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Archaeopress: Publishers of Academic Archaeology
Communicating the researches of thousands of archaeologists worldwide since 1991

Archaeopress is an Oxford-based publisher specialising in academic archaeology. 
 
 
NEW: Small Things – Wide Horizons Studies in honour of Birgitta Hårdh edited by Lars Larsson, Fredrik Ekengren, Bertil Helgesson and Bengt Söderberg. 308 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 172 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911317. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911324. £37.39 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication honours Birgitta Hårdh on her 70th birthday. Birgitta Hårdh is one of the leading experts on European Viking Age, engaged in diverse research projects, and also a vital collaborator in various networks specializing in the period. Through time, Birgitta has extended her research to comprise other periods of the Iron Age.

A feature common to all Birgitta Hårdh’s research is that she has been able, through analysis of a body of finds, to broaden the perspective, not least geographically through her profound knowledge of phenomena in Northern Europe and indeed all of Europe. Therefore, this book has been given the title Small Things – Wide Horizons.

A total of fourty titles have been submitted to the volume. The presentations include a number of perspectives mainly of Iron Age. Themes as silver economy, coins, trinkets, burials, crafts, farms and fields, centrality and transformations give a view of the variation of contributions nationally and internationally.
FORTHCOMING: A Study of the Deposition and Distribution of Copper Alloy Vessels in Roman Britain by Jason Lundock. vi+258 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 171 2015. ISBN 9781784911805. £38.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

By examining patterns in depositional practice as well as the geographic and site distribution of copper alloy vessels in Roman Britain, this book offers an analysis of the varying and divergent practices of material culture in the British provinces under Roman rule. The work also seeks to offer a useful classification system for the study and discussion of copper alloy vessels by adapting familiar typology as well as introducing new vocabulary. Analysis is given to patterns in the deposition of vessel forms during the Roman period in Britain as well as addressing their spatial relation to other objects and their use of decoration. Insight is also offered into the functional application of these objects and how changing culture practice led to the shifting of use from smaller vessel forms in the early Roman period to larger vessel forms by Late Antiquity. Additionally, the discussion offered in this book serves as a case study in the application of small finds research to the larger theoretical debates concerning Rome and its provinces.

This book is scheduled for publication in August 2015, priced £38.00. To register your interest please email info@archaeopress.com.
NEW: The Mysterious Wall Paintings of Teleilat Ghassul, Jordan In Context by Bernadette Drabsch. x+230 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with two colour plates. 170 2015 Monographs of the Sydney University Teleilat Ghassul Project 3. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911706. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911713. £28.90 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is primarily concerned with the re-analysis of the wall paintings from the Jordanian Chalcolithic period (ca. 4700-3700 BC) settlement site of Teleilat Ghassul, first excavated in 1929 by scholars from the Pontifical Biblical Institute Rome and latterly by Australians from the University of Sydney. The seven major paintings were re-analysed using a methodology based on contextualisation, digital reconstruction, experimental replication and subject analysis.

A comprehensive theoretical framework was constructed from published and unpublished materials from the site, consisting of geographical and environmental datasets, topographic, settlement-location and structural contexts. These included material/artefactual associations, technological issues and a comprehensive symbolic regional comparative analysis of the artworks themselves.

The interpretive structure, reconstructed and re-evaluated scenes, and replication studies, have revealed numerous insights into the artistic traditions and cultic practices of South Levantine Ghassulian Chalcolithic culture, with considerable relevance to the ongoing debate on such matters as prehistoric societal makeup and art historical scholarship.

This study has provided intriguing glimpses into the lives of a brilliantly artistic and deeply ritualised society, shedding new light on this little-known and still mysterious people.
NEW: Rivers in Prehistory edited by Andrea Vianello. vi+166 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 169 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911782. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911799. £32.29 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

From antiquity onwards people have opted to live near rivers and major watercourses. Both freshwater and navigable routes provide the obvious reasons for settling near a river, but there are also many drawbacks, such as flooding. This volume explores rivers as facilitators of movement through landscapes, and it investigates the reasons for living near a river, as well as the role of the river in the human landscape. Ultimately, it focuses on the delicate relationship between humans and their environment, looking at the origins to help understand the present.

The symbolic and philosophical perceptions and understanding of rivers, the cultural and social behaviour associated with their presence, and the effort and engineering required to subdue and control their flowing waters are all deeply embedded in human cultures. Through an extended essay and ten case studies, this book introduces the reader to how rivers have been perceived as gateways to wilderness and the environment for humans across the world, and how they have affected behaviour and ideas throughout human history. Students and researchers of humanenvironment dynamics, and/or the colonisation of new lands, will find in this volume a network of bridges to facilitate the exploration of different research paths towards historical narratives of human cultures, through which rivers, and their environments, run.
NEW: Metallurgy in Ancient Ecuador A Study of the Collection of Archaeological Metallurgy of the Ministry of Culture, Ecuador by Roberto Lleras Perez. 150pp; full colour throughout. 168 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911607. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911614. £23.80 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Metallurgical activity was present in Ecuador from at least 1500 BC; by around the beginning of the Common Era metallurgical manufacture and use had extended to most of the Costa and Sierra. Regional styles soon evolved giving rise to high levels of technical craftsmanship and to shaping particular iconographic and decorative patterns. Copper, gold, silver and platinum were mined, processed and converted into thousands of ornaments, offerings, tools and weapons extensively used both by elites and by the common people. By 1450, the Incas had invaded most of the Ecuadorian Sierra and eventually they integrated the diverse metallurgical traditions into their state-managed metallurgical industry. The European conquest in the sixteenth century deeply affected the native metallurgical activities, even though in some regions copper continued to be worked throughout the colonial period. The reconstruction of the general outlines of this fascinating historical process was made possible through the study of the collection of archaeological metal objects of the Ministry of Culture and Heritage of Ecuador, the compilation of previous archaeological references, laboratory analyses and C14 dating of museum objects. This work is the first one of its kind to be published on the ancient metallurgy of Ecuador.
NEW: Derelict Stone Buildings of the Black Mountains Massif by Christopher George Leslie Hodges. xii+334 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 167 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911492. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911508. £40.80 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is based on several years of author’s fieldwork in the valleys of the Black Mountains in South East Wales. Hodges had personal knowledge of the area having worked there in his professional capacity as a drystone waller.

The aim of the fieldwork was to locate all the sites of derelict stone buildings within the designated upland study area of approximately 140 square kilometres. Initial research indicated that the area had not been previously surveyed to any great extent and the presence of derelict stone buildings that existed in the valleys was not a characteristic of the surrounding lower terrain.

Using a combination of documentary evidence and fieldwork, a total of 549 potential sites were identified comprising houses, barns, other ancillary buildings and sheepfolds; 499 separate structures were located on the ground. Following a specially devised protocol at each site, information regarding masonry, modes of construction and extant features was recorded in both tabular and photographic forms.
NEW: Royal Statues in Egypt 300 BC-AD 220 Context and Function by Elizabeth Brophy. iv+166 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 166 2015 Archaeopress Egyptology 10. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911515. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911522. £32.29 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The aim of this book is to approach Ptolemaic and Imperial royal sculpture in Egypt dating between 300 BC and AD 220 (the reigns of Ptolemy I and Caracalla) from a contextual point of view. To collect together the statuary items (recognised as statues, statue heads and fragments, and inscribed bases and plinths) that are identifiably royal and have a secure archaeological context, that is a secure find spot or a recoverable provenance, within Egypt. This material was used, alongside other types of evidence such as textual sources and numismatic material, to consider the distribution, style, placement, and functions of the royal statues, and to answer the primary questions: where were these statues located? What was the relationship between statue, especially statue style, and placement? And what changes can be identified between Ptolemaic and Imperial royal sculpture?

From analysis of the sculptural evidence, this book was able to create a catalogue of 103 entries composed of 157 statuary items, and use this to identify the different styles of royal statues that existed in Ptolemaic and Imperial Egypt and the primary spaces for the placement of such imagery, namely religious and urban space. The results, based on the available evidence, was the identification of a division between sculptural style and context regarding the royal statues, with Egyptian-style material being placed in Egyptian contexts, Greek-style material in Greek, and Imperial-style statues associated with classical contexts. The functions of the statues appear to have also typically been closely related to statue style and placement. Many of the statues were often directly associated with their location, meaning they were an intrinsic part of the function and appearance of the context they occupied, as well as acting as representations of the monarchs. Primarily, the royal statues acted as a way to establish and maintain communication between different groups in Egypt.
NEW: Sounion Revisited: The Sanctuaries of Poseidon and Athena at Sounion in Attica by Zetta Theodoropoulou-Polychroniadis. xii+334 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 165 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911546. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911553. £46.74 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is the first to be published from a wider research project, still in progress, about the sanctuaries of Poseidon and Athena on the promontory of Sounion (southeast Attica). The aim of this volume is to present, for the first time, a comprehensive examination and interpretation of a wide selection of unpublished small finds. These last, of different categories and materials, were discovered in the bothroi (pitdeposits) and the landfills; they are set into their contexts. The illustrations of the finds are integrated within the relevant text for easier reference and a detailed catalogue complements the discussion. The limited archaeological records concerning the work in the sanctuaries, conducted by Valerios Stais between 1897–1915, and which still remain the only extensive excavations undertaken, are re-evaluated.

The author revisits the two sanctuaries, reviewing the structures within them to cast light on the early phases of their establishment and development, as well as their significance for the socio-economic growth of south east Attica. This is realized by drawing upon the evidence of archaeological data and the ancient literary sources alike. The research thus provides a fresh insight into the early cults, with emphasis on the identity of the deities worshipped at Sounion from the Late Geometric to the dawn of the Classical period.
NEW: Répertoire de fleurons sur bandeaux de lampes africaines type Hayes II by Jean Bussière and Jean Claude Rivel. ii+138 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. French text. 164 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911560. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911577. £23.80 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A comprehensive repertory of the stamps decorating the rims of Christian African lamps. This volume will be an indispensable tool to Mediterranean archaeologists for identifying even small fragments of lamps.

French description:
Fruit d’un travail de plus de dix ans ce répertoire de 1383 fleurons sur bandeaux de lampes Hayes II marque une avancée significative par rapport aux onze répertoires existants. Celui d’Ennabli, le plus souvent utilisé avec ses 126 fleurons seulement, ne répond pas toujours aux attentes du chercheur. Les auteurs présentent leur classement alphanumérique et justifient leur choix de rendre les reliefs des dessins en noir et les creux en blanc contrairement à la convention qui pour les dessins de décors sur céramique inverse ces valeurs : les fleurons de lampes Hayes II, issus de moules d’appliques, sont en relief et rendre leur contour en blanc suppose nécessairement un trait de contour en noir qui souvent prête à confusion. Ceci est particulièrement visible dans le cas de cercles concentriques ou de damiers. Une base de données entrant plus de 5000 lampes Hayes II dont les fleurons ont été identifiés grâce au répertoire, permet, en faisant jouer l’association des décors de disques avec ceux des bandeaux et avec les provenances, d’ouvrir d’intéressantes perspectives de recherches ultérieures sur les productions des grands ateliers tunisiens actuellement connus.
NEW: Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 45 2015 edited by Orhan Elmaz. xii+434 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. PSAS45 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911454. £69.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911461. £57.60 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Seminar for Arabian Studies is the only international academic forum which meets annually for the presentation of research in the humanities on the Arabian Peninsula. It focuses on the fields of archaeology, architecture, art, epigraphy, ethnography, history, language, linguistics, literature, and numismatics from the earliest times to the present day.

A wide range of original and stimulating papers presented at the Seminar are published in the Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies and reflect the dynamism and scope of the interdisciplinary event.

The main foci of the Seminar in 2014, in chronological order were the Palaeolithic and Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages, Early Historical and Classical periods, Heritage Management, Islamic Archaeology and History. In addition there were sessions on Ethnography, on Language, and with a session dedicated to the Archaeology and History of ancient Yemen. In addition, on the evening of Saturday, 26 July 2014, Professor Lloyd Weeks, Head of the School of Humanities, the University of University of New England, New South Wales, Australia, a long supporter of the Seminar and Foundation, presented the MBI Lecture entitled ‘The Quest for the Copper of Magan: how early metallurgy shaped Arabia and set the horizons of the Bronze Age world’ and as always provided an informative, interesting and lucid lecture. This volume also includes notes in memoriam on Nigel Groom (1924–2014), ‘Arabist, historian, spy-catcher, and writer on perfume’; and on Professor Tony Wilkinson (1948–2014), Professor of Archaeology at the University of Edinburgh (2005–2006) and Professor of Archaeology at Durham University (2006–2014) who specialised in landscape archaeology.

NEW: The Circle of God An archaeological and historical search for the nature of the sacred: A study of continuity by Brian Hobley. 820 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 163 2015. ISBN 9781784911379. £110.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Symbolism was endemic in the ancient world as a visual language, with its interpretation one of the most important challenges, especially in the realm of the divine and sacred, to today’s cognitive archaeology and Classical Studies. This study is focussed on circular solar/cosmic symbolism which has endured for seven millennia in the European and Mediterranean worlds. The potency of the solar/cosmic circle should not be understated, as this study will demonstrate, with its worldwide affiliation. For all humankind is aware of the sun’s benefits of light and warmth, and of the seasons which needed in the ancient world to be sustained by heavenly harmony through ritual, sacrifice and worship; hence the introduction of sympatheia, i.e. ‘as above so below’ thus satisfying society’s need for a relationship with the natural world of the universe/sun. To that end, Bronze Age people created circular landscapes such as Stonehenge with circular henges and burial monuments (barrows). In the Classical Greco-Roman world, kingship required emperors to play a cosmocrator role acting as a beneficial solar/cosmic earthly filter for their people. Thus Augustus adopted the primary solar Greek god Apollo as his patron, for he commanded prophecy and divination integral in the ancient world. Divination and fate belonged to the Gods, with ancient astrology not just fortune telling but projecting the divine will and workings of the circular living orderly universe with the Sun the centre of Divine intelligence. The pagan world inter-religious toleration was exchanged for Christian universalist monotheism which needed the solarisation of Christ by early Christian fathers to gain followers and permanent converts. Such was the strength of solar tradition that the Emperor Constantine remained loyal nearly unto death, and up to medieval times Christ in Europe was still known as Sol Resurrectionus.

Connecting Networks: Characterising Contact by Measuring Lithic Exchange in the European Neolithic edited by Tim Kerig and Stephen Shennan. x+167 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 162 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911416. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911423. £28.90 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume brings together a group of peer reviewed papers, most of them presented at a workshop held at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. The event took place on 15–17 October 2011 and was part of the European Research Council (ERC) funded project Cultural Evolution of Neolithic Europe (EUROEVOL 2010-2015).

The aim of the EUROEVOL project is to contribute to the new interdisciplinary field of cultural evolution that has developed over the last 30 years, and at the same time use these ideas and methods to address specific questions concerning the links between demographic, economic, social and cultural patterns and processes in the first farming societies of temperate Europe. The aim of the EUROEVOL project is to do that for the first time, and in doing so to provide the basis for a new account of the role of farming in transforming early European societies, c.6000-2000 cal BCE.
Bronze Age Tell Communities in Context – An Exploration Into Culture, Society and the Study of European Prehistory Part 1 – Critique: Europe and the Mediterranean by Tobias L. Kienlin. vi+168 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 161 2015. ISBN 9781784911478. £38.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This study challenges current modelling of Bronze Age tell communities in the Carpathian Basin in terms of the evolution of functionally-differentiated, hierarchical or ‘proto-urban’ society under the influence of Mediterranean palatial centres. It is argued that the narrative strategies employed in mainstream theorising of the ‘Bronze Age’ in terms of inevitable social ‘progress’ sets up an artificial dichotomy with earlier Neolithic groups. The result is a reductionist vision of the Bronze Age past which denies continuity evident in many aspects of life and reduces our understanding of European Bronze Age communities to some weak reflection of foreign-derived social types – be they notorious Hawaiian chiefdoms or Mycenaean palatial rule. In order to justify this view, this study looks broadly in two directions: temporal and spatial. First, it is asked how Late Neolithic tell sites of the Carpathian Basin compare to Bronze Age ones, and if we are entitled to assume structural difference or rather ‘progress’ between both epochs. Second, it is examined if a Mediterranean ‘centre’ in any way can contribute to our understanding of Bronze Age tell communities on the ‘periphery’. It is argued that current Neo-Diffusionism has us essentialise from much richer and diverse evidence of past social and cultural realities. Instead, archaeology is called on to contribute to an understanding of the historically specific expressions of the human condition and human agency, not to reduce past lives to abstract stages on the teleological ladder of social evolution.
Word Becomes Image: Openwork vessels as a reflection of Late Antique transformation by Hallie G. Meredith. x+279 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 160 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911294. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911300. £38.24 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Transformation presents a diachronic investigation providing a rich case study as well as an approach tracing the contours of a category of Roman material culture defined by the Roman period technique of openwork carving. As the first comprehensive assemblage of openwork vessels from Classical to late Antiquity, this work offers primary evidence documenting a key example of the fundamental shift from naturalism to abstraction in which inscriptions are transformed and word becomes image. A glass blower herself, Hallie Meredith poses questions about process, tactility and reception providing a clear picture of the original contexts of production and reception demonstrated by the Roman technique of openwork carving. In an in-depth analysis of the corpus as a whole, typologies (old and new), imagery, geometric patterning and inscriptions as the major divisions among openwork decorative elements, basic design principles are identified, non openwork carving and its relation to openwork decoration are discussed, as are the function, handling, display, movement and provenance of openwork vessels throughout the Roman Empire. Art historians and archaeologists working on the transition from Classical to late Antiquity, as well as scholars focusing on these and later periods of study, can fruitfully apply this approach to visual culture. This work shows how openwork vessels are a reflection of a wide-reaching Roman cultural aesthetic.
L’oblique dans le monde grec Concept et imagerie by Thibault Girard. iv+189; illustrated throughout in black & white. French text. 159 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911393. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911409. £29.75 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

What could be more evident than the concepts of oblique, horizontal or vertical? In the modern world, these concepts form the basis of our thought system, both from a mathematical and artistic point of view. Everything would suggest that these principles were known to the Greek civilization. However, the study of the surviving texts casts a different light on the matter. Homer did not know the concept of oblique - no word could translate it into the language of his time. Even later, the Greeks had five adjectives approximately meaning oblique: λοξός, πλάγιος, λέχριος, σκολιός and δόχμιος. Each discipline (cosmology, optic, geography, art, etc.) had its own way of looking at these five words. Paradoxically, what the written language had not yet synthesized was abundant in imagery. Even more surprising, the oblique in images, which we consider as a sign of movement in our own iconographic language, is found to signify both movement and rest. Two monuments of Greek art draw attention to this new paradox: the frieze of the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus and the Mourning Athena. In each of them, the oblique line is present, and carries two distinct meanings.

These two forms of language, written and figurative, bring a different and complementary perspective on the ancient Greeks' apprehension (or lack thereof) of the concept of oblique.

French description:
Quoi de plus évident que les concepts d’oblique, d’horizontal ou de vertical ? Pour nous, modernes,ces concepts fondamentaux sont la base de tout notre système de pensée, tant mathématiquequ’artistique. Tout porterait à croire que ces principes soient présents dans la civilisation grecque,dont nous nous réclamons les héritiers. Ce n’est pourtant pas une évidence au vu des textes quinous ont été rapportés. Homère n’a pas connu le concept d’oblique – aucun mot ne saurait letraduire dans la langue de son époque. Et même plus tard. Les Grecs ont cinq adjectifs pour signifierapproximativement l’oblique : λοξός, πλάγιος, λέχριος, σκολιός et δόχμιος. Chaque discipline(cosmologie, optique, géographie, artistique, etc.) a sa façon d’appréhender ces cinq termes.Paradoxalement, ce que le langage écrit n’a pas synthétisé se retrouve en abondance dans l’imagerie.Plus surprenant encore, l’oblique dans l’image, que nous considérons comme signe du mouvementdans notre langage iconographique, se retrouve aussi bien pour signifier le mouvement que le repos.Deux monuments de l’art grec attirent notre attention sur ce nouveau paradoxe : la frise du Mausoléed’Halicarnasse et l’Athéna Pensive. À chaque fois l’oblique est présente, à chaque fois elle porte deuxsens bien distincts.

Ces deux formes de langage, écrit et imagé, apportent un éclairage différent, et pour le moinscomplémentaire, sur la façon dont les Grecs de l’Antiquité ont appréhendé (ou non) le conceptd’oblique.
Once upon a Time in the East The Chronological and Geographical Distribution of Terra Sigillata and Red Slip Ware in the Roman East by Philip Bes. viii+196 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 158 2015 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 6. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911201. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911218. £34.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In this book Philip Bes summarises the results of his PhD thesis (Catholic University of Leuven) on the analysis of production trends and complex, quantified distribution patterns of the principal traded sigillatas and slipped table wares in the Roman East, from the early Empire to Late Antiquity (e.g. Italian Sigillata, Eastern Sigillata A, B and C, Çandarli ware, Phocean Red Slip Ware/LRC, Cypriot Red Slip Ware/LRD and African Red Slip Wares). He draws on his own work in Sagalassos and Boeotia, as well as an exhaustive review of archaeological publications of ceramic data. The analysis compares major regional blocks, documenting coastal as well as inland sites, and offers an interpretation of these complex data in terms of the economy and possible distribution mechanisms.
Du Mont Liban aux Sierras d’Espagne Sols, eau et sociétés en montagne: Autour du projet franco-libanais CEDRE “Nahr Ibrahim” edited by Romana Harfouche and Pierre Poupet. ii+284 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. French text. 157 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911355. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911362. £37.39 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Soil and water management is a major stake for the current Mediterranean countries. It was also an important challenge for past societies, especially since the Neolithic and the early well-established farming communities. the mastery of these vital resources accompanied the complexification of social organization. It also widely contributed, if not to impulse it, at least to structure it. This volume presents the results of the CEDRE multidisciplinary project NAHR IBRAHIM that was led on the Lebanese mountain centered around the Nahr Ibrahim valley (the famous Adonis valley in Antiquity), in the hinterland of the ancient city of Byblos. the mountain has been under-researched by archaeology and history due to the attractiveness of the prestigious coastal phoenician cities. The history of settlement patterns and the construction of agricultural mountainous landscapes since the Early Bronze Age is examined with comparisons from other regions surrounding the Mediterranean Basin.

French description:
En préambule à la publication d’un travail collectif international, franco-libanais, qui a été conduit pendant deux années (2010-2012), il faut replacer ce travail dans un monde en évolution constante et accélérée, où les sociétés sont de plus en plus exclusives. En entreprenant une recherche sur la construction des paysages ruraux et sur la maîtrise des sols et de l’eau, au cours de l’histoire, l’équipe internationale a voulu montrer la richesse des savoirs et des pratiques de sociétés agricoles qui, loin d’être immobiles et repliées sur elles-mêmes dans leurs montagnes, sont innovantes par bien des aspects, capables d’effectuer des progrès réfléchis.

Le projet dans son ensemble devait satisfaire à trois questions : quel projet global a été élaboré et avec quels partenaires ? quelles disciplines spécialisées choisies parmi les Sciences naturelles (Sciences de la Terre et de la Vie) ainsi que parmi les Sciences humaines (Sciences de l’Homme et des Sociétés) ont été sollicitées en fonction des objectifs fixés ? quel périmètre a été défini pour l’étude et selon quels critères ?

Au regard des recherches qui ont été conduites, des stratégies et des missions, nous devons expliciter les résultats obtenus et les évolutions remarquables par rapport à l’état des lieux précédent de la connaissance, mais aussi les perspectives scientifiques pour l’avenir, dans le contexte régional et national du Liban, mais aussi au niveau international. C’est pourquoi, dans le cadre de la publication des résultats de l’équipe franco-libanaise, nous avons fait appel à des équipes et à des chercheurs oeuvrant dans d’autres espaces montagnards, proches de la Méditerranée et comparables sur bien des points à la montagne libanaise, ainsi qu’à des chercheurs travaillant plus spécifiquement sur l’histoire des sols et de l’exploitation de l’eau.
FORTHCOMING: Argonauts of the Stone Age Early maritime activity from the first migrations from Africa to the end of the Neolithic by Andrzej Pydyn. viii+255 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 11 colour plates.ISBN 9781784911430. Book contents pageBuy Now

This is an important book. Too often in the past archaeologists have ignored or underestimated sea travel in early prehistory but the evidence has been growing and now it is presented to us in full in this thought provoking study. No longer can those interested in the human achievement neglect to take into account the astonishing achievements of our palaeolithic, mesolithic and neolithic ancestors.

This book gives a full account of stone age seafaring presenting the archaeological evidence in the context of the changing world environment and uses ethnographic sources to broaden the readers understanding of the worlds earliest sea craft. It is essential reading for all concerned to understand the human condition. – Professor Sir Barry Cunliffe, Oxford

The book is a comprehensive study of early navigation and its place in the development of human culture from the earliest times to the late Stone Age. This subject is very timely in light of increasing archaeological and palaeoanthropological evidence that the maritime environment had been mastered in prehistory. As the author rightly points out at the beginning of his book, the maritime environment can no longer be marginalised when portraying both hunter-gatherer and early agrarian prehistoric communities.

The book is a valuable and inspiring work on a subject which had hitherto not enjoyed such in-depth treatment. It greatly enhances our perception of the beginnings of human culture and enriches it with comprehensive, convincing arguments that the maritime environment had been mastered by early humans. I congratulate the author on the effect he has achieved and on unearthing so many chronologically, geographically and thematically diverse sources. – Prof. Paweł Valde-Nowak, Jagiellonian University, Krakow

The title of the book intrigues the reader and promises a fascinating read about issues approached from an innovatively broad perspective. Both the global territorial scope and the chronological range covering almost two million years of human cultural development are worthy of note. What we have here is an aspect of human activity which is often neglected and marginalised in scientific research, which is that directly related to the sea. The fact that up to 90% of Pleistocene coasts, which were after all heavily populated in the Stone Age, have been flooded in modern times is not conducive to large-scale research, as underlined by the author in the Introduction.

The beginnings of human activity on the high seas are the subject of research in numerous scientific disciplines, all of which are discussed here. In writing this book the author has drawn on an exceptionally wide range of literature, mostly in English, owing to which the author’s own views, as well as those of other researchers whom he cites, are credible and convincing. – Dr hab. Krzysztof Cyrek, professor of Nicolaus Copernicus University, Toruń

This book is scheduled for publication in June 2015, priced £36.00. To register your interest please email info@archaeopress.com.
Prepared for Eternity A study of human embalming techniques in ancient Egypt using computerised tomography scans of mummies by Robert Loynes. xx+249 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 7 colour plates. 156 2015 Archaeopress Egyptology 9. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911102. £43.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911119. £36.54 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication brings together personal analyses of sixty CT scans of ancient Egyptian human mummies collected from many museums throughout the UK and continental Europe. The effect is that of performing ‘virtual autopsies’ (‘virtopsies’) allowing techniques of mummification to be examined. The historical age of the mummies ranges from the Middle Kingdom to the Roman Period. Several new observations are made regarding the preparation of mummies and confirmation of previously described themes is tempered by the observation of variations probably indicating individual workshop practices. The work presents a springboard for further detailed research on the subject.

About the Author:
Robert Loynes is an Orthopaedic Surgeon who, after retirement, carried out the research described in this publication and was subsequently awarded a PhD in Egyptology. His lifelong interest in Egyptology and a lifetime career using medical images fired his passion for the subject of mummy research specifically using CT scans as a tool.
The late prehistory of Malta: Essays on Borġ in-Nadur and other sites edited by Davide Tanasi and Nicholas C. Vella. vii+199 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 155 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911270. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911287. £29.75 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Borġ in-Nadur, on the south-east coast of the island of Malta, is a major multi-period site, with archaeological remains that span several thousand years. In the course of the Late Neolithic, the steep-sided ridge was occupied by a large megalithic temple complex that was re-occupied in the succeeding Bronze Age. In the course of the second millennium BC, the ridge was heavily fortified by a massive wall to protect a settlement of huts. Excavations were carried out here in 1881 and again in 1959. This volume brings together a number of contributions that report on those excavations, providing an exhaustive account of the stratigraphy, the pottery, the lithic assemblages, the bones, and the molluscs. Additional studies look at other sites in Malta and in neighbouring Sicily in an effort to throw light on the late prehistory of the south-central Mediterranean at a period when connections with regions near and far were increasing. The volume forms a companion to another monograph which concentrated on the temple remains at Borġ in-Nadur (D. Tanasi and N. C. Vella (eds), Site, artefacts and landscape: prehistoric Borġ in-Nadur, Malta. Praehistorica Mediterranea 3. Monza: Polimetrica, 2011).

About the Editors:
Davide Tanasi (Ph.D.) is Professor of Archaeology at Arcadia University, The College of Global Studies - Arcadia Sicily Center. His research interests include Mediterranean prehistory, island archaeology, archaeometry of ancient ceramics, computer graphics in archaeology, and digital communication of cultural heritage. He has authored a hundred scientific papers in these fields and produced 3D documentaries about Sicilian archaeology and cultural heritage. His publications include La Sicilia e l’arcipelago maltese nell’eta del Bronzo Medio (Palermo, 2008) and Site, Artefacts and Landscape: Prehistoric Borġ in-Nadur, Malta with Nicholas C. Vella (Monza, 2011). He is editor of the international scientific journal Open Archaeology (De Gruyter) and since 2012, he has been directing the Field School in Archaeology of Arcadia University in Sicily.

Nicholas C. Vella is Senior Lecturer and Head of the Department of Classics and Archaeology at the University of Malta, and works on Mediterranean history and archaeology. He has co-edited another volume of essays on Malta’s late prehistory called Site, Artefacts and Landscape: Prehistoric Borġ in- Nadur, Malta with Davide Tanasi (Monza, 2011) and contributed, with him, to the Cambridge Prehistory of the Bronze and Iron Age Mediterranean edited by P. van Dommelen and B. Knapp (Cambridge, 2014). He edits the Malta Archaeological Review, and co-directs excavations at the Żejtun Roman Villa (Malta). He is also co-investigator of the FRAGSUS project, funded by the European Research Council, that is examining the environmental and cultural background of prehistoric Malta.
'Middle Saxon' Settlement and Society: The Changing Rural Communities of Central and Eastern England by Duncan Wright. vi+205 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 154 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911256. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911263. £29.75 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book explores the experiences of rural communities who lived between the seventh and ninth centuries in central and eastern England. Combining archaeology with documentary, place-name and topographic evidences, it shows the way in which the settlements in which people lived provide a unique insight into social, economic and political conditions in ‘Middle Saxon’ England. The material derived from excavations within currently-occupied rural settlements represents a particularly informative dataset, and when combined with other evidence illustrates that the seventh to ninth centuries was a period of fundamental social change that impacted rural communities in significant and lasting ways. The transformation of settlement character was part of a more widespread process of landscape investment during the ‘Middle Saxon’ period, as rapidly stratifying social institutions began to manifest power and influence through new means. Such an analysis represents a significant departure from the prevailing scholarly outlook of the early medieval landscape, which continues to posit that the countryside of England remained largely unchanged until the development of historic villages from the ninth century onward. In this regard, the evidence presented by this book from currently-occupied rural settlements provides substantial backing to the idea that many historic villages emerged as part of a two-stage process which began during the ‘Middle Saxon’ period. Whilst it was only following subsequent change that recognisable later village plans began to take shape, key developments between the seventh and ninth centuries helped articulate the form and identity of rural centres, features that in many instances persisted throughout the medieval period and into the present day.
Quarrying in Western Norway An archaeological study of production and distribution in the Viking period and Middle Ages by Irene Baug. xii+176 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 8 colour plates. 153 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911027. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911034. £28.90 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The theme of this study is the large-scale exploitation of different stone products that took place in Norway during the Viking Age and the Middle Ages (c. AD 800–1500). The research is based on analyses of two different quarry landscapes in Western Norway: the quernstone quarries in Hyllestad, Sogn og Fjordane, and the bakestone quarries in Ølve and Hatlestrand, Hordaland. The centre of attention is the production of utility artefacts: quernstones, millstones and bakestones, and more symbolic products such as stone crosses. The production landscapes are also assessed within wider socio-economic perspectives related to organisation, control and landownership. Following the different products, from production in the quarries to their distribution and use in both urban and rural contexts in Northern Europe, questions regarding trade and networks are addressed. The material is also discussed and assessed in wider methodological and theoretical contexts, and an aim is to illuminate the control and right of use related to the quarrying, also to examine the groups of actors behind production as well as distribution and trade.
Romans, Rubbish, and Refuse The archaeobotanical assemblage of Regione VI, insula I, Pompeii by Charlene Alexandria Murphy. xii+137 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 1 colour plate. 152 2015 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 8. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911157. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911164. £24.65 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Although world-renowned, Pompeii, the first Roman site to be excavated and one of the most visited and best-studied archaeological sites in the world, still has unanswered questions to yield, especially in terms of its long-term development from pre-Roman times. The extensive excavations (1995–2006) by the Anglo-American Project in Pompeii (AAPP) has provided a rare insight into chronological change within the city of Pompeii. This research was significant as an insula block within the city of Pompeii had never previously been excavated in its entirety. The analysis of all the recovered seeds, fruits and cereal remains has provided a unique research opportunity to undertake a diachronic study of urban Roman plant food consumption and discards. Over the past two centuries of excavations at Pompeii only a handful of published works dealing with botanical evidence have been published. The results from this study demonstrate a standard Mediterranean archaeobotanical assemblage recovered from Insula VI.1 which included wheat, barley, legumes, olives, grapes and figs. A wider diversity of fruits, pulses, and additional cereals, especially broomcorn millet were also found. These results support the established view that Pompeii was a fully urbanised city in the 1st century B.C.
The 1927–1938 Italian Archaeological Expedition to Transjordan in Renato Bartoccini’s Archives by Stefano Anastasio and Lucia Botarelli. i+242 pages; extensively illustrated throughout in black & white. 151 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911188. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911195. £34.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents the results of the Italian excavations and surveys carried out in Transjordan between 1927 and 1938. After a first excavation campaign conducted in 1927 on the Amman Citadel by Giacomo Guidi, the excavations were resumed in 1929 by Renato Bartoccini (Rome 1893–Rome 1963), who carried out four campaigns on the Citadel in 1929, 1930, 1933 and 1938. He also travelled across modern Jordan, Syria and Lebanon, taking photos and writing reports on several archaeological sites. Bartoccini published a few notes and reports, but almost all the original documentation of his work was still unpublished at the time this study was conducted. The main source of data is the Fondo Renato Bartoccini, i.e. the private archive of Bartoccini, today held by the University of Perugia, while other useful documents are kept in other archives in Macerata and in Rome. Furthermore, some decorated Islamic pottery from the excavations on the Citadel is held at the Museo Internazionale delle Ceramiche in Faenza. The retrieved photos, excavation journals, letters, and administrative documents make it possible to understand, after almost a century, how the Citadel of Amman appeared at the time of its first excavation.
An Anatomy of a Priory Church: The Archaeology, History and Conservation of St Mary’s Priory Church, Abergavenny edited by George Nash. x+203 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 150 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911089. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911096. £24.65 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Based on documentary evidence, the Priory Church of St Marys in Abergavenny has been a place of worship since the late 11th century; archaeological evidence though suggests that the site has a much earlier period of use. Over the past 1000 years the church has been radically altered to reflect its wealth, status and sometimes, its decline. During the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries a number of drastic alterations were made that included the complete demolition and rebuild of the nave. This wholesale change, coupled with the Reformation of 1536 and the vandalism of the mid- to late 17th century by Cromwell's troops did not deter the people of Abergavenny from using this most beautiful of spaces. In the recent past, the late Jeremy Winston did much to add his signature onto the priory's fabric making St Mary a most splendid place of worship. This book, comprising twelve thoughtprovoking chapters traces the archaeology, history and conservation of this most impressive building, delving deep into its anatomy.
Isles of the Dead? The setting and function of the Bronze Age chambered cairns and cists of the Isles of Scilly by Katharine Sawyer. viii+175 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 2 colour plates. 149 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911133. £33.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911140. £28.04 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The number and density of megalithic chambered cairns in the Isles of Scilly, a tiny archipelago that forms the most south-westerly part of the British Isles, has been remarked upon since the 18th century. Isles of the Dead? examines these sites, generally known as entrance graves, and the associated cist graves. Their physical structure and contents, as well as their landscape setting, orientation and inter-visibility, are discussed. The origins and functions of the monuments and their significance to the communities that built and used them are also considered.

The findings indicate that the entrance graves were indeed used for burial and that a wide range of grave goods, including prestige items, were placed in them. The pottery, in particular, shows the development of a specific island identity. The first radiocarbon determinations from the graves suggest a period of use between c2000 and 1250 cal BC. This coincides with the inundation of large areas of low-lying land in the islands and suggests that the construction of entrance graves may have been regarded as a way of ‘holding the line’ against the depredations of the sea.
Aegean Mercenaries in Light of the Bible Clash of cultures in the story of David and Goliath by Simona Rodan. iv+112 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 148 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911065. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911072. £18.70 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The story of the duel of David and Goliath, the Philistine champion, is narrated in the Bible in several versions. While its symbolic importance in Judaism and later in Christianity gradually came to represent the battle between good and evil, true faith and paganism, attempts were made since ancient times to solve its ambiguities. In modern research, the story arouses many disputes. There is controversy about the degree of realism and fantasy in it and there is also no agreement as to the time it was composed. Some claim that this was close to the time when the event occurred at the beginning of the monarchy period. Others postpone the time of its writing to the end of the Judaean monarchy and even to Second Temple times by pointing out its similarities to Greek literature and the characteristics of Goliath as an Aegean hoplite.

The purpose of the study is not only to shed light on the enigmas about the protagonists and the time of the story, but also to understand why the importance of its message did not lessen and in what circumstances the interest in it was prolonged. The study employs a textual analysis (literary and philological) of the story together with its comparison to Greek, Egyptian and Mesopotamian literary sources, historical analysis, and also a comparative analysis with archaeological findings. It examines sources which until now have not been included in research and suggests a new date, place and motive for the compilation of the duel story.
The Traditio Legis: Anatomy of an Image by Robert Couzin. vi+140 pages; extensively illustrated with 56 plates, 3 in colour. 147 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910815. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910822. £24.65 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The bearded and mature figure of Christ stands majestically raising his right hand, open palm facing the viewer. In his left he holds an unfurled scroll. Saints Peter and Paul appear on either side, Peter approaching to catch or protect the dangling bookroll. This image, the so-called traditio legis, first appeared in late fourthcentury Rome in a variety of media, from the monumental to the miniature, including mosaic, catacomb painting, gold-glass and, the most numerous group, marble relief carving on sarcophagi.

This monograph engages in a close reading of the traditio legis, highlighting its novelty and complexity to early Christian viewers. The image is analyzed as a conflation of two distinct forms of representation, each constructed of unusual and potentially multivalent elements. Iconographical details like the hirsute Christ, his gesture, Peter’s covered hands and the unorthodox positioning of the two saints are examined in isolation and as elements of the whole. The synthetic composition invited alternative and over-determined meanings.
The Dodecanese: Further Travels Among the Insular Greeks Selected Writings of J. Theodore & Mabel V.A. Bent, 1885-1888 edited by Gerald Brisch. xiv+194 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 3rdguides 143 2015 3rdGuides - Archaeopress Travel 8. ISBN 9781784910969. £15.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

A sequel to The Cyclades, a compilation of late-19th-century travel writings (with an archaeological/ethnographical bias) centred on the Greek Dodecanese islands (including Rhodes, Nissiros, Tilos, Karpathos, Patmos, and Astypalea).

The authors are the British explorer J. Theodore Bent (1852-1897), devotedly supported by his wife Mabel Virginia Anna (1847-1929). Theodore met Mabel shortly after coming down from Oxford in 1875 and they married two years later. They were of independent character and means and spent the too few years until Theodore’s early death on a breathless sequence of annual travels to the Eastern Mediterranean, Africa, and Southern Arabia. Theodore’s publications are referenced still by archaeologists and scholars working on sites or regions such as ‘Great Zimbabwe’, Aksum, the Wadi Hadramaut, the Cilician littoral, and, of course, the Greek islands.

Bent’s first successful monograph was based on two winters spent in the Cycladic isles (1882/3 and 1883/4). From the start the couple kept notebooks from which all Theodore’s later lectures and literature sprang. His The Cyclades, or Life Among the Insular Greeks was published in 1885 and has been rarely out of print since. It remains one of the most delightful accounts in English of the region, and few serious travellers and tourists to these islands fail to discover it.

In the year The Cyclades was published the Bents moved a little east and explored the islands now commonly referred to as the Greek Dodecanese. Unforeseen circumstances obliged the explorers to curtail their activities before Theodore’s writings on the area could be edited into a monograph to complement his earlier bestseller. Theodore’s Dodecanesian output was channelled instead into a wide range of articles, while Mabel completed three volumes of her personal Chronicles on their daily travels and travails.

Bent never presented his Dodecanese researches to the public in a compendium, the way he had, so brilliantly, for the Cyclades. Now, 130 years later, his The Dodecanese can appear for the first time: a collection of reminiscences and studies on these sunny, blue-surrounded, and delightful islands.

Contents: ‘Preface’ by Marc Dubin; ‘Introduction’ by Gerald Brisch; ‘J.T. Bent: Selected Writings on the Dodecanese 1885-1888’; ‘M.V.A. Bent: Travel Chronicles for the years 1885-1888’. Fully illustrated with maps and photographs.

Mr. Bent’s book deserves all success, for it is the result of researches pursued in the most laudable manner…[and] a unique description of the life and ideas of a people, which renders it a very storehouse of facts for the student of customs and myths. And in this respect its value will be permanent. Other travellers may follow in Mr. Bent’s footsteps, and fill up what is wanting in his archaeological information; but in a few years’ time, if any traveller be found so enduring as to attempt once more the task which he has so well performed, it is highly probable that a great part of these interesting customs and ideas will have disappeared. (Henry Fanshawe Tozer (1885), on The Cyclades by J.T. Bent)

CAA2014. 21st Century Archaeology Concepts, methods and tools. Proceedings of the 42nd Annual Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology edited by F. Giligny, F. Djindjian, L. Costa, P. Moscati and S. Robert. vi+649 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 146 2015. ISBN 9781784911003. £75.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume brings together a selection of papers proposed for the Proceedings of the 42nd Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology conference (CAA), hosted at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University from 22nd to 25th April 2014. The program was divided into different themes and this structure has been maintained in the arrangement of articles in the various chapters of this book. Chapter headings include: Historiography; Field and Laboratory Data Recording; Ontologies and Standards; Internet and Archaeology; Archaeological Information Systems; GIS and Spatial Analysis; Mathematics and Statistics in Archaeology; 3D Archaeology and Virtual Archaeology; Multi-Agent Systems and Complex System Modelling.