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Archaeopress: Publishers of Academic Archaeology
Communicating the researches of thousands of archaeologists worldwide since 1991

Archaeopress is an Oxford-based publisher specialising in academic archaeology.
 
 
NEW: Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 46 2016 Papers from the forty-seventh meeting of the Seminar for Arabian Studies held at the British Museum, London, 24 to 26 July 2015 edited by Janet Starkey and Orhan Elmaz. xiv+302 pages; illustrated throughout with 42 colour plates. PSAS46 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913632. £69.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913649. £57.60 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Seminar for Arabian Studies is the only international academic forum that meets annually for the presentation of research in the humanities on the Arabian Peninsula. It focuses on the fields of archaeology, architecture, art, epigraphy, ethnography, history, language, linguistics, literature, and numismatics from the earliest times to the present day.

A wide range of original and stimulating papers presented at the Seminar is published in the Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies and reflects the dynamism and scope of the interdisciplinary event. The Proceedings present the cutting edge of new research on Arabia and include reports of new discoveries in the Peninsula. They are published each spring in time for the subsequent Seminar, which is held in July.

The main foci of the Seminar in 2015, in descending order of the number of papers presented in each session were North Arabia, South Arabia and Aksum, Archaeological Survey and Field Methods, Bronze and Iron Ages in Eastern Arabia, Islamic Archaeology, and Neolithic Archaeology. In addition, there were sessions on Recent Cultural History in Arabia, and Heritage Management in Arabia, as well as a special session on the Nabataean world titled ‘Beyond the “rose-red” city: the hinterland of Petra and Nabatean rural sites’, which featured a total of six papers. This volume also includes notes in memoriam on Professor Andrzej Zaborski (1942–2014), Professor Ordinarius at the Jagellonian University of Cracow, who specialized in Afro-Asiatic linguistics, Semitic and Cushitic in particular.
FORTHCOMING: Anthropomorphic Representations in the Cucuteni-Tripolye Culture by Dan Monah. viii+444 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 6 colour plates. 246 2016. ISBN 9781784912321. £55.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Dan Monah (11 February 1943 – 21 September 2013) was a specialist in the Neo-Eneolithic of Romania and, in particular, of the Precucuteni-Cucuteni-Tripolye cultural complex, last affiliated with the Iași Institute of Archaeology of the Romanian Academy. His core body of work, consisting of seven books and more than one hundred articles published, primarily deals with coroplastic analysis as a mean of insight into the religion and art of the Neo-Eneolithic communities. With a unique approach to the study of what he formally named ‘the religious life of Cucuteni-Tripolye communities’, Dan Monah was a staunch critic of the dominant cultural-historic paradigm and its natural interpretative consequences: the supremacy of typological description, the Cartesian ranking of religious systems from simple to complex, and the avoidance of ‘unclassable’ occurrences.

The present volume embodies his vision applied to the analysis of the Cucuteni-Tripolye anthropomorphic representations, resting on two structural pillars: an in-depth knowledge of a large body of history of religion literature, and an almost exhaustive inventory of the Cucuteni- Tripolye anthropomorphic representations, the result of over three decades of personal, patient and meticulous examination of the archaeological data. For those in his wake, Dan Monah’s open and unprejudiced approach to the prehistoric imagery enclosed in this book constitutes a solid cornerstone on which further work can be built. Its pages should be turned, if not on account of the wealth of information inside, but for the author’s pleasant and refreshing style at least.
FORTHCOMING: Le QSAR, type d’implantation humaine au Sahara: architecture du Sud Algérien by Mounia Chekhab-Abudaya. xiv+340 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 12 colour plates. French text with English abstract. 245 2016. ISBN 9781784913472. £50.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The qṣar corresponds to a type of human settlement widely distributed in the Sahara desert, including many examples located today in southern Morocco, southern Algeria, southern Tunisia, Libya, Mauritania and Mali. This architectural model is characterised by its use over a wide-ranging time span – probably since the early first millennium BC according to ancient structures recorded by the archaeologist Mattingly in the Libyan Fazzān.

This volume, through the systematic analysis and comparison of some qṣūr of southeastern Algeria (Rīġ, Mzāb, Miya and al-Manī‘a), reveals common architectural features that can be used to identify a common type of qṣar in this region. The analysis of the construction material shows the primary use of limestone with a local mortar (timchent) and date palm trunks (phoenix dactylifera) for the structural elements (ceilings, doors, arcs, domes). Adobe bricks (ṭūb) are used in the housing and the defence systems punctuated by towers and pierced doors.

Despite a discontinuity within the historical narrative, the establishment of populations in this area of the Sahara appears to be much earlier than the medieval period and the qṣar is certainly not a creation ex nihilo of the modern era. Because of their numerous modifications and extensions over several centuries, the qṣūr problematise the dating of such settlements. However, the comparison of its main components encourages the development of a typology to identify some common characteristics that would help position the qṣar among the urban planning of the dār al-islām.
FORTHCOMING: Rock Art of the Vindhyas: An Archaeological Survey Documentation and Analysis of the Rock Art of Mirzapur District, Uttar Pradesh by Ajay Pratap. xiv+172; highly illustrated throughout with 68 colour plates. 244 2016. ISBN 9781784912451. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Rock paintings and petroglyphs are a record of human memories. No doubt, this function defines in essence all archaeological objects. Yet some objects such as tools, beyond their symbolic value, are clearly fashioned for their utility. How does rock art as an object fashioned by human hands then differ from tools? What utility does it have beyond its symbolic value? The Vindhyan corpus of rock paintings has provided us with a very valuable opportunity to be answering such questions.
FORTHCOMING: Drawings in Greek and Roman Architecture by Antonio Corso. vi+112 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with one colour plate. 243 2016. ISBN 9781784913717. £25.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is an essay on architectural drawings of the Greek and Roman world. The first chapter is focused on the possibility that ancient treatises of architectures were endowed with drawings in order to make clear expositions which sometimes were not easily explainable only with words. Then the drawings which once clarified the treatise of Vitruvius are considered. The problem concerning the possible presence of drawings in post-Vitruvian architectural treatises is also discussed. The issue as to whether descriptive literary compositions sometimes contained illustrations as well is also examined. Then representations of architecture in Roman treatises on divisions of land (the so called gromatic treatises) are considered. The references to architectural drawings in literary and epigraphical testimonia are collected and a catalogue of the surviving Greek and Roman drawings of buildings or of parts of them is given. Thus this research offers all the basic data for the study of an important tool in the context of architecture in antiquity.
NEW: Rock Art Studies: News of the World V edited by Paul Bahn, Natalie Franklin, Matthias Strecker and Ekaterina Devlet. viii+364 pages; highly illustrated throughout with 102 colour plates. 242 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913533. £70.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913540. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This is the fifth volume in the series Rock Art Studies: News of the World. Like the previous editions, it covers rock art research and management across the globe over a five-year period, in this case the years 2010 to 2014 inclusive. The current volume once again shows the wide variety of approaches that have been taken in different parts of the world, although one constant has been the impact of new techniques of recording rock art. This is especially evident in the realm of computer enhancement of the frequently faded and weathered rock imagery that is the subject of our study. As has been the case in past volumes, this collection of papers includes all of the latest discoveries, including in areas hitherto not known to contain rock art. The latest dating research reported in this fifth volume, sometimes returning surprisingly early results, serves to extend our knowledge of the age of rock art as well as highlight the limits of current models for its development around the world.
NEW: A Slave Who Would Be King: Oral Tradition and Archaeology of the Recent Past in the Upper Senegal River Basin by Jeffrey H. Altschul, Ibrahima Thiaw and Gerald Wait. x+314 pages; highly illustrated throughout with 142 colour plates. 241 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913519. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913526. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

From March 2009 Statistical Research Inc. (USA), Nexus Heritage (UK) and the Institut Fondamental d’Afrique Noire (Dakar, Senegal) jointly undertook an integrated programme of cultural heritage research and investigation in the Sabodala area of Senegal. This was part of an environmental and social impact assessment in compliance with Senegalese law and international best practice. The principal investigators were Jeff Altschul (SRI) Gerry Wait (Nexus) and Ibrahima Thiaw (IFAN). This report is the outcome of those investigations and makes a significant contribution to the archaeology and ethnography of eastern Senegal.

Combining ethnographic and archaeological data yields a picture of a period of intense social change that occurred at the end of the nineteenth century and extended well into the mid-twentieth century. This involved the overturning of previous norms by social groups of mixed ethnicity, who proceeded to create new social work-arounds for previous ethnic prohibitions. It also probably involved the final end to slavery, but possibly only within living memory. It seems likely that some sites—archaeological as well as traditional sacred properties—provide tangible links between the current villages and a highly contested and emotionally charged past. To paraphrase the American novelist, William Faulkner, the past in Sabodala is never dead; in fact, it’s not even past.
NEW: Diseños geométricos en los mosaicos del Conventus Astigitanus by Sebastián Vargas Vázquez. vi+342; highly illustrated throughout with 170 colour plates. Spanish text with English summary. 240 2016 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 13. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912734. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912741. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume focuses on the study of the geometric designs documented in the mosaics of the Conventus Astigitanus, one of the four conventi iuridici of Roman Baetica. This study is part of a much broader undertaking, the primary objective of which is the analysis of the geometric mosaic designs of the province as a whole.

The number of mosaics in the Conventus Astigitanus, and the larger number still documented in other areas of Baetica, place this province among those with the highest count of mosaics in the Roman world providing evidence of the level of cultural and economic power enjoyed by the province over the centuries.

As a whole, this study makes an absolutely necessary contribution to the understanding of Roman mosaics in general and Hispanic mosaics in particular, based on an innovative and unprecedented approach in Spain. It includes a very significant number of designs and provides the basis for a completely open catalogue, to which new models may be added as they become available through the continual study of new mosaics. This catalogue ultimately aims to become a reference for the study of geometric mosaics and compositions in the Roman world. Moreover, the value of the present volume also lies in the contribution that is offered to a topic, the analysis of geometric composition, which is of great interest beyond the author’s specific field of study.
NEW: Holocene Prehistory in the Télidjène Basin, Eastern Algeria Capsian occupations at Kef Zoura D and Aïn Misteheyia edited by David Lubell. vi+226 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 4 colour plates. Papers in English and French. 239 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913731. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913748. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

From 1972 to 1979, field work was conducted in the Télidjène Basin, Eastern Algeria, as part of a project called The Prehistoric Cultural Ecology of Capsian Escargotières. The primary objective was the controlled excavation of two stratified Capsian sites, the open-air escargotière Aïn Misteheyia (1973 and 1976) and the rock shelter Kef Zoura D (1976 and 1978), both of which have remained incompletely published until now. Aïn Misteheyia and Kef Zoura D have proven to be key sites in a discussion that has been ongoing since at least the 1930s when Vaufrey published his interpretation of Capsian stratigraphy, trying to understand if there was a temporal succession between the Capsien typique and the Capsien supérieur. These are the only Capsian escargotières excavated with modern methods and extensive radiocarbon dating that have a clear stratigraphic sequence in which both variants of the Capsian are represented. We show that Capsien typique precedes Capsien supérieur, that the latter saw the introduction of a new technique for the production of blanks (pressure flaking), that the change is more-or-less contemporary with the 8200 cal BP cold event, and that it was accompanied by a subtle change in a subsistence regime of continued foraging despite the introduction of some herding of apparently introduced domestic stock in neighbouring regions that suggests the changes observed at these two sites may have eventually led in some areas to the introduction of Neolithic subsistence patterns, although there is as yet no clear evidence for this in the central Capsian area of eastern Algeria and southern Tunisia. Aïn Misteheyia was described in two previous reports in Libyca, but the artifact illustrations were never published and appear here as an addendum. Four chapters describe the chronology, stratigraphy, lithic, faunal and charcoal assemblages from Kef Zoura D. In addition, there are chapters analyzing the well preserved assemblages of worked bone from the Capsien supérieur deposits at both sites as well as the small assemblages of marine shell. One chapter is a reprinted paper that originally appeared in Sahara on an engraved stone plaque from Kef Zoura D, and a final chapter is the first report on an ongoing study of use-wear in the lithic assemblage from Kef Zoura D.

About the Editor: David Lubell (Professor Emeritus, University of Alberta and Adjunct Professor, University of Waterloo) received his PhD in 1971 from Columbia University. He has directed archaeological field work in Algeria, Portugal and Italy, always with an emphasis on the inter-relationship of human groups with their environments as reflected in their subsistence patterns and the analysis of the artifacts they made and used. In collaboration with Mary Jackes, he has expanded his horizons to take into account the bioarchaeology and palaeodemography of the human populations involved. He has also made a decades-long study of the occurrence of edible land snails in Holocene archaeological sites throughout the Mediterranean region and is convinced (but unable yet to prove) that their presence in abundance represents a part of the transition from foraging to food production.
FORTHCOMING: Ōsaka Archaeology by Richard Pearson. viii+127 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 238 2016. ISBN 9781784913755. £28.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is an archaeological study of the Ōsaka region, Japan, from the about 20,000 years ago to 1868 AD. Its purpose is to introduce the recently excavated rich archaeological heritage of the Ōsaka area and to show how archaeology contributes to our general knowledge of Ōsaka in unique ways. The study focuses on excavations, environmental data, sites, and artifacts and their interpretation.
FORTHCOMING: Proceedings of the 17th Iron Age Research Student Symposium, Edinburgh 29th May - 1st June 2014 edited by Graeme JR Erskine, Piotr Jacobsson, Paul Miller and Scott Stetkiewicz. xvi+158 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784913571. £34.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Since its conception in 1998, the Iron Age Research Student Symposium (formerly ‘Seminar’) has provided postgraduates in the archaeology of Iron Age Britain an opportunity to present their current research in a friendly atmosphere. During the course of both formal seminars and informal outings (such as field trips, dinners, and the traditional pub quiz), the Iron Age Research Student Symposium (IARSS) gives students the ability to discuss their research with colleagues and peers, in addition to a number of outstanding lecturers and professors in Iron Age studies. Previous proceedings volumes (Davis et al. 2006; Humphrey 2003; Sterry et al. 2010), also offered participants the prospect of publishing their seminar paper. As a result, IARSS has become a fixture in the development of new academics while at the same time contributing fresh perspectives to Iron Age dialogues.

This proceedings volume, organised to reflect three general themes (migration/interaction, material culture and the built environment), accomplishes two things. First, it provides an accessible survey of emerging concepts, ideas, methods, and fieldwork that will shape future study of the Iron Age. Second, it is an outline, not just of what the 17th IARSS accomplished, but also of a broader scheme envisioned by the organisers for future events in this Symposium series. It is the (perhaps wide-eyed) expectation of the organisers that the IARSS can and should expand to offer further opportunities to research students of the Iron Age, and they firmly hope that this volume aids in the promotion of this annual Symposium, as well as the ideas of the contributing authors.
NEW: Cultural Dynamics and Production Activities in Ancient Western Mexico Papers from a symposium held in the Center for Archaeological Research, El Colegio de Michoacán 18-19 September 2014 edited by Eduardo Williams Blanca Maldonado. 237 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913557. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913564. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book presents a collection of papers from the Symposium on Cultural Dynamics and Production Activities in Ancient Western Mexico, held at the Center for Archaeological Research of the Colegio de Michoacán on September 18-19, 2014. While these thought-provoking essays on key topics in Western Mexican archaeology will spark debate among scholars interested in this cultural area, they will also be of interest to students of ancient Mesoamerica as a whole. The time is ripe for insightful discussions and new syntheses of archaeological research in Western Mesoamerica, and this volume represents, undoubtedly, a valuable contribution to this urgent task.

These papers are grouped into three thematic areas. The first, Cultural dynamics in Western Mexico, includes essays on: The challenges of archaeology in flood-prone areas; Exploitation of local resources and imported products; Settlement systems of the Tarascan state; and Stone tools as indicators of task specialization. The second section, Production of strategic resources, analyzes the following topics: The obsidian jewelry of the Teuchitlán Tradition; Differing obsidian economies in Teuchitlán culture; Source areas and obsidian exploitation in Michoacán; The history of pottery production in Capula, Michoacán; Ethnoarchaeology of Tarascan pottery: domestic production and decoration styles; Ceramics, social status, and the Tarascan state economy; and Copper as a strategic resource in pre-Hispanic Western Mexico; while part three focuses on Trade and exchange: Circulation of goods and communication routes between Western and Central Mexico; Contrasting models of ceramic production in the Tarascan state; and Ceramic evidence of contact between Teotihuacan, the Bajío, and southern Hidalgo.
NEW: Ricerche Archeologiche a Sant’Andrea di Loppio (Trento, Italia) Il Castrum Tardoantico-Altomedievale by Barbara Maurina. xiv+794 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. Italian text. 236 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913618. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913625. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The island of Sant’ Andrea, situated on the road that since ancient times has linked the Adige Valley with the Lake Garda, once rose impressively from the green expanse of water, but now is a small hump on the edge of a vast marshy basin. Fifteen centuries ago it was the fortified seat of a contingent of soldiers and their families. In 1998, after a long series of sporadic discoveries that started way back in the 19th century, the Archeaology Section of the Rovereto Civic Museum began a research and study project that involved a series of summer excavations, that brought to light a multi-layered archeological site with finds ranging from the prehistoric age to late antiquity, medieval times and right through to even the First World War. Along the northeastern side and the southern edge of the island the remains have been found of some buildings that can be traced to a fortified settlement and on the top part of the hump the remains of a Romanesque church have been investigated. The buildings that made up the settlement illustrate a complex series of construction periods; so far these have been dated between the 5th and 7th centuries. Numerous examples of armoury and military clothing have been found in the settlement area and this clearly suggests the military function of the site. The volume is devoted to the results of the research in the castrum: A general overview of the site is followed by a part devoted to periodization and stratigraphic analysis of the dig; then there is a large section that includes contributions on the small finds; the fourth part contains some concluding remarks.

About the Author:
Barbara Maurina is Archaeological Conservator at the Foundation Museo Civico di Rovereto. After she graduated at the University of Trento, she attended post-degree courses at the Institute of Archaeology of the University College London; afterwards she got an advanced degree at the University of Trieste and a PhD at the University of Siena. She has been collaborator of different Universities, Museums and Institutes, e.g. École Française de Rome, Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, University of Trento, University of Würzburg, University of Arizona, Soprintendenza Archeologica del Lazio, Soprintendenza Archeologica di Roma. From 1988 she takes part in archaeological campaigns in Italy and abroad; in 1998 she began the excavation in the site of Loppio-St. Andrea, that still directs today.

Italian Description:
L’isola di Sant’Andrea, situata nell’alveo del Lago di Loppio, prosciugato nel 1956, quindici secoli fa ospitò un insediamento fortificato. In seguito a segnalazioni e rinvenimenti sporadici susseguitisi fin dal XIX secolo, nel 1998 la Sezione Archeologica del Museo Civico di Rovereto avviò un progetto di ricerca e di studio del sito, concretizzatosi in una serie di campagne di scavo estive. Le indagini, attualmente ancora in corso, hanno portato alla scoperta di un contesto archeologico pluristratificato, con testimonianze che vanno dalla preistoria all’epoca tardoantica, a quella medievale, per giungere fino alla prima guerra mondiale. Il presente volume è dedicato ai risultati delle ricerche nel castrum di V-VII secolo, iniziate con il sondaggio del 1998 e conclusesi con lo scavo del 2014. A un inquadramento generale del sito fa seguito una parte dedicata alla periodizzazione e all’analisi stratigrafica dello scavato; vi è poi un’ampia sezione che comprende i contributi sui reperti mobili, mentre la quarta parte raccoglie alcune riflessioni conclusive.
NEW: Post-Palaeolithic Filiform Rock Art in Western Europe edited by Fernando Coimbra and Umberto Sansoni. vi+88 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. 6 papers in English, 1 in French, all papers with abstracts in English and French. Available both in print and Open Access. 235 2016. ISBN 9781784913670. £24.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Filiform rock art appears as a spontaneous technique, more simple and immediate than pecking, good either for autonomous strands of expression, or for sketches and first drafts regarding works of painting or pecking. According to the order of presentation of the session’s papers during the XVII IUPPS (UISPP) Conference in Burgos, the articles published here are the following: Late prehistoric incised rock art in southern Europe: a contribution for its typology, by Fernando A. Coimbra, where the author presents a preliminary typology of this kind of rock art, divided in two groups (geometric and figurative), approaching not only common themes to several countries, but also some examples that have only a regional character; Filiform rock art in mount Bego (Tende, Maritime Alps, France), by Nicoletta Bianchi, which analyses some cases where pecked carvings overlap filiforms, therefore pre-dating pecked engravings and studies the interaction of the two carvings tradition; Filiform figures in the rock art of Valcamonica from Prehistory to the Roman age, by Umberto Sansoni, Cinzia Bettineschi and Silvana Gavaldo, that provides a general corpus of the figurative incised rock art of Valcamonica with a quantitative and qualitative approach, by considering the typological variety, the long-lasting chronological dating and the strong relation with the local pecked rock art of the Camunian filiforms; Threadlike engravings of historical period on the rocks and plaster of churches and civic buildings. Some comparisons and proposals of interpretation, by Federico Troletti, which presents the incised engravings exclusively of historical time located in some sites of Valcamonica – the area of Campanine di Cimbergo and Monticolo di Darfo; The rock art from Figueiredo (Sertã, Portugal): typology, parallels and chronology, by Fernando A. Coimbra and Sara Garcês, focusing vi on the description of the engravings from three carved rocks with incised motives from the place of Figueiredo, in central Portugal, which were studied during different fieldworks. Two other papers of researchers that couldn’t attend the Conference were also presented: The filiform rock art from Kosovo, by Shemsi Krasniqi, which presents recent findings from Kosovo with a similar typology of figures from other European countries; The filiform rock engravings of the Parete Manzi of Montelapiano (Chieti, Italy), by Tomaso Di Fraia, which analyses the problematic of incised rock art from a rock shelter in the centre of Italy.
NEW: Late Prehistory and Protohistory: Bronze Age and Iron Age Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain) Volume 9 / Sessions A3c and A16a edited by Fernando Coimbra, Davide Delfino, Valeriu Sîrbu and Cristian Schuster. xii+222 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. All papers in English, abstracts in English and French. Available both in print and Open Access. 234 2016. ISBN 9781784912970. £38.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

1. The Emergence of warrior societies and its economic, social and environmental consequences Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain) Session A3c edited by Fernando Coimbra and Davide Delfino

Several works have been dedicated to the aim of warfare in European Bronze Age, by a point of view of bronze technology and archaeometallurgy. The present volume wants to be a short and actualized contribution to the study and interpretation of warrior societies, through a point of view of the marks of the first warfare in Europe, its causes and its consequences in all the intelligible evidences, both from a point of view of material culture, of landscape, of human behavior and artistic manifestations.

2. Aegean – Mediterranean imports and influences in the graves from continental Europe – Bronze and Iron Ages Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain) Session A16a edited by Valeriu Sîrbu and Cristian Schuster

There is already a ‘history’ with not only different, but sometimes contradictory opinions regarding the role played by the Aegean-Mediterranean area in the evolution of the peoples who lived in continental Europe during the age of Bronze and Iron, including burial customs. The organizers of this session proposed, through ongoing communication and the discussions that followed, to obtain new data on the influences and Aegean-Mediterranean imports found in the graves, and the possible movements of groups of people who carried them. The main area of interest focused on the ‘roads’ and the stages of their penetration, but also considered feedback from peripheral areas. The session aims to highlight the role of the southern imports in the evolution of local communities’ elites and their impact on the general development of the populations of continental Europe, the possible meanings of their deposit in the burials. Analysis of these phenomena over wide geographical areas (from the Urals to the Atlantic) and large chronological periods (the third-. first millennia BC) allow the identification of certain traits as general (eg., the continuity and discontinuity), or particular (eg., the impact of imports and southern influences on communities of different geographical areas).

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

NEW: Public Images, Private Readings: Multi-Perspective Approaches to the Post-Palaeolithic Rock Art Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain) Volume 5 / Session A11e edited by Ramón Fábregas Valcarce and Carlos Rodríguez-Rellán. vi+70 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. All papers in English, abstracts in English and French. Available both in print and Open Access. 233 2016. ISBN 9781784912895. £22.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

A significant number of Holocene societies throughout the world have resorted at one time or another to the making of paints or carvings on different places (tombs, rock-shelters or caves, openair outcrops). The aim of the session A11e. Public images, private readings: multi-perspective approaches to the post-Palaeolithic rock art, which was held within the XVII World UISPP Congress (Burgos, September 1-7 2014), was to put together the experiences of specialists from different areas of the Iberian Peninsula and the World. The approaches ranged from the archaeological definition of the artistic phenomena and their socioeconomic background to those concerning themselves with the symbolic and ritual nature of those practices, including the definition of the audience to which the graphic manifestations were addressed and the potential role of the latter in the making up of social identities and the enforcement of territorial claims. More empirical issues, such as new recording methodologies and data management or even dating were also considered during this session.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
NEW: Water as a morphogen in landscapes/L’eau comme morphogène dans les paysages Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain) Volume 4/Session A14 edited by Sandrine Robert and Benoit Sittler. viii+104 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. Papers in English and French. Available both in print and Open Access. 232 2016. ISBN 9781784912871. £26.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

These proceedings include eight presentations. Two of them focus on the role played by the river axes and the geography of river basins as factors of circulation and settlement of Palaeolithic hunter gatherers on the European scale (Francois Djindjian) and in the surroundings of the Jura Mountains (Gérald Bereiziat and Harald Floss). José Javier Piña Abellán describes how the central valley of the River Jabalón (Ciudad Real, Spain) was peopled in the course of the second millennium B.C., and how the inhabitants still maintain a close link to the hydrography. Frederic Cruz and Christophe Petit provide new insights into the organization of the princely residences’ territories of the late Hallstatt era in the North-Western region of the Alps, taking into account their relationship to the environment, and especially the distance from the valleys. Ana Lucia Herberts documents how river crossings and related drainage structures played a crucial role in setting cattle trails in Brazil to drive the cattle from their pasture lands to the major market places in remote cities. A 3-D modelling using LiDAR altimetry has been used by Sabine Schellberg, Benoît Sittler, and Werner Konold to reconstruct water meadows that were used in historical times in the upper Rhine Valley. In their paper, Sandrine Robert and Hélène Noizet develop, as an example illustrating resilience, how an ancient meander of the River Seine, which was filled in Antiquity, still dictates the layout of the network of the streets of Paris. Lastly, Martin Orgaz and Norma Ratto addressed the social construction of landscapes by relating Inca sites to the Tinogasta region (Catamarca, Argentina) rivers whose visual features (the colour red) may be regarded as a factor that governed the selection of sites.
NEW: Mégalithismes vivants et passés: approches croisées Living and Past Megalithisms: interwoven approaches edited by Christian Jeunesse, Pierre Le Roux and Bruno Boulestin. x+294 pages; illustrated throughout with 63 colour plates. Papers in French and English. 231 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913458. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913465. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Megalithic monuments from Neolithic Europe have long been considered as rough copies of the monumental architectures built by the first civilizations of the Near East and Eastern Mediterranean. When radiocarbon dating jeopardized this diffusionist pattern, though, specialists could not but wonder why and how these Neolithic societies, usually considered as small ‘village communities’, had erected such monuments. In order to answer these questions and seek explanations in the social, political or religious contexts of recent or present megalith-building societies, the ethnological frame of references has been referred to on a regular basis.

This volume comprises the papers presented by prehistorians and ethnologists at the two multi-disciplinary round tables held in Strasburg in May 2014 and May 2015. Their purpose was, with the help of both case studies and more synthetic works, to discuss how the patterns drawn from the observation of ‘living’ megalithic societies have been used to try and shed light on the functioning of European Neolithic societies, the epistemological problems raised by this transposition and the relevance of ethnology-based archeological explanations. The book is composed of three sections: the first one deals with some methodological reflections, the second and third ones with the ‘living’ or recent megalithisms of respectively the Indonesian Archipelago and Ethiopia.

About the Editors:
Christian Jeunesse is professor of prehistoric archaeology at the Université de Strasbourg and member of the unit “Archimède” (UMR 7044, CNRS) and of the Institut Universitaire de France. He is the author of numerous works about the European Neolithic. His main topics are the history of the danubian Neolithic, the funeral rites and the social organization of neolithic and chalcolithic societies

Bruno Boulestin is an anthropologist at the University of Bordeaux, France, member of the “Anthropologie des populations passées et présentes” (A3P) team of the unit “De la Préhistoire à l’Actuel, Culture, Environnement, Anthropologie” (PACEA, UMR 5199 of the CNRS). He is working on the diachronic study of practices around death in ancient societies from both archaeological, bioarchaeological and socio-anthropological data and is specialized in the study of bone modifications and corpse treatments.
NEW: Palmyrena: City, Hinterland and Caravan Trade between Orient and Occident Proceedings of the Conference held in Athens, December 1-3, 2012 edited by Jørgen Christian Meyer, Eivind Heldaas Seland and Nils Anfinset. vi+184 pages; illustrated throughout with 74 colour plates. 230 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912796. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912802. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume brings together papers presented at a conference in Athens in December 2012 as a part of the Syrian-Norwegian research project Palmyrena: City, Hinterland and Caravan Trade between Orient and Occident. They reflect international research and fieldwork that was going on until the outbreak of the Syrian civil war: Interaction between pastoralism and urban societies in the Bronze Age (K. Hesse), relationship between the merchants and the Palmyrene elite (M. Sommer), the caravan route from Palmyra and the market for the goods (M. Gawlikowski), mechanisms of trade along the Silk Roads from China (M. Żuchowska), a Palmyrene diaspora in Rome and the Mediterranean network (T. Terpstra), road systems between Palmyra and the Mediterranean (P. Mior), Palmyra compared with other large cities in the East (C. Bührig), the use of magnetometry, satellite photo and radar to reveal covered structures in the city (R. Linck), a historiographical analysis of M. I. Rostovtzeff’s impact on the study of religious cult (P. Alipov), a critical discussion of the excavations of the “Hellenistic” town in Palmyra, and finds of glass (C. Ertel and R. Ployer), the ceramic material from Palmyra (C. Römer-Strehl), a new house tomb in the northern necropolis (K. Saito), vessels from banquet scenes (S. Miyashita), the genetic composition and health of the population based on osteoarchaeological and dental analysis (T. Nakahashi, K. Yoshimura, S. Wu, T. Nakahashi, S. Saito), cereal crop production in the hinterland of Palmyra based on a pollen-analysis and radiocarbon dating from a mudbrick (K. Krzywinski, J. Krzywinski).

About the Editors:
Jørgen Christian Meyer is professor in Ancient history at the University of Bergen. From 2008 to 2013 he was head of the joint Syrian-Norwegian project, “Palmyrena: City, Hinterland and Caravan Trade between Orient and Occident”. His research interests are the relations between Palmyra and the hinterland, and the connections between the Mediterranean world and the Indian Ocean and Central Asia.

Eivind Heldaas Seland is associate professor of premodern global history at the University of Bergen. He was member of the project “Palmyrena: City, Hinterland and Caravan Trade between Orient and Occident”, and is head of the research project “Mechanisms of cross-cultural interaction: Networks in the Roman Near East” (2013-2016). His research interests are the Near East and the Indian Ocean in the preslamic period, including Palmyrene trade.

Nils Anfinset is associate professor in Archaeology at the University of Bergen. He was member of the project “Palmyrena: City, Hinterland and Caravan Trade between Orient and Occident”. His research interests are pastoral nomadism, Neolithic, Chalcolithic and early Bronze Age in the Middle East, and metallurgy.
NEW: Un estudio de tecnología lítica desde la antropología de las técnicas: el caso del Alero Deodoro Roca ca. 3000 AP, Ongamira, Ischilín, Córdoba by José María Caminoa. x+246 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text. Available both in print and Open Access. South American Archaeology Series 26. ISBN 9781784913496. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

As part of a series of research projects on the Archaeology of hunter-gatherers societies in the Southern Pampean Hills this presents, among other things, the study of various aspects of the organization of lithic technology and strategies for the use of lithic resources by prehistoric populations. This is in order to understand the social aspects that allow us to recognize and describe habitus or ways of doing things. In this book we studied lithic assemblages, in the manner described above from stratigraphic levels of the Alero Deodoro Roca (Deodoro Roca Rockshelter) comprising chronologies between ca. 3000 years BP to ca. 3600 years BP. We propose that behind the technical movements, organization of the production, distribution of activities in space, the selection of raw materials and any other technological activity, there are people and groups who make decisions based on the context, needs, history and knowledge. We ask ourselves: What affected material selection for the production of stone tools rocks? Was there a differential selection depending on the desired end product? And if so, was it different in diachronic moments? What techniques were used in the production of what instruments? What productive activities were conducted in Alero Deodoro Roca and which were not? What role did the tools produced have?

This study aims to produce relevant and new information that expands our knowledge of technological strategies used by the human groups in order to compare them with those produced in other areas of the Sierras. It will contribute to a process of constructing knowledge about hunter-gatherers of the valleys of Cordoba province, by studying lithic technology and therefore raising new questions for further studies.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

NEW: Estudios antracológicos en los espacios de combustión del Alero Deodoro Roca – Ongamira (Córdoba) by Andrés Ignacio Robledo. xii+150 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. Spanish text. Available both in print and Open Access. South American Archaeology Series 25. ISBN 9781784913434. £30.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

This book is about how hunter-gatherer groups maintained a relationship with the use and management of fire in the Late Holocene of Southern Precordillera. The line of study developed here as part of the anthracology made use of methodologically systematic analysis of the remains of charcoal from the archaeological site Alero Deodoro Roca B. This industry focused on a time frame of ca. 1900 years AP to ca.3900 years AP.

Studies carried out in the Alero Deodoro Roca allow us to understand, on the one hand, the different methods of preservation of charcoal record in the succession of combustion events, and, secondly, to discuss the variability of species present within the composition of the flora in the paleoenvironment. Functional association is proposed for various uses; as a source of heat, cooking, and preparation of raw materials among the possibilities.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

NEW: Easter Island Archaeology/Arqueologia en Rapa Nui (Isla de Pascua) A Tribute to Daniel Schávelzon on the 30th anniversary of the Center for Urban Archaeology at the University of Buenos Aires/Homenaje a Daniel Schávelzon a los treinta años del Centro de Arqueología Urbana de la Universidad de Buenos Aires by Mario Silveira (Coordinador). vi+100 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with one paper in English. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784913595. £28.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This well illustrated volume presents in its introduction a personal history of Daniel Schávelzon’s experience of Easter Island during his youth before collecting all the papers and work he produced in 2014 leading up to his retirement.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Archaeopress Digital Subscription Service: Subscribe Online 12 month subscription package for 2016/2017. Price listed without VAT. VAT may be applicable, please contact info@archaeopress.com to learn more.£1,250.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

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Journal of Greek Archaeology Subscription edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). Price listed refers to 2016 print subscription for private individuals. More pricing options available.ISBN 2059-4674. £65.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

Announcing an international peer-reviewed English-language journal specializing in synthetic articles and in long reviews. The scope of this journal is Greek archaeology both in the Aegean and throughout the wider Greek-inhabited world, from earliest Prehistory to the Modern Era. Thus we include contributions not just from traditional periods such as Greek Prehistory and the Classical Greek to Hellenistic eras, but also from Roman through Byzantine, Crusader and Ottoman Greece and into the Early Modern period. Outside of the Aegean contributions are welcome covering the Archaeology of the Greeks overseas, likewise from Prehistory into the Modern World. Greek Archaeology for the purposes of the JGA thus includes the Archaeology of the Hellenistic World, Roman Greece, Byzantine Archaeology, Frankish and Ottoman Archaeology, and the Postmedieval Archaeology of Greece and of the Greek Diaspora.

The first issue of the journal will be in October 2016 and thereafter it will appear annually and incorporate original articles, research reviews and book reviews. Subscription fees will be charged in December for the following year's Issue.

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Download the subscription form here - complete and return by post of fax. 2016 subscription fees will be collected in December 2015.

NEW: The Three Dimensions of Archaeology Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September, Burgos, Spain). Volume 7/Sessions A4b and A12 edited by Hans Kamermans, Wieke de Neef, Chiara Piccoli, Axel G. Posluschny and Roberto Scopigno. viii+150 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Available both in print and Open Access. 229 2016. ISBN 9781784912932. £29.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume brings together presentations from two sessions organized for the XVII World UISPP Conference that was held from 1-7 September 2014 in Burgos (Spain). The sessions are: The scientific value of 3D archaeology, organised by Hans Kamermans, Chiara Piccoli and Roberto Scopigno, and Detecting the Landscape(s) – Remote Sensing Techniques from Research to Heritage Management, organised by Axel Posluschny and Wieke de Neef. The common thread amongst the papers presented here is the application of digital recording techniques to enhance the documentation and analysis of the spatial component intrinsically present in archaeological data. For a long time the capturing of the third dimension, the depth, the height or z-coordinate, was problematic. Traditionally, excavation plans and sections were documented in two dimensions. Objects were also recorded in two dimensions, often from different angles. Remote sensing images like aerial photographs were represented as flat surfaces. Although depth could be visualized with techniques such as stereoscopes, analysis of relief was troublesome. All this changed at the end of the last century with the introduction of computer based digitization technologies, 3D software, and digital near-surface sampling devices. The spatial properties of the multi-scale archaeological dataset can now be accurately recorded, analysed and presented. Relationships between artefacts can be clarified by visualizing the records in a three dimensional space, computer-based simulations can be made to test hypotheses on the past use of space, remote sensing techniques help in detecting previously hidden features of landscapes, thus shedding light on bygone land uses.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
NEW: CAA2015. Keep The Revolution Going Proceedings of the 43rd Annual Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology edited by Stefano Campana, Roberto Scopigno, Gabriella Carpentiero and Marianna Cirillo. 2 vols, 1160 pages, illustrated throughout in black & white with 3 colour pages. Available both in print and Open Access. 228 2016. ISBN 9781784913373. £129.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume brings together all the successful peer-reviewed papers submitted for the proceedings of the 43rd conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology that took place in Siena (Italy) from March 31st to April 2nd 2015.

Altogether, within the four days of the conference 280 papers were presented in 48 sections divided into ten macro topics, 113 posters, 7 roundtables and 12 workshops. That number, in itself, has prompted a thought or two. Above all it says that CAA is very much alive and kicking, that it is in robust good health, and that it remains a wholly relevant force in the scientific community, fully engaged with the questions of the day, and a continuing focal point for the profession. All of that speaks well for the motto of CAA 2015: KEEP THE REVOLUTION GOING.

Although the significance of the motto is obvious, it is worth some thoughts. Few would deny that in the past 30 years or so, digital technologies have profoundly revolutionised archaeology – in the office and laboratory, in the field and in the classroom. The progressive introduction of digital techniques in the archaeological process has of course led to a general increase in efficiency. But perhaps more importantly it has provided a spur to the discussion of methodology and through that has strongly influenced not only the way we go about things but also the outcomes that we have been able to achieve.

The pioneering phase in the application of digital techniques in archaeological research has clearly been fruitful and today computer applications such as GIS, databases, remote sensing and spatial analysis as well as virtual and cyber archaeology are deeply embedded within our universities. This is all good, of course, but we must not assume that the task has been completed. An intrinsic revolutionary instinct towards technological development has been awakened. But it will only survive by virtue of the results that it brings about. Or using the words of our Chairman Prof Gary Lock: ‘Computers not only change the way we do things, but more importantly they change the way we think about what we do and why we do it’. The general thrust of this statement can be summed up and reinforced by recalling a quote from the philosopher Don Ihde, who has argued we should never forget that all technologies should be regarded as ‘cultural instruments’, which as well as strategies and methodologies implemented in our researches are also ‘non-neutral’.

So KEEP THE REVOLUTION GOING! is a motto that lays stress on the need to maintain innovation in archaeology through technological advances. But innovation must have at its root the fostering of critical thought and the framing of new archaeological questions. So there is much work still to be done, and fresh challenges to be faced in the months, years and decades ahead. -from the introduction by Stefano Campana and Roberto Scopigno

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
NEW: Tomb Security in Ancient Egypt from the Predynastic to the Pyramid Age by Reg Clark. 566 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 227 2016 Archaeopress Egyptology 13. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912994. £70.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913007. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Egyptians went to great lengths to protect their dead from the omnipresent threat of robbery by incorporating specially developed architectural features in their tombs. However, the architecture of tomb security has rarely been studied as a subject in its own right and is usually treated as a secondary topic in publications of a scholarly nature, which tend to regard its role as incidental to the design of the tomb rather than perhaps being the driving force behind it. This issue had been raised in the early Twentieth Century by Reisner (1908: 11), who suggested that the rapid evolution of Egyptian tomb substructures was as a result of the desire for tomb security and more ostentatious tombs, rather than a development spurred by religious or funerary practices. Taking this premise much further, this book presents an in-depth analysis of the architecture of tomb security in Egypt from the Predynastic Period (c. 5000–4000 BC) until the early Fourth Dynasty (c. 2500 BC) by extrapolating data on the security features of published tombs from the whole of Egypt and gathering it together for the first time in one accessible database. Using the information assembled it adds new information to the current body of knowledge concerning the architecture of tomb security and explains many of the underlying reasons behind their adoption. By thematically analysing these features in order to draw conclusions it also demonstrates that many aspects of the architecture of the Egyptian tomb over this period, in both royal and private contexts–whilst subject to changing tastes, needs and ideologies–had indeed originated as the result of the need to protect the tomb or improve its security.
NEW: Quality Management of Cultural Heritage: problems and best practices Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September, Burgos, Spain). Volume 8 / Session A13 edited by Maurizio Quagliuolo and Davide Delfino. 80 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Available both in print and Open Access. 226 2016. ISBN 9781784912956. £22.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

From Lascaux to Shanidar caves, from Malta temples to Stonenge (and the ‘new’ one...), from Serra da Capivara to Foz Coa park, from Australia to North Africa’s Rock Art, from Pechino to Isernia excavations, from the Musée de l’Homme in Paris to the Museum of Civilization in Quebéc, from Çatal Hüyük to the Varna village, from the Rift Valley to the Grand Canyon, most problems have to be fronted in a common perspective. But which perspective? Is it possible to have a common point of view on different values, different sites, different methodologies? The Scientific Commission for the Quality Management of Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sites, Monuments and Museums© set up at UISPP by initiative of the author (UISPP-PPCHM) is aimed to examine these issues and propose solutions acceptable to all those who want to contribute to common understanding of our past history.

The only certainty in fact is our Past. It is undoubted that it happened, it is undoubted that its consequences are in place today, it is undoubted that it is affecting persons, social groups or larger structures in some ways also when it is disregarded. The help of specialists from different Countries and the exchange of opinions with other colleagues from other fields and/or organizations is then needed in order to: discuss the reasons and possibilities for preservation and use of Sites, Monuments and Museums; let the management of Rock Art Sites and Parks, Prehistoric excavations, Museums and Interpretations Centres and related structures open to the public to be made according to criteria agreed at an International level, both in normal and critical conditions; enhance standards in preserving, communicating and using Sites, Monuments and Museums; involve the public and diffuse awareness; analyse tourism benefits and risks at these destinations; introduce new opportunities for jobs and training; develop networks on these topics in connection with other specialized Organizations.

This session aimed to ask: what is your experience? Which problems would you like to address? What solutions can be considered?

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
NEW: ‘A Mersshy Contree Called Holdernesse’: Excavations on the Route of a National Grid Pipeline in Holderness, East Yorkshire Rural Life in the Claylands to the East of the Yorkshire Wolds, from the Mesolithic to the Iron Age and Roman Periods, and beyond edited by Gavin Glover, Paul Flintoft, Richard Moore. xii+286 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 225 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913137. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913144. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Twenty sites were excavated on the route of a National Grid pipeline across Holderness, East Yorkshire. These included an early Mesolithic flint-working area, near Sproatley. In situ deposits of this age are rare, and the site is a significant addition to understanding of the post-glacial development of the wider region. Later phases of this site included possible Bronze Age round barrows and an Iron Age square barrow. Elsewhere on the pipeline route, diagnostic Mesolithic, Neolithic and Bronze Age flints, as well as Bronze Age pottery, provide evidence of activity in these periods.

Iron Age remains were found at all of the excavation sites, fourteen of which had ring gullies, interpreted as evidence for roundhouse structures. The frequency with which these settlements occurred is an indication of the density of population in the later Iron Age and the large assemblage of hand-made pottery provides a rich resource for future study. Activity at several of these sites persisted at least into the second or early third centuries AD, while the largest excavation site, at Burton Constable, was re-occupied in the later third century. However, the pottery from the ring gullies was all hand-made, suggesting that roundhouses had ceased to be used by the later first century AD, when the earliest wheel-thrown wares appear. This has implications for understanding of the Iron Age to Roman transition in the region.

Late first- or early second-century artefacts from a site at Scorborough Hill, near Weeton, are of particular interest, their nature strongly suggesting an association with the Roman military.
NEW: Athens from 1920 to 1940 A true and just account of how History was enveloped by a modern City and the Place became an Event by Dimitris N. Karidis. viii+194 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 224 2016. ISBN 9781784913113. £34.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

During the short interwar period of the early 20th century, Athens entered into a process of meteoric urban transformation which gave her a unique place among European capital cities of the time. The implementation of a settlement programme for hundreds of thousands of refugees, following the 1922 Smyrna catastrophe, effected social and economic metamorphoses, which, in their early steps, were not devoid of patterns of social and spatial segregation. During the 1930s, notwithstanding manifold adversities, the capital city encountered modernity, but she did so on her own terms. On the ideological level, the place acquired a world-wide reputation for two reasons. First, by the ambitious venture of unearthing antiquities in the ancient agora and revealing the glory of ancient Greece, even if a whole neighbourhood standing on the spot, which for centuries had teemed with social exchange and commercial transactions, had to be erased for that purpose. Second, by imprinting her name on the ‘Charter of Athens’, the document concluding the results of the 4th Congress of Modern Architecture which she hosted, intrinsically linking her with the avant-garde architectural theory and practice of the time. Furthermore, state/governmental involvement in the production of the built environment, occasionally supporting the private sector and landowners in particular in their speculative intentions, provided Athens with the infrastructure she demanded for exercising her role as the capital city of Greece. The Marathon Dam, the underground railway, the steam-powered electric plants, and many other projects, implied advances through which the average man and woman in the street could rejoice that modernization had taken deep roots within Athenian daily life. Yet, it seems Athens walked alongside modernism not within it. Very much like Narcissus, the handsome young man from Boeotia, it might be that Athens looked at her beautiful face mirrored as if in the still water of a lake; overwhelmed by a strong feeling of exaltation and delight, she stood there until she died.

About the Author:
Dimitris N. Karidis is an architect and urban historian, Professor Emeritus/National Technical University in Greece.