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Archaeopress: Publishers of Academic Archaeology
Communicating the researches of thousands of archaeologists worldwide since 1991

Archaeopress is an Oxford-based publisher specialising in academic archaeology.
 
 
NEW: Enfoques metodológicos en el estudio de los asentamientos fortificados de la edad del hierro Aproximación teórica a la metodología de estudio sobre la defensa del territorio en la Prehistoria Final Europea by Óscar Rodríguez Monterrubio. 145 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English Abstract. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784914486. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume focuses on the main methodological perspectives currently existing in studies on Iron Age fortified settlements. Current investigations can be characterised according to three methodological approaches: analytic, landscape and componential analysis. These approaches can be traced since the 70s and are found all around Europe from the Baltic regions to the Mediterranean coast. They are examples of diachronic and versatile methodological procedures in use today and applicable to different contexts of the European Iron Age. We introduce digital archaeology at the end of this paper. In each one of the chapters we shall focus not only on the theoretical perspective of the approach but also on its practical application to the study of actual fortified settlements from different geographic contexts. In conclusion, and despite the difficulties of using these methods when investigating Iron Age settlements, they seem to be as versatile as they are adaptable and they have evolved adopting new methods of tele-detection and geographic information systems which update and refresh them as current methodological approaches.
NEW: Lusitanian Amphorae: Production and Distribution edited by Inês Vaz Pinto, Rui Roberto de Almeida and Archer Martin. viii+464 pages; illustrated in black & white throughout with 7 colour plates. 270 2016 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 10. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914271. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914288. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

More than a century of archaeological investigation in Portugal has helped to discover, excavate and study many Lusitanian amphorae kiln sites, with their amphorae being widely distributed in Lusitania. These containers were identified in Ostia and Rome from the 1970s and thereafter in many sites around the Mediterranean, but their numbers have always seemed scarce. Were they not being recognized and therefore underestimated? Were they all fish-product amphorae? Did they ever reach a significant market share in the other provinces of Hispania? And what was their contribution to the supply of the city of Rome or to other cities in the centre of the Empire?

This collective volume is a contribution to the discussion of these and other questions, and to a better understanding of the production and distribution of Lusitanian amphorae.
NEW: Art and Architecture in Neolithic Orkney Process, Temporality and Context by Antonia Thomas. xvi+258 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 272 University of the Highlands and Islands Archaeology Institute Research Series 1. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914332. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914349. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Neolithic sites of Orkney include an impressive number of stone-built tombs, ceremonial monuments and – uniquely for northern Europe – contemporary dwellings. Many of these buildings survive in a remarkable state of preservation, allowing an understanding of the relationship between architectural space and the process of construction that is rarely achievable. Until recently, however, relatively little has been known about the decoration of these sites.

This book addresses that gap to offer a groundbreaking analysis of Neolithic art and architecture in Orkney. Focussing upon the incredible collection of hundreds of decorated stones being revealed by the current excavations at the Ness of Brodgar, it details the results of the author’s original fieldwork both there and at the contemporary sites of Maeshowe and Skara Brae, all within the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site.

It provides the first major discussion of Orkney’s Neolithic carvings, and uses these as a springboard to challenge many of the traditional assumptions relating to Neolithic art and architecture. By foregrounding the architectural context of mark-making, this book explores how both buildings and carvings emerge though the embodied social practice of working stone, and how this relates to the wider context of life in Neolithic Orkney.
NEW: An Illustrated Companion to Japanese Archaeology edited by Werner Steinhaus and Simon Kaner. v+344 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. *eBook version coming soon*. 273 2016 Comparative and Global Perspectives on Japanese Archaeology 1. ISBN 9781784914257. £35.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

The Illustrated Companion to Japanese Archaeology provides, for the first time a comprehensive visual introduction to a wide range of sites and finds from the earliest occupation of the Japanese archipelago prior to 35,000 years ago to the early historical periods and the establishment of the Chinese-style capital at Heijō, modern-day Nara, in the 8th century AD.

The volume originated in the largest ever exhibition of Japanese archaeological discoveries held in Germany in 2004, which brought together over 1500 exhibits from 55 lenders around Japan, and research by over 100 specialists. The Illustrated Companion brings the fruits of this project to an English-reading audience and offers an up-to-date survey of the achievements of Japanese archaeology.

About the Editors:
Werner Steinhaus is Lecturer in Archaeology at Hiroshima University in Japan. After graduating from Freiburg University in Germany he undertook postgraduate research at Osaka University in Japan, specializing in the archaeology of the Kofun period. He spearheaded the largest overseas exhibition of Japanese archaeology ‘Die Zeit der Morgenröte’, which was held in Germany in 2004/2005. His recent publications include the Online Dictionary of Japanese Archaeology (www.wakoku.eu). He is currently developing a new program of research on the ancient mounded tombs of the Kofun period.

Simon Kaner is Head of the Centre for Archaeology and Heritage at the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures (www.sainsbury-institute.org) and Director of the Centre for Japanese Studies at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK. While Studying for his PhD in Jōmon settlement archaeology at the University of Cambridge, he undertook research based at Kyōto University in Japan. His publications include The Power of Dogū: ceramic figures from Ancient Japan (London, British Museum) and the Online Resource for Japanese Archaeology and Cultural Heritage (www.orjach.org). He currently directs the Shinano-Chikuma River Project, investigating the development of historic landscapes along the longest river drainage in Japan.

Table of Contents:
Introduction and Acknowledgements
Map of Japan
Paleolithic period (c. 35,000 – 13,000 BC)
Jōmon period (c. 13,000 – 300 BC)
Yayoi period (c. 900 BC – 250 AD)
Kofun period (c. 250 AD – 710 AD)
Asuka and Nara periods (c. 538 AD – 794 AD)
Accessories and Ornaments
Archaeology in Japan: the past in the present
List of Sites
Bibliography
Further Reading
Figure Credits
Plates images list


NEW: Palaeoart and Materiality The Scientific Study of Rock Art edited by Robert G. Bednarik, Danae Fiore, Mara Basile, Giriraj Kumar and Tang Huisheng. ii+254 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 6 colour plates. 267 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914295. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914301. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book contains a series of selected papers presented at two symposia entitled ‘Scientific study of rock art’, one held in the IFRAO Congress of Rock Art in La Paz, Bolivia, in June 2012, the other held in the IFRAO Congress in Cáceres, Spain, in September 2015; as well as some invited papers from leading rock art scientists. The core topic of the book is the presentation of scientific approaches to the materiality of rock art, ranging from recording and sampling methods to data analyses. These share the fact that they provide means of testing hypotheses and/or of finding trends in the data which can be used as independent sources of evidence to support specific interpretations. The issue of the materiality of visual productions of the distant past, which in archaeological theory has attracted much attention recently and has stimulated much conceptual debate, is addressed through a variety of scientific approaches, including fieldwork methods, laboratory work techniques and/or data analysis protocols. These, in turn, will provide new insights into human agency and people-image engagements through the study of rock art production, display and use.

About the Editors:
Robert G. Bednarik is the Convener and Editor-in-Chief of the International Federation of Rock Art Organisations and is affiliated with Hebei Normal University, China. His principal research interests are the origins of the human ability to create constructs of reality, the evolution of humans, and in a variety of fields providing supplementary information in that quest, including the world’s rock art. He has produced more than 1350 academic publications.

Dr Danae Fiore is a researcher at Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas, Argentina, and a lecturer at Universidad de Buenos Aires. Her main interests are focused on the archaeology of rock art, portable art and body art viewed from technological, economic and cognitive perspectives; hunter-gatherer archaeology; archaeological theory and methods; and visual archaeology (the study of indigenous material culture through ethnographic photographs).

Dr Mara Basile is an archaeologist and a researcher at the National Council of Scientific and Technical Research, Argentina. She has been a member of the Archaeological Project Chaschuil Abaucán (www.proyectopacha.com.ar) since 2002. Her main research interest is to delineate the visual languages that circulated in different expressive media over time in the region of Fiambalá (Catamarca, Argentina).

Dr Giriraj Kumar is Professor in Rock Art Science and Indian Culture and Founding Secretary General and Editor, Rock Art Society of India (estd. 1990), carrying out scientific research on early Indian petroglyphs and their dating in collaboration with Australian and other scientists. He published a book on Indian rock art and more than eighty research papers on Stone Age Indian rock art and culture.

Dr Tang Huisheng is the Director of the International Centre of Rock Art Dating and Conservation, Hebei Normal University, China. He also teaches as a Professor at the of Archaeology Department of Nanjing Normal University. His principal interests are the rock art of China and its dating, and the Chinese Neolithic period.


NEW: The Archaeology and History of the Church of the Redeemer and the Muristan in Jerusalem A Collection of Essays from a Workshop on the Church of the Redeemer and its Vicinity held on 8th/9th September 2014 in Jerusalem edited by Dieter Vieweger and Shimon Gibson. 322 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 266 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914196. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914202. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Muristan is situated in the heart of the Old City of Jerusalem and was a prime property in medieval times with numerous churches, a hospice, and a large hospital complex. This monograph contains fifteen chapters written by leading scholars from around the world dealing with the archaeological and historical aspects of the Muristan from the Iron Age through to Ottoman times. A number of chapters also address its immediate urban surroundings, notably the complex of structures associated with the Church of the Holy Sepulchre on the north and the Church of St John the Baptist to the south-west. Key chapters in this monograph are dedicated to the history of the Church of the Redeemer and on its underlying archaeological remains. Many of the chapters are based on research that was originally presented at an international workshop held in Jerusalem in 2014.

About the Editors:
Dieter Vieweger (born 1958) is the managing Director of the German Protestant Institute of Archaeology in Jerusalem and Amman (www.deiahl.de), Professor at the Church University of Wuppertal, Director of the Biblical Archaeological Institute at Wuppertal (www.bainst.de), Visiting Professor at the Private University of Witten-Herdecke, and Director of a number of archaeological research projects conducted in Jordan, Israel and Palestine (www.tallziraa.de; www.durch-die-zeiten.info).

Shimon Gibson (born 1958) is a Visiting Professor of Archaeology in the History Department at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and is the Head of the Archaeology Department in the University of the Holy Land, Jerusalem. His academic interests include the Archaeology of the Holy Land, History of Photography, and Jerusalem. He has many publications to his name, and directs archaeological projects (www.digtmountzion.com).
NEW: Die antike Münze als Fundgegenstand Kategorien numismatischer Funde und ihre Interpretation by Günther E. Thüry. vi+200 pages; 13 plates of which 11 are in colour. German text with English abstract. 265 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914158. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914165. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Interpretation of coin finds is not quite an easy thing. How to distinguish, e. g., material of ‘hoards’ from that of ‘votive deposits’? Where are the ‘border lines’ dividing numismatic find categories from each other? Questions like these deserve a closer scrutiny. This book tries to face the problems by

- proposing clear definitions for categories and sub-categories of coin finds;
- by collecting and interpreting written testimonies (from ancient literature, epigraphy and papyrology) casting light on reasons and circumstances of coin deposition and coin loss in antiquity;
- by describing differences of composition between the categories;
- and by discussing difficulties of ‘differential diagnosis’;
- and the role of secondary finds.

For each problem and for each find category a large number of examples is offered.

NEW: Networks of trade in raw materials and technological innovations in Prehistory and Protohistory: an archaeometry approach Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain) Volume 12/Session B34 edited by Davide Delfino, Paolo Piccardo, and João Carlos Baptista. viii+104 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Available both in print and Open Access. 264 2016. ISBN 9781784914233. £25.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The papers collected in this book correspond to the lectures held during session B34 of UISPP conference in Burgos (June 2014) where the presentation of multidisciplinary works were encouraged. The main goal of bringing together specialists from various disciplines (humanities and natural sciences) was to debate, from different perspectives, the networks in raw materials and technological innovation in Prehistory and Protohistory, involving investigation topics typical of archaeometry: archeometallurgy, petrography, and mineralogy.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

NEW: L’artisanat de l’os à l’époque Gallo-Romaine De l’ostéologie à l’archéologie expérimentale by Marc Barbier. ii+ 140 pages; highly illustrated throughout with 57 plates in colour. French text. 263 2016 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 16. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914219. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914226. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The transfer, in 1981, of the town Museum collections in Sens (Yonne) to the old Archbishop’s palace required great discretion and an underground passage was planned between the two buildings. Preventive archaeological excavations unearthed 22 Gallo-Roman bone combs, as well as a further 17 pieces when the excavation area was expanded.

This exceptional concentration of bone artefacts incited the author to start on an experimental search at a time when bone artefacts were not finding much interest among specialists. However, it was extremely adventurous to piece together a bone-worker production line and create a never before archaeologically discovered appliance used in Roman times.

Obviously, the first reproductions have been directed towards combs. Those replicas pointed towards the material constraints, but also defined the constructions of necessary tools to take slabs off and conceive objects.

Moreover, matrix origin – small sized compact bone – explained why bone workers used to juxtapose elements to get suitable surfaces. Various complications during free hand denture sawing led them to perfect another operating system, plausible and more reliable.

Logical follow up would have been to extend experimental investigations, perhaps not to all the bone artefacts, but to a typical class of them, in order to complete the reconstructions of the equipment and suggest a general bone worker’s workshop arrangement.

French Description:
Le transfert, en 1981, des collections du Musée municipal de Sens (Yonne) dans l’ancien palais des Archevêques a nécessité le terrassement d’une jonction souterraine entre deux des bâtiments. Des fouilles archéologiques préventives ont notamment permis de découvrir 22 peignes en os d’époque gallo-romaine, puis 17 autres lors de l’extension du secteur.

Cette exceptionnelle concentration a incité l’auteur à entreprendre une démarche expérimentale à une époque où l’on n’accordait que peu d’intérêt au mobilier osseux. On comprendra qu’il était alors aventureux de vouloir reconstituer la chaîne opératoire d’un tabletier et matérialiser l’appareillage dont on n’a aucun témoignage archéologique.

C’est évidemment sur la mise en œuvre de peignes qu’ont porté les premières reproductions. Ces répliques montraient déjà certaines contraintes liées à la matière elle-même, mais permettaient également de cerner les outils nécessaires au prélèvement des plaquettes et à la conception de l’objet.

Par ailleurs, l’origine des matrices - os compact dimensionnellement limité - expliquait pourquoi les tabletiers juxtaposaient les éléments pour obtenir la surface adéquate. Diverses complications, lors du sciage à main levée de la denture, ont amené à mettre au point un autre mode opératoire plausible et plus assuré.

La suite logique voulait que les recherches expérimentales s’étendent sinon à l’ensemble du mobilier osseux, du moins à des catégories d’objets d’une même typologie permettant de compléter l’outillage et suggérer l’agencement de l’atelier d’un tabletier généraliste.

NEW: Warriors and other Men Notions of Masculinity from the Late Bronze Age to the Early Iron Age in Scandinavia by Lisbeth Skogstrand. vi+182 pages; illustrated throughout with 18 colour plates. 262 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914172. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914189. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

What is considered masculine is not something given and innate to males but determined by cultural ideas and ideals constructed through performative practices – today and in the past. This book questions whether androcentric archaeology has taught us anything about prehistoric men and their masculinities. Starting from broad discussions of feminist theory and critical men’s studies, this study examines how notions of masculinity are expressed in cremation burials from the Late Bronze Age to the end of the Roman Period (1100 BC - 400 AD) in Eastern Norway and Funen in Denmark. It is argued that notions of masculinity were deeply intertwined with society, and when central aspects like war systems, task differentiation, or technology changed, so did gender and ideas of masculinity and vice versa.

In the Late Bronze Age, an idealisation and sexualisation of the male body related to warrior esthetic was probably essential to the performance of masculinity. In the Early Roman Period, masculinity became bounded by what it was not – the unmanly. Warrior capabilities were the most prominent ideals of masculinity and concepts of unmanliness structured society, highlighting divergences between men and women. In the Late Roman Period, society grew more complex and multiple contemporary, possibly complementary masculinities associated with the rising class of free peasants, specific roles and regional differences developed and the warrior lost the dominant position as masculine ideal.
NEW: La Céramique du groupe épiscopal d’ARADI/Sidi Jdidi (Tunisie) by Tomoo Mukai with a contribution by C. Capelli. x+434 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. French text with English abstract. 260 2016 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 9. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912611. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912628. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This study focuses on ceramic finds from the excavations (1996-2006) of the Episcopal Group of Sidi Jdidi, the ancient city of Aradi, in the hinterland of Hammamet in Tunisia, directed by Dr Aïcha Ben Abed-Ben Khader and Prof. Michel Fixot. The aim of these excavations was to understand the processes of the (evolution and) insertion of Christian monuments into the pre-existent town and the distribution of the liturgical and economic functions within various buildings of this ecclesiastic centre. The ceramological study contributed to attaining this aim by suggesting dates for each phase of the construction, occupation and abandonment of the Episcopal group, as well as evidence for the function of each space. Furthermore, this study has documented the (strong) rural and regional characteristics of the ceramic assemblages: these are very different from those of the large-scale excavations at Carthage and indicate a pattern of self-sufficient consumption supplied by purely intra-regional trade. The author is a Research Fellow of The National Museum of Western Art (Tokyo, Japan), and Research Associate of the Centre Camille Jullian (Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, MCC, CCJ, F-13000, Aix-en-Provence, France).
NEW: CAMERA KALAUREIA An Archaeological Photo-Ethnography | Μια αρχαιολογική φωτο-εθνογραφία by Yannis Hamilakis & Fotis Ifantidis. Paperback edition: 170 pages; illustrated in full colour throughout. Full text in English and Greek. Available both in print and Open Access. 259 2016. ISBN 9781784914127. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

How can we find alternative, sensorially rich and affective ways of engaging with the material past in the present?

How can photography play a central role in archaeological narratives, beyond representation and documentation?

This photo-book engages with these questions, not through conventional academic discourse but through evocative creative practice. The book is, at the same time, a site guide of sorts: a photographic guide to the archaeological site of the Sanctuary of Poseidon in Kalaureia, on the island of Poros, in Greece.

Ancient and not-so-ancient stones, pine trees that were “wounded” for their resin, people who lived amongst the classical ruins, and the tensions and the clashes with the archaeological apparatus and its regulations, all become palpable, affectively close and immediate.

Furthermore, the book constitutes an indirect but concrete proposal for the adoption of archaeological photo-ethnography as a research as well as public communication tool for critical heritage studies, today.

Also available in hardback; click here to purchase hardback edition priced £55.00.

PDF eBook version available to download in Open Access - click the cover image below:

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NEW: The Development of Domestic Space in the Maltese Islands from the Late Middle Ages to the Second Half of the Twentieth Century by George A. Said-Zammit. xviii+368; illustrated throughout with 132 colour plates. 258 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913915. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913922. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This study traces and analyses the evolution of domestic space in Maltese vernacular and ‘polite’ houses from medieval to contemporary times. The houses under review range from humble buildings of modest size, materials and design, like farmhouses or those for the less affluent towndwellers, to buildings of grand design, like townhouses and palazzi. Owing to the complex nature of the Maltese houses a combination of enquires and a variety of sources was necessary to achieve a holistic picture. This included fieldwork in different parts of the islands, extensive research work in local archives, libraries and museums, an analysis of a sample of literary sources, national censuses and works-of-art, as well as methods of spatial analysis (Space Syntax).

One of the major achievements obtained in this research concerns the development of the native dwelling. The field surveys and archival research have demonstrated that the evolution of the native dwelling was very much influenced by the political, social and economic changes that occurred locally during the period under review. In particular, it was observed that architectural and stylistic changes in the elite houses occurred at a faster rate to suit fashion, in line with what occurred in other European countries, while changes in peasant houses were slower and more sporadic as these adhered to their vernacular idiom for a longer time.

Houses often served as a symbol of class and social status. The dwelling’s size and architectural style, the configuration of domestic space as well as the house furniture and contents were among the main indicators which, between the late Medieval Period and the first half of the 20th century, distinguished a wealthy from a poor dwelling. Class distinction did not occur only between houses, but also within the same building, especially in the elite dwellings. Gender was also another important aspect which directly affected the upper middle and elite Maltese houses, particularly at a time when men and women had fixed roles in society. However, the restricted space by which the lower class houses were normally characterized permitted instead the mixing of genders in work and leisure. A major shift in the relationship between the family and the house occurred in the second half of the 20th century, when the social and demographic changes of this period brought more balance between the social classes.

Through the available evidence, particularly the national censuses, works-of-art, literary sources and travelogues, it was also possible to acquire knowledge about various aspects related to dining fashions, dress code, health and education in the Maltese houses. The results obtained from our Space Syntax investigations have been instrumental to acquire new knowledge and to understand better the social logic of space underpinning Maltese dwellings and settlements.
NEW: Reinterpreting chronology and society at the mortuary complex of Jebel Moya (Sudan) by Michael Jonathan Brass. xii+192 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available both in print and Open Access. Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 92. ISBN 9781784914318. £40.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Jebel Moya (south-central Sudan) is the largest known pastoral cemetery in sub- Saharan Africa with more than 3100 excavated human burials. This research revises our understanding of Jebel Moya and its context. After reviewing previous applications of social complexity theory to mortuary data, new questions are posed for the applicability of such theory to pastoral cemeteries. Reliable radiometric dating of Jebel Moya for the first time by luminescence dates is tied in to an attribute-based approach to discern three distinctive pottery assemblages. Three distinct phases of occupation are recognised: the first two (early fifth millennium BC, and the mid-second to early first millennium BC) from pottery sherds, and the third (first century BC - sixth century AD) with habitation and the vast majority of the mortuary remains. Analytically, new statistical and spatial analyses such as cross-pair correlation function and multi-dimensional scaling provide information on zones of interaction across the mortuary assemblages. Finally, an analysis of mortuary locales contemporary with phase three (Meroitic and post-Meroitic periods) from the central Sudan and Upper and Lower Nubia are examined to show how changing social, economic and power relations were conceptualised, and to highlight Jebel Moya’s potential to serve as a chronological and cultural reference point for future studies in south-central and southern Sudan.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Archaeopress Digital Subscription Service: Subscribe Online 12 month subscription package for 2016/2017. Price listed without VAT. VAT may be applicable, please contact info@archaeopress.com to learn more.£1,250.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

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Journal of Greek Archaeology Subscription edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). Price listed refers to 2016 print subscription for private individuals. More pricing options available.ISBN 2059-4674. £65.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

Announcing an international peer-reviewed English-language journal specializing in synthetic articles and in long reviews. The scope of this journal is Greek archaeology both in the Aegean and throughout the wider Greek-inhabited world, from earliest Prehistory to the Modern Era. Thus we include contributions not just from traditional periods such as Greek Prehistory and the Classical Greek to Hellenistic eras, but also from Roman through Byzantine, Crusader and Ottoman Greece and into the Early Modern period. Outside of the Aegean contributions are welcome covering the Archaeology of the Greeks overseas, likewise from Prehistory into the Modern World. Greek Archaeology for the purposes of the JGA thus includes the Archaeology of the Hellenistic World, Roman Greece, Byzantine Archaeology, Frankish and Ottoman Archaeology, and the Postmedieval Archaeology of Greece and of the Greek Diaspora.

The first issue of the journal will be in October 2016 and thereafter it will appear annually and incorporate original articles, research reviews and book reviews. Subscription fees will be charged in December for the following year's Issue.

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FORTHCOMING: Old Kingdom Copper Tools and Model Tools by Martin Odler. xvi+292 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 275 2016 Archaeopress Egyptology 14. ISBN 9781784914424. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Old Kingdom of Egypt (Dynasties 4–6, c. 2600–2180 BC) is famous as a period of the builders of the largest Egyptian pyramids. It is generally accepted that the evidence on the use of copper alloy tools from this era is meagre. Martin Odler gathers the textual, iconographic and palaeographic evidence and examines Old Kingdom artefacts in order to revise this view on the use of copper alloy tools and model tools. Furthermore, he provides updated definitions of tool classes and tool kits, together with the context of their use. Besides rare specimens of full-size tools, the largest corpora of the material have been preserved in the form of model tools in the burial equipment of the Old Kingdom elite and were most probably symbols of their power to commission and fund craftwork. Moreover, the size and elaboration of the model tools were probably connected to the social status of the buried persons. The long-standing division in the Egyptological literature between full-size tools and model tools is questioned. The ancient sources also enable to show that the preservation of material culture from the Old Kingdom was largely dependent on a conscious selection made within the past culture, with completely different settlement and funerary contexts and a conspicuous absence of weapons. The volume is completed by co-authored case studies on archaeometallurgy of selected Old Kingdom artefacts in the collection of the Egyptian Museum of Leipzig University, on morphometry of Old Kingdom adze blades and on the finds of stone and ceramic vessels associated with the findings of so-called Old Kingdom model tools.
FORTHCOMING: Brochs and the Empire: The impact of Rome on Iron Age Scotland as seen in the Leckie broch excavations by Euan W. MacKie. +122 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 274 2016. ISBN 9781784914400. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The excavation of the Leckie Iron Age broch in Stirlingshire, Scotland, took place during the 1970’s after the author had been asked to organise the work by a local archaeological society. At that stage the author did not consider – despite its location – that the site might vividly reflect the expansion of the Roman Empire into southern Scotland in the late first century AD. For various reasons the final report was not written until about thirty years after the fieldwork finished and by then the quality and significance of the Roman finds was much better understood, thanks to the analysis of them by experts. Many of them seemed like gifts to the broch chief, despite the clear evidence of the violent destruction of the broch at a later date. The Roman author Tacitus gave a detailed account of Governor Agricola’s campaigns in southern Scotland and pointed out that he sometimes tried to make friends with local chiefs before invading their territories, to avoid un-necessary casualties. This also applied to the first Roman naval excursion up the west coast and explains the evidence from Dun Ardtreck, Skye, excavated in the 1960’s. This site was also destroyed later and this could reflect the later hostile voyage of the navy after the battle of Mons Graupius which occurred after a few years of campaigning. Thus Rome’s accounts can allow one to understand the history of some native sites much more vividly.
FORTHCOMING: Houses in Greco-Roman Egypt Arenas for Ritual Activity by Youssri Ezzat Hussein Abdelwahed. viii+104; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 271 2016. ISBN 9781784914370. £25.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This book examines different forms of ritual activities performed in houses of Graeco- Roman Egypt. It draws on the rich archaeological record of rural housing and evidence from literature or papyrological references to both urban and rural housing. The introduction critically considers the literature relevant to the topic in order to identify the research gap. Chapter I attempts to reconstruct the structure of urban and rural houses in Graeco- Roman Egypt in the light of papyri and archaeology. This aims to establish the physical and spatial framework for the rituals considered in the following chapters. In line with this reconstruction of domestic properties is the reconstruction of the architectural layout and use of the domestic pylon in Chapter II. Chapter III deals with two rituals enacted before the front door of the house, namely the sacrifice of fish on the 9th of Thoth and the sacrifice of pigs on the 15th of Pachon. Chapter IV considers the ritual of the illumination of lamps for the goddess Athena-Neith within and around houses on the 13th of Epeiph. Chapter V highlights the use of the house as an arena for social types of rituals associated with dining, birthdays, the mallokouria, the epikrisis, and marriage. Chapter VI explores the religious sphere of houses, which is obvious from domestic shrines, wall paintings with religious themes, and figurines of Egyptian and Graeco-Roman deities uncovered from houses. The last chapter deals with mourning rituals, which the house occupants performed after the demise of their beloved animals, such as dogs, and their family members. In the conclusion, I summarize my work and draw out its implications, suggesting that the house was the locus of social, religious, and funerary rituals in Graeco-Roman Egypt.
FORTHCOMING: Siruthavoor: An Iron Age-Early Historical burial site, Tamil Nadu, South India by Smriti Haricharan. x+92 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 269 2016. ISBN 9781784914356. £22.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Archaeological artifacts such as stone tools, ceramics, coins, metal implements, and ornaments like beads, are generally used to evaluate and understand the history of humans. These artifacts are especially important for the study of periods that lack concrete literary evidence. Intangible aspects such as spiritual beliefs and ceremonies, as well as tangible but perishable objects, are lost in the passage of time but artifacts are more likely to survive the vicissitudes of time. Pollen analysis, plant ecology and not least prehistoric archaeology have contributed to the recognition of the transitional zone between uncontaminated nature and what eventually became known as a cultural landscape. Cultural landscapes are looked upon not only as products of human intervention, but also and in particular as the result of human desire to leave an imprint of control and power, often associated with territoriality and religious or political ambitions. Megalithic burials, which are found in vast numbers in southern and central India, are a well-known global phenomenon and their builders have left behind a landscape altered by their funereal remains.

This study aims at using and understanding man-land relationships in order to better comprehend the megalithic burials of Tamil Nadu. Funereal remains are one of the most important lingering means of understanding society, customs and religion of pre and proto historic periods. Many questions remain unanswered for the Iron Age of south India, and the megalithic burials are an important piece of this puzzle. This site specific study helps us better understand some aspects such as spatial distribution, chronology and post depositional changes of the burials at Siruthavoor.
FORTHCOMING: Cedar Forests, Cedar Ships Allure, Lore, and Metaphor in the Mediterranean Near East by Sara A. Rich. x+280 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 249 2016. ISBN 9781784913656. £36.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

It is commonly recognized that the Cedars of Lebanon were prized in the ancient world, but how can the complex archaeological role of the Cedrus genus be articulated in terms that go beyond its interactions with humans alone? And to what extent can ancient ships and boats made of this material demonstrate such intimate relations with wood? Drawing from object-oriented ontologies and other ‘new materialisms,’ Cedar Forests, Cedar Ships constructs a hylocentric anti-narrative spreading from the Cretaceous to the contemporary. With a dual focus on the woods and the watercraft, and on the considerable historical overlap between them, the book takes another step in the direction of challenging the conceptual binaries of nature/culture and subject/object, while providing an up-to-date synthesis of the relevant archaeological and historical data.

Binding physical properties and metaphorical manifestations, the fluctuating presence of cedar (forests, trees, and wood) in religious thought is interpreted as having had a direct bearing on shipbuilding in the ancient East Mediterranean. Close and diachronic excavations of the interstices of allure, lore, and metaphor can begin to navigate the (meta) physical relationships between the forested mountain and the forest afloat, and their myriad unique realities.
FORTHCOMING: Rock Art of the Vindhyas: An Archaeological Survey Documentation and Analysis of the Rock Art of Mirzapur District, Uttar Pradesh by Ajay Pratap. xiv+172; highly illustrated throughout with 68 colour plates. 244 2016. ISBN 9781784912451. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Rock paintings and petroglyphs are a record of human memories. No doubt, this function defines in essence all archaeological objects. Yet some objects such as tools, beyond their symbolic value, are clearly fashioned for their utility. How does rock art as an object fashioned by human hands then differ from tools? What utility does it have beyond its symbolic value? The Vindhyan corpus of rock paintings has provided us with a very valuable opportunity to be answering such questions.
FORTHCOMING: Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 1 2016 edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). vi+498 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 1 2016. ISBN 2059-4674-1-2016. £85.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

An annual, international peer-reviewed English-language journal specializing in synthetic articles and in long reviews. The scope of this journal is Greek archaeology both in the Aegean and throughout the wider Greek-inhabited world, from earliest Prehistory to the Modern Era. Thus we include contributions not just from traditional periods such as Greek Prehistory and the Classical Greek to Hellenistic eras, but also from Roman through Byzantine, Crusader and Ottoman Greece and into the Early Modern period. Outside of the Aegean contributions are welcome covering the Archaeology of the Greeks overseas, likewise from Prehistory into the Modern World. Greek Archaeology for the purposes of the JGA thus includes the Archaeology of the Hellenistic World, Roman Greece, Byzantine Archaeology, Frankish and Ottoman Archaeology, and the Postmedieval Archaeology of Greece and of the Greek Diaspora.

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FORTHCOMING: Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 1 2016 edited by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph (Heads of Editorial Board). 1 2016. ISBN 2399-1844-1-2016. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

ISSN 2399-1844 (Print)
ISSN 2399-1852 (online)

Table of Contents:
A Fill from a Potter’s Dump at Morgantina – by Shelley Stone
Trade in Pottery within the Lower Adriatic in the 2nd century BCE – by Carlo De Mitri
Hellenistic Ash Containers from Phoinike (Albania) – by Nadia Aleotti
Pottery Production in Hellenistic Chalkis, Euboea. Preliminary Notes – by Yannis Chairetakis
A Terracotta Figurine of a War Elephant and Other Finds from a Grave at Thessaloniki – by Eleni Lambrothanassi & Annareta Touloumtzidou
Moldmade Bowls from Straton’s Tower (Caesarea Maritima) – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom
Greco-Roman Jewellery from the Necropolis of Qasrawet (Sinai) – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom

ARCHAEOLOGICAL NEWS AND PROJECTS
Panathenaic Amphorae of Hellenistic and Roman Times – by Martin Streicher

BOOK REVIEWS
Shelley C. Stone, Morgantina Studies 6. The Hellenistic and Roman Fine Wares – by Peter J. Stone
Pia Guldager Bilde & Mark L. Lawall (eds.), Pottery, Peoples and Places, BSS 16 – by Kathleen Warner Slane
Susan I. Rotroff, Hellenistic Pottery. The Plain Wares, Agora 33 – by Patricia Kögler

2016 PRINT SUBSCRIPTION RATES (1 issue in 2016):

Institutions:
£50.00 (plus standard shipping rates)
Agents will receive 25% discount on institutional print price including shipping rates as stated

Individuals:
£30.00 (plus standard shipping rates)

FORTHCOMING: Archeologia dell’acqua a Gortina di Creta in età protobizantina by Elisabetta Giorgi. x+288 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Italian text with English abstracts for each chapter. Available both in print and Open Access. Limina/Limites: Archaeologies, histories, islands and borders in the Mediterranean (365-1556) 5. ISBN 9781784914448. £40.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Ancient aqueducts have long commanded the attention of archaeologists, both for their intrinsic, monumental importance and for their significance as infrastructures closely related to the concept of civilisation. An aqueduct, in fact, is an artefact that has a great potential for providing information concerning at least two major aspects of ancient society: those relating to structural, technical, and engineering matters, and those relating to building and construction technology. These topics have enjoyed considerable attention in past studies, and in recent years they have also been integrated with a multi-disciplinary and contextual approach. They have further increased the potential of the analysis of ancient hydraulic systems, turning them into historical subjects capable of expanding our knowledge of the urban and social transformation of ancient cities and their territories.

The current study of the early Byzantine aqueduct of Gortyn (Crete) follows this tradition, but starts from a viewpoint related not so much to the aqueduct itself, as to a series of questions about the city: what was the appearance of Gortyn in the early Byzantine era? How did the inhabitants live? Where did they live and what did they do for living?

The aqueduct was born with the Roman city and accompanied it for its entire lifetime, constituting the backbone around which the various forms of urban settlement were redrawn at each major historical stage. Its vital link with everyday life makes the aqueduct a key witness for the study of the transformations of the city over the long term.

FORTHCOMING: Archival Theory, Chronology and Interpretation of Rock Art in the Western Cape, South Africa by Siyakha Mguni. vi+156 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available both in print and Open Access. Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 93. ISBN 9781784914462. £40.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Since absolute dating of rock art is limited, relative chronologies remain useful in contextualising interpretations of ancient images. This book advocates the archival capacity of rock art and uses archival perspectives to analyse the chronology of paintings in order to formulate a framework for their historicised interpretations. The Western Cape painting sequence is customarily accepted to include the hunter-gatherer phase from c. 10,000 BP, pastoralism from c. 2,000 BP and finally the historical-cum-colonial period several centuries ago. Painting traditions with distinct depiction manners and content are conventionally linked to these broad periods. This study evaluates this schema in order to refine the diverse hunter-gatherer, herder and colonial era painting contexts and histories. Using superimpositions as one analytical tool, the notion of datum aided the referencing and correlation of layered imagery into a relative sequence. Although broad differences separate painting traditions, and these variations are generally indistinguishable within a single tradition, it is clear that the long-spanning hunter-gatherer segment of painting in this region reflects a hitherto unrecognised sub-tradition. Some painted themes such as elephants, fat-tailed sheep, handprints and possibly finger dots occur within various levels of the sequence, which this study views as shared graphic fragments occurring between and across traditions and sub-traditions. Through the archival concept of respect des fonds such observable complexities were clarified as coherent graphic narratives that run through the entire chronological sequence of the Western Cape rock paintings. Probing archaeological, ethnographic and historical sources revealed that while these themes remained fundamentally consistent throughout the stratigraphic sequence as preferred subject matter, their meanings might have transformed subliminally from earlier to later periods, possibly reflecting layered shifts in the socio-economic, cultural and political circumstances of the region. Fundamentally, the framework of image histories shown by the choice and sustenance of specific themes is understood to mean that their significance and specific graphic contexts throughout the chronological sequence are pivoted and mirrored through the long established hunter-gatherer rock paintings which predate periods of contact with other cultures. The resulting sequence and interpretation of these painted themes is a descriptive and organisational template reflecting the original organic character in the creation of the paintings and ordered cultural continuities in the use of animal/human symbolism. This book’s agenda in part involves reviewing the Western Cape’s changing social and historical landscape to show variation in painting over time and to project possible interpretative transformations. Painting sequences and cultural (dis)continuities are thus intricately entwined and can be disentangled through a recursive analytical relationship between archaeology, ethnography and history. This amalgamated analytical approach produces historicised narratives and contextual meanings for the rock paintings.
Achaios: Studies presented to Professor Thanasis I. Papadopoulos edited by Evangelia Papadopoulou-Chrysikopoulou, Vassilis Chrysikopoulos, Gioulika Christakopoulou. xx+280 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 2 colour plates. 261 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913410. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913427. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In a career spanning more than forty years Prof. Thanasis I. Papadopoulos exhibited his intensive devotion to the Bronze Age of Greece, and especially to Mycenaean Achaea (his native land), through his excavations, publications and lessons to innumerable students in Greece and abroad. The origins, as well as the interconnections of the Mycenaeans with other civilizations, were always of great interest to Prof. Papadopoulos. This honorary volume expands to diverse eras, from Neolithic to Byzantine times, following Mycenaean paths that lead even to the distant East: to Egypt, whose culture Prof. Papadopoulos taught for many years at Ioannina University, and to Jordan, where he excavated for more than 10 years.

In Achaios, thirty-five scholars from six different countries have contributed with thirty-one papers, as a small token of appreciation, gratitude and affection to a true scholar, who devoted his life studying and revealing the long journeys of the Mycenaeans and their culture, but also, to a passionate professor who, by transmitting his scientific knowledge, left an invaluable legacy for future generations.
Iron Age Hillfort Defences and the Tactics of Sling Warfare by Peter Robertson. xii+132 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 257 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914103. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914110. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Was the purpose of an Iron Age hillfort to defend people and resources or was it there to show the power of the community and its leaders? Was the Middle Iron Age trend to large complex ‘defences’ a response to developing tactics of assault or did the huge amounts of construction work serve the purpose of building community identity through shared labour?

The name ‘hillfort’ implies a defensive purpose, but in recent decades alternative interpretations have gained favour, based on analyses suggesting that hillforts are poorly suited to military purposes and on views of Iron Age society that emphasise the importance of boundaries, symbolic display and communitybuilding. Excavations of hillfort interiors reveal they were sites for many activities; large caches of stones suggest that sling warfare was one.

This book reports an investigation of these issues. Sling accuracy at a hillfort was measured for the first time, in a controlled experiment comparing attack and defence across single and developed ramparts. Tactical scenarios modelled from the results showed that hillfort development gave defenders increased advantage. These results support defence as the explanation for the features of the enclosing works of hillforts. Full details of the method and analyses are included.
Making Pictures of War Realia et Imaginaria in the Iconology of the Ancient Near East edited by Laura Battini. xi+88 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 256 2016 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 1. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914035. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914042. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book brings together the main discussions that took place at an international conference on the iconology of war in the ancient Near East, a subject never addressed at an international meeting before. The articles span the 3rd to the 1st millennium, with a special stress on the Neo-Assyrian period. They try to respond to many questions about representations of war: what is ‘warrior’ iconography and on what basis it can be defined? Did the war scenes follow a specific directory whereby they adopted the most varied forms? Can we determine the most usual conditions for the creation of pictures of wartime (such as periods of great change)? Were the war scenes referring to specific historical events or were they generic representations? What can a society accept from the representations of war? What did war images silence and why? What is a ‘just’ punishment for enemies and thus the ‘just’ representation of it? Who has control of the representation and therefore also the memory of war? Who is the real subject of war representations? What emerges from all the articles published here is the relevance of textual data in any analysis of iconological material. And this is not only true for iconology, but for all the archaeological material discovered at historical sites.
ΠΟΤΑΜΙΚΟΝ: Sinews of Acheloios A Comprehensive Catalog of the Bronze Coinage of the Man-Faced Bull, with Essays on Origin and Identity edited by Nicholas J. Molinari and Nicola Sisci. x+354 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 255 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914011. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914028. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Potamikon attempts to solve a question that has perplexed scholars for hundreds of years: Who exactly is the man-faced bull featured so often on Greek coinage? It approaches this question by examining the origin of the iconography and traces its development throughout various Mediterranean cultures, finally arriving in Archaic and Classical Greece in the first millennium BC. Within the context of Greek coinage, the authors review all the past arguments for the identity of the man-faced bull before incorporating the two leading theories (Local River Gods vs. Acheloios) into a new theory of local embodiments of Acheloios, thereby preserving the sanctity of the local rivers while recognizing Acheloios as the original god of all water. The second part of the book exhibits many of these ‘Sinews of Acheloios’ as they appear throughout the Greek world on bronze coinage, in each case paying careful attention to the reasons a specific group adopted the iconography and shedding further light on the mythos of Acheloios.

Italian Description:
Potamikon tenta di dare risposte ad una domanda che per centinaia di anni ha assillato gli studiosi di Numismatica antica: chi è esattamente il toro androprosopo che compare così frequentemente sulla monetazione greca? Lo studio introduttivo pubblicato nel volume affronta tale questione esaminando l'origine preistorica dell'iconografia e tracciando il suo sviluppo nelle varie culture del Mediterraneo antico, per arrivare infine alla sua diffusione nel mondo greco arcaico e classico. Nell'ambito della monetazione greca gli autori passano in rassegna tutti gli argomenti passati riguardanti l'identità del toro androprosopo, prima di integrare le due teorie principali (divinità fluviali locali o Acheloios) in una nuova teoria, che propone di leggere tale figura come declinazione locale di Acheloios, inteso come il dio originario di tutte le acque da cui scaturisce la "deità" dei vari fiumi locali: i 'tendini' di Acheloios, così come furono descritti dalle fonti antiche. La seconda parte del libro presenta un repertorio dei 'tendini di Acheloios' che furono rappresentati come tori androprosopi nella monetazione in bronzo delle varie zecche greche, prestando attenzione caso per caso alle ragioni che spinsero le comunità emittenti ad adottare tale iconografia, possibilmente gettando ulteriore luce sul mito di Acheloios.

German Description:
Potamikon versucht, eine Frage zu lösen, die Wissenschaftler seit Hunderten von Jahren verwirrt hat: Wer genau ist dieser menschengesichtige Stier, der so oft auf griechischen Münzen dargestellt wird?Es nähert sich dieser Frage, indem es den Ursprung dieser Ikonographie untersucht und ihre Entwicklung innerhalb verschiedener Kulturen des Mittelmeerraumes nachverfolgt, um schließlich im Griechenland des ersten vorchristlichen Jahrtausends anzukommen. Im Rahmen der griechischen Münzprägung bewerten die Autoren alle bisher vorgebrachten Argumente für die Identität des menschengesichtigen Stiers um dann die zwei führenden Theorien (lokale Flussgötter oder Acheloios) in einer neuen Theorie von lokalen Verkörperungen von Acheloios zusammenzuführen, womit die Heiligkeit der lokalen Flüsse erhalten bleibt, währen trotzdem Acheloios als Gott aller Gewässer anerkannt wird. Der zweite Teil des Buches zeigt viele der "Sehnen von Acheloios", wie sie in der gesamten griechischen Welt auf Bronzemünzen erscheinen, wobei jeweils großes Augenmerk auf die Frage gelegt wird, warum eine spezifische Gruppe sich dieser Ikonographie bediente und der Mythos von Achelaios näher beleuchtet.

French Description:
Potamikon tente de répondre à la question qui embarrasse les chercheurs depuis de nombreuses années : Qui est le personnage figuré par un taureau androcéphale que l’on rencontre si souvent sur les monnaies grecques ? L’ouvrage aborde cette question par l’examen de l’origine iconographique puis de son développ