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Archaeopress: Publishers of Academic Archaeology
Communicating the researches of thousands of archaeologists worldwide since 1991

Archaeopress is an Oxford-based publisher specialising in academic archaeology. Series published include Archaeopress Archaeology,
British Archaeological Reports (BAR) and the Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies.

 
Stone Trees Transplanted? Central Mexican Stelae of the Epiclassic and Early Postclassic and the Question of Maya ‘Influence’ by Keith Jordan. xii+237 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 109 2014 Archaeopress Pre-Columbian Archaeology 2. ISBN 9781784910112. £35.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

Stelae dating to the Epiclassic (650-900 CE) and Early Postclassic (950-1150 CE) from Tula, Xochicalco, and other sites in Central Mexico have been presented in the archaeological and art historical literature of the last four decades—when they have been addressed at all—as evidence of Classic Maya ‘influence’ on Central Mexican art during these periods. This book re-evaluates these claims via detailed comparative analysis of the Central Mexican stelae and their claimed Maya counterparts. For the first time the Central Mexican stelae are placed in the context of often earlier local artistic traditions as well as other possible long-distance connections.

Comparison of Tula and Xochicalco stelae with earlier and contemporary stelae from Oaxaca and Guerrero demonstrates connections equally as plausible as those posited with the Maya region, and supported by archaeological evidence. While it is clear that some Central Mexican stelae, especially Stela 4 from Tula, reflect Maya contacts, this has to be balanced by consideration of local and other long distance developments and connections.
The Archaeology of Yucatán: New Directions and Data edited by Travis W. Stanton. xix+514 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Papers in English and Spanish. 108 2014 Archaeopress Pre-Columbian Archaeology 1. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910082. £50.00. Epublication ISBN 9781784910099. £42.50. Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume was conceived to provide a forum for Mexican and foreign scholars to publish new data and interpretations on the archaeology of the northern Maya lowlands, specifically the State of Yucatán. Increased communication among scholars has become increasingly important for grasping a better understanding of the great amount of data emerging from the State of Yucatán. There has been more salvage work conducted in this state than in any of the others throughout Mexico and the data is overwhelming. Because of this large amount of salvage work, archaeologists in the INAH office in Yucatán have had little time to publish the great majority of the new information. Further, many of the forums that are easily accessible to scholars in the northern lowlands have constrictive space restraints not conducive to publishing data. With these points in mind, this volume seeks to gather papers that did not necessarily have to have a theoretical focus, and that could be data laden so that the raw data from many of these projects would not be confined to difficult to access reports in the Mérida and Mexico City offices. The result is a series of manuscripts on the northern lowlands, most of which focus on the State of Yucatán. Some of the papers are very data heavy, while others have a much more interpretive emphasis. Yet all of them contribute to a more complete picture of the northern lowland Maya.
The European Archaeologist: 1 – 21a 1993 – 2004 edited by Henry Cleere, Karen Waugh & Ross Samson. iv+356 pages; black & white throughout. 110 2014. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910129. £30.00. Epublication ISBN 9781784910136. £22.50. Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume gathers together the first 10 years of The European Archaeologist (ISSN 1022-0135), from Winter 1993 through to the 10th Anniversary Conference Issue, published in 2004 for the Lyon Annual Meeting. In reality, like the Journal of European Archaeology, The European Archaeologist (TEA) was born before the official foundation of the EAA at Ljubljana in September 1994, and began publication the year before. The first issue announces the Ljubljana Inaugural Meeting, and documents the work of the International Steering Committee which promoted the Association. Readers can then trace the initial development of their brainchild, from the euphoria of a post-1989 Europe where Archaeologists could at last freely communicate to the consolidation of the Association as a key player in the Archaeology of the continent. Perhaps the most striking thing, reading through these early issues of TEA, is how the central concerns of the EAA, for heritage, commercial and academic archaeology have remained central to its content. This volume is published as the Association meets in Istanbul for its 20th Annual Meeting. –from the preface by Mark Pearce
Binsey: Oxford’s Holy Place Its saint, village, and people edited by Lydia Carr, Russell Dewhurst and Martin Henig. x+147 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 111 2014. ISBN 9781905739844. £20.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

Binsey is a village to the west of Oxford, on the south bank of the main channel of the River Thames, opposite Port Meadow, which has been an open space belonging to the burgesses of Oxford since late Saxon times. Although now within the ring-road, the village is essentially rural and unspoilt. The hub of Binsey is a row of cottages and the Perch Inn on one side of the village green. At one time when the river was wider there was a ferry here taking travelers across to Oxford. The church, its present building no earlier than the 12th century though on an older site, lies a third of a mile distant. Its association with Oxford’s patron saint St Frideswide alone makes this an evocative place for anyone with an interest in the origins of this great University city. Its holy well, dedicated to St Margaret like the church itself, was a place of resort for those with eye problems or desirous of a child: Katharine of Aragon’s lack of success in conceiving a male heir after resort to the well in a sense precipitated the English Reformation! Later associations, which include Charles Dodgson and Alice Liddell as well as Gerard Manley Hopkins and C. S. Lewis, render Binsey a place for the literary as well as the religious pilgrim.

This book is a collection of essays on aspects of Binsey and its environs. It is not a guidebook so much as an evocation of the place, dwelling on specific aspects from the busy river to the tranquil and silent churchyard; from the poplars, great-grandparents of the present trees along the river and Hopkins’ great poem on them, to the personalities who served the village community; from the Binsey of St Frideswide’s time to the community of the present day.
Social Dimensions of Medieval Disease and Disability by Sally Crawford and Christina Lee. 86. BAR S2668 2014 Studies in Early Medicine 3. ISBN 9781407313108. £22.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

The chronological and geographical focus of this volume is medieval northern Europe, from the 6th to the 15th centuries. The contributors examine the sometimes arbitrary social factors which resulted in people being deliberately, accidentally or temporarily categorised as ‘disabled’ within their society, in ways that are peculiar to the medieval period. Health and disease are not static and unchanging; they are subject to cultural construction, manipulation and definition. Medieval ideas of healthy and unhealthy, as these papers show, were not necessarily - or even usually - comparable to modern approaches. Each of the papers represented in this volume assesses social constructs of health and ill-health in different guises within the medieval period.

Contributions by Ármann Jakobsson, Sally Crawford, Damien Jeanne, Christina Lee, Irina Metzler, Rachel Middlemass and Tersa Tyers, Fay Skevington and Wendy Turner.
Early Farming in Central Anatolia An archaeobotanical study of crop husbandry, animal diet and land use at Neolithic Çatalhöyük by Dragana Filipović. xii+167 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. BAR S2667 2014. ISBN 9781407313092. £31.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

The Neolithic Çatalhöyük (c. 7400-6000 cal. BC), in the Konya Plain of Central Anatolia, was made famous by the excavations of James Mellaart in 1960s, who uncovered remains of a large, pueblo-like agglomeration of houses (‘the world’s first city’). Renewed excavations at the site over the past twenty years have used a range of current recovery techniques, including systematic sampling of archaeological deposits for archaeobotanical remains. The archaeobotanical recovery programme represents a unique opportunity to directly investigate the socio-economic underpinnings of an early ‘town’ community through the lens of crop husbandry and plant use. In this book, new archaeobotanical evidence from the early-mid Neolithic sequence of Çatalhöyük (c. 7400- 6500 cal BC) is presented and used as a basis for investigations into the nature and scale of crop cultivation at the site. The results shed light on the economic and social role of agricultural production at a large long-lived Neolithic village, and its implications for issues such as settlement location, residents’ mobility, crop cultivation productivity and long-term sustainability.
Archaeomalacology: Shells in the Archaeological Record edited by Katherine Szabó, Catherine Dupont, Vesna Dimitrijević, Luis Gómez Gastélum and Nathalie Serrand. BAR S2666 2014. ISBN 9781407313085. £39.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication is the volume is the proceedings of the ICAZ Archaeomalacology Working Group which took place at the 11th International Conference of the International Council for Archaeozoology (ICAZ), held in Paris, France 23rd-28th August 2010. Twenty-three papers are published with evidences of human collection and modification of shells from all over the world and over a large scale of chronology (from Prehistory to Antiquity). The papers are organized in three sub-sessions. The section “Acquisition and use of shell raw materials in prehistory” focuses on patterns of acquisition and use of shell raw materials as well as on the production sequences of shell items in time and space. Specific themes of interest include the exploitation of shells as raw materials in relation to their dietary functions, or choices made to use particular shells along with or as opposed to other raw materials.

The section “Shell middens and shells as a food resource” provides a venue to explore the relationships between human groups and molluscan resources and especially encourages the combination of information derived from multiple disciplines, as well as studies that seek to contextualise shell-gathering in a wider socio-economic context. The section “Shells as indicators of palaeoenvironment, site formation and transformation” aims to investigate the potential of the archaeological shell to answer questions not directly related to subsistence or material culture and especially welcomes contributions which mobilise the study of the archaeological shell in relation to modern resource management and environmental change.
Central Asia in Antiquity: Interdisciplinary Approaches edited by Borja Antela-Bernárdez and Jordi Vidal. iv+122 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. BAR S2665 2014. ISBN 9781407313115. £25.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

Central Asia is a wide subject of research in the archaeological and historical studies of the Ancient World. Scholars have usually focused on the complex and diverse questions that resulted from the analysis of the historical realities of this key region during Antiquity. The purpose of this book is to undertake an approach to the polymorphic and multiple aspects of Central Asia in Antiquity from several points of view. The starting point is the confidence in an interdisciplinary perspective as the main way to understand the different aspects of the region in a very wide chronology: from the emergence of the cities and their relation with the nomadic populations, to the expansion of models and practices from Central Asia to the West during the campaigns and conquests led by Islam. Through subjects like warfare, gender studies and historiography, mainly from an archaeological point of view, the chapters analyze concrete sites like Mes Aynak, Uch Kulakh or Vardanzeh, but also models of interaction among the historical peoples living in Asia Central, like the Bactrians and the Persians, the Persians and Macedonians, the Greeks and the Indians, the Sassanid and the Romans, or even the Sassanid and the Steppe peoples. The result is a very clear example of the richness of starting an interdisciplinary dialogue with the intention of improving our perspectives and understandings of the complex relationships that, through Antiquity, the people living in Central Asia had developed and how scholars can, through archaeology and other related disciplines, approach the historical questions that arise in a close study of the subjects.
Sociabilidad y Alimentación Estudio de casos en la transición al siglo XIX en el Virreinato del Río de la Plata by María Marschoff. 195 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. In Spanish.. BAR S2664 2014 South American Archaeology Series 21. ISBN 9781407313061. £33.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

This book attempts to historize the construction of the dichotomy between “public” and “private” in Spanish colonial territories during the late 18th – early 19th centuries, when this opposition assumed some of the characteristics that today seem completely natural. It is usually acknowledged that these changes began at the level of everyday experiences that took place in a material world and while interacting with other people. Here we study these everyday experiences, particularly those structured around food habits within the domestic sphere in colonial non-elite domestic contexts.

The first case study is the port of Buenos Aires while it was the head of the Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata (1776-1810). Analysis of a sample of probate records each of them representing a single domestic unit. The second case study was the Nueva Colonia y Fuerte de Floridablanca, a small agricultural settlement in Patagonia (1780-1784). Here, several archaelogical lines of inquiry were followed: zooarchaeological, ceramic and glass remains and the analysis of architecture and spatial arrangement and distribution within four dwelling units excavated at the site.

In every domestic context of both cases it could be observed that sociability affected the way food habits were organized in different ways, but always re-enforcing domestic group identities. It could also be assessed that none of the identified ways of organizing food habits indicate that these colonial societies were on the margins of the “novelties” that took place in other contexts. On the contrary, having full knowledge of these tendencies, each domestic unit negotiated on a daily basis the way they ate, taking their own, very individual preferences, as the main rule.
Guam’s Hidden Gem Archaeological and Historical Studies at Ritidian edited by Mike T. Carson. BAR S2663 2014. ISBN 9781407313054. £26.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

The Ritidian Site is located in the United States island territory of Guam, the largest and southernmost of the Mariana Islands in the western Pacific Ocean. The site holds a data-rich 3500-year record of natural and cultural history of the islands, now uniquely preserved and open for public access in the Ritidian Unit of Guam National Wildlife Refuge. The place means many things for people in different perspectives, together speaking volumes of Ritidan’s powerful effects as a heritage landscape. Today, Ritidian is known as an archaeological site, as a place where important historical events occurred, as a home of preserved forest habitat, as a spiritual retreat, as an example of land-ownership struggles in Guam, and as much more. While research is ongoing, this book offers a summary update of findings by scholars who have studied different aspects of the profundity and complexity of Ritidian's integrated natural-cultural landscape history.
Proceedings of the First Zooarchaeology Conference in Portugal Held at the Faculty of Letters, University of Lisbon, 8th-9th March 2012 edited by Cleia Detry and Rita Dias. iv+150 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. BAR S2662 2014. ISBN 9781407313047. £29.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume comprises 15 articles - the result of presentations made at the first International Conference on Zooarchaeology which took place in Lisbon in 2012. This meeting was attended by researchers - PhD students, archaeologists, biologists and zooarchaeologists - studying animal remains from Portugal’s past. The papers in this book comprise a wide range of themes and include material from various periods; the common denominator being their Lusitanian origin. The articles describe faunal remains dating from the Paleolithic to modern times and from various aspects, some purely zooarchaeological, others archaeological and combine a spectrum of methods of study, classical osteology/zooarchaeology, ancient DNA, and even written sources.

The volume starts with an article about Paleolithic artefacts, followed by articles about Mesolithic Muge and Algarve and ends the prehistoric period with a discussion about Bronze age animal remains. The Roman period is also well represented as the Medieval and Modern periods, both with specific site-studies and other more wide-ranging ones that summarize work carried out in specific geographical areas. The volume finishes with an article about the situation of Zooarchaeology as a profession and scientific area of study in present-day Portugal.

Here we are presented with the latest results from the younger generation of Portuguese zooarchaeologists as well as several more experienced in this field. With this small volume it is hoped to put Portuguese zooarchaeology ‘on the map’.
Lieux de culte et parcours cérémoniels dans les fêtes des vingtaines à Mexico - Tenochtitlan by Elena Mazzetto. xi+423 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. In French. BAR S2661 2014. ISBN 9781407313030. £57.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

This book analyzes the places of worship used during the eighteen feasts of the Nahua solar calendar, called “veintenas”, and the ceremonial paths of the participants in the ceremonies in the Aztec capital of Mexico-Tenochtitlan. The work is based on the study of written sources of the sixteenth century, the pictographic manuscripts of pre-Hispanic times and their copies of the first colonial era, as well as archaeological data. In this way a comprehensive overview of the buildings and open spaces used during the monthly rites is presented. Each chapter is devoted to the study of a month and its ceremonies and is divided in two parts. As the first part describes the sacred spaces, the second one examines the ceremonial paths, its participants and the moments of realization. This investigation is enriched by the study of their localization in the sacred geography of the city. The conclusions obtained help to understand some of the new aspects of Aztec religious life: the symbolic significance of places of worship, the geographical distribution of the centers of supernatural power in the urban space and their usage. In this way, these data reflect the worldview of the ancient Nahuas.
Archaeology of Mound-Clusters in West Africa edited by Augustin F. C. Holl. x+196 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. BAR S2660 2014 Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 87. ISBN 9781407313023. £27.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

Archaeology of Mounds clusters in West Africa aims to understand the dynamics that enhanced and sustained the settlement systems made of distinct but close mounds. Most of the mounds-clusters are found in low-lying and flat areas in West Africa sahel and savanna. It has been suggested that West-Africa mound-clustering resulted from patterns of residential segregation articulated on ethnicity, specialized occupation, and/or both. However, most of the archaeological research conducted so far on this kind of settlement has failed to test this hypothesis, and does not address the very issues of their processes of formation and patterns of development. The methodology adopted - single mound sampling approach – does not allow for such explorations. The comprehensive approach presented in this book is articulated on the implementation of complementary excavation strategies. This involves the test excavation of all the mounds of two of the largest mounds clusters found in the study area, and the sampling of a third one, located in a different environmental context. The fine-grained chronology obtained allows the probing of the patterns of growth and diversification of mounds clusters through time, showing the operations of a broad range of settlement location decisions. Bio-anthropological data points clearly to warfare during the scramble for land that took place during the first quarter of the second millenium AD. Depending on time-sequences, special purpose mounds – iron producers, weavers, karité-oil producers – are differentially integrated in each of the tested mounds-clusters. No single settlement strategy fits all.
Body, Cosmos and Eternity: New Trends of Research on Iconography and Symbolism of Ancient Egyptian Coffins edited by Rogério Sousa. viii+203 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black and white. 107 2014 Archaeopress Egyptology 3. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910020. £35.00. Epublication ISBN 9781784910037. £30.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume, edited by Rogério Sousa, is part of the scholarly ferment which has wheeled around the subject of ‘coffin’ during the last twenty years. Its magic and religious evaluation identifies it from time to time as body container, but at the same time substitute body for the deceased, a maternal womb in which the regeneration will occur, a microcosm, tomb, funerary temple, as well as a conduit to the dead, a powerful tool activated by means of the Opening of the Mouth ritual. -From the Foreword, by Alessia Amenta

In February 2013, the Symposium Body, Cosmos and Eternity: the Symbolism of Coffins in Ancient Egypt convened at the historical building of the University of Porto to debate conceptual frameworks underlying the contemporary study of Egyptian coffins. Rising from the close association with the depiction of the mummified body, the anthropoid coffins soon absorbed a rich mythological imaginary related to the constellation of Nut, the mother goddess of the sky supposed to give birth to Osiris, and evolved continuously, integrating larger and more complex sets of beliefs, mirroring the increasingly bolder use of coffins in the funerary rituals. It was this complex set of beliefs involving the coffin that we proposed to explore in this series of symposia. Following our original purpose, the studies presented in this volume display an excellent overview on the new trends of research on coffin studies, with diverse contributions concerned either with symbolism or social significance of coffins, museums´ collections or archaeological finds. These studies superbly showcase the richness of coffins as documental sources for the study of Egyptian religion, economy and society.
The Prehistoric Burial Sites of Northern Ireland by Harry and June Welsh. xi+478 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. 106 2014. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910068. £63.00. Epublication ISBN 9781784910075. £53.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

Much has been written about the history of Northern Ireland, but less well-known is its wealth of prehistoric sites, particularly burial sites, from which most of our knowledge of the early inhabitants of this country has been obtained. This work brings together information on all the known sites in Northern Ireland that are in some way associated with burial. It has been compiled from a number of sources and includes many sites that have only recently been discovered. A total of 3332 monuments are recorded in the inventory, ranging from megalithic tombs to simple pit burials. In addition to providing an inventory of all known sites, along with a selection of photographs and plans, the work also includes an introduction to the prehistory of Northern Ireland, an explanation of terms and a full bibliography. The aim is to provide a foundation for more specific research projects, based on a standardised information format of this largely untapped resource. For example, the work highlights several large and previously unrecognised clusters of prehistoric burial monuments, some located at unusual landscape features. Hopefully, further analysis will lead to a greater understanding of why this should be and stimulate a renewed interest in the prehistory of Northern Ireland. Enhanced awareness of this should complement knowledge of the historical period to provide a more balanced picture of human activity here.
Towns in the Dark: Urban Transformations from Late Roman Britain to Anglo-Saxon England by Gavin Speed. ix+196 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. 105 2014. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910044. £34.00. Epublication ISBN 9781784910051. £29.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

What became of towns following the official end of ‘Roman Britain’ at the beginning of the 5th century AD? Did towns fail? Were these ruinous sites really neglected by early Anglo-Saxon settlers and leaders? Developed new archaeologies are starting to offer alternative pictures to the traditional images of urban decay and loss revealing diverse modes of material expression, of usage of space, and of structural change. The focus of this book is to draw together still scattered data to chart and interpret the changing nature of life in towns from the late Roman period through to the mid-Anglo-Saxon period. The research centres on towns that have received sufficient archaeological intervention so that meaningful patterns can be traced. The case studies are arranged into three regional areas: the South-East, South-West, and Midlands. Individually each town contains varying levels of archaeological data, but analysed together these illustrate more clearly patterns of evolution. Much of the data exists as accessible but largely unpublished reports, or isolated within regional discussions. Detailed analysis, review and comparisons generate significant scope for modelling ‘urban’ change in England from AD 300-600. ‘Towns in the Dark’ dispels the simplistic myth of outright urban decline and failure after Rome, and demonstrates that life in towns often did continue with variable degrees of continuity and discontinuity.
Ships, Saints and Sealore: Cultural Heritage and Ethnography of the Mediterranean and the Red Sea edited by Dionisius A. Agius, Timmy Gambin and Athena Trakadas with contributions by Harriet Nash. x+170 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. 104 2014. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781905739950. £32.00. Epublication ISBN 9781905739967. £27.50. Book contents pageBuy Now

Just as the sea has played a pivotal role in the connectivity of people, economies and cultures, it has also provided a common platform for inter-disciplinary cooperation amongst academics. This book is a selection of conference papers and other contributions that has seen the coming-together of scholars and researchers from backgrounds as diverse as archaeology, history, ethnography, maritime and heritage studies of the Mediterranean and the Red Sea. Its strength lies in the way such diversity has been harnessed to provide an engaging and insightful study of the sea and its influences on various factors of life - both past and present.
The Travel Chronicles of Mrs. J. Theodore Bent. Volume II: The African Journeys Mabel Bent's diaries of 1883-1898, from the archive of the Joint Library of the Hellenic and Roman Societies, London. Paperback. xxxii+344 pages, with maps and illustrations. Edited and with additional material by Gerald Brisch. Extended contributions by Innocent Pikirayi and William J. Dewey. 47 2012 3rdGuides - Archaeopress Travel 7. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781905739370. £27.50. Epublication ISBN 9781905739370. £20.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

“At last we reached a circular enclosure among the grass and scanty trees. We rushed in and it was like getting into a tropical greenhouse with the roof off. There were tall trees and long creepers making monkey ropes, large flowers hanging, great cactus trees, aloes and all sorts of beautiful things crowded together, so that one could hardly squeeze through. I should have liked to stop and stare at the vegetation but on we rushed, over walls and to the tower we had heard of, which is close to the outer wall. We did not stay even to walk round the tower but out we rushed again, like people who were taking a stolen look into an enchanted garden and were afraid of being bewitched if we remained… It was quite dark and we had to be guided by shouts to our camp and got home in a state of great wonder and delight and hope of profitable work and full assurance of the great antiquity of the ruins. Theodore was not very well and had to take quinine.” [M.V.A. Bent, 4 June 1891]

Thus a few lines from Mabel (Mrs J. Theodore) Bent’s 1891 African travel diary on her arrival at ‘Great Zimbabwe’ (in present-day Zimbabwe), written for her family, serve to evoke the romance and hardships of colonial exploration for a Victorian audience. Of particular importance are Mabel’s previously unpublished notebooks covering the couple’s arduous wagon trek to these famous ruins, in part sponsored by the ambitious Cecil Rhodes. Theodore Bent’s interpretations of these wonderful monuments sparked a controversy (one of several this maverick archaeologist was involved in over his short career) that still divides scholars today. Mabel Bent was probably the first woman to visit there and help document this major site. As tourists in Egypt and explorers in the Sudan, Ethiopia, and Southern Africa, anyone interested in 19th-century travel will want to follow the wagon tracks and horse trails of the Bents across hundreds of miles of untouched African landscape.

Contents: Personal diaries, travel accounts and letters relating to the Bents’ travels and explorations in: Egypt (1885); Zimbabwe (1891); Ethiopia (1893); Sudan (1896); Egypt (1898). Includes extended contributions on the archaeological background to ‘Great Zimbabwe’ by Innocent Pikirayi, and ‘The Stone Birds of Great Zimbabwe’ by William J. Dewey. Additional documents, maps, and Mabel Bent’s own photographs contribute to this important insight into the lives of two of the great British travellers of the nineteenth century.

The Travel Chronicles of Mrs J. Theodore Bent. Mabel Bent's diaries of 1883-1898, from the archive of the Joint Library of the Hellenic and Roman Societies, London. Published in three volumes: Volume I – Greece and the Levantine Littoral (2006); Volume II: The African Journeys (2012); Vol III – Southern Arabia and Persia (2010).

"...Brisch and Archaeopress have done a major service by reproducing these hidden gems and rescuing Mabel Bent from relative obscurity. This collection is a valuable primary source and will be of immense interest to those interested in female travelogues, historical archaeology, or the daily experiences of European women in colonial Africa." (Reviewed in 'Journal of African History', Vol. 55/2, 2014, 296-298)
World Enough, and Time: The Travel Chronicles of Mrs J. Theodore Bent. Volume I, Greece and the Levantine Littoral Mabel Bent's diaries of 1883-1898, from the archive of the Joint Library of the Hellenic and Roman Societies, London. 380 pages, 7 maps, 15 illustrations (paperback). Edited and with additional material by Gerald Brisch. 45 2006 3rdGuides - Archaeopress Travel 5. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 1905739028. £27.50. Epublication ISBN 1905739028. £18.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

“Then we went to the other bath. Here I found I was being again taken to the men’s place, so I said, ‘I’m not going in here’. But a great outcry was raised and loud exclamations of invitation and constant assurances that there was nobody naked, so when T said fiercely, ‘Come in and don’t make a fuss. They all wish it’, I entered a large hall with the raised divans peopled by gentry in cloaks and turbans of towels. There was fortunately no one in the hot bath as it deserved a careful examination. The wide platform round the tanks was inlaid with beautiful marbles and there were recesses with pumps, etc., also inlaid…” (Bursa, February 1888)

On August 2nd 1877, the English explorer and archaeologist James Theodore Bent married an extraordinary Irishwoman, Mabel Virginia Anna Hall-Dare, the second of the four daughters born to Mr Robert Westley Hall-Dare of Co. Wexford and Essex. Mabel was 31, Theodore 25, and within a few months they had embarked on their pattern of annual travels that continued until his early death in 1897. Their trips began fairly close to home, visiting northern Italy, but by 1883 they were in the Eastern Mediterranean (in modern Greece and Turkey), searching out the antiquities, landscapes and lifestyles of a region that was to captivate them for the next fifteen years. Their researches led to a number of highly regarded monographs, papers and articles (such as Theodore’s 'The Cyclades, or Life Among the Insular Greeks', 1885, and the many publications of their various discoveries in locations such as ‘Rugged Cilicia’, the island of Thassos, and elsewhere) that were to place the couple securely amongst the foremost British travellers of the latter half of the 19th century.

The publication, therefore, of Mabel Bent’s personal notebooks from the archive of the Joint Library of the Hellenic and Roman Societies, London, represents the discovery of a lost and notable milestone for scholars and travel enthusiasts of all kinds. This series of volumes begins with Mabel’s account of the couple’s adventures around the Aegean and beyond, extracted from her fifteen-year sequence of notebooks and presented chronologically. Specifically, we follow Mabel and Theodore to the Greek mainland and the islands known now as the Cyclades and the Dodecanese, as well as the northern Aegean islands; their journeys along the Turkish littoral lead them from bustling Istanbul to provincial Mersin in the far south-west.

Contents include: Chapter 1) 1883-1884: The Cyclades – Mabel’s own accounts of the couple’s two tours of the Cyclades. Theodore relied on these Chronicles for the writing up of his classic travelogue ‘The Cyclades; or Life Among the Insular Greeks’ of 1885; Chapter 2) 1885: The Dodecanese – including Rhodes, Tilos and Karpathos; Chapter 3) 1886: The Eastern Aegean – including Samos, Patmos, Kalymnos and Astypalea; Chapter 4) 1887: The Northern Aegean – including Meteora, Thessaloniki, Thassos and Samothraki; Chapter 5) 1888: The Turkish Coast – from Istanbul to Kastellorizo; Chapter 6) 1890: ‘Rough Cilicia’ – extensive explorations around south-west Turkey.

The Cyclades, or Life Among the Insular Greeks First Published in 1885, a revised edition with additional material by J Theodore Bent. Edited by Gerald Brisch. Archaeopress 3rdguides Series. Paperback, 306 pages, map, 2 b/w photographs. 2002. 44 2002 3rdGuides - Archaeopress Travel 4. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9780953992317. £15.00. Epublication ISBN 978095399231. £10.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

James Theodore Bent (1852-1897) was an Oxford-educated archaeologist, historian and explorer who dedicated his short life to researches in the Levant and Africa. In the winters of 1882-84 he and his wife, Mabel Hall-Dare, made extended tours of the Cycladic islands and in 1885 Bent published what has become a classic account of their wanderings and discoveries in what is now one of the best-loved regions of Greece. His island-by-island journals are a fascinating insight into Greek community living at the turn of the 19th century, and the work established Bent as a traveller of note. As might be expected, most of the major sites and sights are detailed, as well as references to customs and costumes, hospitality and hardship, history, folklore and myth. No account in English, then or since, has come close in terms of scope and achievement. (On a scholarly level, Bent was the first English archaeologist to undertake serious excavation work in the region and his findings on the small island of Antiparos (included here) are still referred to in current bibliographies.) As far as the publishers are aware, no English language edition of Bent’s Cyclades is currently easily available. This new edition of Bent’s 1885 work is accompanied by a newly commissioned biographical introduction and a series of notes including route-planner, and historical and archaeological summaries.

‘Tozer of Oxford sends me a charming book…by Theodore Bent…all about the Cyclades. (Dearly beloved child let me announce to you that this word is pronounced ‘Sick Ladies,’ – howsomdever certain Britishers call it ‘Sigh-claides.’)…’ (Edward Lear writes to Chichester Fortescue, Lord Carlingford [30 April 1885, San Remo])
Miscellania Theory, Rock Art and Heritage edited by Luiz Oosterbeek and Cláudia Fidalgo. vi+87 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. Papers in English and Spanish.. BAR S2659 2014 Proceedings of the XVI World Congress of the International Union of Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sciences (Florianopolis, Brazil, 4-10 September 2011) 11. ISBN 9781407313016. £23.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume brings together several papers delivered in different sessions that, for various reasons, were not completely published. Four major themes are involved: cultural interactions, rock art, theory and heritage.

Papers by A. Meza and F. Vergara discuss intercultural issues in archaeological and ethnoarchaeological contexts.

The paper by Albuquerque and Almeida on cognitive archaeology opens a sequence of five papers dedicated to rock art issues, including pigments studies (Gomes, Rosina and Santos), landscape analysis (Oliveira and Oliveira; Basille and Ratto) and methodology (G. Muñoz).

The relations between New Archaeology and modern Russian research are the focus of discussion by I. Shucteleva.

Urban and modern archaeology in the context of heritage management of contact are discussed in the papers by D. Costa, F. Borba and D. Bandeira, D. Pereiosta and R. Godoy.
Mobility and Transitions in the Holocene edited by Luiz Oosterbeek and Cláudia Fidalgo. viii+184 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white.. BAR S2658 2014 Proceedings of the XVI World Congress of the International Union of Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sciences (Florianopolis, Brazil, 4-10 September 2011) 9. ISBN 9781407313009. £23.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

The organization of the UISPP XVI world congress in Florianópolis was the occasion to focus a certain number of themes that are preferably dealt with at a transcontinental scale. Several sessions discussed the issue of transition mechanism (technological, social, economic, and their climatic and environmental contexts).

Marcel Otte opens the volume, focusing on the specific role of straits, a topic that is also at the foundation of Judith Carlin’s et al. paper.

Contributions by Fabio Parenti et al., Gustavo Wagner and Mercedes Okumura et al., discuss the human adaptations in different contexts in Brazil, during the early and middle Holocene.

First farming societies in Southern America and in Europe are approached in the papers by Marcel Otte and Jorge Oliveira et al., while the transition into more complex societies, bearing metallurgical knowledge, is the focus of papers by Leonor Rocha et al., Cătălin Lazăr.

Finally, classic contexts on both sides of the Atlantic are revisited by Erika Gómez and by Carolina Dias.
Technology and Experimentation in Archaeology edited by Sara Cura, Jedson Cerezer, Maria Gurova, Boris Santander, Luiz Oosterbeek and Jorge Cristóvão. viii+96 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. Papers in English, one paper in French.. BAR S2657 2014 Proceedings of the XVI World Congress of the International Union of Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sciences (Florianopolis, Brazil, 4-10 September 2011) 10. ISBN 9781407312996. £24.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

Experimental Archaeology as an hypothesis contrast method, focusing on technological studies, is not new in archaeological research procedures. Since the early 1970s, as a consequence of the application of châine-operatoire/reduction sequence concepts within the framework of Palaeoethnological investigation, or within the actualistics studies highly developed in the framework of Processual Archaeology, the experimentation and utilization of artefact replicas have been used in the search for answers regarding technological procedures and their functional aspects.

However, since the 1990s the research interface between technology and experimentation, worldwide, has increased, resulting in a renewal of procedures and interest in the incorporation of such studies particularly in the field of techno-functional analysis of prehistoric artefacts.

Nevertheless the criticisms on experimental procedures are abundant, questioning its theoretical fundamentals and explanation validity. These remarks result both from the morphotypological approaches to artefact assemblages, but also from a lack of understanding on the range and goals of such studies.

Stefano Grimaldi discusses the epistemological implications of experimental approaches. Experimentation on lithics are discussed in the papers of S. Cura, P. Cura, S. Grimaldi and E. Cristiani; G. N. de Souza and Â. P. Lima; B. de S. Barreto and M. P. Cabral; M. J. Rodet, A. Prous, J. Machado and L. F. Bass; G. N. Poplevko). Other papers discuss experimentation in the production of beads (M. Gurova, C. Bonsall, B. Bradley, E. Anastassova and P. Cura), new protocols on ceramics experimentation (J. F. Cerezer), ethnographic ceramic technology (R. T. Bortolin and V. Fróis), bone industry (B. Santander; C. Costa, N. Almeida, H. Gomes, S. Cura and P. Cura) and rock art engravings (N. S. da Rosa, S. Cura, S. Garcês and P. Cura).
Lithic Raw Material Resources and Procurement in Pre- and Protohistoric Times Proceedings of the 5th International Conference of the UISPP Commission on Flint Mining in Pre- and Protohistoric Times (Paris, 10-11 September 2012) edited by Françoise Bostyn and François Giligny. 131 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. Papers in English, one paper in French.. BAR S2656 2014. ISBN 9781407312989. £28.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

The Union Internationale des Sciences Pré- et Protohistoriques (UISPP) commission on “Flint Mining in Pre- and Protohistoric Times” was created at the 12th meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (Cracow, Poland, 19th-24th September 2006). The aim was to perpetuate the tradition of organizing international symposia on flint, established by the Limburg Branch of the Dutch Geological Society in 1969 at Maastricht. The commission intends to maintain cooperation in archaeological research on siliceous rock mining (flint, chert, hornstone, radiolarite, jasper and obsidian), by presenting and discussing methods and results. Major fields of interest include the different stages of chaînes opératoires of manufacture, specialisation of labour and circulation of raw materials, as well as the study of flint mining sites in relation to pre- and protohistoric settlement patterns. The objective of the commission is to promote these lines of research into flint mining and its methods, thus enabling a better understanding of the various phenomena and processes taking place in pre- and protohistoric times.

This volume contains the papers of the Paris conference held on 10th-11th September 2012, together with some additional papers presented at Vienna 2010 and Florianópolis 2011.

A first set of contributions concerns the main topic of the conference, which was lithothèques and reference collections. A further group of papers concerns the second conference theme: workshops, from excavation to chaînes opératoires reconstruction.
Archaeology, Societies and Environments in Africa edited by Luis Oosterbeek, Abdoulaye Camara and Cristina Martins. iv+65 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. Papers in English and French. BAR S2655 2014 Proceedings of the XVI World Congress of the International Union of Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sciences (Florianopolis, Brazil, 4-10 September 2011) 7. ISBN 9781407312972. £21.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

African Prehistory is at the core of UISPP concerns, namely due to its crucial role to understand the origins and evolution of humans, but also for the complexity of its cultural diversity, in all major issues that are focused by the Union: cultures, economy and environments; specific environmental contexts like deserts or coastal areas, artistic expressions, prehistoric technologies, related methods and theories, history of research or the interaction between archaeology and current society.

This volume presents eight papers that cover some of the major debates in African contexts: the lower Palaeolithic of Western Africa (A. Camara), the interaction between human cultures and environment in the late Holocene (S. Ozainne), the rock art in western central and austral Africa (C. Martins, L. Oosterbeek and G. Heimlich), metallurgy (H. Kienon Kaboret and K.S. Kouassi), pottery (M. Sall) and archaeological knowledge socialization (S. Fonseca and E. Gil).
Diseños geométricos en los mosaicos de Écija (Sevilla) by Sebastián Vargas Vázquez. BAR S2654 2014. ISBN 9781407312965. £33.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume focusses on the mosaics and geometric designs from Écija, the ancient Roman Astigi, the capital of the Conventus Astigitanus, which is one of four conventus iuridici that made the Roman Baetica. This work is part of a much larger study centered recently on the mosaics and the geometrical compositions of the Conventus Astgitanus, whose immediate objective pursued to cover the analysis of the musivaria of the whole of Baetica.

In conjunction with the mosaics catalogue, this volume presents a catalogue of geometric designs, which are results of studies of different fields that make up the pavements themselves.
Metals from K2 and Mapungubwe, Middle Limpopo Valley A technological study of early second millennium material culture, with an emphasis on conservation by Farahnaz Koleini. xvii+182 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white.. BAR S2653 2014 Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 86. ISBN 9781407312958. £34.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

The book focuses on the conservation of iron and copper objects that mostly belong to the Iron Age sites of K2 and Mapungubwe (AD 825-1290), the two most prominent archaeological settlements in the middle Limpopo valley area of northern South Africa. For the purpose of conservation three main objectives were considered: revealing the material and methods of fabrication; evaluating physical and chemical stability; and preservation.

Chapter 1 provides a short introduction to the study and presents its objectives. Chapter 2 then sets out the analytical methods and principles used in gathering and managing the data obtained. Next, Chapters 3 and 4 discuss the methods of manufacture of the selected artefacts as well as their physical stability. In these chapters the artefacts were respectively studied by the use of non-destructive methods such as neutron tomography and microscopy. Here, a new quantitative technique for estimating the corrosion percentage by using neutron tomograms and IMAGEJ software was introduced. Some of the objects with ambiguities as to their fabrication, were sampled destructively for metallographical examination and further chemical analyses. The native objects were manufactured by hot forging or cold working followed by annealing only in the case of copper, strip twisting and casting of molten copper in one piece mould. Meanwhile, new light was shed regarding signs of a new technique used in the production of some types of round wire on Mapungubwe Hill (strip-drawing).

Chapter 5 examines the chemical stability of the artefacts and the deterioration processes affecting them, considering both the composition of corrosion products and the effects of environmental conditions on their formation. This information was gathered using analytical techniques such as Raman spectroscopy, XRD and SEM-EDS. Chapter 6 then presents suitable and practical conservation methods for the objects in question. These methods consist of both interventive and preventive conservation. The thesis concludes (in Chapter 7) with a summary of the results obtained.
The Excavations of Maresha Subterranean Complex 57: The ‘Heliodorus’ Cave edited by Ian Stern. xiv+132 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. BAR S2652 2014. ISBN 9781407312941. £27.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

Maresha is located in the Judean lowlands approximately 40 km southwest of Jerusalem and approximately 30 km southeast of Ashkelon. This volume is the final report of one of the most interesting subterranean complexes at Maresha. Located in close proximity to an area identified as a temple or shrine, its contents suggest a possible connection to this structure. It was within this cave complex that the “Heliodorus” stele was discovered (Chapter 12), along with Aramaic (Chapter 8) and Greek ostraca (Chapter 9), numerous figurines (Chapter 6), kernos lamps (Chapter 5), coins (Chapter 10), stamped handles (Chapter 7), astragals and an extraordinary array of faunal remains (Chapter 11). In addition, a 7th century BCE bulla of a sphinxa was found (Chapter 4).
The Gresham Ship Project A 16th-Century Merchantman Wrecked in the Princes Channel, Thames Estuary Volume I: Excavation and Hull Studies edited by Jens Auer and Thijs J. Maarleveld with contributions by Massimiliano Ditta, Antony Firth, Nigel Nayling, Delia Ní Chíobháin, Christian Thomsen, and Cate Wagstaffe. iv+109 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. BAR 602 2014. ISBN 9781407312101. £28.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

Sometime in the late 16th century an armed merchantman foundered in the Thames Estuary. Forgotten for over four centuries, it was rediscovered in 2003 during an operation by the Port of London Authority to clear a navigational hazard from the Princes Channel. Wessex Archaeology, called in by the PLA, recovered five sections of the ship’s hull and four cannons, as well as numerous artefacts.

With only a few sites studied in detail, our knowledge of 16th century shipbuilding in England is still limited. The well-preserved wreck of the Gresham Ship – so named after the founder of one of the cannons – presents an excellent opportunity to study the construction of a merchant vessel from this period. In addition, the wreck is currently the only archaeological example of a remedial procedure for unstable ships, otherwise known only from documentary sources. This procedure, called ‘furring’, increases the breadth of the hull by removing the planking, adding timbers to the existing frames and re-planking.

This volume, the first of two on the Gresham Ship, gives a detailed account of the sections of the wreck recovered and describes the work of researchers at the University of Southern Denmark in their analysis of the hull and of the armament. Volume II will deal with the studies undertaken at the University College London of the ship’s context and contents.

This volume is the fourth of a series of NAS monographs. Others previously published are The Sound of Mull Archaeological Project, Records of Traditional Watercraft from South and West Sri Lanka and The Hulks of Forton Lake, Gosport.
A Social Topography of the Commote of Caerwedros in Ceredigion within its Regional Context during the Sixteenth Century by G. Lynn Morgan. xxvi+151 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. BAR 601 2014. ISBN 9781407312934. £29.00. Book contents pageBuy Now

The author was inspired to embark on this work by her own sense of Welsh identity and by her surrounding landscape in south-west Ceredigion. In this interdisciplinary research the author defines the historical geography of the commote of Caerwedros by retroactive analysis, relating the area’s social topography and structure to the political and economic dynamics of Welsh culture from the later Middle Ages to the 16th century, including its ancient territorial units (tref and rhandir).

Part of this is the religious landscape represented by medieval stone churches gracing Ceredigion’s coastal rim and the role of important religious houses of founded in the 12th century, especially the Cistercian Abbey of Whitland, whose farms are recorded in charters of the Lord Rhys of Deheubarth. These are mapped within the framework of three granges in the commote.

The 15th and 16th centuries saw the emergence of a largely indigenous gentry class as primary controllers of the land and the study tracks the genealogies and family inter-relationships of prominent local families within local community landscapes. Alongside this is an analysis of Welsh place names aimed at increasing our understanding of the social evolution of land ownership and management, within the context of farming communities in the cultural landscape of 16th century south-west Ceredigion.