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Archaeopress: Publishers of Academic Archaeology
Communicating the researches of thousands of archaeologists worldwide since 1991

Archaeopress is an Oxford-based publisher specialising in academic archaeology.
Journal of Greek Archaeology Subscription edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). Price listed refers to 2016 print subscription for private individuals. More pricing options available.ISBN 2059-4674. £65.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

Announcing an international English-language journal specializing in synthetic articles and in long reviews. The scope of this journal is Greek archaeology both in the Aegean and throughout the wider Greek-inhabited world, from earliest Prehistory to the Modern Era. Thus we include contributions not just from traditional periods such as Greek Prehistory and the Classical Greek to Hellenistic eras, but also from Roman through Byzantine, Crusader and Ottoman Greece and into the Early Modern period. Outside of the Aegean contributions are welcome covering the Archaeology of the Greeks overseas, likewise from Prehistory into the Modern World. Greek Archaeology for the purposes of the JGA thus includes the Archaeology of the Hellenistic World, Roman Greece, Byzantine Archaeology, Frankish and Ottoman Archaeology, and the Postmedieval Archaeology of Greece and of the Greek Diaspora.

The first issue of the journal will be in October 2016 and thereafter it will appear annually and incorporate original articles, research reviews and book reviews. Subscription fees will be charged in December for the following year's Issue.


ISSN: 2059-4674 (print); 2059-4682 (online)

Print: £85 including free shipping in UK & Europe (£10 ROW). Early bird price: £70
Print & Online access: £95 including free shipping in UK & Europe (£10 ROW). Early bird price: £75
Online access only: £90. Early bird price: £70
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Special price for digital only subscribers: £25.

Download the subscription form here - complete and return by post of fax. 2016 subscription fees will be collected in December 2015.

NEW: Cannibalism in the Linear Pottery Culture: The Human Remains from Herxheim by Bruno Boulestin and Anne-Sophie Coupey. viii+143 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 183 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912130. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912147. £29.75 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Herxheim enclosure, located in the German region of Palatinate, is one of the major discoveries of the last two decades regarding the Linear Pottery Culture, and probably one of the most significant in advancing understanding of how this culture ended. The spectacular deposits, mostly composed of human remains, recovered on the occasion of the two excavation campaigns carried out on the site, grabbed people’s attention and at the same time raised several questions regarding their interpretation, which had so far mostly hesitated between peculiar funerary practices, war and cannibalism.

The authors provide here the first extensive study of the human remains found at Herxheim, focusing mainly on those recovered during the 2005–2010 excavation campaign. They first examine the field data in order to reconstruct at best the modalities of deposition of these remains. Next, from the quantitative analyses and those of the bone modifications, they describe the treatments of the dead, showing that they actually were the victims of cannibalistic practices. The nature of this cannibalism is then discussed on the basis of biological, palaeodemographic and isotopic studies, and concludes that an exocannibalism existed linked to armed violence. Finally, the human remains are placed in both their local and chronocultural contexts, and a general interpretation is proposed of the events that unfolded in Herxheim and of the reasons for the social crisis at the end of the Linear Pottery culture in which they took place.

About the Authors:
Bruno Boulestin is an anthropologist at the University of Bordeaux, France, member of the “Anthropologie des populations passées et presents” (A3P) team of the unit “De la Préhistoire à l’Actuel, Culture, Environnement, Anthropologie” (PACEA, UMR 5199 of the CNRS). He is working on the diachronic study of practices around death in ancient societies from both archaeological, bioarchaeological and socio-anthropological data and is specialized in the study of bone modifications and corpse treatments.

Anne-Sophie Coupey is an archaeologist at the University of Rennes 1, France, Centre de Recherche en Archéologie, Archéosciences et Histoire (CReAAH, UMR 6566 of the CNRS). She is specialized in the archaeology of death and has worked mainly on funerary practices in Southeastern Asia.

FORTHCOMING: Homines, Funera, Astra 2 Life Beyond Death in Ancient Times (Romanian Case Studies) edited by Raluca Kogălniceanu, Mihai Gligor, Roxana-Gabriela Curcă and Susan Stratton. viii+124 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Nine papers in English, one in French. 182 2015. ISBN 9781784912062. £32.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Proceedings of the International Symposium on Funerary Anthropology 23-26 September 2012 ‘1 Decembrie 1918’ University (Alba Iulia, Romania)

The present volume reunites most of the papers that were presented at the second meeting of the Homines, Funera, Astra Symposium on Funerary Anthropology that took place at ‘1 Decembrie 1918’ University, Alba Iulia, between 23rd and 26th September 2012.

The theme of the volume is Life beyond Death in Ancient Times. The intention was to create a forum for discussing Prehistoric, Roman and Migration Period burial practices from Central and South-Eastern Europe, focusing on elements that might suggest belief in afterlife.

The interdisciplinary character of the volume is provided by the varied approaches to the archaeology by the contributors, resulting in exploring the subject from multiple perspectives: archaeological, anthropological, geological, architectural, landscape, and epigraphic. Seven studies are dedicated to prehistoric burial practices, discussing discoveries dating from the Palaeolithic (one study), Neolithic and Copper Age (four studies), and Bronze Age (one study). A study focusing on methodology proposes a non-invasive method of analysis for burial mounds, with examples from the Bronze and Iron Ages. Two studies focusing on the Roman Period and another on the Migration Period complete our vision of funerary archaeology for this part of Europe.

We want to express joy that our editorial project, which started with the publication of the first HFA volume (R. Kogălniceanu, R.-G. Curcă, M. Gligor and S. Stratton (eds.), Homines, Funera, Astra. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Funerary Anthropology, 5-8 June 2011, ‘1 Decembrie 1918’ University, Alba Iulia, Romania. Oxford, Archaeopress, BAR International Series 2410) , is followed by the present book. The basis for the series dedicated to burial archaeology with the intention to be a useful, modern, interdisciplinary instrument, is thus laid.

This book is scheduled for publication in October 2015, priced £32.00. To register your interest please email info@archaeopress.com.
FORTHCOMING: Bronze ‘Bathtub’ Coffins In the Context of 8th-6th Century BC Babylonian, Assyrian and Elamite Funerary Practices by Yasmina Wicks. vi+168 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 181 2015. ISBN 9781784911744. £35.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is dedicated to a small number of unique bronze ‘bathtub’ coffins found in 8th–6th century BC Babylonian, Assyrian and Elamite burial contexts. Usually treated as an incidental aspect of the burial process, these fascinating burial receptacles have until now garnered little in the way of academic interest. Here the author takes the opportunity to further explore the coffins, drawing together the widely dispersed information on their archaeological contexts, investigating the method and place of their manufacture, and establishing a possible date range for their production and use. To progress towards an understanding of the bronze ‘bathtub’ coffin burials within the broader context of regional funerary practices, they are then incorporated into an analysis of Neo-Babylonian, Neo-Assyrian and Neo-Elamite funerary ritual and belief. Finally the coffins are placed within the historical framework of these regions’ socio-political interaction in an attempt to establish whether they represent a shared funerary tradition. Underpinning this study is the principle that mortuary evidence is the product of intentional behaviour; that the bronze ‘bathtub’ coffins represent a deliberate choice by the burying group and each would have featured in an emotionally and symbolically charged burial act.

This book is scheduled for publication in October 2015, priced £35.00. To register your interest please email info@archaeopress.com.
NEW: La production de la céramique antique dans la région de Salakta et Ksour Essef (Tunisie) by Jihen Nacef. viii+256 pages; illustrated throughout. French text with English abstract. 180 2015 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 8. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911720. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911737. £38.24 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication provides the most updated information on the ceramic production (amphorae, cooking and coarse wares, ceramic building materials) of Salakta and the Ksour Essef district, in the Sahel region of Tunisia, from the 3rd century BC to the 7th century AD. This book deals with the history and the archaeology of Sullecthum/Salakta, the typology of the ceramic production (mainly amphorae), the chronology and the location of the workshops, the amphora stamps and contents, the distribution in the Mediterranean, and the organisation of production and trade. The author is Lecturer at the Institut Supérieur des Etudes Appliquées en Humanités de Mahdia (University of Monastir, Tunisia).

This book is scheduled for publication in October 2015, priced £45.00. To register your interest please email info@archaeopress.com.
NEW: Contextos cerámicos y transformaciones urbanas en Carthago Nova (s. II-III d.C.) by Alejandro Quevedo. x+397 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English summary. 179 2015 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 7. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910549. £72.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910556. £61.20 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The transition process of the Roman city between the Early Roman period and Late Antiquity is difficult to understand due to the absence of urban models and the decline in epigraphy. The transformations that accompany this period are detectable in the western provinces of the Empire from a very early time. Their interpretation –crisis, mutation, etc.– varies with each study case. Ancient Cartagena (Hispania Citerior) is a paradigm of these changes. Starting under Marcus Aurelius, the city began to show symptoms of exhaustion, at the same time as literary and epigraphic evidence began to decline, until it disappeared altogether. In these pages we aim to contribute –and at the same time vindicate– an approach to discovering more about the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD based on the archaeological record and taking into account the stratigraphic sequences and especially the pottery material culture. The compiled documentation begins with a triple vocation: to serve as an instrument for dating; to provide quantified data about Carthago Nova’s patterns of consumption, way of life and trading links; and to understand the evolution of the city in a period from which the urban model of the Late Period emerged.
NEW: Die Römische Villa als Indikator provinzialer Wirtschafts- und Gesellschaftsstrukturen by Mareike Rind. vi+286; illustrated throughout in black & white. German text with extensive English summary. 178 2015 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 10. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911683. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911690. £38.24 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The investigation of the Roman villa and its economic structures in the western provinces of the Roman Empire has clearly shown that rural settlement developed at different paces and intensities that largely depended on the specific region in which a villa landscape was intended and created. The progress of Romanisation was strongly linked to the existence of pre- Roman infrastructure in a given region (e.g. Tres Galliae: Celtic; Narbonensis: Greek; Northern Africa: Punic). This existing infrastructure was at first acquired and successively intensified by the Romans.

In its sum, the Roman villa economy was a complex and dynamic system that in its configuration vastly differed, according to the specific province. Still, the system essentially served clear functional purposes such as self-subsistence and, ideally, surplus production for the supply of the Roman military in newly conquered provinces. Besides that, the implementation of a villa landscape in a province, often carried by veterans and other groups of Italic origin, the Roman villa network took the role as a carrier of processes that evolve around the term Romanisation during the phase of Roman conquest and authority.
NEW: Glass Beads from Early Medieval Ireland Classification, dating, social performance by Mags Mannion. viii+145 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 3 colour plates. 177 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911966. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911973. £25.50 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This is the first dedicated and comprehensive study of glass beads from Early Medieval Ireland, presenting the first national classification, typology, dating, symbology and social performance of glass beads.

Glass beads are one of the most visually stunning archaeological objects and they remain as popular a part of body ornament today as in the past. This continuing fascination is explained somewhat by the versatility of glass which can be rendered opaque or transparent and produced in a variety of colours. Glass has an almost mesmerising effect in its ability to reflect light, presenting not just a surface but also dimensional depths of shade and light. In this respect the crafting of glass beads as representations of the human eye may go some way towards explaining their enduring and universal popularity.

Glass beads however are much more than this and their enduring appeal is also a reflection of their aesthetic and symbolic qualities. This book explores not only the importance of beads as a tool of archaeological research but also the relevance of beads in the social arena and their significance as markers of cultural and religious identity and symbols of status and age both in Ireland and further afield.
NEW: Elijah’s Cave on Mount Carmel and its Inscriptions by Asher Ovadiah and Rosario Pierri. vi+138 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 176 . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911980. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911997. £27.19 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Literary sources suggest that Mt. Carmel was a sacred site for the pagans, for the veneration and worship of Ba’al, as practiced there since the 9th century BCE through the erection of altars and temples/shrines in his honour. According to Iamblichus, the Greek philosopher Pythagoras, on his way to Egypt, visited the mountain in the second half of the 6th century BCE and sought solitude in a temple, or perhaps in a temenos. In the days of the Achaemenid king of Persia Darius I (521-486 BCE), the mountain seems to have been sacred to Zeus.

Artistic and epigraphic evidence suggest that Elijah’s Cave, on the western slope of Mt. Carmel, had been used as a pagan cultic place, possibly a shrine, devoted to Ba’al Carmel (identified with Zeus/Jupiter) as well as to Pan and Eros as secondary deities. The visual representation of the cult statue (idol) of Ba’al Carmel, a libation vessel (kylix?) and the presumed figure of the priest or, alternatively, the altar within the aedicula, strengthen the assumption that the Cave was used in the Roman period, and perhaps even earlier. In addition, one of the Greek inscriptions, dated to the Roman period, indicates the sacred nature of the Cave and the prohibition of its profanation.

When Elijah’s Cave ceased to be used for pagan worship it continued to be regarded as a holy site and was dedicated to Prophet Elijah, presumably in the Early Byzantine period. Following the tradition linking Elijah (so-called el-Khader) with Mt. Carmel, it became sacred to the Prophet and was used by supplicants (Jews, Christians, Muslims and Druze) to Elijah for aid, healing and salvation, a tradition that still persists to this day.

There are no literary or historical sources which are recording the existence of Elijah’s Cave on Mt. Carmel prior to the 12th century. The earliest written testimony is that of the laconic description of the Russian Abbot Daniel, who made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land in 1106-1107, followed by Rabbi Benjamin of Tudela, who visited the Land of Israel in 1165. Any earlier written material must have been lost over time, since it is unlikely that the Cave and its surroundings were entirely ignored before the 12th century.

Asher Ovadiah is Hannelore Kipp Professor (Emeritus) of Classical and Early Byzantine Archaeology and Art History, Tel Aviv University.

Rosario Pierri is Professor of Greek Language and Literature, Faculty of Biblical Sciences and Archaeology (Studium Biblicum Franciscanum), Jerusalem.

This book is scheduled for publication in September 2015, priced £32.00. To register your interest please email info@archaeopress.com.
NEW: Gnathia and related Hellenistic ware on the East Adriatic coast by Maja Miše. x+168 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 175 . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911645. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911652. £27.19 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Gnathia ware, originally produced in Apulia (today’s Puglia in South East Italy), was found on numerous sites on the East Adriatic coast and in its hinterland: in the Greek settlements – majority of them in Issa, today’s Vis on the island of Vis in Central Dalmatia – and in indigenous settlements on the East Adriatic coast, stretching from the Istrian peninsula in the north to the present-day Albania in the south. The high number and specific characteristics of Gnathia ware have raised questions about the development of local production, especially in ancient Issa. Thanks to numerous archaeological excavations in southern Italy, especially in Apulia, as well as the accompanying publications, current knowledge of Gnathia ware has reached a stage where we can speak of the entire production process: from moulding and decorative techniques, to firing and distribution; from identification of the different workshops to an understanding of the function of the vessels in different archaeological contexts. Familiarity with all of these aspects of production fosters an understanding of the establishment and development of Gnathia production in Issa.

The aims of this study are fourfold: to present Gnathia ware on the East Adriatic coast; to define local Issaean Gnathia production, from the manufacturing process to its distribution (including the typology of shapes and decorations); to identify further workshops on the East Adriatic coast and their relationship to other types of Hellenistic pottery; and finally to understand the trade and contacts in the Adriatic during the Hellenistic period.
NEW: Rise of the Hyksos Egypt and the Levant from the Middle Kingdom to the Early Second Intermediate Period by Anna-Latifa Mourad. xiv+314; black & white throughout with 4 colour plates. 174 11 Archaeopress Egyptology . ISBN 9781784911331. £48.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Second Intermediate Period of Egypt is characterised by the destabilisation of the Egyptian state. It is also recognised as the time in which the aptly named ‘rulers of the foreign lands’, or Hyksos, extended their control over parts of Egypt. But, who are these rulers and where did they come from? How did they create their Fifteenth Dynasty within Egypt? This book provides a new appraisal of the circumstances leading to Hyksos rule. Utilising theories on ethnicity and cultural mixing, it investigates the nature and effects of Egyptian-Levantine contact from the Middle Kingdom to the early Second Intermediate Period, and reassesses the Egyptian concept of the other. The approach is holistic, gathering archaeological, textual and artistic evidence from sites across three regions: Egypt, the Eastern Desert, and the Levant. This method is proven to be wellsuited in shedding light on the origins of the enigmatic Hyksos, offering new insights into how these ‘rulers of foreign lands’ established their Fifteenth Dynasty in Egypt.
NEW: Sharma Un entrepôt de commerce medieval sur la côte du Ḥaḍramawt (Yémen, ca 980-1180) edited by Axelle Rougeulle. xxii + 559 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. French text throughout. 173 2015. ISBN 9781784911942. £88.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Cited by al-Muqaddasī in c.985 and then by al-Idrīsī in c.1150, the medieval port of Sharma was discovered in 1996 at the extremity of the Ra's Sharma, 50km east of al-Shiḥr on the Ḥaḍramawt coast of Yemen; it was excavated in 2001-2005. This unique site was actually a transit entrepôt, a cluster of warehouses probably founded by Iranian merchants and entirely devoted to the maritime trade. It knew a rather short period of activity, between around 980 and the second half of the 12th century, which may be acknowledged as the Sharma horizon. Excavations proved that this settlement experienced six occupation phases, which are closely related to the political and economic developments in the region at that time. The material is mainly transit merchandises, small objects, resins, glass and pottery; some of the ceramics were locally made, in the nearby kilns of Yaḍghaṭ, but most (70%) were imported, from all parts of the Indian Ocean from China to East Africa. The typo-chronological study of this closed assemblage brings very precise information on the dating and evolution of the various types recorded, and the historical analyse sheds new light on the history of the Islamic maritime trade in the 10th to 12th centuries.

French description:
Mentionné par al-Muqaddasī vers 985 puis par al-Idrīsī vers 1150, le port médiéval de Sharma a été découvert en 1996 à l’extrémité du Ra’s Sharma, à 50 km à l’est de la ville d’al-Shiḥr sur la côte du Ḥaḍramawt au Yémen ; il a fait l’objet de quatre campagnes de fouilles en 2001-2005. Ce site unique était en fait un entrepôt de transit, probablement fondé par des marchands iraniens et entièrement consacré au commerce maritime. Il connut un brève période d’activité entre ca 980 et la seconde moitié du XIIe siècle, que l’on peut appeler l’horizon Sharma. Les fouilles ont montré que l’entrepôt avait connu 6 phases chronologiques, qui reflètent étroitement l’évolution politico-économique de la région à cette époque. Le matériel mis au jour représente essentiellement les vestiges de marchandises en transit, petits objets, résines aromatiques, verreries et céramiques ; un tiers du corpus céramique est d’origine locale, produit dans les fours proches de Yaḍghaṭ, le reste est importé, de toutes les régions riveraines de l’océan Indien depuis la Chine jusqu’à l’Afrique orientale. L’étude chrono-typologique de cet ensemble clos apporte des informations précises sur la datation et l’évolution des divers types répertoriés, et l’analyse historique éclaire d’un jour nouveau l’histoire du commerce maritime musulman aux Xe-XIIe siècles.

This book is scheduled for publication in September 2015, priced £88.00. To register your interest please email info@archaeopress.com.
The Antonine Wall: A Handbook to Scotland's Roman Frontier by Anne S Robertson; revised and edited by Lawrence Keppie. 144 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 6th Edition; published by Glasgow Archaeological Society, 2015.ISBN 9780902018143. £9.95 (No VAT). Buy Now

The Antonine Wall, constructed between the Forth and the Clyde in AD 142, was held by the Roman Army for about 20 years as the northern frontier of the province of Britannia. A continuous barrier of turf on a stone foundation, it ran for 60 kilometres, with a regular series of forts along it. The Antonine Wall was made a World Heritage Site in 2008.

This handbook outlines the historical and geographical background, and provides a detailed guide to the remains on the ground. It is lavishly illustrated in colour.

This well-known handbook to the Roman frontier between Forth and Clyde, in print since 1960, is republished here in a revised format and illustrated for the first time in full colour. It incorporates the latest results of archaeological excavation, fieldwork and research, with numerous photographs and plans to aid the modern visitor.

Published by Glasgow Archaeological Society, 2015.

NEW: Small Things – Wide Horizons Studies in honour of Birgitta Hårdh edited by Lars Larsson, Fredrik Ekengren, Bertil Helgesson and Bengt Söderberg. 308 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 172 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911317. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911324. £37.39 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication honours Birgitta Hårdh on her 70th birthday. Birgitta Hårdh is one of the leading experts on European Viking Age, engaged in diverse research projects, and also a vital collaborator in various networks specializing in the period. Through time, Birgitta has extended her research to comprise other periods of the Iron Age.

A feature common to all Birgitta Hårdh’s research is that she has been able, through analysis of a body of finds, to broaden the perspective, not least geographically through her profound knowledge of phenomena in Northern Europe and indeed all of Europe. Therefore, this book has been given the title Small Things – Wide Horizons.

A total of fourty titles have been submitted to the volume. The presentations include a number of perspectives mainly of Iron Age. Themes as silver economy, coins, trinkets, burials, crafts, farms and fields, centrality and transformations give a view of the variation of contributions nationally and internationally.
FORTHCOMING: A Study of the Deposition and Distribution of Copper Alloy Vessels in Roman Britain by Jason Lundock. vi+258 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 171 2015. ISBN 9781784911805. £38.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

By examining patterns in depositional practice as well as the geographic and site distribution of copper alloy vessels in Roman Britain, this book offers an analysis of the varying and divergent practices of material culture in the British provinces under Roman rule. The work also seeks to offer a useful classification system for the study and discussion of copper alloy vessels by adapting familiar typology as well as introducing new vocabulary. Analysis is given to patterns in the deposition of vessel forms during the Roman period in Britain as well as addressing their spatial relation to other objects and their use of decoration. Insight is also offered into the functional application of these objects and how changing culture practice led to the shifting of use from smaller vessel forms in the early Roman period to larger vessel forms by Late Antiquity. Additionally, the discussion offered in this book serves as a case study in the application of small finds research to the larger theoretical debates concerning Rome and its provinces.

This book is scheduled for publication in August 2015, priced £38.00. To register your interest please email info@archaeopress.com.
The Mysterious Wall Paintings of Teleilat Ghassul, Jordan In Context by Bernadette Drabsch. x+230 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with two colour plates. 170 2015 Monographs of the Sydney University Teleilat Ghassul Project 3. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911706. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911713. £28.90 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is primarily concerned with the re-analysis of the wall paintings from the Jordanian Chalcolithic period (ca. 4700-3700 BC) settlement site of Teleilat Ghassul, first excavated in 1929 by scholars from the Pontifical Biblical Institute Rome and latterly by Australians from the University of Sydney. The seven major paintings were re-analysed using a methodology based on contextualisation, digital reconstruction, experimental replication and subject analysis.

A comprehensive theoretical framework was constructed from published and unpublished materials from the site, consisting of geographical and environmental datasets, topographic, settlement-location and structural contexts. These included material/artefactual associations, technological issues and a comprehensive symbolic regional comparative analysis of the artworks themselves.

The interpretive structure, reconstructed and re-evaluated scenes, and replication studies, have revealed numerous insights into the artistic traditions and cultic practices of South Levantine Ghassulian Chalcolithic culture, with considerable relevance to the ongoing debate on such matters as prehistoric societal makeup and art historical scholarship.

This study has provided intriguing glimpses into the lives of a brilliantly artistic and deeply ritualised society, shedding new light on this little-known and still mysterious people.
Rivers in Prehistory edited by Andrea Vianello. vi+166 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 169 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911782. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911799. £32.29 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

From antiquity onwards people have opted to live near rivers and major watercourses. Both freshwater and navigable routes provide the obvious reasons for settling near a river, but there are also many drawbacks, such as flooding. This volume explores rivers as facilitators of movement through landscapes, and it investigates the reasons for living near a river, as well as the role of the river in the human landscape. Ultimately, it focuses on the delicate relationship between humans and their environment, looking at the origins to help understand the present.

The symbolic and philosophical perceptions and understanding of rivers, the cultural and social behaviour associated with their presence, and the effort and engineering required to subdue and control their flowing waters are all deeply embedded in human cultures. Through an extended essay and ten case studies, this book introduces the reader to how rivers have been perceived as gateways to wilderness and the environment for humans across the world, and how they have affected behaviour and ideas throughout human history. Students and researchers of humanenvironment dynamics, and/or the colonisation of new lands, will find in this volume a network of bridges to facilitate the exploration of different research paths towards historical narratives of human cultures, through which rivers, and their environments, run.
Metallurgy in Ancient Ecuador A Study of the Collection of Archaeological Metallurgy of the Ministry of Culture, Ecuador by Roberto Lleras Perez. 150pp; full colour throughout. 168 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911607. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911614. £23.80 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Metallurgical activity was present in Ecuador from at least 1500 BC; by around the beginning of the Common Era metallurgical manufacture and use had extended to most of the Costa and Sierra. Regional styles soon evolved giving rise to high levels of technical craftsmanship and to shaping particular iconographic and decorative patterns. Copper, gold, silver and platinum were mined, processed and converted into thousands of ornaments, offerings, tools and weapons extensively used both by elites and by the common people. By 1450, the Incas had invaded most of the Ecuadorian Sierra and eventually they integrated the diverse metallurgical traditions into their state-managed metallurgical industry. The European conquest in the sixteenth century deeply affected the native metallurgical activities, even though in some regions copper continued to be worked throughout the colonial period. The reconstruction of the general outlines of this fascinating historical process was made possible through the study of the collection of archaeological metal objects of the Ministry of Culture and Heritage of Ecuador, the compilation of previous archaeological references, laboratory analyses and C14 dating of museum objects. This work is the first one of its kind to be published on the ancient metallurgy of Ecuador.
Derelict Stone Buildings of the Black Mountains Massif by Christopher George Leslie Hodges. xii+334 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 167 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911492. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911508. £40.80 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is based on several years of author’s fieldwork in the valleys of the Black Mountains in South East Wales. Hodges had personal knowledge of the area having worked there in his professional capacity as a drystone waller.

The aim of the fieldwork was to locate all the sites of derelict stone buildings within the designated upland study area of approximately 140 square kilometres. Initial research indicated that the area had not been previously surveyed to any great extent and the presence of derelict stone buildings that existed in the valleys was not a characteristic of the surrounding lower terrain.

Using a combination of documentary evidence and fieldwork, a total of 549 potential sites were identified comprising houses, barns, other ancillary buildings and sheepfolds; 499 separate structures were located on the ground. Following a specially devised protocol at each site, information regarding masonry, modes of construction and extant features was recorded in both tabular and photographic forms.
Royal Statues in Egypt 300 BC-AD 220 Context and Function by Elizabeth Brophy. iv+166 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 166 2015 Archaeopress Egyptology 10. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911515. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911522. £32.29 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The aim of this book is to approach Ptolemaic and Imperial royal sculpture in Egypt dating between 300 BC and AD 220 (the reigns of Ptolemy I and Caracalla) from a contextual point of view. To collect together the statuary items (recognised as statues, statue heads and fragments, and inscribed bases and plinths) that are identifiably royal and have a secure archaeological context, that is a secure find spot or a recoverable provenance, within Egypt. This material was used, alongside other types of evidence such as textual sources and numismatic material, to consider the distribution, style, placement, and functions of the royal statues, and to answer the primary questions: where were these statues located? What was the relationship between statue, especially statue style, and placement? And what changes can be identified between Ptolemaic and Imperial royal sculpture?

From analysis of the sculptural evidence, this book was able to create a catalogue of 103 entries composed of 157 statuary items, and use this to identify the different styles of royal statues that existed in Ptolemaic and Imperial Egypt and the primary spaces for the placement of such imagery, namely religious and urban space. The results, based on the available evidence, was the identification of a division between sculptural style and context regarding the royal statues, with Egyptian-style material being placed in Egyptian contexts, Greek-style material in Greek, and Imperial-style statues associated with classical contexts. The functions of the statues appear to have also typically been closely related to statue style and placement. Many of the statues were often directly associated with their location, meaning they were an intrinsic part of the function and appearance of the context they occupied, as well as acting as representations of the monarchs. Primarily, the royal statues acted as a way to establish and maintain communication between different groups in Egypt.
Sounion Revisited: The Sanctuaries of Poseidon and Athena at Sounion in Attica by Zetta Theodoropoulou-Polychroniadis. xii+334 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 165 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911546. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911553. £46.74 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is the first to be published from a wider research project, still in progress, about the sanctuaries of Poseidon and Athena on the promontory of Sounion (southeast Attica). The aim of this volume is to present, for the first time, a comprehensive examination and interpretation of a wide selection of unpublished small finds. These last, of different categories and materials, were discovered in the bothroi (pitdeposits) and the landfills; they are set into their contexts. The illustrations of the finds are integrated within the relevant text for easier reference and a detailed catalogue complements the discussion. The limited archaeological records concerning the work in the sanctuaries, conducted by Valerios Stais between 1897–1915, and which still remain the only extensive excavations undertaken, are re-evaluated.

The author revisits the two sanctuaries, reviewing the structures within them to cast light on the early phases of their establishment and development, as well as their significance for the socio-economic growth of south east Attica. This is realized by drawing upon the evidence of archaeological data and the ancient literary sources alike. The research thus provides a fresh insight into the early cults, with emphasis on the identity of the deities worshipped at Sounion from the Late Geometric to the dawn of the Classical period.
Répertoire de fleurons sur bandeaux de lampes africaines type Hayes II by Jean Bussière and Jean Claude Rivel. ii+138 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. French text. 164 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911560. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911577. £23.80 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A comprehensive repertory of the stamps decorating the rims of Christian African lamps. This volume will be an indispensable tool to Mediterranean archaeologists for identifying even small fragments of lamps.

French description:
Fruit d’un travail de plus de dix ans ce répertoire de 1383 fleurons sur bandeaux de lampes Hayes II marque une avancée significative par rapport aux onze répertoires existants. Celui d’Ennabli, le plus souvent utilisé avec ses 126 fleurons seulement, ne répond pas toujours aux attentes du chercheur. Les auteurs présentent leur classement alphanumérique et justifient leur choix de rendre les reliefs des dessins en noir et les creux en blanc contrairement à la convention qui pour les dessins de décors sur céramique inverse ces valeurs : les fleurons de lampes Hayes II, issus de moules d’appliques, sont en relief et rendre leur contour en blanc suppose nécessairement un trait de contour en noir qui souvent prête à confusion. Ceci est particulièrement visible dans le cas de cercles concentriques ou de damiers. Une base de données entrant plus de 5000 lampes Hayes II dont les fleurons ont été identifiés grâce au répertoire, permet, en faisant jouer l’association des décors de disques avec ceux des bandeaux et avec les provenances, d’ouvrir d’intéressantes perspectives de recherches ultérieures sur les productions des grands ateliers tunisiens actuellement connus.
Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 45 2015 edited by Orhan Elmaz. xii+434 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. PSAS45 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911454. £69.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911461. £57.60 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Seminar for Arabian Studies is the only international academic forum which meets annually for the presentation of research in the humanities on the Arabian Peninsula. It focuses on the fields of archaeology, architecture, art, epigraphy, ethnography, history, language, linguistics, literature, and numismatics from the earliest times to the present day.

A wide range of original and stimulating papers presented at the Seminar are published in the Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies and reflect the dynamism and scope of the interdisciplinary event.

The main foci of the Seminar in 2014, in chronological order were the Palaeolithic and Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages, Early Historical and Classical periods, Heritage Management, Islamic Archaeology and History. In addition there were sessions on Ethnography, on Language, and with a session dedicated to the Archaeology and History of ancient Yemen. In addition, on the evening of Saturday, 26 July 2014, Professor Lloyd Weeks, Head of the School of Humanities, the University of University of New England, New South Wales, Australia, a long supporter of the Seminar and Foundation, presented the MBI Lecture entitled ‘The Quest for the Copper of Magan: how early metallurgy shaped Arabia and set the horizons of the Bronze Age world’ and as always provided an informative, interesting and lucid lecture. This volume also includes notes in memoriam on Nigel Groom (1924–2014), ‘Arabist, historian, spy-catcher, and writer on perfume’; and on Professor Tony Wilkinson (1948–2014), Professor of Archaeology at the University of Edinburgh (2005–2006) and Professor of Archaeology at Durham University (2006–2014) who specialised in landscape archaeology.

The Circle of God An archaeological and historical search for the nature of the sacred: A study of continuity by Brian Hobley. 820 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 163 2015. ISBN 9781784911379. £110.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Symbolism was endemic in the ancient world as a visual language, with its interpretation one of the most important challenges, especially in the realm of the divine and sacred, to today’s cognitive archaeology and Classical Studies. This study is focussed on circular solar/cosmic symbolism which has endured for seven millennia in the European and Mediterranean worlds. The potency of the solar/cosmic circle should not be understated, as this study will demonstrate, with its worldwide affiliation. For all humankind is aware of the sun’s benefits of light and warmth, and of the seasons which needed in the ancient world to be sustained by heavenly harmony through ritual, sacrifice and worship; hence the introduction of sympatheia, i.e. ‘as above so below’ thus satisfying society’s need for a relationship with the natural world of the universe/sun. To that end, Bronze Age people created circular landscapes such as Stonehenge with circular henges and burial monuments (barrows). In the Classical Greco-Roman world, kingship required emperors to play a cosmocrator role acting as a beneficial solar/cosmic earthly filter for their people. Thus Augustus adopted the primary solar Greek god Apollo as his patron, for he commanded prophecy and divination integral in the ancient world. Divination and fate belonged to the Gods, with ancient astrology not just fortune telling but projecting the divine will and workings of the circular living orderly universe with the Sun the centre of Divine intelligence. The pagan world inter-religious toleration was exchanged for Christian universalist monotheism which needed the solarisation of Christ by early Christian fathers to gain followers and permanent converts. Such was the strength of solar tradition that the Emperor Constantine remained loyal nearly unto death, and up to medieval times Christ in Europe was still known as Sol Resurrectionus.

Connecting Networks: Characterising Contact by Measuring Lithic Exchange in the European Neolithic edited by Tim Kerig and Stephen Shennan. x+167 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 162 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911416. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911423. £28.90 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume brings together a group of peer reviewed papers, most of them presented at a workshop held at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. The event took place on 15–17 October 2011 and was part of the European Research Council (ERC) funded project Cultural Evolution of Neolithic Europe (EUROEVOL 2010-2015).

The aim of the EUROEVOL project is to contribute to the new interdisciplinary field of cultural evolution that has developed over the last 30 years, and at the same time use these ideas and methods to address specific questions concerning the links between demographic, economic, social and cultural patterns and processes in the first farming societies of temperate Europe. The aim of the EUROEVOL project is to do that for the first time, and in doing so to provide the basis for a new account of the role of farming in transforming early European societies, c.6000-2000 cal BCE.
Bronze Age Tell Communities in Context – An Exploration Into Culture, Society and the Study of European Prehistory Part 1 – Critique: Europe and the Mediterranean by Tobias L. Kienlin. vi+168 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 161 2015. ISBN 9781784911478. £38.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This study challenges current modelling of Bronze Age tell communities in the Carpathian Basin in terms of the evolution of functionally-differentiated, hierarchical or ‘proto-urban’ society under the influence of Mediterranean palatial centres. It is argued that the narrative strategies employed in mainstream theorising of the ‘Bronze Age’ in terms of inevitable social ‘progress’ sets up an artificial dichotomy with earlier Neolithic groups. The result is a reductionist vision of the Bronze Age past which denies continuity evident in many aspects of life and reduces our understanding of European Bronze Age communities to some weak reflection of foreign-derived social types – be they notorious Hawaiian chiefdoms or Mycenaean palatial rule. In order to justify this view, this study looks broadly in two directions: temporal and spatial. First, it is asked how Late Neolithic tell sites of the Carpathian Basin compare to Bronze Age ones, and if we are entitled to assume structural difference or rather ‘progress’ between both epochs. Second, it is examined if a Mediterranean ‘centre’ in any way can contribute to our understanding of Bronze Age tell communities on the ‘periphery’. It is argued that current Neo-Diffusionism has us essentialise from much richer and diverse evidence of past social and cultural realities. Instead, archaeology is called on to contribute to an understanding of the historically specific expressions of the human condition and human agency, not to reduce past lives to abstract stages on the teleological ladder of social evolution.
Word Becomes Image: Openwork vessels as a reflection of Late Antique transformation by Hallie G. Meredith. x+279 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 160 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911294. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911300. £38.24 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Transformation presents a diachronic investigation providing a rich case study as well as an approach tracing the contours of a category of Roman material culture defined by the Roman period technique of openwork carving. As the first comprehensive assemblage of openwork vessels from Classical to late Antiquity, this work offers primary evidence documenting a key example of the fundamental shift from naturalism to abstraction in which inscriptions are transformed and word becomes image. A glass blower herself, Hallie Meredith poses questions about process, tactility and reception providing a clear picture of the original contexts of production and reception demonstrated by the Roman technique of openwork carving. In an in-depth analysis of the corpus as a whole, typologies (old and new), imagery, geometric patterning and inscriptions as the major divisions among openwork decorative elements, basic design principles are identified, non openwork carving and its relation to openwork decoration are discussed, as are the function, handling, display, movement and provenance of openwork vessels throughout the Roman Empire. Art historians and archaeologists working on the transition from Classical to late Antiquity, as well as scholars focusing on these and later periods of study, can fruitfully apply this approach to visual culture. This work shows how openwork vessels are a reflection of a wide-reaching Roman cultural aesthetic.
L’oblique dans le monde grec Concept et imagerie by Thibault Girard. iv+189; illustrated throughout in black & white. French text. 159 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911393. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911409. £29.75 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

What could be more evident than the concepts of oblique, horizontal or vertical? In the modern world, these concepts form the basis of our thought system, both from a mathematical and artistic point of view. Everything would suggest that these principles were known to the Greek civilization. However, the study of the surviving texts casts a different light on the matter. Homer did not know the concept of oblique - no word could translate it into the language of his time. Even later, the Greeks had five adjectives approximately meaning oblique: λοξός, πλάγιος, λέχριος, σκολιός and δόχμιος. Each discipline (cosmology, optic, geography, art, etc.) had its own way of looking at these five words. Paradoxically, what the written language had not yet synthesized was abundant in imagery. Even more surprising, the oblique in images, which we consider as a sign of movement in our own iconographic language, is found to signify both movement and rest. Two monuments of Greek art draw attention to this new paradox: the frieze of the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus and the Mourning Athena. In each of them, the oblique line is present, and carries two distinct meanings.

These two forms of language, written and figurative, bring a different and complementary perspective on the ancient Greeks' apprehension (or lack thereof) of the concept of oblique.

French description:
Quoi de plus évident que les concepts d’oblique, d’horizontal ou de vertical ? Pour nous, modernes,ces concepts fondamentaux sont la base de tout notre système de pensée, tant mathématiquequ’artistique. Tout porterait à croire que ces principes soient présents dans la civilisation grecque,dont nous nous réclamons les héritiers. Ce n’est pourtant pas une évidence au vu des textes quinous ont été rapportés. Homère n’a pas connu le concept d’oblique – aucun mot ne saurait letraduire dans la langue de son époque. Et même plus tard. Les Grecs ont cinq adjectifs pour signifierapproximativement l’oblique : λοξός, πλάγιος, λέχριος, σκολιός et δόχμιος. Chaque discipline(cosmologie, optique, géographie, artistique, etc.) a sa façon d’appréhender ces cinq termes.Paradoxalement, ce que le langage écrit n’a pas synthétisé se retrouve en abondance dans l’imagerie.Plus surprenant encore, l’oblique dans l’image, que nous considérons comme signe du mouvementdans notre langage iconographique, se retrouve aussi bien pour signifier le mouvement que le repos.Deux monuments de l’art grec attirent notre attention sur ce nouveau paradoxe : la frise du Mausoléed’Halicarnasse et l’Athéna Pensive. À chaque fois l’oblique est présente, à chaque fois elle porte deuxsens bien distincts.

Ces deux formes de langage, écrit et imagé, apportent un éclairage différent, et pour le moinscomplémentaire, sur la façon dont les Grecs de l’Antiquité ont appréhendé (ou non) le conceptd’oblique.

Read an interview with author Thibault Girard published in Insula: Le blog de la Bibliothèque des Sciences de l'Antiquité (Lille 3) — ISSN 2427-8297 concerning his publication L’oblique dans le monde grec.
Once upon a Time in the East The Chronological and Geographical Distribution of Terra Sigillata and Red Slip Ware in the Roman East by Philip Bes. viii+196 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 158 2015 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 6. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911201. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911218. £34.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In this book Philip Bes summarises the results of his PhD thesis (Catholic University of Leuven) on the analysis of production trends and complex, quantified distribution patterns of the principal traded sigillatas and slipped table wares in the Roman East, from the early Empire to Late Antiquity (e.g. Italian Sigillata, Eastern Sigillata A, B and C, Çandarli ware, Phocean Red Slip Ware/LRC, Cypriot Red Slip Ware/LRD and African Red Slip Wares). He draws on his own work in Sagalassos and Boeotia, as well as an exhaustive review of archaeological publications of ceramic data. The analysis compares major regional blocks, documenting coastal as well as inland sites, and offers an interpretation of these complex data in terms of the economy and possible distribution mechanisms.
Du Mont Liban aux Sierras d’Espagne Sols, eau et sociétés en montagne: Autour du projet franco-libanais CEDRE “Nahr Ibrahim” edited by Romana Harfouche and Pierre Poupet. ii+284 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. French text. 157 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911355. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911362. £37.39 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Soil and water management is a major stake for the current Mediterranean countries. It was also an important challenge for past societies, especially since the Neolithic and the early well-established farming communities. the mastery of these vital resources accompanied the complexification of social organization. It also widely contributed, if not to impulse it, at least to structure it. This volume presents the results of the CEDRE multidisciplinary project NAHR IBRAHIM that was led on the Lebanese mountain centered around the Nahr Ibrahim valley (the famous Adonis valley in Antiquity), in the hinterland of the ancient city of Byblos. the mountain has been under-researched by archaeology and history due to the attractiveness of the prestigious coastal phoenician cities. The history of settlement patterns and the construction of agricultural mountainous landscapes since the Early Bronze Age is examined with comparisons from other regions surrounding the Mediterranean Basin.

French description:
En préambule à la publication d’un travail collectif international, franco-libanais, qui a été conduit pendant deux années (2010-2012), il faut replacer ce travail dans un monde en évolution constante et accélérée, où les sociétés sont de plus en plus exclusives. En entreprenant une recherche sur la construction des paysages ruraux et sur la maîtrise des sols et de l’eau, au cours de l’histoire, l’équipe internationale a voulu montrer la richesse des savoirs et des pratiques de sociétés agricoles qui, loin d’être immobiles et repliées sur elles-mêmes dans leurs montagnes, sont innovantes par bien des aspects, capables d’effectuer des progrès réfléchis.

Le projet dans son ensemble devait satisfaire à trois questions : quel projet global a été élaboré et avec quels partenaires ? quelles disciplines spécialisées choisies parmi les Sciences naturelles (Sciences de la Terre et de la Vie) ainsi que parmi les Sciences humaines (Sciences de l’Homme et des Sociétés) ont été sollicitées en fonction des objectifs fixés ? quel périmètre a été défini pour l’étude et selon quels critères ?

Au regard des recherches qui ont été conduites, des stratégies et des missions, nous devons expliciter les résultats obtenus et les évolutions remarquables par rapport à l’état des lieux précédent de la connaissance, mais aussi les perspectives scientifiques pour l’avenir, dans le contexte régional et national du Liban, mais aussi au niveau international. C’est pourquoi, dans le cadre de la publication des résultats de l’équipe franco-libanaise, nous avons fait appel à des équipes et à des chercheurs oeuvrant dans d’autres espaces montagnards, proches de la Méditerranée et comparables sur bien des points à la montagne libanaise, ainsi qu’à des chercheurs travaillant plus spécifiquement sur l’histoire des sols et de l’exploitation de l’eau.