​​ We use cookies to enhance your experience on our site. By continuing to use the site you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy & Cookies.​

Archaeopress logo
Gordon House, 276 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 7ED, England
tel +44 (0) 1865 311914 fax +44 (0) 1865 512231   email: info@archaeopress.com
Monthly AP Alert - join our mailing list today Archaeopress on Facebook Archaeopress on Twitter Archaeopress Site Hut


title, author, ISBN, keyword

Browse for books in the following languages

Archaeopress Archaeology
Seminar for Arabian Studies
Journal of Greek Archaeology
Praehistorica Mediterranea
Digital Editions
Open Access
British Archaeological Reports
Ordering Information
Publish With Us
Standing Orders
Trade Sales
Contact Us
Request Review Copy
Archaeopress: Publishers of Academic Archaeology
Communicating the researches of thousands of archaeologists worldwide since 1991

Archaeopress is an Oxford-based publisher specialising in academic archaeology.
Journal of Greek Archaeology Subscription edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). Price listed refers to 2016 print subscription for private individuals. More pricing options available.ISBN 2059-4674. £65.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

Announcing an international peer-reviewed English-language journal specializing in synthetic articles and in long reviews. The scope of this journal is Greek archaeology both in the Aegean and throughout the wider Greek-inhabited world, from earliest Prehistory to the Modern Era. Thus we include contributions not just from traditional periods such as Greek Prehistory and the Classical Greek to Hellenistic eras, but also from Roman through Byzantine, Crusader and Ottoman Greece and into the Early Modern period. Outside of the Aegean contributions are welcome covering the Archaeology of the Greeks overseas, likewise from Prehistory into the Modern World. Greek Archaeology for the purposes of the JGA thus includes the Archaeology of the Hellenistic World, Roman Greece, Byzantine Archaeology, Frankish and Ottoman Archaeology, and the Postmedieval Archaeology of Greece and of the Greek Diaspora.

The first issue of the journal will be in October 2016 and thereafter it will appear annually and incorporate original articles, research reviews and book reviews. Subscription fees will be charged in December for the following year's Issue.


ISSN: 2059-4674 (print); 2059-4682 (online)

Print: £85 including free shipping in UK & Europe (£10 ROW).
Print & Online access: £95 including free shipping in UK & Europe (£10 ROW).
Online access only: £90.
Agents will receive 25% discount on institutional print price including shipping rates as stated

Print: £65 including free shipping in UK & Europe (£10 ROW). Includes free digital copy.
Special price for digital only subscribers: £25.

Download the subscription form here - complete and return by post of fax. 2016 subscription fees will be collected in December 2015.

FORTHCOMING: Ritual in Late Bronze Age Ireland Material Culture, Practices, Landscape Setting and Social Context by Katherine Leonard. xii+230 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 195 2015. ISBN 9781784912208. £38.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This text develops a new perspective on Late Bronze Age (LBA) Ireland by identifying and analysing patterns of ritual practice in the archaeological record. The bookends of this study are the introduction of the bronze slashing sword to Ireland at around 1200 BC and the introduction and proliferation of iron technology beginning around 600 BC. Therefore, it is societal change related to new technology which defines the period discussed as the Irish Late Bronze Age (LBA) herein. Ritual practices find expression in a range of contexts which can be studied separately. However, they require an overarching, integrated ritual system to contextualise and attempt to understand their broader purpose. Similar rituals were consistently enacted in similar locations across the island of Ireland in the LBA. This indicates shared understanding of the way to enact certain rituals as well as shared understanding of what these practices would achieve.

This book is scheduled for publication in November 2015, priced £38.00. To register your interest please email info@archaeopress.com.
FORTHCOMING: The Enigmatic World of Ancient Graffiti Rock Art in Chukotka. The Chaunskaya Region, Russia by Margarita Kir’yak (Dikova). Translated by Richard L. Bland. vi+160 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 7 colour plates. 194 2015. ISBN 9781784911881. £32.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This monograph is devoted to small forms of engraving on stone. It summarizes the archaeological material obtained during the course of excavations at the Rauchuvagytgyn I site (dated to 2500 years ago) in northern Chukotka. The book analyzes the content and semantics of the pictorial resources, and ethnic identification is made. The interpretive part of the study raises issues of an ideological character and brings one closer to the inaccessible realm of ideas and concepts of the ancients. This well-illustrated book is directed primarily toward archaeologists, ethnographers, historians, and fine art experts but will also be of interest to a broad range of readers.

About the author:
Dr Margarita Kiry’ak is one of the foremost archaeologists of far Northeast Asia (Chukotka). She has been conducting archaeological research in Chukotka for more than 30 years, during which time she has published four books in Russia, Great Britain, and the U.S., and 115 scholarly articles in Russia, the U.S., Italy, and Korea.

This book is scheduled for publication in November 2015, priced £32.00. To register your interest please email info@archaeopress.com.
FORTHCOMING: La implantación del culto imperial de la provincia en Hispania by Marta González Herrero. x+150 pages; 18 black & white illustrations. Spanish text with English summary. 193 2015 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 11. ISBN 9781784911768. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The aim of this study is to show how the Imperial Cult was introduced and organised in provincial Hispania, and examines the collaboration with the Romanised native elites who came from Lusitania, Baetica and Hispania Citerior. This book draws upon literary, numismatic, archaeological and epigraphic sources. The epigraphy found in Lusitania is especially important because it is the only one of the Hispanic provinces where there is evidence of flamines provinciae officiating before the Flavian period, even as early as under Tiberius.

This book is scheduled for publication in November 2015, priced £30.00. To register your interest please email info@archaeopress.com.
FORTHCOMING: Origins, Development and Abandonment of an Iron Age Village Further Archaeological Investigations for the Daventry International Rail Freight Terminal, Crick & Kilsby, Northamptonshire 1993-2013 (DIRFT Volume II) by Robert Masefield (ed), Andy Chapman, Peter Ellis, John Hart, Roy King & Andrew Mudd. vi+324 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 192 2015. ISBN 9781784912185. £48.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is the second of two reports on archaeological excavations undertaken ahead of the eastern expansion of Daventry International Rail Freight Terminal (DIRFT) which lies in the northern watershed region of Northamptonshire at its border with Warwickshire.

The excavations, covering 178 hectares, recorded one of the most extensive Iron Age farming settlements yet discovered in the British Isles. It comprised at least five individual sites of house clusters and enclosures, spread around the rim of a shallow valley overlooking around 100 hectares of open pasture. At its peak between 400 BC and 100 BC the settlement would have contained up to 100 circular buildings.

Volume 2 describes the excavations of four of these individual sites, undertaken at various times by MOLA Northampton (then Northamptonshire Archaeology) at The Lodge and Long Dole, by Foundations Archaeology at Crick Hotel, and by Cotswold Archaeology at Nortoft Lane, Kilsby. The project was managed by RPS. The site reports are followed by a wide-ranging discussion, putting the discoveries here and at Covert Farm, Crick (Volume 1) into the context of Iron Age settlement patterns and dynamics in the East Midland region.

This book is scheduled for publication in November 2015, priced £48.00. To register your interest please email info@archaeopress.com.
FORTHCOMING: The Iron Age and Romano-British Settlement at Crick Covert Farm: Excavations 1997-1998 (DIRFT Volume I) by Gwilym Hughes and Ann Woodward. xiv+314 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 191 2015. ISBN 9781784912086. £48.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is the first of two reports on archaeological excavations undertaken ahead of the eastern expansion of Daventry International Rail Freight Terminal (DIRFT) which lies in the northern watershed region of Northamptonshire at its border with Warwickshire.

The excavations, covering 178 hectares, recorded one of the most extensive Iron Age farming settlements yet discovered in the British Isles. It comprised at least five individual sites of house clusters and enclosures, spread around the rim of a shallow valley overlooking around 100 hectares of open pasture. At its peak between 400 BC and 100 BC the settlement would have contained up to 100 circular buildings.

Volume 1 describes the excavation of the largest of these individual sites, that at Covert Farm, Crick, excavated by the Birmingham University Field Archaeology Unit. From the outset the excavations adopted an innovative approach to examine social themes in Iron Age studies, such as relationships with rubbish, fire and water, and the way life in the settlement may have been experienced by its inhabitants - themes that are presented and discussed in this book.

This book is scheduled for publication in November 2015, priced £48.00. To register your interest please email info@archaeopress.com.
NEW: Metallurgical Production in Northern Eurasia in the Bronze Age by Stanislav Grigoriev. 831 pages. Only available as e-version. ISBN 9781784912369. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Buy Now

Copper is the first metal to play a large part in human history. This work is devoted to the history of metallurgical production in Northern Eurasia during the Bronze Age, based on experiments carried out by the author. It should be noted that archaeometallurgical studies include a huge range of works reflecting different fields of activity of ancient metallurgists. Often, all that unites these is the term ‘metallurgy’. This work considers the problems of proper metallurgy, i.e. extracting metal from ore. A number of accompanying operations are closely connected with it, such as charcoal-burning, ore dressing, furnace constructing, and preparation of crucibles. In some instances the author touches upon these operations; however the main topic of the work is the smelting process. The closing stage of the metallurgical production is metalworking including various casting and forging operations, and also auxiliary operations: making of crucibles, casting molds, stone tools for metal forging. These problems are, as a rule, out of frameworks of this research.

This book is exclusively available as an e-Publication.
NEW: Ritual Landscapes and Borders within Rock Art Research Papers in Honour of Professor Kalle Sognnes edited by Heidrun Stebergløkken, Ragnhild Berge, Eva Lindgaard and Helle Vangen Stuedal. Available to download from Open Access page. i-viii, 1-188 pages, illustrated in colour throughout. 190 2015. ISBN 9781784911584. £42.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Ritual landscapes and borders are recurring themes running through Professor Kalle Sognnes' long research career. This anthology contains 13 articles written by colleagues from his broad network in appreciation of his many contributions to the field of rock art research. The contributions discuss many different kinds of borders: those between landscapes, cultures, traditions, settlements, power relations, symbolism, research traditions, theory and methods.

We are grateful to the Department of Historical studies, NTNU; the Faculty of Humanities; NTNU, The Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters and The Norwegian Archaeological Society (Norsk arkeologisk selskap) for funding this volume that will add new knowledge to the field and will be of importance to researchers and students of rock art in Scandinavia and abroad.

This book is available to download in e-format in Archaeopress Open Access.
NEW: The Danubian Lands between the Black, Aegean and Adriatic Seas (7th Century BC-10th Century AD) edited by Gocha R. Tsetskhladze, Alexandru Avram and James Hargrave. xx+563 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Papers in English, French & German. 189 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911928. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911935. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Proceedings of the Fifth International Congress on Black Sea Antiquities (Belgrade – 17-21 September 2013)

The themes of this volume are concerned with archaeological, historical, linguistic, anthropological, geographical and other investigations across the vast area (and different regions) through which the Argonauts travelled in seeking to return from Colchis: from the eastern shore of the Black Sea and the mouth of the Danube to the Adriatic. The contributions investigate an extended time period, from Greek colonisation to the end of Antiquity, and different cultural influences involving peoples and states, Greek cities, native peoples, Roman rule and events in Late Roman times. Each particular study contributes to the ground research, helping to create a complete picture of the theoretical level of cultural and political development and interaction of different cultures. The research and general conclusions concerning the social, ethnic, cultural and political development of the peoples who lived around the Black Sea shore and along the great Danube and Sava rivers can be reliable only if based on the detailed study of particular questions related to the extensive area stretching from the Black Sea to the Adriatic, and involving the many different peoples and epochs which lasted many hundreds of years.
NEW: Best Practices of GeoInformatic Technologies for the Mapping of Archaeolandscapes edited by Apostolos Sarris. iv+269 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 188 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911621. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911638. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

New geoinformatic technologies have recently had a transformative effect on landscape archaeology, particularly by facilitating the high resolution acquisition and analysis of data over large areas. These techniques have fundamentally changed the nature and scope of questions that can be addressed regarding the archaeological record. Despite this stimulating potential, many practising archaeologists were not trained in these methods and so are not fully aware of their capabilities or the most appropriate ways to apply them. This volume collates state of the art research in the fields of geophysics, geochemistry, aerial imaging, dating, digital archaeology, GIS and marine archaeology to present a comprehensive overview of the specialised techniques which can contribute to landscape scale archaeological investigations. It is hoped that it will serve as a “best practice” guide for their use and encourage their widespread adoption by the archaeological community.
NEW: Hoards, Grave Goods, Jewellery Objects in hoards and in burial contexts during the Mongol invasion of Central-Eastern Europe by Mária Vargha. vi+95 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 187 2015 Archaeolingua Central European Archaeological Heritage Series . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912024. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912034. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This monograph examines one specific hoard horizon, which is connected to the Mongol invasion of Hungary (1241-42). With this catastrophic event, the historical context is both well-known and much discussed by contemporaries and modern scholars. This opportunity to examine material connected to a sole event, but across a broad spectrum of geographical space and social class, is unique for hoard horizons in Hungary, and, for that matter, in Europe. Though this study focuses on hoards connected to the Mongol invasion, it is also relevant beyond this specific context. The work addresses issues concerning hoard finds and material culture, and examines how finds are related when found in different contexts (a hoard, grave, or settlement feature), thus the questions raised and conclusions reached are important for other medieval hoard finds. By comparing hoards related to a single historical event to a contemporaneous site – containing a village, a church, and a cemetery – assessments can be made regarding how hoards reflect social issues such as stratification, wealth, status, and fashion.
NEW: Micromorphological Analysis of Activity Areas Sealed by Vesuvius’ Avellino Eruption The Early Bronze Age Village of Afragola in Southern Italy by Tiziana Matarazzo. viii+200 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 186 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912116. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912123. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The remarkable preservation of the Early Bronze Age village of Afragola on the Campania Plain of Southern Italy is unmatched in Europe. The site was buried under nearly a meter of volcanic ash deposited by the Avellino eruption of Vesuvius ca. 3945+10 cal. BP. The site boasts a large number of well-preserved structures, built features and organic materials and thus provides a laboratory-type setting in which to investigate variability in artifact distribution and activity areas across a single village. This research utilizes micromorphological analysis of thin sections of undisturbed sediment collected at the site to understand how people used living spaces, organized daily activities and, when possible, to connect village life to broad issues related to the emergence of social complexity on the Campanian Plain. In particular, micromorphology is used to identify the type and range of human activities, the function of features and buildings, and the intensity of site occupation. The micromorphological analysis at Afragola provides a unique example of a briefly occupied agricultural village with what appears to be minimally stratified social organization during the Early Bronze Age of southern Italy.
NEW: Eastern Han (AD 25-220) Tombs in Sichuan by Xuan Chen. vi+118 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 185 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912161. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912178. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This work explores the many factors underlying the extended popularity of the cliff tomb, a local burial form in the Sichuan Basin in China during the Eastern Han dynasty (AD 25-220). The development of the cliff tomb was linked to a complex set of connections involved with burial forms, and continued through associations with many other contemporary burial practices: brick chamber tombs, stone chamber tombs, and princely rock-cut tombs. These connections and links formed to a large extent through the incorporation of the Sichuan region within the Empire, which began in the fourth century BC. It was as part of this overall context that a series of factors contributed to the formation and popularity of the cliff tombs in Sichuan. The hilly topography and the soft sandstone, easy to cut, provided a natural resource for the development of cliff tombs. The present book, therefore, analyses the decisions behind the exploitation of this natural resource, which were also affected by many complexities rooted in the social background. The inherent nature of the cliff tomb structure is fully explored, followed by an investigation into the corresponding innovations involving pictorial carvings and burial objects. The meanings behind the seemingly continuous ‘family’ associated with the cliff tomb structure are also explored, as the construction of the tomb resulted from the continuous endeavours of many generations, and the physical appearance of the cliff tomb becomes a metaphor for family prosperity.
NEW: Crude Hints towards an History of my House in Lincoln’s Inn Fields by by Sir John Soane with an introduction by Helen Dorey. 60pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 184 2015. ISBN 9781784912154. £15.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

In 1812 the architect Sir John Soane (1753-1837) wrote a strange and perplexing manuscript, Crude Hints towards an History of my House in Lincoln’s Inn Fields, in which, in the guise of an Antiquary, he imagines his home as a future ruin, inspected by visitors speculating on its origins and function.

Never published in his lifetime, the manuscript has been meticulously transcribed and provided with an explanatory Introduction and footnotes by Helen Dorey, Deputy Director and Inspectress of Sir John Soane’s Museum. Originally published as part of an exhibition catalogue sixteen years ago, this new edition has been extensively revised and updated. The text is accompanied by nineteen illustrations, seventeen of them in full colour.

About the Author:
Sir John Soane (1753 – 1837) was one of the most inventive architects of his time. He built the Bank of England and Dulwich Picture Gallery, as well as his own extraordinary home by buying, demolishing and rebuilding three houses in Lincoln’s Inn Fields. First, in 1792, he bought number 12 – pleased, perhaps, with its proximity to the Royal Academy, then at Somerset House, and the coaching inns on High Holborn. This was to be his home, office, and a space for his collections. He created a distinctive façade in white Norfolk brick – a material which would have stood out on the street. And at the back of the house, he built a two-storey architectural office. Then in 1807, Soane bought number 13 in order to acquire its stable block. He rebuilt the stables into a new office and museum space, which he filled with plaster casts and Roman marbles. Soane continued to acquire objects and display them, but instead of categorising objects, he decided to show his collection in creative, eclectic ways instead. In 1812, Soane’s unusual collection had taken over the space once occupied by the stables at the back of number 13. He needed more room, so he acquired the rest of the house and moved in. He rebuilt the front part, connecting it to the back, giving him plenty of new space to display his collection. Soane now opened up the house to his students, hoping to aid their studies with his collection. Magazines began referring to the house as ‘an Academy of Architecture’. Soane’s collection grew futher. He ended up with some spectacular items – like the sarcophagus of the Egyptian king, Seti I. He was constantly arranging and rearranging these objects throughout his life, not just to incorporate new acquisitions, but to enhance their poetic qualities through inspiring juxtapositions. The organisation of the museum can seem chaotic. It is, in fact, quite purposeful – each room a work of art in its own right. In 1824, Soane acquired and rebuilt number 14 Lincoln’s Inn Fields. The front part was a separate house which was rented out. The stables and courtyard at the back were demolished, became part of his as the Picture Room. In 1833, he negotiated an Act of Parliament: to preserve his house and collection, exactly as it would be at the time of his death – and to keep it open and free for inspiration and education. Four years later, Soane died. A board of trustees took on the responsibility of upholding Soane’s wishes – as they continue to do to this day.
NEW: Cannibalism in the Linear Pottery Culture: The Human Remains from Herxheim by Bruno Boulestin and Anne-Sophie Coupey. viii+143 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 183 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912130. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912147. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Herxheim enclosure, located in the German region of Palatinate, is one of the major discoveries of the last two decades regarding the Linear Pottery Culture, and probably one of the most significant in advancing understanding of how this culture ended. The spectacular deposits, mostly composed of human remains, recovered on the occasion of the two excavation campaigns carried out on the site, grabbed people’s attention and at the same time raised several questions regarding their interpretation, which had so far mostly hesitated between peculiar funerary practices, war and cannibalism.

The authors provide here the first extensive study of the human remains found at Herxheim, focusing mainly on those recovered during the 2005–2010 excavation campaign. They first examine the field data in order to reconstruct at best the modalities of deposition of these remains. Next, from the quantitative analyses and those of the bone modifications, they describe the treatments of the dead, showing that they actually were the victims of cannibalistic practices. The nature of this cannibalism is then discussed on the basis of biological, palaeodemographic and isotopic studies, and concludes that an exocannibalism existed linked to armed violence. Finally, the human remains are placed in both their local and chronocultural contexts, and a general interpretation is proposed of the events that unfolded in Herxheim and of the reasons for the social crisis at the end of the Linear Pottery culture in which they took place.

About the Authors:
Bruno Boulestin is an anthropologist at the University of Bordeaux, France, member of the “Anthropologie des populations passées et presents” (A3P) team of the unit “De la Préhistoire à l’Actuel, Culture, Environnement, Anthropologie” (PACEA, UMR 5199 of the CNRS). He is working on the diachronic study of practices around death in ancient societies from both archaeological, bioarchaeological and socio-anthropological data and is specialized in the study of bone modifications and corpse treatments.

Anne-Sophie Coupey is an archaeologist at the University of Rennes 1, France, Centre de Recherche en Archéologie, Archéosciences et Histoire (CReAAH, UMR 6566 of the CNRS). She is specialized in the archaeology of death and has worked mainly on funerary practices in Southeastern Asia.

NEW: Homines, Funera, Astra 2 Life Beyond Death in Ancient Times (Romanian Case Studies) edited by Raluca Kogălniceanu, Mihai Gligor, Roxana-Gabriela Curcă and Susan Stratton. viii+124 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Nine papers in English, one in French. 182 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912062. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912079. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Proceedings of the International Symposium on Funerary Anthropology 23-26 September 2012 ‘1 Decembrie 1918’ University (Alba Iulia, Romania)

The present volume reunites most of the papers that were presented at the second meeting of the Homines, Funera, Astra Symposium on Funerary Anthropology that took place at ‘1 Decembrie 1918’ University, Alba Iulia, between 23rd and 26th September 2012.

The theme of the volume is Life beyond Death in Ancient Times. The intention was to create a forum for discussing Prehistoric, Roman and Migration Period burial practices from Central and South-Eastern Europe, focusing on elements that might suggest belief in afterlife.

The interdisciplinary character of the volume is provided by the varied approaches to the archaeology by the contributors, resulting in exploring the subject from multiple perspectives: archaeological, anthropological, geological, architectural, landscape, and epigraphic. Seven studies are dedicated to prehistoric burial practices, discussing discoveries dating from the Palaeolithic (one study), Neolithic and Copper Age (four studies), and Bronze Age (one study). A study focusing on methodology proposes a non-invasive method of analysis for burial mounds, with examples from the Bronze and Iron Ages. Two studies focusing on the Roman Period and another on the Migration Period complete our vision of funerary archaeology for this part of Europe.

We want to express joy that our editorial project, which started with the publication of the first HFA volume (R. Kogălniceanu, R.-G. Curcă, M. Gligor and S. Stratton (eds.), Homines, Funera, Astra. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Funerary Anthropology, 5-8 June 2011, ‘1 Decembrie 1918’ University, Alba Iulia, Romania. Oxford, Archaeopress, BAR International Series 2410) , is followed by the present book. The basis for the series dedicated to burial archaeology with the intention to be a useful, modern, interdisciplinary instrument, is thus laid.
NEW: Bronze ‘Bathtub’ Coffins In the Context of 8th-6th Century BC Babylonian, Assyrian and Elamite Funerary Practices by Yasmina Wicks. vi+168 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 181 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911744. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911751. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is dedicated to a small number of unique bronze ‘bathtub’ coffins found in 8th–6th century BC Babylonian, Assyrian and Elamite burial contexts. Usually treated as an incidental aspect of the burial process, these fascinating burial receptacles have until now garnered little in the way of academic interest. Here the author takes the opportunity to further explore the coffins, drawing together the widely dispersed information on their archaeological contexts, investigating the method and place of their manufacture, and establishing a possible date range for their production and use. To progress towards an understanding of the bronze ‘bathtub’ coffin burials within the broader context of regional funerary practices, they are then incorporated into an analysis of Neo-Babylonian, Neo-Assyrian and Neo-Elamite funerary ritual and belief. Finally the coffins are placed within the historical framework of these regions’ socio-political interaction in an attempt to establish whether they represent a shared funerary tradition. Underpinning this study is the principle that mortuary evidence is the product of intentional behaviour; that the bronze ‘bathtub’ coffins represent a deliberate choice by the burying group and each would have featured in an emotionally and symbolically charged burial act.
NEW: La production de la céramique antique dans la région de Salakta et Ksour Essef (Tunisie) by Jihen Nacef. viii+256 pages; illustrated throughout. French text with English abstract. 180 2015 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 8. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911720. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911737. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication provides the most updated information on the ceramic production (amphorae, cooking and coarse wares, ceramic building materials) of Salakta and the Ksour Essef district, in the Sahel region of Tunisia, from the 3rd century BC to the 7th century AD. This book deals with the history and the archaeology of Sullecthum/Salakta, the typology of the ceramic production (mainly amphorae), the chronology and the location of the workshops, the amphora stamps and contents, the distribution in the Mediterranean, and the organisation of production and trade. The author is Lecturer at the Institut Supérieur des Etudes Appliquées en Humanités de Mahdia (University of Monastir, Tunisia).
NEW: Glass Beads from Early Medieval Ireland Classification, dating, social performance by Mags Mannion. viii+145 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 3 colour plates. 177 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911966. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911973. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This is the first dedicated and comprehensive study of glass beads from Early Medieval Ireland, presenting the first national classification, typology, dating, symbology and social performance of glass beads.

Glass beads are one of the most visually stunning archaeological objects and they remain as popular a part of body ornament today as in the past. This continuing fascination is explained somewhat by the versatility of glass which can be rendered opaque or transparent and produced in a variety of colours. Glass has an almost mesmerising effect in its ability to reflect light, presenting not just a surface but also dimensional depths of shade and light. In this respect the crafting of glass beads as representations of the human eye may go some way towards explaining their enduring and universal popularity.

Glass beads however are much more than this and their enduring appeal is also a reflection of their aesthetic and symbolic qualities. This book explores not only the importance of beads as a tool of archaeological research but also the relevance of beads in the social arena and their significance as markers of cultural and religious identity and symbols of status and age both in Ireland and further afield.
Contextos cerámicos y transformaciones urbanas en Carthago Nova (s. II-III d.C.) by Alejandro Quevedo. x+397 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English summary. 179 2015 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 7. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910549. £72.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910556. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The transition process of the Roman city between the Early Roman period and Late Antiquity is difficult to understand due to the absence of urban models and the decline in epigraphy. The transformations that accompany this period are detectable in the western provinces of the Empire from a very early time. Their interpretation –crisis, mutation, etc.– varies with each study case. Ancient Cartagena (Hispania Citerior) is a paradigm of these changes. Starting under Marcus Aurelius, the city began to show symptoms of exhaustion, at the same time as literary and epigraphic evidence began to decline, until it disappeared altogether. In these pages we aim to contribute –and at the same time vindicate– an approach to discovering more about the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD based on the archaeological record and taking into account the stratigraphic sequences and especially the pottery material culture. The compiled documentation begins with a triple vocation: to serve as an instrument for dating; to provide quantified data about Carthago Nova’s patterns of consumption, way of life and trading links; and to understand the evolution of the city in a period from which the urban model of the Late Period emerged.
Die Römische Villa als Indikator provinzialer Wirtschafts- und Gesellschaftsstrukturen by Mareike Rind. vi+286; illustrated throughout in black & white. German text with extensive English summary. 178 2015 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 10. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911683. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911690. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The investigation of the Roman villa and its economic structures in the western provinces of the Roman Empire has clearly shown that rural settlement developed at different paces and intensities that largely depended on the specific region in which a villa landscape was intended and created. The progress of Romanisation was strongly linked to the existence of pre- Roman infrastructure in a given region (e.g. Tres Galliae: Celtic; Narbonensis: Greek; Northern Africa: Punic). This existing infrastructure was at first acquired and successively intensified by the Romans.

In its sum, the Roman villa economy was a complex and dynamic system that in its configuration vastly differed, according to the specific province. Still, the system essentially served clear functional purposes such as self-subsistence and, ideally, surplus production for the supply of the Roman military in newly conquered provinces. Besides that, the implementation of a villa landscape in a province, often carried by veterans and other groups of Italic origin, the Roman villa network took the role as a carrier of processes that evolve around the term Romanisation during the phase of Roman conquest and authority.
Elijah’s Cave on Mount Carmel and its Inscriptions by Asher Ovadiah and Rosario Pierri. vi+138 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 176 . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911980. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911997. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Literary sources suggest that Mt. Carmel was a sacred site for the pagans, for the veneration and worship of Ba’al, as practiced there since the 9th century BCE through the erection of altars and temples/shrines in his honour. According to Iamblichus, the Greek philosopher Pythagoras, on his way to Egypt, visited the mountain in the second half of the 6th century BCE and sought solitude in a temple, or perhaps in a temenos. In the days of the Achaemenid king of Persia Darius I (521-486 BCE), the mountain seems to have been sacred to Zeus.

Artistic and epigraphic evidence suggest that Elijah’s Cave, on the western slope of Mt. Carmel, had been used as a pagan cultic place, possibly a shrine, devoted to Ba’al Carmel (identified with Zeus/Jupiter) as well as to Pan and Eros as secondary deities. The visual representation of the cult statue (idol) of Ba’al Carmel, a libation vessel (kylix?) and the presumed figure of the priest or, alternatively, the altar within the aedicula, strengthen the assumption that the Cave was used in the Roman period, and perhaps even earlier. In addition, one of the Greek inscriptions, dated to the Roman period, indicates the sacred nature of the Cave and the prohibition of its profanation.

When Elijah’s Cave ceased to be used for pagan worship it continued to be regarded as a holy site and was dedicated to Prophet Elijah, presumably in the Early Byzantine period. Following the tradition linking Elijah (so-called el-Khader) with Mt. Carmel, it became sacred to the Prophet and was used by supplicants (Jews, Christians, Muslims and Druze) to Elijah for aid, healing and salvation, a tradition that still persists to this day.

There are no literary or historical sources which are recording the existence of Elijah’s Cave on Mt. Carmel prior to the 12th century. The earliest written testimony is that of the laconic description of the Russian Abbot Daniel, who made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land in 1106-1107, followed by Rabbi Benjamin of Tudela, who visited the Land of Israel in 1165. Any earlier written material must have been lost over time, since it is unlikely that the Cave and its surroundings were entirely ignored before the 12th century.

Asher Ovadiah is Hannelore Kipp Professor (Emeritus) of Classical and Early Byzantine Archaeology and Art History, Tel Aviv University.

Rosario Pierri is Professor of Greek Language and Literature, Faculty of Biblical Sciences and Archaeology (Studium Biblicum Franciscanum), Jerusalem.
Gnathia and related Hellenistic ware on the East Adriatic coast by Maja Miše. x+168 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 175 . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911645. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911652. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Gnathia ware, originally produced in Apulia (today’s Puglia in South East Italy), was found on numerous sites on the East Adriatic coast and in its hinterland: in the Greek settlements – majority of them in Issa, today’s Vis on the island of Vis in Central Dalmatia – and in indigenous settlements on the East Adriatic coast, stretching from the Istrian peninsula in the north to the present-day Albania in the south. The high number and specific characteristics of Gnathia ware have raised questions about the development of local production, especially in ancient Issa. Thanks to numerous archaeological excavations in southern Italy, especially in Apulia, as well as the accompanying publications, current knowledge of Gnathia ware has reached a stage where we can speak of the entire production process: from moulding and decorative techniques, to firing and distribution; from identification of the different workshops to an understanding of the function of the vessels in different archaeological contexts. Familiarity with all of these aspects of production fosters an understanding of the establishment and development of Gnathia production in Issa.

The aims of this study are fourfold: to present Gnathia ware on the East Adriatic coast; to define local Issaean Gnathia production, from the manufacturing process to its distribution (including the typology of shapes and decorations); to identify further workshops on the East Adriatic coast and their relationship to other types of Hellenistic pottery; and finally to understand the trade and contacts in the Adriatic during the Hellenistic period.
Rise of the Hyksos Egypt and the Levant from the Middle Kingdom to the Early Second Intermediate Period by Anna-Latifa Mourad. xiv+314; black & white throughout with 4 colour plates. 174 11 Archaeopress Egyptology . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911331. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911348. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Second Intermediate Period of Egypt is characterised by the destabilisation of the Egyptian state. It is also recognised as the time in which the aptly named ‘rulers of the foreign lands’, or Hyksos, extended their control over parts of Egypt. But, who are these rulers and where did they come from? How did they create their Fifteenth Dynasty within Egypt? This book provides a new appraisal of the circumstances leading to Hyksos rule. Utilising theories on ethnicity and cultural mixing, it investigates the nature and effects of Egyptian-Levantine contact from the Middle Kingdom to the early Second Intermediate Period, and reassesses the Egyptian concept of the other. The approach is holistic, gathering archaeological, textual and artistic evidence from sites across three regions: Egypt, the Eastern Desert, and the Levant. This method is proven to be wellsuited in shedding light on the origins of the enigmatic Hyksos, offering new insights into how these ‘rulers of foreign lands’ established their Fifteenth Dynasty in Egypt.
Sharma Un entrepôt de commerce medieval sur la côte du Ḥaḍramawt (Yémen, ca 980-1180) edited by Axelle Rougeulle. xxii + 559 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. French text throughout. 173 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911942. £88.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911959. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Cited by al-Muqaddasī in c.985 and then by al-Idrīsī in c.1150, the medieval port of Sharma was discovered in 1996 at the extremity of the Ra's Sharma, 50km east of al-Shiḥr on the Ḥaḍramawt coast of Yemen; it was excavated in 2001-2005. This unique site was actually a transit entrepôt, a cluster of warehouses probably founded by Iranian merchants and entirely devoted to the maritime trade. It knew a rather short period of activity, between around 980 and the second half of the 12th century, which may be acknowledged as the Sharma horizon. Excavations proved that this settlement experienced six occupation phases, which are closely related to the political and economic developments in the region at that time. The material is mainly transit merchandises, small objects, resins, glass and pottery; some of the ceramics were locally made, in the nearby kilns of Yaḍghaṭ, but most (70%) were imported, from all parts of the Indian Ocean from China to East Africa. The typo-chronological study of this closed assemblage brings very precise information on the dating and evolution of the various types recorded, and the historical analyse sheds new light on the history of the Islamic maritime trade in the 10th to 12th centuries.

French description:
Mentionné par al-Muqaddasī vers 985 puis par al-Idrīsī vers 1150, le port médiéval de Sharma a été découvert en 1996 à l’extrémité du Ra’s Sharma, à 50 km à l’est de la ville d’al-Shiḥr sur la côte du Ḥaḍramawt au Yémen ; il a fait l’objet de quatre campagnes de fouilles en 2001-2005. Ce site unique était en fait un entrepôt de transit, probablement fondé par des marchands iraniens et entièrement consacré au commerce maritime. Il connut un brève période d’activité entre ca 980 et la seconde moitié du XIIe siècle, que l’on peut appeler l’horizon Sharma. Les fouilles ont montré que l’entrepôt avait connu 6 phases chronologiques, qui reflètent étroitement l’évolution politico-économique de la région à cette époque. Le matériel mis au jour représente essentiellement les vestiges de marchandises en transit, petits objets, résines aromatiques, verreries et céramiques ; un tiers du corpus céramique est d’origine locale, produit dans les fours proches de Yaḍghaṭ, le reste est importé, de toutes les régions riveraines de l’océan Indien depuis la Chine jusqu’à l’Afrique orientale. L’étude chrono-typologique de cet ensemble clos apporte des informations précises sur la datation et l’évolution des divers types répertoriés, et l’analyse historique éclaire d’un jour nouveau l’histoire du commerce maritime musulman aux Xe-XIIe siècles.
The Antonine Wall: A Handbook to Scotland's Roman Frontier by Anne S Robertson; revised and edited by Lawrence Keppie. 144 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 6th Edition; published by Glasgow Archaeological Society, 2015.ISBN 9780902018143. £9.95 (No VAT). Buy Now

The Antonine Wall, constructed between the Forth and the Clyde in AD 142, was held by the Roman Army for about 20 years as the northern frontier of the province of Britannia. A continuous barrier of turf on a stone foundation, it ran for 60 kilometres, with a regular series of forts along it. The Antonine Wall was made a World Heritage Site in 2008.

This handbook outlines the historical and geographical background, and provides a detailed guide to the remains on the ground. It is lavishly illustrated in colour.

This well-known handbook to the Roman frontier between Forth and Clyde, in print since 1960, is republished here in a revised format and illustrated for the first time in full colour. It incorporates the latest results of archaeological excavation, fieldwork and research, with numerous photographs and plans to aid the modern visitor.

Published by Glasgow Archaeological Society, 2015.

Small Things – Wide Horizons Studies in honour of Birgitta Hårdh edited by Lars Larsson, Fredrik Ekengren, Bertil Helgesson and Bengt Söderberg. 308 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 172 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911317. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911324. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication honours Birgitta Hårdh on her 70th birthday. Birgitta Hårdh is one of the leading experts on European Viking Age, engaged in diverse research projects, and also a vital collaborator in various networks specializing in the period. Through time, Birgitta has extended her research to comprise other periods of the Iron Age.

A feature common to all Birgitta Hårdh’s research is that she has been able, through analysis of a body of finds, to broaden the perspective, not least geographically through her profound knowledge of phenomena in Northern Europe and indeed all of Europe. Therefore, this book has been given the title Small Things – Wide Horizons.

A total of fourty titles have been submitted to the volume. The presentations include a number of perspectives mainly of Iron Age. Themes as silver economy, coins, trinkets, burials, crafts, farms and fields, centrality and transformations give a view of the variation of contributions nationally and internationally.
A Study of the Deposition and Distribution of Copper Alloy Vessels in Roman Britain by Jason Lundock. vi+258 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 171 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911805. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911812. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

By examining patterns in depositional practice as well as the geographic and site distribution of copper alloy vessels in Roman Britain, this book offers an analysis of the varying and divergent practices of material culture in the British provinces under Roman rule. The work also seeks to offer a useful classification system for the study and discussion of copper alloy vessels by adapting familiar typology as well as introducing new vocabulary. Analysis is given to patterns in the deposition of vessel forms during the Roman period in Britain as well as addressing their spatial relation to other objects and their use of decoration. Insight is also offered into the functional application of these objects and how changing culture practice led to the shifting of use from smaller vessel forms in the early Roman period to larger vessel forms by Late Antiquity. Additionally, the discussion offered in this book serves as a case study in the application of small finds research to the larger theoretical debates concerning Rome and its provinces.
The Mysterious Wall Paintings of Teleilat Ghassul, Jordan In Context by Bernadette Drabsch. x+230 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with two colour plates. 170 2015 Monographs of the Sydney University Teleilat Ghassul Project 3. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911706. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911713. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is primarily concerned with the re-analysis of the wall paintings from the Jordanian Chalcolithic period (ca. 4700-3700 BC) settlement site of Teleilat Ghassul, first excavated in 1929 by scholars from the Pontifical Biblical Institute Rome and latterly by Australians from the University of Sydney. The seven major paintings were re-analysed using a methodology based on contextualisation, digital reconstruction, experimental replication and subject analysis.

A comprehensive theoretical framework was constructed from published and unpublished materials from the site, consisting of geographical and environmental datasets, topographic, settlement-location and structural contexts. These included material/artefactual associations, technological issues and a comprehensive symbolic regional comparative analysis of the artworks themselves.

The interpretive structure, reconstructed and re-evaluated scenes, and replication studies, have revealed numerous insights into the artistic traditions and cultic practices of South Levantine Ghassulian Chalcolithic culture, with considerable relevance to the ongoing debate on such matters as prehistoric societal makeup and art historical scholarship.

This study has provided intriguing glimpses into the lives of a brilliantly artistic and deeply ritualised society, shedding new light on this little-known and still mysterious people.
Rivers in Prehistory edited by Andrea Vianello. vi+166 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 169 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911782. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911799. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

From antiquity onwards people have opted to live near rivers and major watercourses. Both freshwater and navigable routes provide the obvious reasons for settling near a river, but there are also many drawbacks, such as flooding. This volume explores rivers as facilitators of movement through landscapes, and it investigates the reasons for living near a river, as well as the role of the river in the human landscape. Ultimately, it focuses on the delicate relationship between humans and their environment, looking at the origins to help understand the present.

The symbolic and philosophical perceptions and understanding of rivers, the cultural and social behaviour associated with their presence, and the effort and engineering required to subdue and control their flowing waters are all deeply embedded in human cultures. Through an extended essay and ten case studies, this book introduces the reader to how rivers have been perceived as gateways to wilderness and the environment for humans across the world, and how they have affected behaviour and ideas throughout human history. Students and researchers of humanenvironment dynamics, and/or the colonisation of new lands, will find in this volume a network of bridges to facilitate the exploration of different research paths towards historical narratives of human cultures, through which rivers, and their environments, run.