paul appear on either side, Peter approaching to catch or protect the dangling bookroll. This image, the so-called traditio legis, first appeared in late fourthcentury Rome in a variety of media, from the monumental to the miniature, including mosaic, catacomb painting, gold-glass and, the most numerous group, marble relief carving on sarcophagi.

This monograph engages in a close reading of the traditio legis, highlighting its novelty and complexity to early Christian viewers. The image is analyzed as a conflation of two distinct forms of representation, each constructed of unusual and potentially multivalent elements. Iconographical details like the hirsute Christ, his gesture, Peter’s covered hands and the unorthodox positioning of the two saints are examined in isolation and as elements of the whole. The synthetic composition invited alternative and over-determined meanings.
CAA2014. 21st Century Archaeology Concepts, methods and tools. Proceedings of the 42nd Annual Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology edited by F. Giligny, F. Djindjian, L. Costa, P. Moscati and S. Robert. vi+649 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 146 2015. ISBN 9781784911003. £75.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume brings together a selection of papers proposed for the Proceedings of the 42nd Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology conference (CAA), hosted at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University from 22nd to 25th April 2014. The program was divided into different themes and this structure has been maintained in the arrangement of articles in the various chapters of this book. Chapter headings include: Historiography; Field and Laboratory Data Recording; Ontologies and Standards; Internet and Archaeology; Archaeological Information Systems; GIS and Spatial Analysis; Mathematics and Statistics in Archaeology; 3D Archaeology and Virtual Archaeology; Multi-Agent Systems and Complex System Modelling.
Charles-Étienne Brasseur de Bourbourg, premier grand mayaniste de France by Jean-Marie Lebon. xii+377 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 6 colour plates. French text. 145 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910983. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910990. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Two hundred years ago, on September 8, 1814, in the northern French city of Bourbourg, a boy was born into a family of local entrepreneurs connected to the local political or judicial elite. The young Charles-Etienne Brasseur was lucky to spend days and days in the impressive library of Alexandre Nicolas Muchembled, the son of his godmother. The reading of exciting travel books there mapped out the course of his truly adventurous life to come. Although a rebellious schoolboy, he acquired a huge knowledge in many fields by his omnivorous reading of books and journals. He was also a very curious young man, delving into the private libraries of the local grand families, resulting in him contributing many historical articles to newspapers and learned societies. At the age of 24, while still in high school, he published his first novel.

This biography is the first to reveal insights into the many facets of the life of Brasseur; the extent of his secret activities for the Vatican; his advanced ideas regarding the dual phonetic and ideographic nature of Mayan writing, as early as 1843-44, and explicitly confirmed by him in May 1852, which he later dramatically rejected in 1870, thus failing to become the Champollion of Mesoamerica; his continuous attempts to preserve documents while crossing territories ravaged by civil wars; the immense value of the manuscripts he saved, like the Tzeltal vocabulary of Copanabastla or the Motul dictionary; his unique dedication in copying old manuscripts, with the help of his nephews, to be sent to other pioneers of Mayan studies in Europe and America; his short-lived pioneering work on the Huave (Wabis); details of his six expeditions to Mesoamerica, often in terrible conditions, as shown by his later severe ill health; his defence of the Indians against the academic community; details of the internal conflicts in the Quebec Catholic Church; and his ideas on certain geophysical events, such as the elevation of ocean beds and islands, which he wrongly dated to the time of the ancient Mayans, or the shifting of the Earth’s rotation axis.
Bryan Faussett: Antiquary Extraordinary by David Wright. xii+324 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 144 2015 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910846. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910853. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A biography of Bryan Faussett, F.S.A., (1720-1776), pioneering Kent genealogist, archaeologist and antiquary who, at his death, had amassed the world’s greatest collection of Anglo-Saxon jewellery and antiquities. The material was famously rejected by the British Museum, saved for the nation by a Liverpudlian philanthropist, and now resides in the Liverpool World Museum. This episode led directly to the British Museum’s setting up departments devoted to British Antiquities.

This volume is the first to focus on Faussett, presenting comprehensive genealogical sections on the Faussetts and Godfreys; a history of the family seat near Canterbury; and an introduction to antiquarianism and how the history of the world was imperfectly viewed in the 18th century. A detailed biography of Bryan Faussett’s life covers his education, career and scholarly circle, with detailed descriptions of the sites he excavated. Surviving archaeological notebooks offer insights into his working practice, and family account-books reveal a great deal about his personal life and interests.

Bryan Faussett was a quintessentially Georgian cleric and antiquary whose extraordinary archaeological career and collections are modestly well known within the county, but deserve far greater national recognition. It is hoped that this biography may further that aim.

About the Author:
David Wright has known the county of Kent all his life. He studied classics, palaeography and Anglo-Saxon at University College, London, before being invited to become one of its teaching fellows, when he soon gained further loves of history, both ancient and mediaeval. Whilst practising as a professional genealogist for nearly four decades, he has taught, lectured and written about Kent’s historical sources, and also produced several indexes to the county’s very rich probate records.
The Dodecanese: Further Travels Among the Insular Greeks Selected Writings of J. Theodore & Mabel V.A. Bent, 1885-1888 edited by Gerald Brisch. xiv+194 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 143 2015 3rdGuides - Archaeopress Travel 8. ISBN 9781784910969. £15.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

A sequel to The Cyclades, a compilation of late-19th-century travel writings (with an archaeological/ethnographical bias) centred on the Greek Dodecanese islands (including Rhodes, Nissiros, Tilos, Karpathos, Patmos, and Astypalea).

The authors are the British explorer J. Theodore Bent (1852-1897), devotedly supported by his wife Mabel Virginia Anna (1847-1929). Theodore met Mabel shortly after coming down from Oxford in 1875 and they married two years later. They were of independent character and means and spent the too few years until Theodore’s early death on a breathless sequence of annual travels to the Eastern Mediterranean, Africa, and Southern Arabia. Theodore’s publications are referenced still by archaeologists and scholars working on sites or regions such as ‘Great Zimbabwe’, Aksum, the Wadi Hadramaut, the Cilician littoral, and, of course, the Greek islands.

Bent’s first successful monograph was based on two winters spent in the Cycladic isles (1882/3 and 1883/4). From the start the couple kept notebooks from which all Theodore’s later lectures and literature sprang. His The Cyclades, or Life Among the Insular Greeks was published in 1885 and has been rarely out of print since. It remains one of the most delightful accounts in English of the region, and few serious travellers and tourists to these islands fail to discover it.

In the year The Cyclades was published the Bents moved a little east and explored the islands now commonly referred to as the Greek Dodecanese. Unforeseen circumstances obliged the explorers to curtail their activities before Theodore’s writings on the area could be edited into a monograph to complement his earlier bestseller. Theodore’s Dodecanesian output was channelled instead into a wide range of articles, while Mabel completed three volumes of her personal Chronicles on their daily travels and travails.

Bent never presented his Dodecanese researches to the public in a compendium, the way he had, so brilliantly, for the Cyclades. Now, 130 years later, his The Dodecanese can appear for the first time: a collection of reminiscences and studies on these sunny, blue-surrounded, and delightful islands.

Contents: ‘Preface’ by Marc Dubin; ‘Introduction’ by Gerald Brisch; ‘J.T. Bent: Selected Writings on the Dodecanese 1885-1888’; ‘M.V.A. Bent: Travel Chronicles for the years 1885-1888’. Fully illustrated with maps and photographs.

Mr. Bent’s book deserves all success, for it is the result of researches pursued in the most laudable manner…[and] a unique description of the life and ideas of a people, which renders it a very storehouse of facts for the student of customs and myths. And in this respect its value will be permanent. Other travellers may follow in Mr. Bent’s footsteps, and fill up what is wanting in his archaeological information; but in a few years’ time, if any traveller be found so enduring as to attempt once more the task which he has so well performed, it is highly probable that a great part of these interesting customs and ideas will have disappeared. (Henry Fanshawe Tozer (1885), on The Cyclades by J.T. Bent)

I vetri del Museo archeologico di Tripoli by Sofia Cingolani. ii+182 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 3 colour plates. Italian text. 142 2015 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 7. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910945. £33.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910952. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is focused on the cataloguing of glass conserved in the Archaeological Museum of Tripoli. This is so far an unpublished corpus of objects identified from investigations into the necropolis and other burials in Tripoli and its suburbs, in conjunction with the activities of the Italian Government in Libya during the first twenty years of the last century. The main objective of the work is filling the gaps in the state of knowledge concerning the production of glass of the North-African area by providing as complete as possible a documentation on the findings from Oea and its territory.
LBK Realpolitik: An Archaeometric Study of Conflict and Social Structure in the Belgian Early Neolithic by Mark Golitko. vi+188 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 141 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910884. £33.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910891. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The causes and consequences of violence and warfare have long interested social scientists, historians, and philosophers. While economic motivations for conflict are among the most commonly discussed drivers of human violence, prehistorians have often downplayed economic factors when studying non-state society. This volume explores linkages between conflict and socioeconomic organization during the early Neolithic of eastern Belgium (c. 5200-5000 BC), using compositional analysis of ceramics from Linienbandkeramik villages to assess production organization and map intercommunity connections against the backdrop of increasing evidence for conflict.

About the Author:
Mark Golitko is the Regenstein Research Scientist at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. He has conducted archaeological research in Europe, Papua New Guinea, and the Americas. A specialist in applications of the physical sciences and network analysis to archaeological research, his research explores how patterns of interaction structure human society and change in response to evolutionary, environmental, and social forces.
Material Culture and Cultural Identity: A Study of Greek and Roman Coins from Dora by Rosa Maria Motta. xiv+103 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 140 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910921. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910938. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The ancient harbor town of Dor/Dora in modern Israel has a history that spanned from the Bronze Age until the Late Roman Era. The story of its peoples can be assembled from a variety of historical and archaeological sources derived from the nearly thirty years of research at Tel Dor — the archaeological site of the ancient city. Each primary source offers a certain kind of information with its own perspective. In the attempt to understand the city during its Graeco-Roman years — a time when Dora reached its largest physical extent and gained enough importance to mint its own coins, numismatic sources provide key information. With their politically, socio-culturally and territorially specific iconography, Dora’s coins indeed reveal that the city was self-aware of itself as a continuous culture, beginning with its Phoenician origins and continuing into its Roman present.
Evolution of a Community: The Colonisation of a Clay Inland Landscape Neolithic to post-medieval remains excavated over sixteen years at Longstanton in Cambridgeshire by Samantha Paul and John Hunt. xii+245 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 139 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910860. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910877. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The movement of people from the fen edge and river valleys into the clay lands of eastern England has become a growing area of research. The opportunity of studying such an environment and investigating the human activities that took place there became available 9 km to the north-west of Cambridge at the village of Longstanton. The archaeological excavations that took place over a sixteen year period have made a significant contribution to charting the emergence of a Cambridgeshire clayland settlement and its community over six millennia.

Evolution of a Community chronologically documents the colonisation of this clay inland location and outlines how it was not an area on the periphery of activity, but part of a fully occupied landscape extending back into the Mesolithic period. Subsequent visits during the Late Neolithic became more focused when the locality appears to have been part of a religious landscape that included a possible barrow site and ritual pit deposits. The excavations indicate that the earliest permanent settlement at the site dates to the Late Bronze Age, with the subsequent Iron Age phases characterised as a small, modest and inward-looking community that endured into the Roman period with very little evidence for disjuncture during the transition. The significant discovery of a group of seventh-century Anglo-Saxon burials which produced rare evidence for infectious deceases is discussed within the context of ‘final phase’ cemeteries and the influence of visible prehistoric features within the local landscape. The excavation of the Late Anglo-Saxon and medieval rural settlement defined its origins and layout which, alongside the artefactual and archaeobotanical assemblages recovered creates a profile over time of the life and livelihood of this community that is firmly placed within its historical context.
A History of Research into Ancient Egyptian Culture in Southeast Europe edited by Mladen Tomorad. xii+272 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 138 2015 Archaeopress Egyptology 8. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910907. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910914. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The history of Ancient Egypt has been studied in the region of Southeast Europe since the end of the nineteenth century. In some of the countries this was not the case for various reasons, but mainly because of the undeveloped scholarly capabilities and institutions, insufficient funds for archaeological research in Egypt, and the lack of cooperation with scholars from other countries.

From the 1960s, however, this situation has changed for the better, firstly with the numerous publications of the diffusion of the Ancient Egyptian cults during Graeco-Roman period, and then with publications (articles, catalogues, books) on Ancient Egyptian collections in various museum institutions located in Southeast Europe.

From the early 1990s one can trace the increased production of various scholarly papers in which researchers from Slovenia, Croatia, Serbia, Macedonia, Romania, and Bulgaria not only researched the Egyptian cults in the Roman Empire, but also on the various aspects of history, religion and literature of Ancient Egypt. Their work, however, was mostly unknown to the scholars outside the region primarily because the results were written in the native languages. This book will try to give a review of the history of the studies of Ancient Egypt done in Southeast Europe, and present some of the latest research.

The book comprises a selection of papers in which scholars from various institutions of the region reviewed the different aspects of past studies and the development of the research of the Ancient Egypt in some countries, along with recent research in the field. We hope that this publication will be useful for all scholars who are unfamiliar with the historiography of this region.
Experiencing Etruscan Pots: Ceramics, Bodies and Images in Etruria by Lucy Shipley. vi+155 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 137 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910563. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910570. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In a world without plastics, ceramics, alongside organic containers, were used for almost every substance which required protection or containment: from perfume to porridge. The experience of an Etruscan person, living day to day, would have been filled with interactions with ceramics, making them objects which can recall intimate transactions in the past to the archaeologist in the present.

Characterising that experience of Etruscan pottery is the concern of this book. What was it like to use and live with Etruscan pottery? How was the interaction between an Etruscan pot structured and constituted? How can that experience be related back to bigger questions about the organisation of Etruscan society, its increasingly urban nature and relationship with other Mediterranean cultures? More specifically, this volume aims to unpick both the physical encounter between vessel and hand, and the emotional interaction between the user of a pot and the images inscribed upon its surface.
Landscapes of Pilgrimage in Medieval Britain by Martin Locker. vi+292 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 136 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910761. £43.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910778. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book seeks to address the journeying context of pilgrimage within the landscapes of Medieval Britain. Using four case studies, an interdisciplinary methodology developed by the author is applied to four different geographical and cultural areas of Britain (Norfolk, Wiltshire/Hampshire, Flintshire/Denbighshire and Cornwall), to investigate the practicalities of travel along the Medieval road network including the routes themselves, accommodation, the built environments and natural topographies encountered.

An introduction, assessment of current theory and scholarship is provided, followed by an explanation of the methodology used. The four case studies are then presented (Ely to Walsingham, Salisbury to Winchester, St Asaph to Holywell, and Camelford to Bodmin). Within each case study, both the selected starting point for the pilgrimage (typically either a locale confirmed in the historical record as linked to the pilgrim destination, or a settlement of some significance within the local area and thus well connected to the route network), and the site of the saint cult itself are analysed for their growth, reaction and accommodation to the pilgrim phenomenon. Also addressed are the route networks of the county as a whole, relationships to economic centres and their impact on travel possibilities, the topography, the distribution patterns for saint dedications in parish churches within the area, material culture and the ecclesiastical built environment (for example pilgrim badges, monasteries), and the physical landscapes through which the pilgrim travels. Here, the interaction between the pilgrim and the environments through which they move is addressed. Considerations include fatigue, exertion, panoramas and way-finding, route visibility, sight lines to monuments, folklore within the landscape, and the potential echoing of Christian scriptural motifs within certain landscape types/features (e.g. wilderness and sanctuary).

Within the final section of the book these themes are compared and expanded into the broader context of pilgrimage not only in Medieval Christendom, but within Buddhist, Hindu and Islamic religious traditions, in order to demonstrate the methodology's validity and flexibility in addressing pilgrimage holistically. Comparisons are made between the local and universal pilgrim routes in terms of material culture, landscape interaction and travel practicalities, and suggestions for future research and development of the pilgrim studies field are also provided.
Archeologia a Firenze: Città e Territorio Atti del Workshop. Firenze, 12-13 Aprile 2013 edited by Valeria d'Aquino, Guido Guarducci, Silvia Nencetti and Stefano Valentini. iv+438 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Italian text. Abstracts for all papers in Italian & English.. 135 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910587. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910594. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents the proceedings of the workshop ‘Archeologia a Firenze: Città e territorio’, organized by CAMNES, Centre for Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Studies, in collaboration with the Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici della Toscana, in April 2013. This event experienced an extraordinary participation by experts in the field, and resulted also in a significant success in terms of public archaeological awareness. Almost twenty years after the exhibition ‘Alle origini di Firenze’ and the publication of its Catalogo, which is considered a signal point in Florentine archaeology, the workshop provided an opportunity for discussion between all those who conducted research, protection and enhancement of the archaeological heritage of Florence thanks to the presentation of the most recent excavations. Moreover, the origins of the city that took the leading role during the Renaissance were discussed, finding in its roots the very reasons for its glorious destiny. The sessions, organized in chronological order – from prehistoric to medieval topics – were supplemented by contributions concerned with conservation and enhancement of the historic landscape whose reconstruction through research and excavation activities constantly requires new discussions and often additional reflections.
Egyptian Cultural Identity in the Architecture of Roman Egypt (30 BC-AD 325) by Youssri Ezzat Hussein Abdelwahed. x+222 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 134 2015 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 6. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910648. £37.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910655. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Egyptian Cultural Identity in the Architecture of Roman Egypt (30 BC–AD 325) considers the relationship between architectural form and different layers of identity assertion in Roman Egypt. The Roman province of Aegyptus was a peculiar province such that many scholars have generally assumed that it was given a special status in the Roman Empire. The text covers the period from the Roman conquest of Egypt under Octavian in 30 BC to the official recognition of Christianity in AD 325. It stresses the sophistication of the concept of identity, and the complex yet close association between architecture and identity. This monograph is the outcome of four years of research at the Department of Classics and Ancient History, the University of Durham. The book will be of interest and value for both Classicists and Egyptologists working on the archaeology of Egypt under Roman rule and the concept of identity.
The Archaeology and Epigraphy of Indus Writing by Bryan K. Wells with technical appendices by Andreas Fuls. x+143 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 133 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910464. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910471. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Archaeology and Epigraphy of Indus Writing is a detailed examination of the Indus script. It presents new analysis based on an expansive text corpus using revolutionary analytical techniques developed specifically for the purpose of deciphering the Indus script. This exploration of Indus writing examines the structure of Indus text at a level of detail that has never been possible before. This advance in analytic techniques is combined with detailed linguistic information to suggest a root language for the Indus script. Further the syntax of the Indus script is demonstrated to match a Dravidian language. In the process of analysis the place name for the ancient Indus site of Dholavira is identified. This leads to the eventual identification of 17 signs with various levels of certainty. These readings lead to the partial definition of the Indus system of affixing. Using innovative analytical techniques Indus signs can be defined functionally as logographic or syllabic. Further, specific sign sequences are identified as verbs or nouns. The volumetric system used at Harappa during the Indus period is demonstrated. This discovery gives us a good idea of the scale and process of Indus exchange. The Indus inscriptions are analyzed with an emphasis on their archaeological contexts. The analysis presented in this book represents a significant advancement in our understanding of Indus writing.

Bryan K. Wells is an archaeologist, epigrapher and geographer. He has excavated on the east and west coasts of North America and in Pakistan. Wells has studied ancient writing systems, including the Indus script, since 1990, and holds a PhD. in anthropology from Harvard University.
The Early and Late Roman Rural Cemetery at Nemesbőd (Vas County, Hungary) edited by Gábor Ilon and Judit Kvassay. x+194 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 132 2015 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 5. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910488. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910495. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Roman Cemetery at Nemesbőd belonged to a settlement or a villa which was located on the territory of the Roman colony of Savaria (present day Szombathey, Hungary) in Pannonia. The book deals with thirty-seven graves, which consisted of mainly cremation but also of some inhumation burials. Detailed analysis of grave goods (bronze vessels, pottery, glass, personal accessories, lamps etc.) provides a study of burial customs and their evolution. In addition, specialist reports on human remains and animal bone as well as on epigraphic material are presented.

The Origins and Use of the Potter’s Wheel in Ancient Egypt by Sarah Doherty. x+140 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with two colour plates. 131 2015 Archaeopress Egyptology 7. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910600. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910617. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The invention of the wheel is often highlighted as one of humankinds’ most significant inventions. Wheels do not exist in nature, and so can be viewed entirely as a human-inspired invention. Machinery too, was relatively rare in the ancient world. The potter’s wheel is arguably the most significant machine introduced into Egypt, second only perhaps to the drill, the loom and the bellows for smelting metal. In Predynastic Egypt (c3500 B.C.), the traditional methods of hand-building pottery vessels were already successful in producing pottery vessels of high quality on a large scale for the domestic market, so it would seem that the potter’s wheel was a rather superfluous invention. However, the impact of this innovation would not just have affected the Egyptian potters themselves learning a new skill, but also signalled the beginnings of a more complex and technologically advanced society.

Despite many years work on the technology of pottery production it is perhaps surprising that the origins of the potter’s wheel in Egypt have yet to be determined. This present project seeks to rectify this situation by determining when the potter’s wheel was introduced into Egypt, establishing in what contexts wheel thrown pottery occurs, and considering the reasons why the Egyptians introduced the wheel when a well-established hand making pottery industry already existed.

A sequence of videos by the author to compliment her publication can be viewed here.
La difusión comercial de las ánforas vinarias de Hispania Citerior-Tarraconensis (s. I a.C. – I. d.C.) edited by Verònica Martínez Ferreras. x+220 pages; illustrated in colour and black & white throughout. Papers in Spanish and French with English abstracts; Preface in Spanish and English. 130 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 4. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910624. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910631. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents a series of studies of the wine from Hispania Citerior-Tarraconensis traded in amphorae, with the aim of demonstrating (as has recently been done for the amphora production) the existence of different trade dynamics, according to individual cases, territories and periods. While seeking to avoid descriptions of a generalised nature, the present volume aims to illustrate the complexity of the trading system, emphasizing intra- and inter-provincial commercial patterns and the way in which these evolved during the period considered. Although this work includes the results of a few highly specific case studies (which cannot replace the findings from other better or lesser known sites), they cover most of the areas of wine production and trade and all the dimensions of analysis in which archaeological, epigraphic and literary data related to the commercial distribution might be framed.
Diana Umbronensis a Scoglietto Santuario, Territorio e Cultura Materiale (200 a.C. - 550 d.C.) edited by Alessandro Sebastiani, Elena Chirico, Matteo Colombini and Mario Cygielman. x+396 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Papers in Italian with English abstracts. 129 2015 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 3. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910525. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910532. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is the first in a series of works detailing the archaeological investigations of the ager Rusellanus, in coastal southern Etruria, undertaken by the Alberese Archaeological Project.

It focuses on the Roman temple and sanctuary dedicated to Diana Umbronensis, located at Scoglietto (Alberese – GR) on the ancient Tyrrhenian coast. In so doing it adds to the study of trade and settlement networks in ancient Italy, and provides new data on the character of Roman and late antique Etruria.

The book discusses the changing aspect and character of the sanctuary over approximately eight centuries – from its foundation in the mid-2nd century BC and substantial refurbishment in the Antonine period, to its destruction in the 4th century AD and the varied use and reuse of the site through the following two centuries. It includes archaeological, historical and landscape studies, as well as detailed architectural and material culture studies for a composite interpretation of the site and its history.