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NEW: Technologie lithique et circulation des matieres premieres au paleolithique moyen dans Le Salento by Enza E. Spinapolice. xii+224 pages; illustrated in black & white throughout with 14 plates in colour. French text.. 409 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918217. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918224. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Salento is a peninsula in Southern Italy, the heel of the Italian boot, characterised both by an abundance of Middle Palaeolithic sites and a scarcity of raw material suitable for knapping. The research question at the basis of this book concerns the managing of raw materials by Neanderthals, through both the procurement and use of the locally available raw materials and the exploitation of possibly more distant sources.

Le Salento est une péninsule du sud de l’Italie, le talon de la botte italienne, caractérisée à la fois par l’abondance des sites du Paléolithique moyen et par une pénurie des matières premières propres à la taille. La question de recherche à la base de ce livre concerne la gestion des matières premières par les Néandertaliens, à travers l’approvisionnement et l’utilisation des matières premières disponibles localement et l’exploitation éventuelle de sources plus éloignées.

About the Author ENZA E. SPINAPOLICE is a researcher at Sapienza University of Rome. She is a Palaeolithic archaeologist, broadly interested in what makes us human. Her main research focus is on the origins and spread of modern humans and the Neanderthal extinction. She is currently studying MSA lithic industries from North Africa, Ethiopia and Kenya and Mousterian/Uluzzian record from Italy. She is particularly interested in the interactions between culture and biological evolution, as well as in the cultural, social and demographic processes of prehistoric hunter-gatherers from both a synchronic and diachronic perspective.

ENZA E. SPINAPOLICE est chercheur à l’Université La Sapienza, Rome (Italie). Elle est une archéologue du paléolithique, intéressée à la question de «ce qui nous rend humains». Ses principaux intérêts de recherche portent sur les origines et la diffusion des humains modernes et sur l’extinction des Néandertaliens. Elle étudie actuellement les industries lithiques MSA d’Afrique du Nord, d’Éthiopie et du Kenya et la Transition Moustérien/ Uluzzien en Italie. Elle s’intéresse particulièrement aux interactions entre la culture et l’évolution biologique, ainsi qu’aux processus culturels, sociaux et démographiques des chasseurs-cueilleurs préhistoriques, d’un point de vue synchronique et diachronique.
NEW: Marcadores gráficos y territorios megalíticos en la Cuenca interior del Tajo: Toledo, Madrid y Guadalajara by Mª Ángeles Lancharro Gutiérrez. 346 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (222 plates in colour). 46 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917975. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917982. Book contents pageDownload

The aim of this work is to analyze Late Prehistoric graphical markers, comprising paintings, engravings, Megalithic elements, and other portable objects. All of them can be described as post-paleolithic or Schematic Art over various surfaces. The chosen area, the inland region of the Tajo inner basin (Spain), was especially appealing for several reasons, such as the lack of scholarship on the subject, the lack of information on the geographical location of the archaeological sites, and the extended ignorance about the sites’ materials and relationships.

The methodology is based on systematic registration of all archaeological sites. This is studied from an Archaeology Landscape perspective through Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis. It tests geographical markers according to their strategic location (pre-eminence and visibility) and their relationship with other funerary, habitable and resources sites. This has allowed parietal surfaces (megaliths, caves, shelters) and mobile pieces to be given coordinate position for the first time in the region, which has demonstrated abundant and complex prehistoric graphical markers. The results achieved allow the extrapolation of settlement models, explained in chapter VI. Generally, shelters divide the territory by geographical units where the settlers have access to a variety of economic resources and transit networks.

About the Author
Dr. María Ángeles Lancharro has a BA in History from the University of Alcalá (Spain) and received her PhD in Prehistory from the same university. Her research interests include landscape archaeology, megalithic territories and their symbolism, Prehistoric Rock Art in the Iberian Peninsula and Late Prehistory in the inner basin of the Tajo river. Additionally, she specialises in databases, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and spatial analysis. Her work is focused on territorial analysis from rock shelters, habitats, necropoli, areas of exploitation and resources. Dr. Lancharro has an extensive teaching experience and has participated in several excavations in Spain and southern France aimed at the compared study of Megalithic and Schematic Art. Her findings have been published in different peer-reviewed journals and books, and she has participated in a number of archaeological conferences.

Spanish description:
El objetivo de este trabajo es el estudio de los marcadores gráficos de la Prehistoria Reciente, entre los que se incluyen pinturas, grabados, elementos megalíticos y elementos mobiliares que responden a la descripción de Arte Esquemático o Postpaleolítico sobre diferentes soportes. Se eligió como zona de estudio la cuenca interior del Tajo a su paso por las provincias interiores (España), de especial interés por su carencia de valoraciones conjuntas y desde luego, por la escasa información acerca del posicionamiento geográfico de estos yacimientos y el desconocimiento bastante generalizado de sus contenidos y relaciones contextuales. El método de trabajo se ha fundamentado en la recogida sistemática de todos los yacimientos registrados. El estudio se ha llevado a cabo con nuevas tecnologías como los Sistemas de Información Geográfica (SIG), desde una perspectiva de la Arqueología del Paisaje. Se han efectuado diversos análisis establecidos sobre su posición estratégica (preeminencia y visibilidad) y su relación con otros yacimientos de carácter funerario, habitacional y recursos de explotación. Esto ha permitido que los soportes parietales (abrigos, cuevas y megalitos), así como piezas mobiliares, se hayan georreferenciado por primera vez en la región, dando muestras de la abundancia y complejidad de estas grafías prehistóricas.

Los resultados nos han permitido extrapolar modelos de implantación en el territorio, expuestos en el capítulo VI. En general, existe una tendencia a delimitar el territorio en unidades geográficas caracterizadas, en las que las sociedade
NEW: Sites of Prehistoric Life in Northern Ireland by Harry and June Welsh. iv+236 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (47 colour plates). 398 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917937. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917944. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Much has been written about the history of Northern Ireland, but less well-known is its wealth of prehistoric sites, from which most of our knowledge of the early inhabitants of this country has been obtained. Until recently, the greatest sources for this information were prehistoric burial sites, which have been visible in our landscape for thousands of years and have attracted the attention of inquisitive people throughout this time, often removing items, or adding others and in doing so, making it difficult for later generations to sift through the evidence. Fortunately, sketches, notes and artefacts have been gathered by Ordnance Survey surveyors, antiquarians and archaeological and historical societies and these continue to be interrogated by modern archaeologists in their search for understanding.

A further problem has been the dependence on information about prehistoric societies from their burial sites. Very few sites where these people lived and worked were visible above ground and as a consequence, little was known about them. However, during the last few decades, large-scale infrastructure projects and associated archaeological investigation has revealed a wealth of information. Much of the detail has still to be published and made available for research, but has already enriched understanding of our prehistoric past.

This monograph brings together information on all the currently known sites in Northern Ireland that are in some way associated with prehistoric life. It has been compiled from a number of sources and includes many that have only recently been discovered. A total of 1580 monuments are recorded in the inventory, ranging from burnt mounds to hillforts. In addition to providing an inventory of all known sites, along with a selection of photographs and plans, the work also includes an introduction to the prehistory of Northern Ireland, an explanation of terms and a full bibliography. It should be considered alongside an earlier work by the same authors on prehistoric burial sites in Northern Ireland (The Prehistoric Burial Sites of Northern Ireland, Archaeopress Archaeology 2014). The aim is to provide a foundation for more specific research projects, based on a standardised format for this largely untapped resource and stimulate a renewed interest in the prehistory of Northern Ireland. Hopefully, this can then be considered along with our knowledge of the historical period to provide a more complete overview of the story of human activity in what is now Northern Ireland.

About the Authors: Harry Welsh is an archaeologist and historian and currently works at the Centre for Archaeological Fieldwork at Queen’s University, Belfast. He has participated in and directed many archaeological excavations from Mesolithic to early modern periods and has published many books, articles and reports on archaeological sites and associated matters, as well as documenting and publishing on the history of the fire service in Northern Ireland. He has also managed the fieldwork activities of the Ulster Archaeological Society for many years and is an enthusiastic supporter of community archaeology projects.

June Welsh is a retired primary school teacher and has been a member of the Ulster Archaeological Society for many years. She has participated in a wide range of archaeological excavations and surveys, publishing many archaeological survey reports on the society website. She also took part in a research project funded by the Royal Irish Academy into prehistoric burials in Ireland. It was this project that led to her collaboration in the 2014 publication The Prehistoric Burial Sites of Northern Ireland, also published by Archaeopress, and this stimulated her interest in the life of prehistoric people.
Ceramic manufacturing techniques and cultural traditions in Nubia from the 8th to the 3rd millennium BC Examples from Sai Island by Giulia D’Ercole. xviii+186 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (33 colour plates). 41 2017 Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 96. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916718. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916725. Book contents pageDownload

In Sudan the first ceramic containers appeared at the beginning of the 9th millennium BC, with the earliest dates c. 8700 BC from Sorourab 2, in Central Sudan, and c. 8600 BC from the district of Amara West, in Northern Sudan.

This book presents a comprehensive critical analysis of diverse ceramic assemblages from Sai Island, in the Middle Nile Valley of Northern Sudan, on the border between ancient Upper and Lower Nubia. The assemblages included in this study cover about five millennia, spanning the period c. 8000 to c. 2500 BC. They go from the initial appearance of ceramic technology within hunting-fishing-gathering communities living in permanent or semi-permanent settlements (locally named ‘Khartoum Variant’ or ‘Mesolithic’ horizon: c. 7600–4800 BC), through the ceramic productions of the first ‘Neolithic’ pastoral societies (Abkan horizon: c. 5550−3700 BC), to those of the Pre-Kerma Nubian culture (c. 3600−2500 BC).

A thorough stylistic macroscopic observation of the finds is integrated with a solid technological approach by means of archaeometric petrographic (OM), mineralogical (XRPD) and chemical (XRF) analyses. Data are discussed and compared across a broad geographical area, including Lower and Upper Nubia, Central Sudan and the Egyptian Western Desert. They provide an original synthesis and interpretation of the ceramic traditions in Nubia and Sudan and propose a critical review of the debate on the invention of pottery and the functional and cultural reasons for the emergence of the ceramic technology.

This book is also available to purchase in paperback, priced £30.00.
Remembered Places, Forgotten Pasts The Don Drainage Basin in Prehistory by Tim Cockrell. xii+222 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (10 colour plates). 366 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917012. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917029. Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

South Yorkshire and the North Midlands have long been ignored or marginalized in narratives of British Prehistory. In Remembered Places, Forgotten Pasts, largely unpublished data is used for the first time in a work of synthesis to reconstruct the prehistory of the earliest communities across the River Don drainage basin. The author uses a relational approach to account for the complex and sophisticated interaction between people and materiality. Monuments and material culture are considered together, in relation to the diverse landscapes across which they were deposited in the distant past. The memory of significant places along lines of movement are central to the approach taken, combined with the changing character of the land which supported people. Virtually absent in recent narratives, the forgotten prehistoric pasts of the region are now able to be approached on a systematic basis. The author concludes that a region that was the centre of dynamic interaction between mobile groups in its earliest phase gave way to a pastoral lifestyle facilitated by extensive wetlands. These wetlands were connected by waterways and gorges. Thus connected, the wetlands were located to either side of its drier, centrally defining feature, the Magnesian Limestone ridge.
Palaeolithic Pioneers: Behaviour, abilities, and activity of early Homo in European landscapes around the western Mediterranean basin ~1.3-0.05 Ma. by Michael J. Walker. 342 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916206. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916213. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Archaic humans were present for over a million years in western Mediterranean Europe where they left very many traces of their early stone-age activities and behaviour, and sometimes even human skeletal remains. This book evaluates archaeological findings about their life-ways at many important sites in Italy, southern France, and Spain, from the earliest ones 1,300,000 years ago, to those of Neanderthals fifty-thousand years ago, just before they were superseded by skeletally-“modern” humans. The cognitive and manual skills of archaic humans in western Mediterranean Europe are considered in the Pleistocene contexts of major climatic fluctuations and changing environmental circumstances. The book focusses on their remarkable capacity to adapt, frequently reinvent themselves, and persist for long periods of time, even though finally they did not endure. Their achievements and abilities withstand comparison to those of ancient humans in Africa or Asia during Early, Middle, and early Late Pleistocene times.

About the Author Michael Walker (Colchester, 1941) is Honorific Emeritus Professor in the Department of Zoology and Physical Anthropology at the University of Murcia in Spain, and directs field-work at Cueva Negra del Estrecho del Río Quípar (Caravaca, Murcia) and Sima de las Palomas del Cabezo Gordo (Torre Pacheco, Murcia). He studied at University College, Oxford, graduated in Animal Physiology and Medicine, took the Postgraduate Diploma in Prehistoric Archaeology and gained his D.Phil. for research in S.E. Spanish prehistory and palaeoanthropology. Following a junior research fellowship at The Queen’s College, Oxford, he lectured at the universities of Edinburgh and Sydney before being appointed in 1988 to establish Physical Anthropology at the University of Murcia. Paleoanthropologist Erik Trinkaus (Washington University of St. Louis) and Michael Walker have edited The People of Palomas, Neandertals from the Sima de las Palomas del Cabezo Gordo, Southeastern Spain (Texas A&M University Press, 2017).
La ocupación humana del territorio de la comarca del río Guadalteba (Málaga) durante el Pleistoceno by Lidia Cabello Ligero. x+212 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Spanish text with English abstract. 338 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916121. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916138. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This investigation exhaustively gathers the archaeological evidence of the Palaeolithic human settlement in the Guadalteba river region (Malaga, Spain) during the Pleistocene. The main objective is to show the direct relationship between the reservoirs and the sources of raw materials, located in the fluvial terraces, in the geological outcrops and in the surface deposits. An important part of the work has been the geoarchaeological and archeometric surveys and the analysis of new lithic collections from surface archaeological surveys and recent systematic archaeological excavations in the Ardales Cave and Las Palomas de Teba Sima. In this sense, the methodological tools of other disciplines were used. Geoarchaeology enabled an understanding of the sedimentary and Post -depositional processes affecting the deposits and consequently its lithic industry. Archaeometry helped to see the petrographic features of lithic assemblies of deposits. These disciplines have been fundamental to propose a settlement pattern and mobility of these groups of Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers during the Pleistocene period in the interior of the province of Malaga, laying down a basic structure for future prehistoric investigations in the area.

Spanish Description: Una investigación que recoge de manera exhaustiva las evidencias arqueológicas del poblamiento humano Paleolítico en la comarca del río Guadalteba (Málaga, España) durante el Pleistoceno. El objetivo principal es mostrar la relación directa entre los yacimientos y las fuentes de materias primas, localizadas en las terrazas fluviales, en los afloramientos geológicos y en los propios yacimientos. Destacar la importancia del análisis del registro arqueológico de superficie, donde la prospección se convierte en la herramienta más efectiva para detectar yacimientos que han permanecido al aire libre, sobre todo del Paleolítico inferior y medio. De igual forma cobra especial relevancia el reconocimiento y la caracterización espacial y territorial, donde el artefacto se convierte en la unidad básica de investigación. Parte importante del trabajo han sido los muestreos geoarqueológicos y arqueométricos y el análisis de los nuevos conjuntos líticos procedentes de las prospecciones arqueológicas superficiales y de las recientes excavaciones arqueológicas sistemáticas, realizadas en la Cueva de Ardales y en la Sima de Las Palomas de Teba. En este sentido, hemos utilizado herramientas metodológicas de otras disciplinas, como la Geoarqueología, para comprender los procesos sedimentarios y postdeposicionales que afectan a los yacimientos y en consecuencia a su industria lítica, y la Arqueometría, para ver las características petrográficas de los conjuntos líticos, disciplinas fundamentales para proponer un patrón de asentamiento y movilidad de estos grupos de cazadores-recolectores del Pleistoceno. Este trabajo constituye un hito en la investigación del Paleolítico en el interior de la provincia de Málaga, convirtiéndose en una estructura básica para futuras investigaciones prehistóricas en la zona.
Sig y análisis espacial en la arqueología de cazadores recolectores de Magallania (extremo sur de Sudamérica) by María Cecilia Pallo. 426 pages; illustrated throughout with 102 plates in colour. Spanish text. 28 2017 South American Archaeology Series 28. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916060. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916077. Book contents pageDownload

Magallania defines the region between the Santa Cruz river basin to the north and the Fuegian expression of the Andes to the south. It is one of the southernmost spaces in the world and the last to be occupied by humans, a process that occurred at least at the end of the Pleistocene (11,000 to 9,000 AP) and before the complete formation of the Strait of Magellan (ca. 8000 AP). Thereafter, the Strait functioned as a biogeographic barrier, creating conditions for divergent cultural evolution between the populations of the mainland and Tierra del Fuego. For this reason, the archeology of Magallania offers a unique possibility to inquire about the relationship between the environmental dynamics and the spatial organization of populations of hunter-gatherers settled on both sides of the Strait of Magellan.

Spanish Description: En su versión original, Magallania es el nombre acuñado por Martinic para definir la región comprendida entre la cuenca del río Santa Cruz al norte hasta la expresión fueguina de la cordillera de los Andes al sur. Es uno de los espacios más australes del mundo y de los últimos en ser ocupados por humanos, proceso que ocurrió al menos a fines del Pleistoceno (11.000 a 9.000 AP) y antes de la completa formación del estrecho de Magallanes (ca. 8000 AP). A partir de entonces el Estrecho funcionó como una barrera biogeográfica, creando condiciones para que ocurra la evolución cultural divergente entre las poblaciones del continente y la Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego. Por este motivo, la arqueología de Magallania ofrece una posibilidad única para indagar acerca de la relación entre la dinámica ambiental y la organización espacial de las poblaciones de cazadores recolectores asentadas a un lado y otro del estrecho de Magallanes.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

L’arte rupestre dell’età dei metalli nella penisola italiana: localizzazione dei siti in rapporto al territorio, simbologie e possibilità interpretative edited by Renata Grifoni Cremonesi & Anna Maria Tosatti. 276 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Italian text. 26 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784915568. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915575. Book contents pageDownload

This volume presents the proceedings of the conference “L’arte rupestre dell’età dei metalli nella penisola italiana: localizzazione dei siti in rapporto al territorio, simbologie e possibilità interpretative” that took place in Pisa at the Cantiere delle Navi di Pisa under the aegis of the Soprintendenza Archeologica della Toscana and of the University of Pisa on 15th June 2015. The addressed issues were related to the Post-Pleistocene rock art along the Apennine ridge; in recent years more and more evidence has been identified, which is different from the magnificent evidence found in the Alps such as, for example, the well-known Monte Bego and Val Camonica. This evidence, despite various and peculiar features, can be all related to the iconographic field whose main expressions are anthropomorphic figures, weapons, daggers, halberds and several other symbols, all similarly stylised. A peculiarity of these manifestations is their location in small shelters inappropriate for habitation or in places suitable for supervising mountain and territory roads, bearing comparison to evidence from Western Mediterranean coastal areas. An interpretative possibility has emerged: these sites could have been not only ceremonial places, but also spaces linked to the socio-economic fields or perhaps to the power of communities that occupied these territories.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Suyanggae and Her Neighbours in Haifa, Israel Proceedings of the 20th (1) Congress June 21–28, 2015 edited by Sharon Gonen and Avraham Ronen. 156 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 313 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915384. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915391. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Proceedings of the 20th symposium: Suyanggae and Her Neighbours. The 20th symposium took place across two meetings, the first in Haifa, Israel and the second in Danyang, Republic of Korea. This proceedings volume gathers papers, abstracts and posters from the meeting in Haifa, which took place from 21–28 June 2015.
Myths about Rock Art by Robert G. Bednarik. ii+218 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 278 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914745. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914752. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Rather than considering the myths supposedly depicted in the world’s rock art, this book examines the myths archaeologists and others have created about the meanings and significance of rock art. This vast body of opinions dominates our concepts of the principal surviving cultural manifestations of early worldviews. Here these constructs are subjected to detailed analysis and are found to consist largely of misinterpretations. From the misidentification of natural rock markings as rock art to mistaken interpretations, from sensationalist claims to pareidolic elucidations of iconographies, the book presents numerous examples of myths researchers have created about pre-Historic ‘art’. The claims about a connection between rock art and the neuropathologies of its producers are assessed, and the neuroscience of rock art interpretation is reviewed. The book presents a comprehensive catalogue of falsities claimed about palaeoart, and it endeavours to explain how these arose, and how they can be guarded against by recourse to basic principles of science. It therefore represents a key resource in the scientific study of rock art.

About the Author:
Robert G. Bednarik is the Convener and Editor-in-Chief of the International Federation of Rock Art Organisations and is affiliated with Hebei Normal University, China. His principal research interests are the origins of the human ability to create constructs of reality, the evolution of humans, and in a variety of fields providing supplementary information in that quest, including the world’s rock art. He has produced more than 1350 academic publications.
20% OFF: Les sépultures mésolithiques de Téviec et Hoedic: révisions bioarchéologiques by Bruno Boulestin. 292 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914967. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914974. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Spotlight promotion: 20% off select 'death and burial' titles. RRP: £50. Offer Price: £40. Offer ends 31/03/2018. The sites of Teviec and Hoedic, located in Brittany and excavated from 1928 to 1934 by Marthe and Saint-Just Péquart, have yielded twenty-odd graves dating to the end of the Mesolithic and containing almost forty individuals. Nearly a century later, they remain the most important funerary groups ever discovered in France for this period, and two major French Mesolithic sites. Until these days though, despite previous re-examinations of part of the unearthed material, no general review of the field data or of the human remains had ever been carried out, and all the debates concerning the functioning of both cemeteries relied on the interpretations once made by the Péquart and on the anthropological studies by Marcellin Boule and Henri Victor Vallois. This book presents the long lacking bioarchaeological review study of the Teviec and Hoedic graves: the field data have been reconsidered, relying in particular on a large series of pictures taken by the excavators, and the number of dead individuals, their age and sex have been reevaluated using anthropological techniques in accordance with our current knowledge. This review also gives us the occasion to carry out a global reflection on the circumstances under which the dead were grouped during the Mesolithic period and on the society of Atlantic Europe’s last hunters-gatherers as perceived through the filter of their funerary practices.

About the author:
Bruno Boulestin is an anthropologist at the University of Bordeaux, France, member of the research unit “De la Préhistoire à l’Actuel : Culture, Environnement, Anthropologie” (PACEA, UMR 5199 of the CNRS). He is working on the diachronic study of practices around death in ancient societies from both archaeological, bioarchaeological and socio-anthropological data and is specialized in the study of bone modifications and corpse treatments.

French Description:
Fouillés entre 1928 et 1934 par Marthe et Saint-Just Péquart, Téviec et Hoedic, en Bretagne, ont livré une vingtaine de tombes datant de la fin du Mésolithique et contenant près de quarante individus. Presque un siècle plus tard, ils demeurent les ensembles funéraires les plus importants de cette période découverts en France, et parmi les sites majeurs du Mésolithique français. Mais jusque-là, si une partie des matériels mis au jour avaient été réexaminés, ni les données de terrain ni les restes humains n’avaient fait l’objet d’une révision générale, et toutes les discussions sur le fonctionnement des deux cimetières s’appuyaient sur les anciennes interprétations des Péquart et sur les études anthropologiques de Marcellin Boule et Henri Victor Vallois. Cet ouvrage présente le travail de révision bioarchéologique des sépultures de Téviec et Hoedic qui faisait jusqu’à présent défaut : les données de terrain y sont reconsidérées, en s’appuyant en particulier sur une importante série de photographies prises par les fouilleurs, et le nombre de morts, leur âge et leur sexe y sont réévalués en utilisant des techniques anthropologiques conformes au savoir actuel. Cette révision est également l’occasion d’une réflexion générale sur les regroupements des morts au Mésolithique, ainsi que sur la société des derniers chasseurs-cueilleurs d’Europe atlantique telle qu’elle est perçue à travers le filtre de leurs pratiques funéraires.

Bruno Boulestin est anthropologue à l’Université de Bordeaux, France, membre de l’UMR 5199 du CNRS PACEA, « De la Préhistoire à l’Actuel : Culture, Environnement et Anthropologie ». Ses recherches portent sur l’étude diachronique des pratiques autour de la mort dans les sociétés anciennes, à partir à la fois des données archéologiques, bioarchéologiques et de l’anthropologie sociale, et il est spécialisé dans l’étude des modifications osseuses et des trai
Palaeoart and Materiality The Scientific Study of Rock Art edited by Robert G. Bednarik, Danae Fiore, Mara Basile, Giriraj Kumar and Tang Huisheng. ii+254 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 6 colour plates. 267 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914295. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914301. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book contains a series of selected papers presented at two symposia entitled ‘Scientific study of rock art’, one held in the IFRAO Congress of Rock Art in La Paz, Bolivia, in June 2012, the other held in the IFRAO Congress in Cáceres, Spain, in September 2015; as well as some invited papers from leading rock art scientists. The core topic of the book is the presentation of scientific approaches to the materiality of rock art, ranging from recording and sampling methods to data analyses. These share the fact that they provide means of testing hypotheses and/or of finding trends in the data which can be used as independent sources of evidence to support specific interpretations. The issue of the materiality of visual productions of the distant past, which in archaeological theory has attracted much attention recently and has stimulated much conceptual debate, is addressed through a variety of scientific approaches, including fieldwork methods, laboratory work techniques and/or data analysis protocols. These, in turn, will provide new insights into human agency and people-image engagements through the study of rock art production, display and use.

About the Editors:
Robert G. Bednarik is the Convener and Editor-in-Chief of the International Federation of Rock Art Organisations and is affiliated with Hebei Normal University, China. His principal research interests are the origins of the human ability to create constructs of reality, the evolution of humans, and in a variety of fields providing supplementary information in that quest, including the world’s rock art. He has produced more than 1350 academic publications.

Dr Danae Fiore is a researcher at Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas, Argentina, and a lecturer at Universidad de Buenos Aires. Her main interests are focused on the archaeology of rock art, portable art and body art viewed from technological, economic and cognitive perspectives; hunter-gatherer archaeology; archaeological theory and methods; and visual archaeology (the study of indigenous material culture through ethnographic photographs).

Dr Mara Basile is an archaeologist and a researcher at the National Council of Scientific and Technical Research, Argentina. She has been a member of the Archaeological Project Chaschuil Abaucán (www.proyectopacha.com.ar) since 2002. Her main research interest is to delineate the visual languages that circulated in different expressive media over time in the region of Fiambalá (Catamarca, Argentina).

Dr Giriraj Kumar is Professor in Rock Art Science and Indian Culture and Founding Secretary General and Editor, Rock Art Society of India (estd. 1990), carrying out scientific research on early Indian petroglyphs and their dating in collaboration with Australian and other scientists. He published a book on Indian rock art and more than eighty research papers on Stone Age Indian rock art and culture.

Dr Tang Huisheng is the Director of the International Centre of Rock Art Dating and Conservation, Hebei Normal University, China. He also teaches as a Professor at the of Archaeology Department of Nanjing Normal University. His principal interests are the rock art of China and its dating, and the Chinese Neolithic period.


Holocene Prehistory in the Télidjène Basin, Eastern Algeria Capsian occupations at Kef Zoura D and Aïn Misteheyia edited by David Lubell. vi+226 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 4 colour plates. Papers in English and French. 239 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913731. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913748. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

From 1972 to 1979, field work was conducted in the Télidjène Basin, Eastern Algeria, as part of a project called The Prehistoric Cultural Ecology of Capsian Escargotières. The primary objective was the controlled excavation of two stratified Capsian sites, the open-air escargotière Aïn Misteheyia (1973 and 1976) and the rock shelter Kef Zoura D (1976 and 1978), both of which have remained incompletely published until now. Aïn Misteheyia and Kef Zoura D have proven to be key sites in a discussion that has been ongoing since at least the 1930s when Vaufrey published his interpretation of Capsian stratigraphy, trying to understand if there was a temporal succession between the Capsien typique and the Capsien supérieur. These are the only Capsian escargotières excavated with modern methods and extensive radiocarbon dating that have a clear stratigraphic sequence in which both variants of the Capsian are represented. We show that Capsien typique precedes Capsien supérieur, that the latter saw the introduction of a new technique for the production of blanks (pressure flaking), that the change is more-or-less contemporary with the 8200 cal BP cold event, and that it was accompanied by a subtle change in a subsistence regime of continued foraging despite the introduction of some herding of apparently introduced domestic stock in neighbouring regions that suggests the changes observed at these two sites may have eventually led in some areas to the introduction of Neolithic subsistence patterns, although there is as yet no clear evidence for this in the central Capsian area of eastern Algeria and southern Tunisia. Aïn Misteheyia was described in two previous reports in Libyca, but the artifact illustrations were never published and appear here as an addendum. Four chapters describe the chronology, stratigraphy, lithic, faunal and charcoal assemblages from Kef Zoura D. In addition, there are chapters analyzing the well preserved assemblages of worked bone from the Capsien supérieur deposits at both sites as well as the small assemblages of marine shell. One chapter is a reprinted paper that originally appeared in Sahara on an engraved stone plaque from Kef Zoura D, and a final chapter is the first report on an ongoing study of use-wear in the lithic assemblage from Kef Zoura D.

About the Editor:
David Lubell (Professor Emeritus, University of Alberta and Adjunct Professor, University of Waterloo) received his PhD in 1971 from Columbia University. He has directed archaeological field work in Algeria, Portugal and Italy, always with an emphasis on the inter-relationship of human groups with their environments as reflected in their subsistence patterns and the analysis of the artifacts they made and used. In collaboration with Mary Jackes, he has expanded his horizons to take into account the bioarchaeology and palaeodemography of the human populations involved. He has also made a decades-long study of the occurrence of edible land snails in Holocene archaeological sites throughout the Mediterranean region and is convinced (but unable yet to prove) that their presence in abundance represents a part of the transition from foraging to food production.

Reviews:

'This volume is a detailed and convincing interdisciplinary presentation of important archaeological material, illustrated with numerous very informative, high-quality figures.' -Jörg Linstädter (Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa, 2017)

'The major achievement of this book is the systematic description of well stratified Capsian sites, offering a high-resolution representation of the transformation of this horizon from the beginning, during the Early Holocene, until its evolved phase... The book is undoubtedly an important entry point for the research in Kef Zoura and at the same time a significant contribution to the knowledge of the Holocene of Algeria.' -Giuseppina Mut
‘A Mersshy Contree Called Holdernesse’: Excavations on the Route of a National Grid Pipeline in Holderness, East Yorkshire Rural Life in the Claylands to the East of the Yorkshire Wolds, from the Mesolithic to the Iron Age and Roman Periods, and beyond edited by Gavin Glover, Paul Flintoft, Richard Moore. xii+286 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 225 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784913137. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913144. Book contents pageDownload

Twenty sites were excavated on the route of a National Grid pipeline across Holderness, East Yorkshire. These included an early Mesolithic flint-working area, near Sproatley. In situ deposits of this age are rare, and the site is a significant addition to understanding of the post-glacial development of the wider region. Later phases of this site included possible Bronze Age round barrows and an Iron Age square barrow. Elsewhere on the pipeline route, diagnostic Mesolithic, Neolithic and Bronze Age flints, as well as Bronze Age pottery, provide evidence of activity in these periods.

Iron Age remains were found at all of the excavation sites, fourteen of which had ring gullies, interpreted as evidence for roundhouse structures. The frequency with which these settlements occurred is an indication of the density of population in the later Iron Age and the large assemblage of hand-made pottery provides a rich resource for future study. Activity at several of these sites persisted at least into the second or early third centuries AD, while the largest excavation site, at Burton Constable, was re-occupied in the later third century. However, the pottery from the ring gullies was all hand-made, suggesting that roundhouses had ceased to be used by the later first century AD, when the earliest wheel-thrown wares appear. This has implications for understanding of the Iron Age to Roman transition in the region.

Late first- or early second-century artefacts from a site at Scorborough Hill, near Weeton, are of particular interest, their nature strongly suggesting an association with the Roman military.

Public Images, Private Readings: Multi-Perspective Approaches to the Post-Palaeolithic Rock Art Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain) Volume 5 / Session A11e edited by Ramón Fábregas Valcarce and Carlos Rodríguez-Rellán. vi+70 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. All papers in English, abstracts in English and French. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912895. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912901. Book contents pageDownload

A significant number of Holocene societies throughout the world have resorted at one time or another to the making of paints or carvings on different places (tombs, rock-shelters or caves, openair outcrops). The aim of the session A11e. Public images, private readings: multi-perspective approaches to the post-Palaeolithic rock art, which was held within the XVII World UISPP Congress (Burgos, September 1-7 2014), was to put together the experiences of specialists from different areas of the Iberian Peninsula and the World. The approaches ranged from the archaeological definition of the artistic phenomena and their socioeconomic background to those concerning themselves with the symbolic and ritual nature of those practices, including the definition of the audience to which the graphic manifestations were addressed and the potential role of the latter in the making up of social identities and the enforcement of territorial claims. More empirical issues, such as new recording methodologies and data management or even dating were also considered during this session.

Argonauts of the Stone Age Early maritime activity from the first migrations from Africa to the end of the Neolithic by Andrzej Pydyn. viii+255 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 11 colour plates. 219 2016. ISBN 9781784911430. £36.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This is an important book. Too often in the past archaeologists have ignored or underestimated sea travel in early prehistory but the evidence has been growing and now it is presented to us in full in this thought provoking study. No longer can those interested in the human achievement neglect to take into account the astonishing achievements of our palaeolithic, mesolithic and neolithic ancestors.

This book gives a full account of stone age seafaring presenting the archaeological evidence in the context of the changing world environment and uses ethnographic sources to broaden the readers understanding of the worlds earliest sea craft. It is essential reading for all concerned to understand the human condition. – Professor Sir Barry Cunliffe, Oxford

The book is a comprehensive study of early navigation and its place in the development of human culture from the earliest times to the late Stone Age. This subject is very timely in light of increasing archaeological and palaeoanthropological evidence that the maritime environment had been mastered in prehistory. As the author rightly points out at the beginning of his book, the maritime environment can no longer be marginalised when portraying both hunter-gatherer and early agrarian prehistoric communities.

The book is a valuable and inspiring work on a subject which had hitherto not enjoyed such in-depth treatment. It greatly enhances our perception of the beginnings of human culture and enriches it with comprehensive, convincing arguments that the maritime environment had been mastered by early humans. I congratulate the author on the effect he has achieved and on unearthing so many chronologically, geographically and thematically diverse sources. – Prof. Paweł Valde-Nowak, Jagiellonian University, Krakow

The title of the book intrigues the reader and promises a fascinating read about issues approached from an innovatively broad perspective. Both the global territorial scope and the chronological range covering almost two million years of human cultural development are worthy of note. What we have here is an aspect of human activity which is often neglected and marginalised in scientific research, which is that directly related to the sea. The fact that up to 90% of Pleistocene coasts, which were after all heavily populated in the Stone Age, have been flooded in modern times is not conducive to large-scale research, as underlined by the author in the Introduction.

The beginnings of human activity on the high seas are the subject of research in numerous scientific disciplines, all of which are discussed here. In writing this book the author has drawn on an exceptionally wide range of literature, mostly in English, owing to which the author’s own views, as well as those of other researchers whom he cites, are credible and convincing. – Dr hab. Krzysztof Cyrek, professor of Nicolaus Copernicus University, Toruń

Reviews

‘…Pydyn makes a compelling case that pre-Homo sapiens may have utilized water transport technology. Even the use of natural floats was perhaps “culturally enriched,” meaning that our ancestors consciously affected the direction of drifting or floating. He also argues that studies of early maritime activity have demonstrated the research potential of the continental shelf, because many Paleolithic and Neolithic sites are likely underwater… Argonauts of the Stone Age is a well-illustrated and engaging addition to the recent volumes on early seafaring and maritime activities.’ – Katelyn Dibenedetto, University of Nevada (Journal Of Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology And Heritage Studies, Vol 5, Nos 3-4, 2017)

Over The Hills and Far Away Last Glacial Maximum Lithic Technology Around the Great Adriatic Plain by Emanuele Cancellieri. x+125 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 198 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912345. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912352. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The research scope of this book is the human occupation of the northern Adriatic region at the end of the Last Glacial Maximum (ca. 24,000- 20,000 calBP), and a point of view over the long debated occupation of the once exposed Great Adriatic Plain and the role it played within the early Epigravettian hunter-gatherers settlement system. The study relied on a comprehensive techno-economic approach to lithic technology, one among the possible means to investigate site function, mobility and land use.
Prehistoric Art as Prehistoric Culture Studies in Honour of Professor Rodrigo de Balbín-Behrmann edited by Primitiva Bueno-Ramírez and Paul G. Bahn. x+180 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 197 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912222. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912239. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Professor Rodrigo de Balbín has played a major role in advancing our knowledge of Palaeolithic art, and the occasion of his retirement provides an excellent opportunity to assess the value of prehistoric art studies as a factor in the study of the culture of those human groups which produced this imagery. The diverse papers in this volume, published in Professor de Balbín’s honour, cover a wide variety of the decorated caves which traditionally defined Palaeolithic art, as well as the open-air art of the period, a subject in which he has done pioneering work at Siega Verde and elsewhere. The result is a new and more realistic assessment of the social and symbolic framework of human groups from 40,000 BP onwards.
Ritual Landscapes and Borders within Rock Art Research Papers in Honour of Professor Kalle Sognnes edited by Heidrun Stebergløkken, Ragnhild Berge, Eva Lindgaard and Helle Vangen Stuedal. i-viii, 1-188 pages, illustrated in colour throughout. 190 2015. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784911584. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911591. Download

Ritual landscapes and borders are recurring themes running through Professor Kalle Sognnes' long research career. This anthology contains 13 articles written by colleagues from his broad network in appreciation of his many contributions to the field of rock art research. The contributions discuss many different kinds of borders: those between landscapes, cultures, traditions, settlements, power relations, symbolism, research traditions, theory and methods.

We are grateful to the Department of Historical studies, NTNU; the Faculty of Humanities; NTNU, The Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters and The Norwegian Archaeological Society (Norsk arkeologisk selskap) for funding this volume that will add new knowledge to the field and will be of importance to researchers and students of rock art in Scandinavia and abroad.
Rivers in Prehistory edited by Andrea Vianello. vi+166 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 169 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911782. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911799. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

From antiquity onwards people have opted to live near rivers and major watercourses. Both freshwater and navigable routes provide the obvious reasons for settling near a river, but there are also many drawbacks, such as flooding. This volume explores rivers as facilitators of movement through landscapes, and it investigates the reasons for living near a river, as well as the role of the river in the human landscape. Ultimately, it focuses on the delicate relationship between humans and their environment, looking at the origins to help understand the present.

The symbolic and philosophical perceptions and understanding of rivers, the cultural and social behaviour associated with their presence, and the effort and engineering required to subdue and control their flowing waters are all deeply embedded in human cultures. Through an extended essay and ten case studies, this book introduces the reader to how rivers have been perceived as gateways to wilderness and the environment for humans across the world, and how they have affected behaviour and ideas throughout human history. Students and researchers of humanenvironment dynamics, and/or the colonisation of new lands, will find in this volume a network of bridges to facilitate the exploration of different research paths towards historical narratives of human cultures, through which rivers, and their environments, run.
Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 45 2015 edited by Orhan Elmaz. xii+434 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. PSAS45 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911454. £69.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911461. £48.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £69.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Seminar for Arabian Studies is the only international academic forum which meets annually for the presentation of research in the humanities on the Arabian Peninsula. It focuses on the fields of archaeology, architecture, art, epigraphy, ethnography, history, language, linguistics, literature, and numismatics from the earliest times to the present day.

A wide range of original and stimulating papers presented at the Seminar are published in the Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies and reflect the dynamism and scope of the interdisciplinary event.

The main foci of the Seminar in 2014, in chronological order were the Palaeolithic and Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages, Early Historical and Classical periods, Heritage Management, Islamic Archaeology and History. In addition there were sessions on Ethnography, on Language, and with a session dedicated to the Archaeology and History of ancient Yemen. In addition, on the evening of Saturday, 26 July 2014, Professor Lloyd Weeks, Head of the School of Humanities, the University of University of New England, New South Wales, Australia, a long supporter of the Seminar and Foundation, presented the MBI Lecture entitled ‘The Quest for the Copper of Magan: how early metallurgy shaped Arabia and set the horizons of the Bronze Age world’ and as always provided an informative, interesting and lucid lecture. This volume also includes notes in memoriam on Nigel Groom (1924–2014), ‘Arabist, historian, spy-catcher, and writer on perfume’; and on Professor Tony Wilkinson (1948–2014), Professor of Archaeology at the University of Edinburgh (2005–2006) and Professor of Archaeology at Durham University (2006–2014) who specialised in landscape archaeology.

20% OFF: The Prehistoric Burial Sites of Northern Ireland by Harry and June Welsh. xi+478 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. 106 2014. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910068. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910075. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £63.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Spotlight promotion: 20% off select 'death and burial' titles. RRP: £63. Offer Price: £50. Offer ends 31/03/2018. Much has been written about the history of Northern Ireland, but less well-known is its wealth of prehistoric sites, particularly burial sites, from which most of our knowledge of the early inhabitants of this country has been obtained. This work brings together information on all the known sites in Northern Ireland that are in some way associated with burial. It has been compiled from a number of sources and includes many sites that have only recently been discovered. A total of 3332 monuments are recorded in the inventory, ranging from megalithic tombs to simple pit burials. In addition to providing an inventory of all known sites, along with a selection of photographs and plans, the work also includes an introduction to the prehistory of Northern Ireland, an explanation of terms and a full bibliography. The aim is to provide a foundation for more specific research projects, based on a standardised information format of this largely untapped resource. For example, the work highlights several large and previously unrecognised clusters of prehistoric burial monuments, some located at unusual landscape features. Hopefully, further analysis will lead to a greater understanding of why this should be and stimulate a renewed interest in the prehistory of Northern Ireland. Enhanced awareness of this should complement knowledge of the historical period to provide a more balanced picture of human activity here.
Art as Metaphor The Prehistoric Rock-Art of Britain edited by Aron Mazel, George Nash and Clive Waddington. 53 2007. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781905739165. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916022. £14.17 (Exc. VAT) Buy Now

Enigmatic, esoteric and fascinating, the rock-art of the British Isles has for a long time been a well-kept secret. However, over the last few decades hundreds of new rock art panels have been discovered and several regional surveys have been carried out. This volume brings together a carefully selected collection of papers that cover British prehistoric rock-art from over 10000 years ago.
Creating the Human Past An Epistemology of Pleistocene Archaeology by Robert G. Bednarik. ii + 186 pp., illustrated in colour and black and white. 85 2013. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781905739639. £14.95 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910730. £10.58 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £14.95 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book examines systematically both the theoretical and practical issues that have characterized the discipline over the past two centuries. Some of the historically most consequential mistakes in archaeology are dissected and explained, together with the effects of the related controversies. The theoretical basis of the discipline is deliberated in some detail, leading to the diagnosis that there are in fact numerous archaeologies, all with different notions of commensurability, ideologies, and purposes. Their various perspectives of what archaeology is and does are considered and the range of views of the human past is illuminated in this book. How humans became what they are today is of profound importance to understanding ourselves, both as a species and individually. Our psychology, cognition, diseases, intellect, communication forms, physiology, predispositions, ideologies, culture, genetics, behavior, and, perhaps most importantly, our reality constructs are all the result of our evolutionary history. Therefore the models archaeology—especially Pleistocene archaeology—creates of our past are not just narratives of what happened in human history; they are fundamental to every aspect of our existence.
Dissent with Modification: Human Origins, Palaeolithic Archaeology and Evolutionary Anthropology in Britain 1859–1901 by John McNabb. 377 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black and white; paperback. Was £29.95. 67 2012. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781905739523. £9.95 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910785. £10.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Special Offer: £9.95 (RRP: £29.95): The author’s original aim in writing this book was to chronicle the story of a very specific debate in human evolutionary studies that took place between the late 1880s and the 1930s – the ‘eolith’ debate that had to do with small, natural stones whose shape and edges suggested to our earliest ancestors their use as tools, either as they were, or with a small amount of chipping to the stone’s edge, a process called ‘retouch’. These were the most primitive of tools, thought to date to the very beginning of human cultural evolution, and therefore suited to our very earliest ancestors. The more the author researched this topic the more he realised that its explanation was rooted in a number of research questions which today are considered separate subjects, and, gradually, a book that was to be about a forgotten Palaeolithic debate became a book that was just as much about ‘Morlocks’, stone tools, racial difference, and the Anthropological Society of London. The major themes of this study include: Apart from interconnectivity itself, the development of Palaeolithic archaeology, its relationship with the study of human physical anthropology in Britain and, to a much lesser extent, on the Continent; The links between these and the study of race and racial origins; The question of human origins itself; The link with geological developments in climate and glacial studies; The public perception of the whole ‘origins’ question and its relationship with ‘race’; How the public got its information on origins-related questions, and in what form this was presented to them; a review of the opening phase of the eolith debate (1889-1895/6) as a logical extension of developments in a number of these areas (e.g. Victorian science fiction). This fascinating book incorporates original research with synthesis and overview, and at the same time presents original perspectives derived from the author’s overall arrangement of the material. While the targeted readership includes postgraduates and third-year undergraduates, the work is very much intended as accessible to the non-academic reader wanting to know more about a subject that (re)touches on everyone.
Beyond the Ice: Creswell Crags and its place in a wider European context by Matthew Beresford . illustrated throughout; paperback. 66 2012. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781905739509. £14.95 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910808. £10.58 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £14.95 (Exc. UK VAT) Buy Now

Since the discovery of Britain’s first Ice Age cave art in 2003, the site of Creswell Crags has gained international recognition as one of Britain’s leading Ice Age sites. For the first time the history of the site is brought together in one accessible volume. Documenting the early fieldwork at the site it uncovers antiquarian discoveries such as the famous horse engraving, excavations in the 1920s that saw our understanding of our early ancestors take shape, discusses the demise of the Neanderthals and the emergence of Modern Man, and looks at how Creswell Crags grew as a heritage attraction of potential World Heritage Status. In Beyond the Ice, Matthew Beresford examines how our ancestors lived, how they hunted, examines the tools and weapons they made and, most importantly, what they left behind. The book also challenges the term ‘Creswellian’, an isolated British culture that occupied the fringe lands of western Europe, and instead offers hard evidence for viewing Creswell Crags and its inhabitants as being part of a vast Ice Age world. Finally, it looks at what happened right at the end of the last Ice Age and examines what the changes in climate and landscape meant to our early ancestors. Beyond the Ice will appeal as much to the general reader as it will to the student or scholar, as it raises fundamental questions and offers up interpretations that apply to us all.
Digging up the Ice Age Recognising, recording and understanding fossil and archaeological remains found in British quarries. A Guide and Practical Handbook by Simon Buteux, Jenni Chambers and Barbara Silva. Edited by Simon Buteux with contributions by David Keen, Danielle Schreve and Mark Stephens. vi, 189, illustrated throughout in colour, index.. 54 2009. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781905739240. £14.99 (No VAT). Institutional Price £12.49 (Exc. UK VAT) Buy Now

For over a hundred years, sand and gravel quarrying has been of enormous benefit to geology, palaeontology and archaeology – quarries have been the main source of Ice Age fossils and finds. It is because of deep excavations into Ice Age sediments that the geological sequences, the fossil remains of plants and animals, and the stone tools of Britain’s earliest human inhabitants have come to light. This handbook, packed with practical information and guidance is written for all charged with caring for the natural and historic environment, geologists and archaeologists and anybody with an interest in our past and future, and not least those working in the quarry industry.




Mapping Doggerland: The Mesolithic Landscapes of the Southern North Sea edited by Vincent Gaffney. Kenneth Thomson and Simon Finch. xii+131 pages; paperback; illustrated throughout in colour and black and white. 31 2007. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781905739141. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913250. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Buy Now

12,000 years ago the area that now forms the southern North Sea was dry land: a vast plain populated by Mesolithic hunter-gatherers. By 5,500 BC the entire area had disappeared beneath the sea as a consequence of rising sea levels. Until now, this unique landscape remained hidden from view and almost entirely unknown. The North Sea Palaeolandscape Project, funded by the Aggregates Levy Sustainability Fund, have mapped 23,000 km2 of this “lost world” using seismic data collected for mineral exploration. "Mapping Doggerland" demonstrates that the North Sea covers one of the largest and best preserved prehistoric landscapes in Europe. In mapping this exceptional landscape the project has begun to provide an insight into the historic impact of the last great phase of global warming experienced by modern man and to assess the significance of the massive loss of European land that occurred as a consequence of climate change. Contents: 1) Mapping Doggerland Vincent Gaffney and Kenneth Thomson; 2) Coordinating Marine Survey Data Sources (Mark Bunch, Vincent Gaffney and Kenneth Thomson); 3) 3D Seismic Reflection Data, Associated Technologies and the Development of the Project Methodology (Kenneth Thomson and Vincent Gaffney); 4. Merging Technologies: The integration and visualisation of spatial data sets used in the project (Simon Fitch, Vincent Gaffney and Kenneth Thomson); 5) A Geomorphological Investigation of Submerged Depositional Features within the Outer Silver Pit, Southern North Sea (Simon Fitch, Vincent Gaffney and Kenneth Thomson; 6) Salt Tectonics in the Southern North Sea: Controls on Late Pleistocene-Holocene Geomorphology (Simon Holford, Kenneth Thomson and Vincent Gaffney); 7) An Atlas of the Palaeolandscapes of the Southern North Sea (Simon Fitch, Vincent Gaffney, Kenneth Thomson with Kate Briggs, Mark Bunch and Simon Holford); 8) The Potential of the Organic Archive for Environmental Reconstruction: An Assessment of Selected Borehole Sediments from the Southern North Sea (David Smith, Simon Fitch, Ben Gearey, Tom Hill, Simon Holford, Andy Howard and Christina Jolliffe); 9) Heritage Management and the North Sea Palaeolandscapes Project (Simon Fitch, Vincent Gaffney and Kenneth Thomson).

See further information at Mapping Doggerland
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