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Archaeopress: Publishers of Academic Archaeology
Communicating the researches of thousands of archaeologists worldwide since 1991

Archaeopress is an Oxford-based publisher specialising in academic archaeology.
 
 
FORTHCOMING: Analysis of the Economic Foundations Supporting the Social Supremacy of the Beaker Groups Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September, Burgos, Spain): Volume 6 / Session B36 edited by Elisa Guerra Doce and Corina Liesau von Lettow-Vorbeck. vi+156 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. 215 2016. ISBN 9781784913076. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Bell Beaker phenomenon is one of the most fascinating horizons in European Later Prehistory, due to its vast geographical distribution, the intrinsic value of some of the artefacts comprising the Beaker package, or its supposed links to certain kinds of ritual ceremonies as shown by the frequent deposition of Beaker items in burial contexts. At present, the idea that the Beaker package is best interpreted as a symbol of power common to socially-prominent individuals by the mid-to-late third millennium BC is widely acknowledged by scholars in this field. From this point of view, the Beaker phenomenon is seen as the archaeological evidence representing an ideology which was shared by a number of prehistoric societies geographically scattered throughout much of Western and Central Europe, or, more specifically, was only shared by elite individuals within these territories.

The strategies employed by these individuals to attain such privileged statuses, however, are poorly known. Therefore, in the framework of the XVII World UISPP Congress, held in September 2014 in Burgos (Spain), a session entitled ‘Analysis of the economic foundations supporting the social supremacy of the Beaker groups’ (B36) was organised by this volume’s two editors. The session focused mostly on examining this issue at a European level, and less on the study of the Beaker package itself, as a way of looking at the economic foundations that helped these individuals attain their higher social statuses.

The proximity of Beaker sites to natural routes of communication highlights the importance of exchange networks through which people, objects and ideas may have circulated through Europe during this time. The Amesbury Archer in southern England is one of the best examples of interaction within Beaker territories. Having said this, considering that Beaker pots themselves were not exchanged over long distances, attention must be paid to other mechanisms of diffusion. The present volume comprises the papers presented at this session suggesting that Beaker groups may have controlled certain products and technologies.
NEW: Giants in the Landscape: Monumentality and Territories in the European Neolithic Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September, Burgos, Spain): Volume 3 / Session A25d edited by Vincent Ard and Lucile Pillot. vi+94 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. Available both in print and Open Access. 214 2016. ISBN 9781784912857. £26.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

In many European areas, the Neolithic period corresponds to the development of architectural monumentality which left important marks in the landscape, as well as the land clearing and the cultivation by the first agro-pastoral societies.

This volume presents proceedings from the session ‘Monumentality and territory: relationship between enclosures and necropolis in the European Neolithic’, part of the XVII World UISPP Congress, held in Burgos (Spain), the 4th September 2014. The session considered the various manifestations of the relationship between Neolithic enclosures and tombs in different contexts of Europe, notably through spatial analysis; the concept of landscape appropriation, combining domestic, symbolic, economic or natural spaces; and the patterns of territorial organization, in which enclosures and tombs have a fundamental role in some Neolithic contexts.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

NEW: Monumental Earthen Architecture in Early Societies: Technology and power display Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September, Burgos, Spain): Volume 2 / Session B3 edited by Annick Daneels. iv+64 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. Available both in print and Open Access. 213 2016. ISBN 9781784912833. £20.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The theme of the symposium is the archaeology of earthen architecture in pre- and protohistoric cultures, with an emphasis on constructive techniques and systems, and diachronic changes in those aspects. The main interest is in monumental architecture (not domestic), where it is better possible to appreciate the building strategies that show raw earth to be as noble a material as stone or wood, but with its very own characteristics which required the development of original solutions and construction techniques. The scope on monumental buildings also allows analyzing the political, social and economical factors that made such architecture a recognized expression of societal values and political power.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

NEW: Intellectual and Spiritual Expression of Non-Literate Peoples Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September, Burgos, Spain): Volume 1 / Session A20 edited by Emmanuel Anati. xiv+386 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. Available both in print and Open Access. 212 2016. ISBN 9781784912819. £55.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents the proceedings of the session ‘Intellectual and Spiritual Expression of Non-literate Peoples’ part of the XVII World UISPP Congress, held in Burgos (Spain), the 4th September 2014. The session brought together experts from various disciplines to share experience and scientific approaches for a better understanding of human creativity and behaviour in prehistory.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

NEW: La ceramica bassomedievale a Pisa e San Genesio (San Miniato-Pi) città e campagna a confronto by Beatrice Fatighenti. vi+228 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. 211 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912772. £37.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 97817849122789. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book presents the study of pottery in two medieval contexts, Pisa (a city) and San Genesio (a central rural settlement in the Arno Valley). The research focusses on specific issues observed in the two contexts, like characters of production (type of workshops, technological characteristics and characterization of ceramic bodies), specialization of pottery and circulation of the products; characters of consumption (similarities and differences in the composition of the pottery equipment and their modification); the role of social-economic indicator of some pottery classes to verify how much and when imported products from the Mediterranean were considered luxury items, if some types of local or regional pottery could have the same role, if the consumer wealth could be reflected in the specialization of ceramic forms used on the table and in the kitchen, if the desire to emulate aristocracy could be read even in the use of particular forms or pottery equipment; movement to understand in what way (whether by land or water), by what means and by what logic (market, pay census, barter) the pottery would move. The data from this research helps define a picture of relations between town and countryside in the Arno Valley between Xth and XIVth century.
NEW: Elis 1969: The Peneios Valley Rescue Excavation Project British School at Athens Survey 1967 and Rescue Excavations at Kostoureika and Keramidia 1969 by John Ellis Jones and Ourania Kouka. vi+184 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 210 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912307. £33.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912314. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In the 1960s a great new barrier dam was built across the Peneios Valley in Elis in the N.W. Peloponnese to create an artificial lake for irrigation purposes. In 1967 the Greek Archaeological Service organised a preliminary survey of the areas to be affected and also asked all the Foreign Archaeological Schools to assist and allocated specific sections to each. The British School at Athens sent a small team in late 1967 to survey part of the south-west fringes of the area to be flooded; this team identified many sites and opened test-trenches at six of them. In 1969 further work was undertaken in that area for the British School: a small team from Birmingham University and from Bangor undertook excavations at two of the identified sites, ‘Kostoureika’ and ‘Keramidia’. This account describes the results in detail. ‘Kostoureika’, identified as a likely Hellenistic ‘villa’ proved structurally disappointing (the 1967 test-trench had located the only surviving wall), but revealed a deposit of Early Helladic pottery, which supplements very usefully evidence for early occupation in the north-west Peloponnese. ‘Keramidia’ proved to be a site occupied, at least at times, from the Hellenistic to the late Roman imperial period.
FORTHCOMING: Geometric Period Plithos Burial Ground at Chora of Naxos Island, Greece: Anthropology Report by Anagnostis P. Agelarakis. 94 pages; colour graphs throughout. Available both in print and Open Access. Access Archaeology . ISBN 9781784913038. £28.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This report aims to offer glimpses of the human condition on Naxos island, Greece, focusing on the archaeoanthropologic study of the human skeletal remains along with associated contexts of faunal materials recovered from the Geometric (9th -7th c BC) component of the burial ground site of Plithos in Chora at Naxos island.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

NEW: 3D Delineation: A modernisation of drawing methodology for field archaeology by Justin J.L. Kimball. 78 pages; illustrated throughout in full colour throughout. Available both in print and Open Access. Access Archaeology . ISBN 9781784913052. £24.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

A recent trend concerning archaeological research has focused on producing a real-time methodology for 3D digital models as archaeological documentation within the excavation setting. While such methodologies have now firmly been established, what remains is to examine how 3D models can be integrated more fully alongside other forms of archaeological documentation. This work explored one avenue by developing a method that combines the interpretative power of traditional archaeological drawings and the realistic visualisation capacity of 3D digital models. An experiment was initiated during archaeological excavations at Uppåkra, Sweden where photographic data was captured to produce 3D digital models through Photoscan. These models were geospatially located within ESRI’s 3D GIS ArcScene where shapefile editing tools were used to draw overtop of their surfaces in three-dimensions. All drawings closely followed the single context method of drawing, were allotted context numbers, and given descriptive geodatabase attributes. This methodology resulted in the further integration of 3D models alongside other forms of archaeological documentation. The drawings increased the communicative powers of archaeological interpretation by enabling the information to be disseminated in a 3D environment alongside other formats of data that would have otherwise been disconnected in 2D space. Finally, the database attributes permitted the drawings complete integration within the geodatabase, thereby making them available for query and other analytical procedures. Archaeological information is three-dimensional; therefore, archaeologists must begin to approach documentation bearing this in mind. This technique has demonstrated that 3D models are a fluidic form of documentation allowing for accurate preservation of archaeology while enabling new forms of data to be derived all within a limited amount of time. Archaeologists must begin to affect change towards embracing 3D models and their associated applications as a standard tool within the excavator’s toolbox.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

NEW: Archaeological Paleography A Proposal for Tracing the Role of Interaction in Mayan Script Innovation via Material Remains by Joshua D. Englehardt. x+202 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 209 2016 Archaeopress Pre-Columbian Archaeology 6. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912390. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912406. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This research explores the development of the Maya writing system in Middle–Late Formative and Early Classic period (700 BC–AD 450) Mesoamerica. It seeks to correlate script development with interregional interaction and diachronic changes in material culture, and proposes a new methodological template for examining script development via material remains. In doing so, it contributes to anthropological debate regarding the role and effects of interregional interaction in processes of development and change of material and symbolic culture. This investigation posits that Maya writing developed in late Middle Formative through Early Classic period Mesoamerica as a correlate of interregional sociopolitical and economic interaction. Scholars working in many areas of the world have long claimed that interaction is central to cultural innovation, especially in relation to the development of writing. If the emergence of the Mayan script is a correlate of systemic interaction, then its developmental process should be traceable archaeologically through artifactual evidence. This hypothesis is tested by exploring archaeological indicators of interaction against a backdrop of previously-documented transformations in the emerging Mayan script. The methodological model proposed here builds on current models of the development of Mesoamerican writing systems and models of interregional interaction and cultural development to associate archaeological remains with the development of the Mayan script.
NEW: Proceedings of ArcheoFOSS Free, libre and open source software e open format nei processi di ricerca archeologica: VIII Edizione, Catania 2013 edited by Filippo Stanco and Giovanni Gallo. viii+274 pages. Illustrated throughout in black & white. Papers in Italian with English Abstracts. Available both in print and Open Access. 208 2016. ISBN 9781784912598. £40.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The VIII Workshop ArcheoFOSS, Free, Libre and Open Source Software e Open Format for archeological research, was held in Catania, at The Department of Mathematics and Informatics of Catania University, on June 18-19, 2013. The workshop was attended by about 60 Italian scientists and specialists of open source technology for cultural heritage and archaeology. During the workshop, several original contributions were presented in well attended talks, followed by lively Q&A and open discussion among the attenders. The Workshop sessions were organized around general themes: Usage and application of Geographical Information Systems; 3D modeling; Data Management. The papers related to oral contribution have been expanded, revised, peer reviewed and collected here according to the same themes. The contributed talks have been also complemented by 3D modeling and digital visual effects tutorials. A lively barcamp covering the main issues related with the main topics of the conference concluded the meeting. It is hoped that the present collection of papers will provide readers and experts useful ideas and research perspectives beyond the people attending the workshop.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

NEW: Mapping Society: Settlement Structure in Later Bronze Age Ireland by Victoria Ruth Ginn. viii+254 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 207 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912437. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912444. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This study examines Middle–Late Bronze Age (c. 1750–600 BC) domestic settlement patterns in Ireland. Recent archaeological investigations have extended the knowledge of habitation, but no detailed, systematic attempts have been made to understand the domestic evidence, or to substantially revise the existing models for the development of complex Bronze Age societies. All available data relating to settlements dating to Middle–Late Bronze Age have been collated. An evidence-based chronology for settlement is established for the first time. The data are examined at multiple scales to investigate any spatial or chronological trends in settlement character or distribution. The relationships between settlements and the surrounding environmental and social landscapes are analysed through a GIS. The new data are investigated to see how domestic settlements operated, and if traditional concepts regarding the structure of Bronze Age society can still be upheld. Agent-based modelling and social network analysis provide another dimension to the discussion regarding power, regionalism, and hierarchy within the settlement network. The results reveal a distinct rise in the visibility, and a rapid adaption, of domestic architecture, which seems to have occurred earlier in Ireland than elsewhere in western and northern Europe.
NEW: Le Néolithique ancien en Italie du sud Evolution des industries lithiques entre VIIe et VIe millénaire by Carmine Collina. xvi+510; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. French text. 206 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911867. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911836. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The principal aim of this study is to put forward a technological and typological analysis of the industries of the Early Neolithic concerned in the process of neolithisation in several regions of Southern Italy. The rooting concepts are centred on the principles of the lithic technology outlined by J. Tixier, H. Roche, and M.-L. Inizan, D. Binder, C. Perlès, N. Pigeot et J. Pelegrin. The lithic series examined belong to the different horizons concerned in the process of Neolithitisation of Southern Italy in several areas of the envisaged region. In a view to reconstruct the economy of débitage and the economy of raw materials and the possible formation of technical traditions, this research is based on the following points: the economic and petrographic analysis of the raw materials; the analysis of the technological aspects and of the technical facts; the typometrical analysis of the different products of the chaînes opératoires; the typological analysis through the creation of an inventory allowing to integrate the study of the technological criteria with that of specific characters of the lithic tools. The main targets of this research are to highlight the methods and the techniques of débitage and to identify the chaînes opératoires set up by the early groups of farmers in the South of Italy and in Sicily. Is it possible to recognize a techno-economic variability in the débitage systems of the Early Neolithic of Southern Italy? Is it possible to give a cultural value to the variability of technical facts? What is the rate of continuity and discontinuity among groups of hunters-gatherers and the first farming societies? These questions shed light on the whole of technical and cultural transformations between the seventh and sixth millennium B.C. in the South of Italy, a region that played a key role in the process of diffusion of Neolithic towards the West Mediterranean.
FORTHCOMING: Medieval Rural Settlements in the Syrian Coastal Region (12th and 13th Centuries) by Balázs Major. xvi+270 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 205 2016 Archaeolingua Central European Archaeological Heritage Series 9. ISBN 9781784912048. £52.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is the result of more than a dozen years of research in the field of the hitherto unstudied medieval settlement pattern of the Syrian coastal region in the 12th and 13th centuries. The conclusions presented in this work were reached with the combined use of several source types including medieval documents, travellers’ accounts, former research, map evidence, toponymy, archive and satellite photographs, oral sources and extensive archaeological field surveys accompanied by documentation between the years 2000 and 2015. After enumerating the historical events that influenced the settlement pattern of the coast, its centres, including the towns and castles (with special regard to the smaller fortifications of the countryside that seem to have been a Frankish introduction to the area) are analysed. Following the detailed examination of the written sources and the architectural material preserved at these lesser sites, a closer look at the villages and their environment aims to draw a general picture on the density of settlements and their basic characteristics. The book also discusses communication lines and provides an assessment of the medieval population that inhabited the region in the 12th and 13th centuries. The text is accompanied by a collection of maps, plan drawings, tables and illustrations on a selected number of sites visited during the field surveys.
NEW: The Wisdom of Thoth Magical Texts in Ancient Mediterranean Civilisations edited by Grażyna Bąkowska-Czerner, Alessandro Roccati and Agata Świerzowska. ii+130 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 15 colour plates. 204 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912475. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912482. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume represents a selection of contributions on Mediterranean themes from a wider international interdisciplinary conference on Magical Texts in Ancient Civilizations, organised by the Centre for Comparative Studies of Civilizations at Jagiellonian University in Kraków in Poland between 27-28 June 2013. The meeting welcomed researchers from Hungary, Italy, Poland and Ukraine, covering various disciplines including comparative civilizations, comparative religions, linguistics, archaeology, anthropology, history and philosophy.

In the past ‘magic’ was often misunderstood as irrational behaviour, in contrast to the tradition of philosophical or rational thought mostly based on Greek models. Evidence collected from ancient high cultures, like that of Pharaonic Egypt, includes massive amounts of documents and treatises of all kinds related to what has been labelled ‘magic’. Today it cannot be written off as merely a primitive or ‘lesser human’ phenomenon: the awareness of magic remains to the present day in many societies, at all social levels, and has not been generally replaced by what might be considered as more advanced thinking. The researches in this volume focus heavily on Egypt (in particular Predynastic, Pharaonic, Hellenistic, Roman and Christian evidence), but Near Eastern material was also presented from Pagan (Ugaritic) and Christian (Syriac) times.
NEW: The Production and Use of Flint Tools in the Archaic Period and the Old Kingdom in Egypt by Michał Kobusiewicz. vi+168 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 203 2016 Archaeopress Egyptology 12. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912499. £36.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912505. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book seeks to explore the issues of production, use and importance of flint tools in the Archaic Period, known also as the Early Dynastic Period, and the Old Kingdom of Egypt, the epoch immediately following the unification of pre-state organisms of Upper and Lower Egypt into one political body. This volume provides an in-depth study of tools made of flint, which unceasingly fulfilled a major role in the period being considered. Flint, occurring in a number of varieties, substantially outnumbers other raw materials used for manufacturing tools, to wit: chalcedony, obsidian, quartzite, carnelian or rock crystal, all found in small or even minute amounts, which attests to their minor role in the first periods of Egyptian history. Notwithstanding a growing number of implements made of copper, then bronze, flint tools constituted an essential element of a broad-based culture, and not only material culture, in the Archaic Period, the Old Kingdom and beyond.
NEW: Late Roman Handmade Grog-Tempered Ware Producing Industries in South East Britain by Malcolm Lyne. xii+179 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 202 2016 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 12. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912376. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912383 . £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The appearance and revival of handmade grog-tempered ware producing pottery industries during the late 3rd and 4th centuries using technology more appropriate to the Late Iron Age in the south and south-east of Britain is something of an enigma. This revival in the popularity of such primitive pottery took place on the Isle of Wight and in the Hampshire Basin, East Sussex and Kent at a time when the production of Romanised wheel-turned grey and fine colour-coated wares was still on a large scale in the south of Britain and elsewhere in the British provinces.

This publication is the result of 25 years research into these grog-tempered wares: it presents corpora of forms associated with the various industries and discusses the distributions of their products at different periods. It also discusses the possible reasons for the revival of such wares, increasing popularity during the 4th century and disappearance during the 5th century AD.
NEW: Corpus Inscriptionum Christianarum et Mediaevalium Provinciae Burgensis (ss. IV-XIII) by Álvaro Castresana López . vi+533 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Spanish text.. 201 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912536. £70.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912543. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Information regarding epigraphy, both early Christian and medieval, in the province of Burgos was scarce and spread around in inaccessible publications. This Corpus contains and analyses all entries between IV and XIII centuries, located in the province of Burgos in various monuments like Quintanilla de las Viñas, San Pedro de Arlanza, Santo Domingo de Silos, The Real Huelgas, Burgos Cathedral, etc.

To this end, starting from a review of the bibliography which has been published, a detailed fieldwork was performed resulting in the collection of 326 entries, 45 of which have never been published before, providing new and corrected readings to many of them.

Indeed, the description of each item; its edition, both epigraphic and paleographic; its translation; the metric study of the inscriptions; its historical context; the paleographic study of its characters and analysis of the literary texts, All of that gives the ability to specify many dates in history of the creation of the corresponding monuments the inscriptions are part of, and the recognition of numerous analogies among several of these constructions. Therefore, this work stands as a valuable landmark and touchstone for the fields of History, Art and Medieval Studies.
NEW: Fish-salting in the northwest Maghreb in antiquity A Gazetteer of Sites and Resources by Athena Trakadas. xi+159 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 200 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912413. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912420. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is a detailed gazetteer of fish-salting production in the northwest Maghreb in antiquity. It consists of a catalogue of fish-salting sites in addition to catalogues of other related resources that are necessary for the production and trans-shipment of the industry’s products: salt and amphorae kilns. The gazetteer is intended to serve as a comprehensive source book, and as such, it builds upon previous studies and current research on the region’s fish-salting industry.
NEW: Darwin´s Legacy: The Status of Evolutionary Archaeology in Argentina edited by Marcelo Cardillo & Hernán Muscio. xii+98 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Available both in print and Open Access. South American Archaeology Series 24. ISBN 9781784912765. £25.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

This book collects the contributions to the symposium “The current state of evolutionary archeology in Argentina” that was held in Buenos Aires, for celebrating the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin’s birth and the 150th anniversary of the publication of "On the Origin of Species”. The meeting was sponsored by the IMHICIHU-CONICET (Instituto Multidisciplinario de Historia y Ciencias Humanas-Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas). Contents: PREFACE (Hernán J. Muscio and Marcelo Cardillo); INTRODUCTION (Hernán J. Muscio and Marcelo Cardillo); CULTURAL ADAPTATIONS: IS IT CONCEPTUALLY COHERENT TO APPLY NATURAL SELECTION TO CULTURAL EVOLUTION? (Santiago Ginnobili); THEORY OF CLASSIFICATION AND TAXONOMICAL SCHOOLS: A SYNTHESIS FOR ARCHAEOLOGY (Daniel García Rivero); ENVIRONMENT, SPACE, HISTORY, AND TECHNOLOGICAL EVOLUTION. THE CASE OF THE PATAGONIAN COAST (Marcelo Cardillo); ON THE PROBLEM OF IDENTIFYING HOMOLOGIES IN LITHIC ARTIFACTS (Gustavo Barrientos); LOCAL EXTINTION, POPULATION DYNAMICS AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL PATTERNS OF CULTURAL EVOLUTION: A CASE STUDY IN THE NORTH PUNA OF ARGENTINA (Hernán Muscio); HUMAN HOLOCENE COLONIZATION, DIET BREADTH AND NICHE CONSTRUCTION IN SIERRAS OF CORDOBA [ARGENTINA] (Diego Rivero and Matías Medina); THE DEVELOPMENT OF A LEGACY: EVOLUTION, BIOGEOGRAPHY AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL LANDSCAPES (Juan Bautista Belardi, Ramiro Barberena, Rafael Goñi and Anahi Re)

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

NEW: Estudio antropológico de las estructuras cefálicas en una colección osteológica procedente de Chinchero (Perú) An anthropological study of cephalic structures in an osteological collection from Chinchero (Peru) by José I. Herrera Ureña. viii+62 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English abstract. Available both in print and Open Access. Access Archaeology . ISBN 9781784912710. £24.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

In this work we present an anthropological study of crania and mandibles from the osteological collection from Chinchero (Peru), currently housed at the American Archaeological and Ethnological Museum of the Complutense University of Madrid. From 1968 to 1971, a team of archaeologists of the Spanish Scientific Mission in Hispanic America excavated the site of Chinchero, a small village located in the Andean high plateau near Cusco. As the result of this mission, remains from 8 single burials and two ossuaries dated to pre-colonial times were exhumed and brought to Spain. The excavated area included an ancient palace and several administrative and religious structures built by Tupac Yupanqui, who ruled the Inca Empire between 1471 and 1493. The surroundings of the catholic church, erected over one of these buildings, were excavated as well.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

NEW: Metallurgical Production in Northern Eurasia in the Bronze Age by Stanislav Grigoriev. 831 pages; illustrated throughout black & white. Available both in print and Open Access. Access Archaeology . ISBN 9781784912758. £80.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Copper is the first metal to play a large part in human history. This work is devoted to the history of metallurgical production in Northern Eurasia during the Bronze Age, based on experiments carried out by the author and analyses of ancient slag, ore and metal. It should be noted that archaeometallurgical studies include a huge range of works reflecting different fields of activity of ancient metallurgists. Often, all that unites these is the term ‘metallurgy’. This work considers the problems of proper metallurgy, i.e. extracting metal from ore. A number of accompanying operations are closely connected with it, such as charcoal-burning, ore dressing, furnace constructing, and preparation of crucibles. In some instances the author touches upon these operations; however the main topic of the work is the smelting process. The closing stage of the metallurgical production is metalworking including various casting and forging operations, and also auxiliary operations: making of crucibles, casting molds, stone tools for metal forging. These problems are, as a rule, out of frameworks of this research.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

NEW: SOMA 2013. Proceedings of the 17th Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology Moscow, 25-27 April 2013 edited by Sergei Fazlullin, Mazlum Mert Antika. 262 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available both in print and Open Access. Access Archaeology . ISBN 9781784912673. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Papers from the 17th Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology, SOMA 2013 held in Moscow, 25-27 April 2013.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

NEW: Structured Deposition of Animal Remains in the Fertile Crescent during the Bronze Age by José Luis Ramos Soldado. vi+58 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available both in print and Open Access. Access Archaeology . ISBN 9781784912727. £20.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Although most of the animal remains recorded throughout the archaeological excavations consist usually of large assemblages of discarded and fragmented bones, it is possible to yield articulated animal skeletons in some cases. Most of them have been usually picked up from sacred and/or funerary contexts, but not all of them might fit necessarily in ritual and symbolic interpretations, and not all of the structured deposit of animal remains may be explained due to anthropic factors. In addition, zooarchaeology has traditionally focused on animal domestication, husbandry and economy, and species identification above all, shutting out further discussion about these type of findings. Moreover, the limited condition of the data is also another issue to bear in mind. Thus, the aim of this paper has been to draw up a literature review of the structured deposits of animal remains during the third and second millennia BC in the Ancient Near East for its subsequent classification and detailed interpretation. In this survey it has been attested that not only most of the articulated animal remains have been found in ritual and/or funerary contexts but also that all species recorded– but some exceptions–are domestic. Hence, I argue in this paper that there is a broad religious attitude towards the main domesticated animals of human economy in the Ancient Near East, based on the closeness of these animals to the human sphere. Therefore, it seems that domesticated animals were powerful constituents in the cultural landscape of these regions, never simply resources.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

NEW: Rhesus' Gold, Heracles' Iron: the archaeology of metals mining and exploitation in NE Greece by Nerantzis X Nerantzis. ISBN 9780956824028. £35.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

East Macedonia in northern Greece has rich deposits of gold and silver as well as copper and iron ores. The gold and silver were important to Classical Athens and even more so to Alexander the Great’s Hellenistic world. Copper was extracted as early as the Late Neolithic, and iron was worked from the Iron Age to Ottoman times. Bringing to life the essential background to this wealth derived from metals, this book looks at the archaeological and archaeometallurgical evidence, some of it very new, for the mining and processing of the ores and the extraction of the metal. The book is written with the visitor to the region very much in mind, taking the reader closer to the landscapes where these practices took place to make sense of ‘silent landscapes’ where so much happened at one time but where nature has now taken over the remains of buildings, installations and heaps of waste rendering them ‘mute’ and meaningless for all but the expert historian of technology. Written by a native of the region who has himself been directly involved in field and laboratory work on ancient metallurgy, this book will raise the profile of this aspect of the region’s past as well as the region’s great natural beauty.

About the Author:
N Neratzis is an archaeologist working for the Greek Archaeological Service in eastern Macedonia. He combines extensive fieldwork experience with a specialism in archaeometallurgy; his recent PhD was on metals extraction during the Byzantine period, in N. Greece.
Journal of Greek Archaeology Subscription edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). Price listed refers to 2016 print subscription for private individuals. More pricing options available.ISBN 2059-4674. £65.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

Announcing an international peer-reviewed English-language journal specializing in synthetic articles and in long reviews. The scope of this journal is Greek archaeology both in the Aegean and throughout the wider Greek-inhabited world, from earliest Prehistory to the Modern Era. Thus we include contributions not just from traditional periods such as Greek Prehistory and the Classical Greek to Hellenistic eras, but also from Roman through Byzantine, Crusader and Ottoman Greece and into the Early Modern period. Outside of the Aegean contributions are welcome covering the Archaeology of the Greeks overseas, likewise from Prehistory into the Modern World. Greek Archaeology for the purposes of the JGA thus includes the Archaeology of the Hellenistic World, Roman Greece, Byzantine Archaeology, Frankish and Ottoman Archaeology, and the Postmedieval Archaeology of Greece and of the Greek Diaspora.

The first issue of the journal will be in October 2016 and thereafter it will appear annually and incorporate original articles, research reviews and book reviews. Subscription fees will be charged in December for the following year's Issue.

2016 SUBSCRIPTION RATES (all prices exclusive of VAT where applicable):

ISSN: 2059-4674 (print); 2059-4682 (online)

Institutions:
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Print & Online access: £95 (+VAT where applicable) including free shipping in UK & Europe (£10 ROW).
Online access only: £90 (+VAT where applicable).
Agents will receive 25% discount on institutional print price including shipping rates as stated

Individuals:
Print: £65 including free shipping in UK & Europe (£10 ROW). Includes free digital copy.
Special price for digital only subscribers: £25 (+VAT where applicable).

Download the subscription form here - complete and return by post of fax. 2016 subscription fees will be collected in December 2015.

Archaeopress Digital Subscription Service: Subscribe Online 12 month subscription package for 2016/2017. £1,250.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

A digital subscription for library and institutional customers is now available, providing access to all new Archaeopress Archaeology (AA) e-publications (approx. 6-9 titles per month) and the existing digital backlist (approx. 130 titles at time of printing).

We offer a 12-month subscription package (2016/2017) price of £1250 + VAT (if applicable). Our web-hosted system allows users access via IP authentication. Remote access can be arranged for EZProxy users. A full subscription licence provides virtually unrestricted access placing no limits on the number of times a file may be accessed, nor to how many users may access a title concurrently.

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*During 2016 we expect to be able to supply title information via MARC records. Existing users will be updated via email when this becomes possible.
Controlling Colours Function and meaning of Colour in the British Iron Age by Marlies Hoecherl. vi+147 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 199 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912253. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912260. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Colour defines our material world, operates as a communication tool and creates meaning. But despite the wealth of colour present in British Iron Age archaeology, interpretative studies have concentrated mostly on the shape of material objects and their decoration, with at best fleeting references to colour. This book revisits well known and well documented sites or artefacts and explores their colours and colour connotations – whether hue or luminosity, whether natural or man-made, whether innate or deliberately applied - by looking at various contexts such as processes, landscape, iconography, body decoration or the colour connotations of death. The importance of changes in colour caused by passing of time, processing, handling or exposure, as well as the deliberate concealment or defacing of colour is looked at . Finally and most importantly, using methodologies ranging from examination of written sources, comparisons from the fields of anthropology and ethnology to experimental archaeology the author attempts to shed light on the symbolic meaning behind such colours or colour contexts and contribute to our understanding of Iron Age cosmologies.
Over The Hills and Far Away Last Glacial Maximum Lithic Technology Around the Great Adriatic Plain by Emanuele Cancellieri. x+125 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 198 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912345. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912352. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The research scope of this book is the human occupation of the northern Adriatic region at the end of the Last Glacial Maximum (ca. 24,000- 20,000 calBP), and a point of view over the long debated occupation of the once exposed Great Adriatic Plain and the role it played within the early Epigravettian hunter-gatherers settlement system. The study relied on a comprehensive techno-economic approach to lithic technology, one among the possible means to investigate site function, mobility and land use.
Ritual in Late Bronze Age Ireland Material Culture, Practices, Landscape Setting and Social Context by Katherine Leonard. xii+230 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 195 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912208. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912215. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This text develops a new perspective on Late Bronze Age (LBA) Ireland by identifying and analysing patterns of ritual practice in the archaeological record. The bookends of this study are the introduction of the bronze slashing sword to Ireland at around 1200 BC and the introduction and proliferation of iron technology beginning around 600 BC. Therefore, it is societal change related to new technology which defines the period discussed as the Irish Late Bronze Age (LBA) herein. Ritual practices find expression in a range of contexts which can be studied separately. However, they require an overarching, integrated ritual system to contextualise and attempt to understand their broader purpose. Similar rituals were consistently enacted in similar locations across the island of Ireland in the LBA. This indicates shared understanding of the way to enact certain rituals as well as shared understanding of what these practices would achieve.
The Enigmatic World of Ancient Graffiti Rock Art in Chukotka. The Chaunskaya Region, Russia by Margarita Kir’yak (Dikova). Translated by Richard L. Bland. vi+160 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 7 colour plates. 194 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911881. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911898. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This monograph is devoted to small forms of engraving on stone. It summarizes the archaeological material obtained during the course of excavations at the Rauchuvagytgyn I site (dated to 2500 years ago) in northern Chukotka. The book analyzes the content and semantics of the pictorial resources, and ethnic identification is made. The interpretive part of the study raises issues of an ideological character and brings one closer to the inaccessible realm of ideas and concepts of the ancients. This well-illustrated book is directed primarily toward archaeologists, ethnographers, historians, and fine art experts but will also be of interest to a broad range of readers.

About the author:
Dr Margarita Kiry’ak is one of the foremost archaeologists of far Northeast Asia (Chukotka). She has been conducting archaeological research in Chukotka for more than 30 years, during which time she has published four books in Russia, Great Britain, and the U.S., and 115 scholarly articles in Russia, the U.S., Italy, and Korea.