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NEW: Etnicidad vs. Aculturación: Las necrópolis castellanas de los siglos V-VI d.C. y el asentamiento visigodo en la Península Ibérica. Una mirada desde la meseta sur by Rafael Barroso Cabrera. Paperback; 203x276mm; 238 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Spanish text with English summary. (Print RRP £35.00). 72 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690798. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690804. Book contents pageDownload

The Visigoth settlement in the Iberian Peninsula and its relationship with the archaeological record of the 5th-6th centuries AD continues to be one of the most controversial issues in Spanish archaeology. The controversy relates to politics as much as it relates to archaeological research with two points remaining particularly controversial: the alleged use of the Visigoth past by the Francoist intelligentsia as an ideological affirmation of the regime and the contribution of archaeologist Julio Martínez Santa-Olalla in supporting and enabling this re-interpretation of Visigothic archaeology.

The purely archaeological aspect of the controversy relates to an archaeological interpretation, stemming from the ranks of the so-called New Archeology, of the Castilian necropoleis containing grave goods of Pontic-Danubian type. This interpretation places special emphasis on social and cultural phenomena above the ethnic criteria defended by the Vienna School.

This volume approaches the ideological question that underlies these controversies, as well as their repercussions in the direction adopted by later archaeological investigations in relation to the history of Spain. The author attempts to deconstruct the work of Martínez Santa-Olalla and places it in the context of the scientific production of his time. At the same time, it relativizes the role played by the Visigoth period in the Francoist ideological construction.

Once the discussion is framed in these terms, the author dedicates his study to a refutation of the cultural interpretation of the phenomenon of the Visigothic necropoleis of the Castilian plateau based on the archaeological data and by comparing this data with literary sources. The study also addresses two other historical problems that could be related to the Gothic settlement in the Castilian plateau: the creation of the bishopric of Segovia and the flourishing of the city of Toledo.

El asentamiento visigodo en la Península Ibérica y su relación con el registro arqueológico de los siglos V-VI d.C. continúa siendo en la actualidad una de las cuestiones más controvertidas de la arqueología española. Gran parte de esa controversia tiene que ver con aspectos que trascienden a la propia investigación arqueológica y nos sitúan en el plano de la política. Así, a la hora de abordar el problema hay dos puntos que han resultado especialmente polémicos: la presunta utilización del pasado visigodo por parte de la intelectualidad franquista como afirmación ideológica del régimen y la contribución del arqueólogo burgalés Julio Martínez Santa-Olalla en la fijación del esquema de arqueología visigoda.

Por otro lado, el aspecto puramente arqueológico de la controversia tiene que ver con la interpretación que desde las filas de la denominada New Archaeology se viene realizando de las necrópolis castellanas con ajuares de tipo póntico-danubiano. Dicha interpretación hace especial hincapié en fenómenos sociales y culturales por encima de los criterios étnicos defendidos por la Escuela de Viena. El presente estudio aborda de forma lúcida la cuestión ideológica que subyace detrás de la polémica, así como las repercusiones que ha tenido en la posterior dirección adoptada por la investigación arqueológica en relación con la propia historia de España. En este sentido, el autor realiza un ejercicio de deconstrucción de la figura de Martínez Santa-Olalla y lo sitúa en el contexto de la producción científica de su época. Al mismo tiempo, relativiza el papel desempeñado por el periodo visigodo en la construcción ideológica franquista.

Una vez situada la discusión en estos términos, el autor dedica su estudio a una refutación de la interpretación en clave cultural del fenómeno de las necrópolis visigodas de la meseta castellana desde los propios datos arqueológicos y a partir del cotejo de estos datos con los testimonios que proporcionan las fuentes literarias. Además, el presen
NEW: The Middle Ages Revisited: Studies in the Archaeology and History of Medieval Southern England Presented to Professor David A. Hinton edited by Ben Jervis. Paperback; 205x290mm; ii+160mm; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 501 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690354. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690361. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume, produced in honour of Professor David A. Hinton’s contribution to medieval studies, re-visits the sites, archaeologists and questions which have been central to the archaeology of medieval southern England. Contributions are focused on the medieval period (from the Anglo-Saxon period to the Reformation) in southern England, to reflect the research of Professor Hinton.

The contributions largely re-examine important debates believed to have been settled long ago, or explore the implications of changing research traditions for the interpretation of archaeological sites. The volume begins with two considerations of archaeologists themselves, the antiquary Richard James (Tom James) and those who have shaped our understanding of Anglo-Saxon Hamwic (Mark Brisbane and Richard Hodges). Both studies show the role of individuals, and the times in which they worked, on the questions and interpretations advanced by archaeological study. Staying in the Anglo-Saxon period, Barbara Yorke re-opens the debate about the Jutish archaeology of Wessex, Martin Biddle re-visits the archaeology of Winchester Old Minster and Katherine Weikert explores the household of early medieval Facombe Netheron.

Moving into the later medieval period, Duncan H. Brown re-assesses the evidence from the important site at Cuckoo Lane, Southampton, with a focus on ceramics, and Maureen Mellor examines the evidence of church floor tiles from Oxfordshire, an early research interest of Professor Hinton. Two chapters deal with medieval food, Mark Robinson discusses wheat cultivation and Dale Serjeantson et. al. revisit the animal bones from excavations at Eynsham Abbey, comparing them with those from St Albans to explore the issue of the Saxon-Norman transition. Finally, staying with the archaeology elite culture, the volume concludes with Matthew Johnson’s contribution on recent work on late medieval elite landscapes in south-east England.

Together, these contributions combine historiography, new evidence and emerging ideas, helping us to understand how the landscape of research has developed, whilst showing the importance of re-visiting old sites and questions to advance the discipline of medieval studies.

About the Editor
BEN JERVIS is Lecturer in Archaeology at Cardiff University, where he specialises in the medieval archaeology of southern Britain. He undertook his doctoral research at the University of Southampton and his current research is concerned with the material culture of English rural households, medieval pottery and the study of urbanism in Wessex.
NEW: Roots of Nationhood: The Archaeology and History of Scotland edited by Louisa Campbell, Dene Wright, Nicola A. Hall. Paperback; 175x245mm; ii+210 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 7 plates in colour. 478 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919825. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919832. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In a break away from the traditional mono-disciplinary scope of academic enquiry, this volume sets forth a challenge for practitioners within, and outwith archaeology to develop multi-disciplinary approaches in the study of identity in general and aspects in the formation of national identity in particular. The entanglement of identity and nationhood is explored from the prehistory of northern Britain; the establishment of a proto-Scottish identity in the early Middle Ages; facets of Scottish identity at home and in the wider diaspora of Empire; and the more recent heralding of Scottish identity as a multiethnic construction. Set against the backdrop of a groundswell change in the Scottish political landscape and the unprecedented, and largely unexpected, energised and proactive politicisation of the Scottish electorate in the lead up to and aftermath of the 2014 Independence Referendum, the volume is a timely and relevant contribution to discussions of national identities. By bringing together specialists covering a wide array of time periods and subject specialisms, we transcend the concept of identity. This is achieved by exploring the links of nationhood and Scottish identity in the early 20th and 21st Centuries in the ongoing quest for independence demonstrating the political manipulation of history, imagery and mythology entangled in political propaganda.

About the Editors
LOUISA CAMPBELL MA PhD FSA Scot is a graduate of the University of Glasgow. She a Roman ceramic specialist and her main research interests are threefold: material culture, the Roman and Provincial interface with a particular focus on frontier contexts and theoretical approaches to the study of culture contact. She has recently undertaken a Postdoctoral Fellowship supported by Historic Environment Scotland to develop innovative methodologies and technologies for the non-destructive in situ analysis of museum collections. This project, entitled Paints and Pigments in the Past (PPIP), resulted in the identification and reconstruction of pigments originally applied to Roman monumental sculptures from the Antonine Wall and Hadrian’s Wall.

DENE WRIGHT MA MLitt PhD FSA Scot is a graduate of the University of Glasgow. Dene is a lithic specialist and his principal research interest is the Mesolithic. His research centres on the Mesolithic of Scotland with a particular focus on west central Scotland. The structure of his research develops and incorporates Deleuzian theoretical approaches to the concepts of repetition, difference and becoming, identity and group identities as philosophical constructs in Archaeology, the symmetry of lithic technology and technological choices, symmetrical approaches to the chaîne opératoire and lithic analysis and the construct of time as a relational multiplicity of dimensions in co-existence. A research associate at Glasgow funded by Historic Environment Scotland, with Kenneth Brophy he is currently writing up for publication the excavations for Phase II (2012-17) of the Strathearn Environs & Royal Forteviot ‘SERF’ Project.

NICOLA A. HALL MA MLitt is a Senior Heritage Management Officer at Historic Environment Scotland. She is an Archaeology graduate of the University of Glasgow with a particular interest on ritual practice in the Neolithic/Early Bronze Age of Western Scotland. Her research incorporates archaeological theory, landscape archaeology, gender, ritual practice and seasonality.
NEW: Barrow Old Hall and Twiss Green Investigations of two sub-manorial estate centres within the townships of Bold and Culcheth in the Hundred of Warrington 1982-87 by Dan Garner, Jennifer Lewis and David Freke, edited by Jill Collens. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+108 pages; 93 illustrations (30 plates in colour). (Print RRP £30.00). 473 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919689. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919696. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Excavations were carried out at the moated sites of Barrow Old Hall and Twiss Green, in Warrington, North West England, in the 1980s. Sub-manorial estates were established at these two sites by the fourteenth century, located near the boundaries of their multi-moated townships. Townships with multiple moats were a feature of parts of North West England and may have been the result of medieval assarting and the expansion of agriculture on to fringe or marginal areas, on the boundaries of earlier manors. It also owed much to the unusual tenurial arrangements of the region, whereby lords granted small estates out of their holdings, often to family members, to construct moated homesteads.

This report presents the results of the excavations at these two small moated sites, including evidence for possible aisled halls at both sites, as well as a significant assemblage of medieval and early post-medieval pottery. There is also a full account of the finding of the remains of a timber bridge at Twiss Green and its full reconstruction; an illustration of which was previously published in the Shire Archaeology series book on Moated Sites in 1985.

The publication of these excavations contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of the role and development of moated sites in this part of North West England and completes the outstanding analysis of moated sites excavated in the Warrington area.
NEW: The Palace Lady’s Summerhouse and other inside stories from a vanishing Turkey by Patricia Daunt. Hardback with Dust Jacket; 210x260mm; 304 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. 5 2017. ISBN 9780995756601. £25.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

From Istanbul's palatial old embassies to its glorious Bosphorus summerhouses, from Ottoman Paris to Ankara's Art Deco, from rainforest mansions to a mad mosque in the mountains... a diplomat's wife reveals their secret histories. This book brings together essays by Patricia Daunt written over the past 25 years for Cornucopia Magazine. It concludes with her latest article, on the magnificent ruins of Aphrodisias, newly listed as a World Heritage Site but long one of her greatest loves. The images are by internationally renowned photographers, including Fritz von der Schulenburg, Simon Upton, Cemal Emden and Jean-Marie del Moral. Foreword by John Julius Norwich.

About the Author
Patricia Daunt is a writer, married to a former ambassador to Turkey, Sir Timothy Daunt; they first met when both were stationed at the British Embassy in Ankara in 1960. Over the past sixty years she has travelled widely in Turkey, often on horse or foot, acquiring a deep knowledge of its history and civilizations. She has introduced parties of enthusiasts to Turkey's archaeological and architectural treasures, as well as its indigenous plants and trees. But her abiding interest remains the ancient city of Aphrodisias. Since 1993, she has been chairman of the Friends of Aphrodisias Trust, a British charity that supports archaeological projects at the site, in the southwest of Turkey.

Reviews
".a record of her expertise and enthusiasms, whose coffee-table dimensions belie its scholarly contents."--Yasmine Seale (Times Literary Supplement) (03/01/2018)

"[This is] much more than a beautifully illustrated book: it's about the people who lived - and live - in these buildings... a love letter to a country and to a world that has been almost completely swallowed up by tourism, new money and development.""--Owen Matthews (The Spectator) (12/01/2017)

Table of Contents
Foreword

PALACES OF DIPLOMACY
1 The Winter Palaces The Pera Embassies

WINDOW ON THE BOSPHORUS
2 Boating with Billy
3 The Summer Palaces: The Bosphorus Embassies
4 The Jewel Box: The Çürüksulu Mehmet Pasha Yalı
5 The Vizier’s Retreat: The Kıbrıslı Yalı
6 A Room for the Books: Ahmed Vefik Pasha’s Library
7 Water’s Edge: The Hekimbaşı Yalı
8 The Talk of the Bosphorus: The Zeki Pasha Yalı
9 Some Enchanted Evenings: The Ratip Efendi Yalı
10 The House that Came out of the Blue: The Germen Yalı
11 In the Spirit’s Wake: Sumahan on the Water
12 The Palace Lady’s Summerhouse: The Ethem Pertev Yalı

TRAVELS IN ANATOLIA
13 The Country Houses that Ride the Storm
14 The Lake that Time Forgot
15 Sublime Portals The Great Mosque and Hospital of Divriği

SECRET ANKARA
16 A Brave New World The Embassies’ Big Move to Ankara
17 Fly in the Face of Fashion Ankara’s Hidden Assets

PARIS A LA TURQUE
18 Treasures of a Lost Dynasty
19 From Lunacy to Diplomacy 276

APHRODISIAS REBORN
20 City of Aphrodite

Acknowledgements and glossary
Index
FORTHCOMING: Thurrock’s Deeper Past: A Confluence of Time The archaeology of the borough of Thurrock, Essex, from the last Ice Age to the establishment of the English kingdoms by Christopher John Tripp. Paperback; 148x210mm; vi+200 pages; 65 figures, 6 maps (36 plates in colour). (Print RRP £25.00). 504 2018. ISBN 9781789691115. Book contents pageBuy Now

Thurrock’s Deeper Past: A Confluence of Time looks at the evidence for human activity in Thurrock and this part of the Thames estuary since the last Ice Age, and how the river crossing point here has been of great importance to the development of human settlement and trade in the British Isles. It is a book about the archaeology of Thurrock. It takes in all periods and most of the sites which have been excavated in the borough of Thurrock over the last sixty or more years.

The account opens at a time when Britain is still joined to the continent and the inhabitants are using flint tools and weapons. The author follows through the impact of the succeeding ages on the locality: the melting of the ice, the Neolithic period bringing the farming of crops and stockholding, the first appearance of worked metal in the Bronze Age, through the widespread use of iron in the Iron Age; and then the dramatic impact of Rome and its gradual dissolution to the English kingdoms whose traces are still recognisable today. All is set in the context of the author’s lasting interest in the subject, first nurtured at his Tilbury school.

About the Author
Thurrock was home to Chris Tripp for much of his early life. He attended St Chad’s Secondary Modern School in Tilbury and then Palmer’s Sixth Form College. After years spent in retail he became an archaeologist, graduating from the Institute of Archaeology (UCL) in 1986. He took up his first archaeological post in 1990 at the Passmore Edwards Museum, Plaistow, after which he worked for the Museum of London Archaeology Service and the Essex County Field Unit between 1995 and 2002. During this time he gained his masters degree in public archaeology at UCL.

For the next four years Chris worked on various excavations and community archaeology projects including ‘The Dig’ for the Museum of London, and ‘The Big Dig’ for Time Team/Channel 4 among many others. Moving to Dorset in 2006, he continued in archaeology and, inter alia established the ‘Dorset Diggers Community Archaeology Group’ to bring people closer to their local archaeological heritage.

It is in this spirit that he began research for this book in 1997, and his labours have been sustained by his passion for the past of his home borough of Thurrock and of the majestic Thames.
FORTHCOMING: Egil’s Saga: Traditional evidence for Brúnanburh compared to Literary, Historic and Archaeological Analyses by John R. Kirby. Paperback; 203x276mm; 58 pages; 12 figures (9 in colour). (Print RRP £22.00). 74 2019. ISBN 9781789691092. Book contents pageBuy Now

Regarded as the secondary source advocated by some scholars for this battle around Brúnanburh in AD 937, Egil’s Saga Skalla-Grímssonar (collated c. AD 1242-3) becomes problematical when compared with literary, historic and archaeological evidence. Thus, this argument places the saga in a rather awkward position.

In addressing the general veracity of this saga, allegedly ‘written’ by Snorri Sturluson in 1240/1 we must draw a comparison to distinguish reality from fiction. For this article highlights not only the questionable traditions of Egil fighting at Brúnanburh but whether Snorri’s interpretation was motivated by self-interest. More importantly, could other people have gathered together Snorri’s notes and produced Egil’s Saga? Doubts arise as to its authenticity as many scholars have previously expressed the differing literary anomalies within the narrative. Was the saga written by more than one person? Was it embellished by Snorri or others? Where did the Brúnanburh traditions come from? Is it accurate enough to be used as a historic source – a factual reference? The author suggests this approach may identify the incongruities within this saga demonstrating a correct analysis.
FORTHCOMING: Identifying Brúnanburh: ón dyngesmere – the sea of noise by John R. Kirby. Paperback; 203x276mm; 44 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (13 colour plates). (Print RRP £20.00). 73 2019. ISBN 9781789691078. Buy Now

Scholars each have their own rationale as to the ‘site’ of this momentous battle. Their thirst for recognition has created diverse arguments, some flooding the media, others proposing to the point of acrimony that they have this ‘site’. The ‘conundrum’ is whether any identification of the ‘site’ is correct for all, apart from the circumspect, have taken assorted place-names similar to Brúnanburh as their starting point.

The author chose to disregard the place-name approach and look at the topographic references in the manuscript. The first references were maritime then latterly landscape leading to field-names which have a more stable base than the constantly changing place-names. He found inconsistences in various positions held by some scholars to that of historical record about Brúnanburh.

One major stumbling block was the phrase “ón dingesmere” which has created controversy, some scholars totally dismissing it but the ‘sea of noise’ appears to have some scientific foundation. Obviously it had some special significance to the Anglo-Saxon’s and their Christian allies and may well have been a kenning. Importantly, ‘who were these allies?’

The challenge for the author was to unearth the correct locale of these historic events. As an archaeologist he decided to interpret the topographic phrases in the manuscript evidence as material culture. The results were surprising.
FORTHCOMING: Profane Death in Burial Practices of a Pre-Industrial Society: A study from Silesia by Paweł Duma. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+122 pages; 6 tables, 66 figures (29 plates in colour). (Print RRP £28.00). 506 2019. ISBN 9781789690897. Book contents pageBuy Now

This book discusses phenomena characteristic of the funeral practices of the pre-industrial society of Silesia (Poland). The author explores specific groups of people: unbaptised children, women who died in childbirth, suicides, convicts and those who perished in epidemics, who were refused an honorary burial in consecrated land or had ceremonies conducted on special terms. Also discussed are the places where the bodies of these excluded individuals were interred. The study is supplemented by an analysis of the results of archaeological research, which mainly involved fieldwork carried out at former execution sites. The skeletal remains of numerous convicts were discovered during these investigations, together with the remnants of stone-built gallows. This analysis is especially relevant for interpreting selected funeral finds, so-called ‘vampire burials’ and the general question of atypical treatment of bodies perceived as unworthy, badly-deceased or ‘unclean’. The research subject is novel, as no similar synthetic studies on unusual funerary practices have yet been conducted in Polish archaeology for this particular era and territory. The author is primarily concerned with cases mentioned in historical and archaeological sources from the region of Silesia, but evidence from beyond this area is also presented. Chronologically the study covers the period between the 15th and early 19th centuries.

About the Author
PAWEŁ DUMA is Assistant Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, University of Wroclaw, Poland. His main interests concern historical archaeology, profane death, late medieval and post-medieval material culture. He has excavated historical execution sites in Silesia both as a team member and a supervisor and is the author and co-author of several articles published in international scholarly journals.
FORTHCOMING: The Archaeology and Early History of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem by Justin Kelley. Paperback; 175x245mm; 368pp; illustrated throughout in black & white. (Print RRP £48.00). 489 2018. ISBN 9781789690569. Buy Now

The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, was built by the Byzantine emperor Constantine I to commemorate the Passion of Jesus Christ. Encased within its walls are the archaeological remains of a small piece of ancient Jerusalem ranging in date from the 8th century BC through the 16th century AD, at which time the Turkish Ottoman Empire ushered Jerusalem into the modern period. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre was the subject of extensive archaeological investigation between 1960 and 1981 during its restoration. With the development of non-destructive techniques of archaeological research, investigation within the church has continued, which led to the restoration and conservation of the shrine built over the Tomb of Jesus in 2017. The first part of this monograph focuses on the archaeological record of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, surveying past excavations as well as recent research carried out within the church over the past three decades. The archaeological survey provides historical context for the second part of the book—a collection of primary sources pertinent to the history of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The texts included here range in date from the 1st century AD to the mid-19th century and are presented in their original languages with English translation.

About the Author
JUSTIN KELLEY teaches classes in Christian history and biblical studies at Life Pacific College. Justin specializes in the history and culture of the ancient Near East and spent several years as a student in Israel, where he studied biblical historical geography and archaeology at Jerusalem University College and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
NEW: Une archéologie des provinces septentrionales du royaume Kongo edited by Bernard Clist, Pierre de Maret and Koen Bostoen. Paperback; 205x290mm; 500pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (approx. 205 plates in colour). French text throughout. 465 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919726. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919733. Book contents pageDownload

Of all the great kingdoms that flourished in Africa, the Kongo is one of the most famous. It remains an important historical and cultural reference for Africans and their diaspora. The KongoKing inter-university project (2012-2016), funded by the European Research Council, aimed, through an interdisciplinary approach, to understand the origin of the kingdom and to shed light on the phenomena of political centralization, economic integration and linguistic evolution that took place there. This book presents in detail the results of archaeological research carried out by the KongoKing project in the former northern provinces of the Kongo Kingdom, currently located in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

French Description: De tous les grands royaumes qui fleurirent en Afrique, le royaume Kongo est l’un des plus célèbres. Il reste une référence historique et culturelle importante pour les Africains et leur diaspora. Entraînés très tôt dans le commerce de traite, les esclaves originaires de la région font que du Brésil à New York, en passant par les Caraïbes, la culture Kongo a laissé de nombreuses traces.

Le projet interuniversitaire KongoKing (2012-2016), financé par le Conseil Européen de la Recherche a été coordonné par Koen Bostoen, tandis que Bernard Clist et Pierre de Maret en ont dirigé le volet archéologique. Ce projet visait par une approche interdisciplinaire à comprendre l’origine du royaume et à éclairer les phénomènes de la centralisation politique, d’intégration économique et d’évolution linguistique qui s’y sont déroulés .

Cet ouvrage présente de façon détaillée les résultats des recherches archéologiques menées par le projet KongoKing dans les anciennes provinces septentrionales du royaume Kongo, situées actuellement en République Démocratique du Congo. Dans une première partie on présente le contexte général, l’évolution du milieu, l’histoire du groupe linguistique kikongo et ce que l'on sait des périodes qui précèdent le royaume, ainsi que des informations récoltées dans diverses sources historiques sur ces provinces. Les prospections et fouilles des différents sites étudiés sont ensuite présentées. Puis vient le bilan des recherches archéologiques avec une synthèse des datations, une esquisse de la séquence chrono-culturelle de la poterie kongo et les études systématiques des différents types de vestiges récoltés. Pour conclure, on présente la synthèse de l'ensemble de ces découvertes et la façon dont celles-ci viennent compléter les données issues des autres disciplines pour éclairer d'un jour nouveau l'histoire du royaume Kongo.

BERNARD CLIST est actuellement professeur invité de l’Université de Gand (UGent). Il est archéologue depuis 38 ans, spécialiste de l’Afrique centrale où il a dirigé des projets de recherches notamment en Angola, Cameroun, Gabon et Guinée-Equatoriale. Entre 1985 et 1995 il a été le responsable du Département d’Archéologie du CICIBA au Gabon qu’il a créé. Il a aussi réalisé de nombreuses Etudes d’Impact Environnemental pour des sociétés américaines, britanniques, françaises au Gabon et en Zambie. Pendant toutes ces années, il a publié ou co-publié plus de 130 articles et 8 ouvrages. Entre 2015 et 2016, il a contribué à la version finale du dossier de classement par l’UNESCO du centre historique de Mbanza Kongo au Patrimoine Mondial de l’Humanité, chose acquise en juillet 2017.

PIERRE DE MARET est professeur d’anthropologie et d’archéologie à l’Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) dont il a été le recteur, et Honorary professor à l’University College de Londres. Il poursuit depuis plus de 45 ans des recherches sur le terrain en Afrique centrale et est l’auteur de nombreuses publications sur l’histoire précoloniale, l’anthropologie économique et appliquée, et la gestion culturelle. Membre de l’Académie Royale de Belgique, il est aussi président du conseil scientifique du Musée Royal de l’Afrique Centrale (MRAC)
NEW: New Approaches to Disease, Disability and Medicine in Medieval Europe edited by Erin Connelly and Stefanie Künzel. Paperback; 175x245mm; ii+152 pages; 2 figures, 1 table (2 plates in colour). 441 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918835. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918842. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £29.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The majority of papers in this volume were originally presented at the eighth annual ‘Disease, Disability, and Medicine in Medieval Europe’ conference. The conference focused on infections, chronic illness, and the impact of infectious diseases on medieval society, including infection as a disability in the case of visible conditions, such as infected wounds, leprosy, syphilis, and tuberculosis. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this conference emphasised the importance of collaborative projects, novel avenues of research for treating infectious disease, and the value of considering medieval questions from the perspective of multiple disciplines. This volume aims to carry forward this interdisciplinary synergy by bringing together contributors from a variety of disciplines and from a diverse range of international institutions. Of note is the academic stage of the contributors in this volume. All the contributors were PhD candidates at the time of the conference, and the majority have completed or are in the final stages of completing their programmes at the time of this publication. The originality and calibre of research presented by these early career researchers demonstrates the promising future of the field, as well as the continued relevance of medieval studies for a wide range of disciplines and topics. Contributions by Stefanie Künzel, Marit Ronen, Cathrin Hähn, Rachel Welsh, Ninon Dubourg, Clara Jáuregui, Lucy Barnhouse, Cecilia Collins, Erin Connelly, and Christoph Wieselhuber.

About the Editors
ERIN CONNELLY is the CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow for Data Curation in Medieval Studies in the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies, University of Pennsylvania Libraries. She holds a PhD in English from the University of Nottingham with a special interest in medieval medical texts and the relevance of medieval medicine for modern infections (‘ancientbiotics’). Her doctoral project was the first edition of the 15th-century Middle English translation of Bernard of Gordon's Lilium medicinae, the Lylye of Medicynes (Bodleian Library MS Ashmole 1505). She collaborates on a wide range of interdisciplinary projects, including a ‘big data’ approach to analysing medieval medical texts and using multispectral imaging to categorise stains in medieval manuscripts.

STEFANIE KÜNZEL has recently finished her doctorate at the University of Nottingham. Her thesis explores concepts of disease in Anglo-Saxon literature and culture, focusing on metaphors pertaining primarily to the fields of infection and epidemics. She obtained her BA from the University of Bamberg in 2011 and subsequently completed an MA in Anglo-Saxon and Viking Studies at the University of Nottingham.
NEW: Grabados rupestres en La Mancha centro: documentación y estudio de un patrimonio desconocido Rock engravings in La Mancha center: documentation and study of an unknown heritage by Rocío Ramiro Rodero, Víctor Manuel López-Menchero Bendicho, Ángel Marchante Ortega, Ángel Javier Cárdenas Martín-Buitrago, Pedro Miguel García Zamorano and Jorge Onrubia Pintado. Paperback; 203x276mm; 116 pages; illustrated throughout with 67 plates in colour. Spanish text with English abstract. 63 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919962. £36.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919979. Book contents pageDownload

This book deals with the documentation and interpretation of the rock sites located in La Mancha center (Spain), from the detailed study of the symbols that have been engraved in the rock. These sites, from historical times, can provide valuable information for the study of the mentalities and beliefs of the popular classes during the Modern Age, strongly influenced by the atmosphere created after the Counter-Reformation. Crosses, calvaries, orbs, human and animal representations, letters, cup-marks and game boards make up an authentic symbolic universe, of clear Christian roots, whose understanding is possible to achieve even though it requires collaboration between multiple fields of knowledge such as archaeology, theology, numismatics, heraldry, architecture, sculpture, painting...

Unfortunately, researchers have paid scant attention to the issue at hand, assuming paradigms that from our point of view should be reviewed, such as the authorship of the petroglyphs or their chrono-cultural affiliation. The study of the rock formations located in La Mancha center can shed light on these and other subjects, providing a good starting point in order to improve the documentation and interpretation of historical rock engravings in other parts of the world.

El presente libro aborda la documentación e interpretación de las estaciones rupestres localizadas en La Mancha centro (España), a partir del estudio pormenorizado de los símbolos que han sido grabados en la roca. Estas estaciones, de época histórica, pueden proporcionar valiosa información para el estudio de las mentalidades y creencias de las clases populares durante la Edad Media y la Edad Moderna, fuertemente influenciadas por la atmósfera creada tras la Contrarreforma. Cruces, calvarios, orbes, representaciones humanas y de animales, letras, cazoletas y tableros de juego conforman un auténtico universo simbólico, de clara raíz cristiana, cuya comprensión es posible alcanzar aunque requiere de la colaboración entre múltiples ramas del saber como la arqueología, la teología, la numismática, la heráldica, la arquitectura, la escultura, la pintura...

Desafortunadamente, hasta el momento los investigadores han prestado escasa atención al tema que nos ocupa, asumiendo paradigmas que desde nuestro punto de vista deben ser revisados, como la autoría de los petroglifos o su adscripción crono-cultural. El estudio de las estaciones rupestres localizadas en La Mancha centro puede arrojar luz sobre estos y otros temas, proporcionando un buen punto de partida de cara a mejorar la documentación e interpretación de los grabados rupestres de época histórica en otros puntos del mundo.
NEW: Dinamiche insediative nelle campagne dell'Italia tra Tarda Antichità e Alto Medioevo by Angelo Castrorao Barba. Paperback; 203x276mm; ii+180 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in Italian with English abstracts. 47 2018 Limina/Limites: Archaeologies, histories, islands and borders in the Mediterranean (365-1556) 6. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918231. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918248. Book contents pageDownload

This volume gathers together a series of selected contributions about settlement patterns in the Italian countryside between Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. This volume aims to show a critical overview of a range of some of the most recent research carried out on late antique and early medieval Italy (Friuli Venezia Giulia, Liguria, Emilia Romagna, Tuscany, Lazio, Apulia and Calabria), and to enhance our current knowledge as well as to provide innovative interpretative frameworks to gain a better understanding of rural settlement dynamics.

About the Editor
ANGELO CASTRORAO BARBA (Palermo, 1983) is currently a Fellow at the University of Palermo (Sicily, Italy). His principal fields of interest are Late Antique and Early Medieval Archaeology and the transformations of landscape and settlement patterns from Roman times to the Middle Ages in the Mediterranean area. In 2013, he obtained a PhD in Medieval Archaeology (University of Siena) with a dissertation about the end of Roman villas in Italy between Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages (AD 200-800). In 2014, he received a post-graduate Masters Diploma in GIS & Remote Sensing (Centre for Geo Technologies / Siena). In 2014-2015 he was a guest researcher at VU University Amsterdam and a postdoctoral fellow at the Royal Netherlands Institute in Rome (KNIR). In summer 2018 he was a postdoctoral fellow at the DFG Center for Advanced Studies ‘Migration and Mobility in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages’ of the University of Tübingen. For the period 2018/2020 he is a postdoctoral scholar in the Getty-sponsored workshop series ‘Mediterranean Palimpsests: Connecting the Art and Architectural Histories of Medieval & Early Modern Cities’. Currently (2016-2018), he is a research fellow on the project ‘Harvesting Memories’ (University of Palermo / Soprintendenza BB.CC.AA. of Palermo) which aims to study the ecology and archaeology of rural landscapes in the Sicani Mountains (C-W Sicily).
The Life and Works of W.G. Collingwood A wayward compass in Lakeland by Malcolm Craig. Paperback; 148x210mm; xii+254 pages; 38 figures, 13 plates in colour. 466 2018 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918712. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918729. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The son of a watercolour artist, William Gershom Collingwood (1854-1932) studied at University College, Oxford where he met John Ruskin, whose secretary he later became and with whom he shared a wide range of interests. Collingwood travelled extensively, sketching as he went, and after studying at the Slade School of Art, moved to the Lake District where he wrote extensively about the Lakes, Icelandic sagas and Norse mythology, as well as publishing a biography on Ruskin in 1893. He was an accomplished artist, founding the Lake Artists Society in 1904 and serving as Professor of Fine Art at the University of Reading from 1905-11. His interest in art and Scandinavia prompted his research into the Pre-Norman Crosses of Cumbria and the North of England. In 1927 he published ‘Northumbrian Crosses of the Pre-Norman Age’, illustrated with his own drawings. He was also an accomplished musician, climber, swimmer and walker. His son was the noted archaeologist (a leading authority on Roman Britain), philosopher and historian R. G. Collingwood. This well researched biography provides a comprehensive account of the life and works of a nineteenth century polymath whose story should be better known.

About the Author
Malcolm Craig PhD lives with his wife Margaret in Histon, Cambridgeshire; they have a daughter, Alison and son, Andrew. He began working life as a marine engineer in the Merchant Navy, his voyages taking him to the far east and twice around the world. A keen mountaineer, between voyages he worked in the Alps of Switzerland, Italy and Austria. He became Chief Instructor at Outward Bound schools in Wales and Malaysia before moving back to engineering as a Training Manager in shipbuilding. He joined the Industrial Training Research Unit in Cambridge and completed a PhD in engineering at Cranfield Institute of Technology (now University), where he subsequently lectured, and worked as a Tutor for the Open University in Britain and Russia. He has written seven books, most with mountains as a theme, and became interested in the work of W.G. Collingwood while rock climbing as a young man in the English Lake District.
Softstone: Approaches to the study of chlorite and calcite vessels in the Middle East and Central Asia from prehistory to the present edited by Carl S. Phillips and St John Simpson. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+270 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 461 2018 British Foundation for the Study of Arabia Monographs (formerly Society for Arabian Studies Monographs) 20. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919924. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919931. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Stone containers have been made and used in the Middle East for over eleven millennia where they pre-dated the invention of pottery and were widely traded. The appearance or properties of the stone helped govern how stone vessels were valued or used and many classes were strictly utilitarian, being used for storage, cooking or lighting. Others were decorated and at times they were considered valuable exotica, particularly in regions far removed from their source areas. The subject of stone vessels is attracting growing attention but this is the first attempt to bring together different approaches to the study of softstone vessels, particularly but not exclusively those carved from varieties of chlorite, and covering all periods from prehistory to the present.

About the Editors
CARL S. PHILLIPS works in the Université Paris Ouest, specialises in Arabian archaeology and has excavated extensively in Oman, Yemen and the United Arab Emirates.

ST JOHN SIMPSON is a senior curator in the Department of the Middle East at the British Museum, specialises in the archaeology of the Sasanian and early medieval periods and has excavated extensively in the Middle East and Central Asia.
Treinta años de Arqueología Medieval en España edited by Juan Antonio Quirós Castillo. Paperback; 203x276mm; xii+418 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English preface and introduction (Print RRP £64.00). 58 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919238. £64.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919245. Book contents pageDownload

This book presents, in sixteen papers, recent developments and some of the main topics seen in academic Medieval Archaeology studies in Spain. The papers explore some of the emergent and consolidated topics of the discipline, such as landscapes, cities, rural spaces, bio-archaeological records, archaeology of architectures, agrarian archaeology, post-Roman archaeology, colonial archaeology in the Canary Islands and the archaeology of religious minorities, opening new lines of enquiries and providing new theoretical and methodological approaches. An overview of Medieval Archaeology studies in Spain is offered, proposing a wide range of topics for discussion. Finally, the book explores the connections between Spanish Medieval Archaeology and other European traditions, specifically, English, Italian and Portuguese Medieval Archaeology.

About the Editor
Juan Antonio Quirós is a Professor of Medieval Archaeology at the University of the Basque Country, Honorary Senior Research Associate at the Institute of Archaeology (University College London), and Visiting Fellow at All Souls College (University of Oxford). He is the director of the ‘Heritage and Cultural Landscapes Research Group’ of the University of the Basque Country and the 'Rural Medieval Research Group', CSIC-UPV/EHU. His principal interests lie in the study of the archaeology of landscapes, the archaeology of rural communities, Mediterranean Archaeology, Archaeology of Architectures, and the study of Social Complexity. Besides, he is very interested in a multi-proxy and multidisciplinary approach to cultural resources. Some of his recent works include ‘Arqueología de una comunidad campesina medieval: Zornoztegi’ (Bilbao, 2018); ‘Longhouses, house biography and social complexity in Early Medieval Northwestern Iberia’ (Arqueología de la Arquitectura 2017); ‘Local identities and desertions in Late Medieval period’ (Reti Medievali, 2017); ‘Social complexity in Early Medieval rural communities’ (Oxford, 2016); and ‘Agrarian Archaeology in Early Medieval Europe’ (Quaternary International 346, 2014). Currently, he is preparing a book about the Archaeology of Medieval Peasantry.
Metal Sewing-Thimbles Found in Britain by Brian Read; principal illustrator: Mike Trevarthen. Paperback; 203x273mm; viii+88 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (26 colour plates). (Print £25.00). 450 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919450. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919467. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This is the first reference book that deals specifically with all types of sewing-thimble made from copper-alloy or silver, or either of these metals combined with iron or steel, and found in Britain: also included is a seemingly rare gold specimen. Domed, ring-type and open-top (here the latter classed as a new type) sewing-thimbles are described, among them unusual examples and others previously absent from the known record. From Britain the earliest reliable dating for these humble yet fascinating tools is between c.1270 – c.1350, and continues through the medieval and early post-medieval periods and into the 18th and 19th centuries.

Dating from at least the 17th century, subjected to detailed attention is the largely neglected sailmakers’ and sailors’ palm-iron, a heavy-duty tool made from either iron, steel or copper alloy. Also described are the two known types of silver or copper-alloy finger guard, an 18th – 19th century tool used in conjunction with finer sewing-thimbles.

The majority of sewing-thimbles and other sewing-tools catalogued here are credited to metal-detectorists or members of The Society of Thames Mudlarks, who also use metal-detectors. To show constructional detail, each object is archaeologically drawn. This information is essential for metal-detectorists, archaeologists, museum curators, sewing-tool collectors and dealers, or anyone with an interest, seeking to gauge the type or age of any particular sewing-thimble or palm-iron.

About the Author
BRIAN READ was born in 1939 in Essex and raised in East and South-East London. With no formal educational qualifications, in 1954 he left Secondary Modern School and became a trainee millwright and then a trainee groundsman before joining the Merchant Navy in 1955 where he travelled widely. In 1961 he embarked on a fire service career, first with the Devon County Fire Service, then the City of Plymouth Fire Brigade, and finally the newly formed Devon Fire Brigade. While on duty in 1983, in the rank of assistant divisional officer, he sustained an injury that, in 1986, resulted in his medical discharge.

Since leaving the fire service he has worked as a freelance writer. His first book History Beneath Our Feet, published in 1988, was a bestseller and after extensive revision underwent re-publication in 1995 and again proved successful. Between 1999 – 2015 he self-published, under the imprint Portcullis Publishing.

From 1978, metal detecting and its associated study of small metal artefacture, has been his primary leisure interest.
Travellers in Ottoman Lands The Botanical Legacy edited by Ines Aščerić-Todd, Sabina Knees, Janet Starkey and Paul Starkey. Paperback; 160x230mm; xxii+358 pages; 2 maps, 7 tables, 167 figures (139 plates in colour). (Print RRP £60.00). 438 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919153. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919160. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This collection of around twenty papers has its origins in a two-day seminar organised by the Association for the Study of Travel in Egypt and the Near East (ASTENE) in conjunction with the Centre for Middle Eastern Plants at the Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh (RBGE), with additional support from Cornucopia magazine and the Turkish Consulate General, Edinburgh. This multi-disciplinary event formed part of the Ottoman Horizons festival held in Edinburgh in 2017 and attracted a wide range of participants from around the world, including several from Turkey and other parts of the Middle East.

This splendidly illustrated book focuses on the botanical legacy of many parts of the former Ottoman Empire — including present-day Turkey, the Levant, Egypt, the Balkans, and the Arabian Peninsula — as seen and described by travellers both from within and from outside the region. The papers cover a wide variety of subjects, including Ottoman garden design and architecture; the flora of the region, especially bulbs and their cultural significance; literary, pictorial and photographic depictions of the botany and horticulture of the Ottoman lands; floral and related motifs in Ottoman art; culinary and medicinal aspects of the botanical heritage; and efforts related to conservation.

About the Editors
DR INES AŠČERIĆ-TODD is a Teaching Fellow in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Edinburgh. Her research interests include social and cultural history of the Middle East and the Ottoman Empire, Sufism and dervish orders. She is the author of Dervishes and Islam in Bosnia: Sufi Dimensions to the Formation of Bosnian Muslim Society, in the Brill series ‘The Ottoman Empire and its Heritage’ (Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2015).

DR SABINA KNEES has edited the Flora of the Arabian Peninsula and Socotra, since 2005. Before joining The Centre for Middle Eastern Plants (CMEP) at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE) in 2005, Sabina was a principal editor on the European Garden Flora, and a Stanley Smith Research Fellow based at the RBGE. Sabina is a member of the Horticultural Taxonomy Group (Hortax), the IUCN SSC Arabian Plant Specialist Group and the Executive Committee of the Friends of Socotra.

DR JANET STARKEY has edited the Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies since 2007. A former lecturer at Durham University, she has published extensively on travellers in the Middle East. Her most recent book, The Scottish Enlightenment Abroad: the Russells of Braidshaw in Aleppo and on the Coast of Coromandel (Leiden & Boston: Brill), was published in March 2018.

PROFESSOR PAUL STARKEY, a specialist in Arabic literature and culture, is Emeritus Professor at Durham University and is currently Vice-President of the British Society for Middle Eastern Studies (BRISMES) and Chairman of the Banipal Trust for Arab Literature. His translation of The Book of the Sultan’s Seal by Youssef Rakha won the 2015 Saif Ghobash Banipal Prize for Arabic Literary Translation, and his translation of The Shell by Mustafa Khalifa won a Sheikh Hamad Award for Translation and International Understanding in 2017.
Coins in Rhodes From the monetary reform of Anastasius I until the Ottoman conquest (498 - 1522) by Anna-Maria Kasdagli. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+444 pages; 139 figures, 154 plates (7 colour pages). 437 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918415. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918422. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Coins in Rhodes: From the monetary reform of Anastasius I until the Ottoman conquest (498 – 1522) presents the Byzantine and medieval coins collected by Greek archaeologists in Rhodes over a period of more than sixty years. It includes lists of excavated land plots, stray finds, an illustrated catalogue of all the Byzantine and local coins up to 1309, and a representative sample of the Hospitaller petty coins as well as all the Western coins found. Hoard evidence helps sort various emissions and their dates between c. 1320 – c. 1420.

After a chapter introducing the reader to the archaeology of Rhodes, the nature of the material and the way it has been handled, the coins are set against the reconsidered backdrop of local history from 498 to 1522, tracing fluctuations in circulation and attempting to explore their significance. Particular care is taken over the transitional 13th century, when fragmentation of power in the region has made the scanty documentary evidence very hard to assess.

Different approaches have been applied, depending on the available evidence integral to the material and that available from other sources. The archaeology of Rhodes across ten centuries presents all the difficulties of disturbed stratigraphy and recycling of structures expected of an intensively used site. The work aspires to promote a way of dealing with quantities of finds from large-scale rescue excavation that will help other scholars date contexts more accurately and review or compare their own data from this or other sites.

About the Author
ANNA-MARIA KASDAGLI BA (University of Birmingham, UK); MA, PhD (University of Athens, Greece) is an archaeologist, employed by the Greek Ministry of Culture in Rhodes since 1986. She is involved in restoration projects, rescue excavation, heritage protection and heritage awareness promotion. She has published papers on Byzantine and Hospitaller coins, epigraphics, medieval monuments of Rhodes and a volume on Hospitaller architectural sculpture.
The Search for Winchester’s Anglo-Saxon Minsters by Martin Biddle with illustrations by Simon Hayfield. iv+76pp; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £15.00). 420 2018 Winchester Excavations Committee Publication . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918576. £15.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918583. £8.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £15.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The ancient cathedral of Old Minster and the abbey church of New Minster once stood at the heart of Anglo-Saxon Winchester. Buildings of the first importance, honoured by Anglo-Saxon and Norman kings, these great churches were later demolished and their locations lost. Through an extensive programme of archaeological excavation begun in 1961, and as a result of years of research, the story of these lost minsters can now be revealed. Written by Martin Biddle, Director of the Winchester Excavations Committee and Research Unit, and marvellously illustrated by Simon Hayfield, The Search for Winchester’s Anglo-Saxon Minsters traces the history of these excavations from 1961 to 1970 and shows how they led to the discovery of the Old and New Minsters, bringing back to life the history, archaeology and architecture of Winchester’s greatest Anglo-Saxon buildings.

About the Author
PROFESSOR MARTIN BIDDLE is an Emeritus Fellow of Hertford College, Oxford, and Honorary Fellow of Pembroke College, Cambridge. He was the first Lecturer in Medieval Archaeology in England, at the University of Exeter (1963–67) and has held many other distinguished academic positions worldwide. He is the Founder and Director of the Winchester Excavations Committee (1962–present) and the Winchester Research Unit (1968–present). Professor Biddle is also Chairman of the Fabric Advisory Committee (FAC) for Winchester Cathedral, Archaeological Consultant for St Albans Cathedral, and former Archaeological Consultant for Canterbury Cathedral.

SIMON HAYFIELD is an experienced draughtsman who trained as a technical illustrator in the 1970s. He has spent most of his career working as a freelance artist, but has also worked at several top Midland advertising agencies, and lectured part time at the Birmingham College of Art. A love of history led him to archaeological illustration, in which he has worked with a number of senior scholars producing artist’s impressions, finds drawings, elevations and plans for publication. Simon Hayfield began his career in archaeological illustration working with the Winchester Research Unit in 1975 and continues to work with the Unit to this day preparing illustrations for volumes in the series of ‘Winchester Studies’.

Table of Contents
Preface; Introduction; Anglo-Saxon Winchester; Archaeological excavations and finds; Understanding the evidence; Evolution of Old Minster; Destruction of Old Minster; The Royal Quarter; Winchester Studies; Further Reading
An Intellectual Adventurer in Archaeology: Reflections on the work of Charles Thomas edited by Andy M Jones and Henrietta Quinnell. Paperback; 205x290mm; xiv+286 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 418 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918613. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918620. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £44.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Charles Thomas (1928-2016) was a Cornishman and archaeologist, whose career from the 1950s spanned nearly seven decades. This period saw major developments that underpin the structures of archaeology in Britain today, in many of which he played a pivotal part. He campaigned for the Chair of Cornish Studies at the University of Exeter, which he then held from 1972 until retirement, after teaching archaeology at Edinburgh and Leicester Universities.

The ‘Intellectual Adventure in Archaeology’ was to Charles the mental stimulation of developing narratives for the past, especially in the areas in which he was a leading authority, including the early church in Britain, the early medieval period more generally, and Cornish studies. The contributions to this volume demonstrate the extent to which his scholarship and character has underpinned the work of others, in Cornwall and beyond. Contributions come from life-long friends and from archaeologists at all of stages of their careers. Their subjects are predominantly Cornish, Gwithian, Tintagel and Scilly, but also range from Scotland to Southern France. The whole is brought to life by a series of Charles’ watercolours, previously unpublished.

The volume should appeal to all those interested in the development of archaeology in the later 20th century and of Cornwall from prehistory to its distinctive present.

About the Editors
ANDY JONES BA PhD FSA MCIfA is Principal Archaeologist with the Cornwall Archaeological Unit. His PhD focused on the Earlier Bronze Age barrow and monument complexes in Cornwall and South West Britain. His research interests include the Neolithic and Bronze Age periods, as well as the archaeology of the upland and coastal areas of western Britain. Significant publications include ‘Settlement and Metalworking in the Middle Bronze Age and Beyond’ and ‘Preserved in the Peat: an Extraordinary Bronze Age Burial on Whitehorse Hill, Dartmoor, and its Wider Context’. He recently worked with Charles Thomas on the North Cliffs project.

HENRIETTA QUINNELL BA FSA MCIfA was formerly Lecturer in Archaeology at the Department of Adult Education, Exeter University. Her acquaintance with the late Charles Thomas began in the late 1960s. She has worked in South West Britain ever since, is an authority on the prehistory of the region and has published extensively. She now works as a consultant for the region’s prehistoric ceramics.

Table of Contents
Foreword – by Caroline Dudley
Andy M Jones and Henrietta Quinnell – A miscellany of papers
Nicholas Johnson – Charles Thomas 1928–2016: The sixty-year archaeological adventure of a Cornish polymath
Andy M Jones – To the North Cliffs!
Roger Mercer – Looking at the Cornish Early Neolithic from all directions
Vanessa Straker and Thomas Walker – Gwithian’s environmental history: Landscape change and farming
Henrietta Quinnell – Before the Early Christian cemetery site on Lundy Island
Jacqueline A Nowakowski – Working in the shadows of the giants: Charles Thomas, Courtenay Arthur Ralegh Radford (and King Arthur) – past and current archaeological fieldwork at Tintagel, Cornwall
Charles Thomas† and Charles Johns – Archaeological investigations on Teän, Isles of Scilly, 1956
Ewan Campbell and Adrián Maldonado – Charles Thomas in North Britain: A career in the making
Anna Tyacke – My memorial stone to Charles
Ann Preston-Jones – St Piran’s Cross: A Cornish Icon Re-considered
Thomas Goskar – A little less mute: 3D capture and enhancement of Cornwall's inscribed and decorated stones
Oliver Padel – The name of Annet (Scilly)
Peter Fowler – Deserted Settlement in an Antique land: Elements of a post-Roman field archaeology on le Causee Méjean, Languedoc, France
Martin Bell – Coastal Archaeology in South West England: Charles Thomas and other inspirations
Timothy Darvill – Lift up mine eyes unto the hills: Archaeology and th
London’s Waterfront 1100–1666: excavations in Thames Street, London, 1974–84 by John Schofield, Lyn Blackmore and Jacqui Pearce, with Tony Dyson. Hardback; 210x297mm; xxiv+514 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (132 colour plates). English text with summaries in French and German. 422 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918378. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918385. Book contents pageDownload

London’s Waterfront 1100–1666: excavations in Thames Street, London, 1974–84 presents and celebrates the mile-long Thames Street in the City of London and the land south of it to the River Thames as an archaeological asset. The argument is based on the reporting of four excavations of 1974–84 by the Museum of London near the north end of London Bridge: Swan Lane, Seal House, New Fresh Wharf and Billingsgate Lorry Park. Here the findings of the period 1100–1666 are presented.

Buildings and property development on sixteen properties south of Thames Street, on land reclaimed in many stages since the opening of the 12th century, include part of the parish church of St Botolph Billingsgate. The many units of land reclamation are dated by dendrochronology, coins and documents. They have produced thousands of artefacts and several hundred kilos of native and foreign pottery. Much of this artefactual material has been published, but in catalogue form (shoes, knives, horse fittings, dress accessories, textiles, household equipment). Now the context of these finds, their deposition in groups, is laid out for the first time. Highlights of the publication include the first academic analysis and assessment of a 13th- or 14th-century trumpet from Billingsgate, the earliest surviving straight trumpet in Europe; many pilgrim souvenirs; analysis of two drains of the 17th century from which suggestions can be made about use of rooms and spaces within documented buildings; and the proposal that one of the skeletons excavated from St Botolph’s church is John Reynewell, mayor of London in 1426–7 and a notable figure in London’s medieval history.

The whole publication encourages students and other researchers of all kinds to conduct further research on any aspect of the sites and their very rich artefactual material, which is held at the Museum of London’s Archaeological Archive. This is a significantly large and varied dataset for the archaeology and history of London in the period 1100 to 1666 which can be continuously interrogated for generations to come.

About the Authors
JOHN SCHOFIELD was an archaeologist at the Museum of London from 1974 to 2008. He has written several well-received books on the archaeology of London and of British medieval towns; and as Cathedral Archaeologist for St Paul’s Cathedral, archaeological accounts of the medieval and Wren buildings.

LYN BLACKMORE is a Senior Ceramics and Finds Specialist who has worked for MOLA and its predecessors since 1986. During this time she has established the Anglo-Saxon fabric type series for London, has contributed to the Type-Series of London Medieval Pottery and has published widely on aspects of post- Roman pottery. Her special research interests are the development of London and the role of local, regional and imported pottery and finds in trade and exchange. In 2009–14 she was Assistant Treasurer of the Medieval Pottery Research Group and in 2017 was elected co-editor of its journal Medieval Ceramics, a role she first held in 1989–94.

JACQUI PEARCE is a Senior Ceramics Specialist with MOLA, focusing especially on medieval and later pottery, on which she has published widely. She joined the Museum of London’s Department of Urban Archaeology in 1977 and has played a major role in the development and publication of the Type-Series of London Medieval Pottery. She has served as Joint Editor of Medieval Ceramics, as well as of Post-Medieval Archaeology and is currently Joint Editor of English Ceramic Circle Transactions. In 2017 she was elected President of the Society for Post-Medieval Archaeology.

TONY DYSON was the principal documentary historian and general editor at the Department of Urban Archaeology of the Museum of London from 1974 to 1998.
Manx Crosses: A Handbook of Stone Sculpture 500-1040 in the Isle of Man by David M. Wilson. Paperback; iv+182 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 388 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917562. £24.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917586. £15.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The carved stone crosses of the Isle of Man of the late fifth to mid-eleventh century are of national and international importance. They provide the most coherent source for the early history of Christianity in the Island, and for the arrival and conversion of Scandinavian settlers in the last century of the Viking Age – a century which produced some of the earliest recognisable images of the heroes and gods of the North; earlier, indeed, than those found in Scandinavia. This, the first general survey of the material for more than a century, provides a new view of the political and religious connections of the Isle of Man in a period of great turmoil in the Irish Sea region. The book also includes an up-to-date annotated inventory of the monuments.

About the Author:
David M. Wilson, Director of the British Museum from 1977-1992, is a leading authority on the Viking Age and has written a number of studies of the art and archaeology of the Anglo-Saxon period and the Viking Age in their Northern European context. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and lives in the Island.
Shipwrecks and Provenance: in-situ timber sampling protocols with a focus on wrecks of the Iberian shipbuilding tradition by Sara A. Rich, Nigel Nayling, Garry Momber and Ana Crespo Solana. vi+66 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (21 colour plates). 42 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917173. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917180. Book contents pageDownload

Two of the questions most frequently asked by archaeologists of sites and the objects that populate them are ‘How old are you?’ and ‘Where are you from?’ These questions can often be answered through archaeometric dating and provenance analyses. As both archaeological sites and objects, shipwrecks pose a special problem in archaeometric dating and provenance because when they sailed, they often accumulated new construction material as timbers were repaired and replaced. Additionally, during periods of globalization, such as the so-called Age of Discovery, the provenance of construction materials may not reflect where the ship was built due to long-distance timber trade networks and the global nature of these ships’ sailing routes. Accepting these special challenges, nautical archaeologists must piece together the nuanced relationship between the ship, its timbers, and the shipwreck, and to do so, wood samples must be removed from the assemblage. Besides the provenance of the vessel’s wooden components, selective removal and analysis of timber samples can also provide researchers with unique insights relating to environmental history. For this period, wood samples could help produce information on the emergent global economy; networks of timber trade; forestry and carpentry practices; climate patterns and anomalies; forest reconstruction; repairs made to ships and when, why, and where those occurred; and much more.

This book is a set of protocols to establish the need for wood samples from shipwrecks and to guide archaeologists in the removal of samples for a suite of archaeometric techniques currently available to provenance the timbers used to construct wooden ships and boats. While these protocols will prove helpful to archaeologists working on shipwreck assemblages from any time period and in any place, this book uses Iberian ships of the 16th to 18th centuries as its case studies because their global mobility poses additional challenges to the problem at hand. At the same time, their prolificacy and ubiquity make the wreckage of these ships a uniquely global phenomenon.
Excavation of the Late Saxon and Medieval Churchyard of St Martin’s, Wallingford, Oxfordshire by Iain Soden. xii+86 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (22 colour plates). 392 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917661. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917678. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) undertook excavations over 2003-4 at the former St Martin’s churchyard, Wallingford, Oxfordshire. St Martin’s, one of perhaps eight churches of late Saxon Wallingford, was located in a prominent position in the centre of the burh. No middle Saxon activity was found and the earliest remains consisted of a layer sealing the natural subsoil which contained a probable late Saxon lead cross. Earliest use of the churchyard has been dated to the late 10th to early 11th century by radiocarbon dating, and burials continued until the end of the 14th century, serving a dwindling parish population, before the cemetery rapidly fell out of use thereafter. No burials post-date 1412. Part of the cemetery has not been disturbed by the present development. The unexcavated areas and previous post-medieval and modern disturbances has meant the original size of the cemetery remains unknown.

A late Saxon mortar mixer found on the site has added to a growing number of this distinctive early constructional feature. While its presence indicates the vicinity of the late Saxon church, no foundations of St Martin’s church appear to have survived cellar digging and quarrying for gravel that occurred in the early 18th century.

Osteological analysis of 187 of the 211 excavated skeletons of the cemetery has depicted a lay population which was almost equally split between males and females, with only a slight bias towards males. Their distribution showed no observable cluster within the churchyard by age or gender. A high proportion of children is notable but newborns and very young children were comparatively rare. The significance of this is unclear since so many disarticulated remains were also present due to later disturbance. Both degenerative pathologies and inherited conditions affecting bone were noted, as were a high frequency of trauma, some of it violent. Generally the population could be shown to have led healthy early lives compared to other urban assemblages, although evidence of tuberculosis and iron deficiency suggest that living conditions and diet at the heart of medieval Wallingford were far from ideal.

Within the excavated area of the cemetery, a number of the burials demonstrated known pre-Conquest burial rites and there are some aspects which may be peculiar to the area, suggesting local variations to common rites. Eight pre-Conquest burials had their heads supported mostly by stones, but one had his head supported by two disarticulated skulls. One 30-40 year old male was buried wearing a pierce scallop-shell, presumably a pilgrim badge from Santiago de Compostella. Four burials were interred in stone-built cists and these ranged from a c1 year old to adults of both sexes. A further six burials lay in stone-built cists without a cover. All post-Conquest burials were earth-cut examples.
Huosiland: A Small Country in Carolingian Europe by Carl I. Hammer. viii+250 pages; black & white throughout. 44 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917593. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917609. Book contents pageDownload

Discussed here is the landscape of western Bavaria in the early-medieval period, between about 750 and 850. The title of the study derives from several indications that a noble genealogia, the Huosi, were particularly influential there during the period. Huosiland may be the best documented European landscape of this time. This is due to the extraordinary cartulary or register of deeds prepared for the diocese of Freising by the monk, Cozroh, in the second quarter of the ninth century. The first part of the study (Contexts) describes Cozroh’s codex and Huosiland and then analyzes the main political, ecclesiastical, social and economic structures and features there, based upon the available historical and archaeological evidence. The second part (Connections) explores a selection of particular issues raised by specific documents or related groups of documents from Huosiland. The third part provides all of the voluminous and highly-informative documentary evidence for Huosiland, both from Cozroh’s codex and other sources, complete in full English translation. As a result, the reader is able to construct his or her own Contexts and Connections. A full annotated Bibliography of the relevant secondary literature is included as is a complete Gazetteer of the translated documents. The publication will provide a valuable resource both for advanced teaching and for scholarly research.

About the Author
Carl Hammer graduated from Amherst College (B.A.) and the University of Toronto (Ph.D.). He has also studied and conducted research at the universities of Munich, Chicago and Oxford. After a brief teaching career, he spent the balance of his professional life in international business with Westinghouse Corporation and the former Rail Systems Division of Daimler Benz. He is now retired. He has published four other scholarly monographs on early-medieval Bavaria, two of them with Archaeopress, and numerous articles in North American and European academic journals. He and his wife live in Pittsburgh but spend several months each year in Easthampton, MA, where he has acquired a new research interest in the Puritans of the Connecticut Valley and colonial western Massachusetts.

New Home, New Herds: Cuman Integration and Animal Husbandry in Medieval Hungary from an Archaeozoological Perspective by Kyra Lyublyanovics. 338 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 383 2017 Archaeolingua Central European Archaeological Heritage Series 10. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917524. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917531. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Cumans, a people that inhabited the steppe zone in the medieval period and actively shaped the fate of the region from the Black Sea to the Carpathian Basin, have been primarily known to history as nomadic, mounted warriors. Some of them arrived in the Hungarian Kingdom in the mid-thirteenth century as a group of refugees fleeing the invading Mongol army and asked for asylum. In the course of three centuries they settled down in the kingdom, converted to Christianity, and were integrated into medieval Hungarian society.

This study collects all available information, historical, ethnographic and archaeological alike, on the animal husbandry aspect of the complex development of the Cuman population in medieval Hungary. Although this medieval minority has been in the focus of scholarly interest in the past decades, no attempt has been made so far to study their herds using interdisciplinary methods. The research of faunal assemblages through archaeozoological methods has the potential to reveal direct, and by other means, unavailable information on animal keeping practices, although this source of evidence often escapes scholarly attention in Central and Eastern Europe. This book combines a primary scientific dataset with historical information and interprets them within the framework of settlement history in order to investigate the manifold integration process of a medieval community.
A Life in Norfolk's Archaeology: 1950-2016 Archaeology in an arable landscape by Peter Wade-Martins. xviii+380 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (87 plates in colour). Casebound with dust jacket. 358 2017 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916572. £24.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916589. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This is a history of archaeological endeavour in Norfolk set within a national context. It covers the writer’s early experiences as a volunteer, the rise of field archaeology as a profession and efforts to conserve the archaeological heritage against the tide of destruction prevalent in the countryside up to the 1980s when there was not even a right of access to record sites before they were lost. Now developers often have to pay for an excavation before they can obtain planning consent. The book features progress with archaeology conservation as well as the growth of rescue archaeology as a profession both in towns and in the countryside. Many of the most important discoveries made by aerial photography, rescue excavations and metal detecting from the 1970s onwards are illustrated. The last section covers the recent growth of the Norfolk Archaeological Trust as an owner of some of the most iconic rural sites in Norfolk. The book concludes with a discussion of some issues facing British field archaeology today.

About the author
Peter Wade-Martins obtained a PhD studying the evidence for the history of rural settlement in Norfolk from the Anglo- Saxon period through the Middle Ages up to the enclosures. This involved what was then a new technique of collecting sherds of pottery off ploughed fields and from that evidence working out where people lived in a parish at different periods from the seventh to the nineteenth centuries. He also excavated two deserted villages revealing evidence for the first time about village life in Norfolk in the Middle Ages. He followed this by excavating a high-status Anglo- Saxon settlement at North Elmham, where it was possible to work out the plans of Anglo-Saxon timber buildings from patterns left by their post-holes in the subsoil.

Then, as County Field Archaeologist for Norfolk from 1973 to 1999, he organised and ran a county service for field archaeology developing a Sites and Monuments Record, an aerial photography programme, which made many startling discoveries, and a series of rescue excavations on a wide range of sites from prehistoric to medieval. His passion for countryside conservation led him to organise a number of ground-breaking conservation projects often trying to move a lot faster than English Heritage seemed willing to go.

Having retired early as County Field Archaeologist in 1999, he became the first Director of the Norfolk Archaeological Trust where he was instrumental in raising funds to buy an Iron Age fort, most of the Roman town at Caistor near Norwich, the remarkably well preserved Roman fort at Burgh Castle, a medieval castle and a complete monastery. All of them have been opened to the public. His one regret was that he didn’t have the opportunity to buy a deserted medieval village for the Archaeological Trust as well.

His other countryside interests include writing books on the decline and revival of the Manx mountain sheep, The Manx Loghtan Story (1990), the decline and eventual extinction of the old Norfolk Horn sheep, Black Faces (1993) and, with others, a two-volume work on Britishmade toy farm vehicles Farming in Miniature (2013 and 2014). His particular interest here has been to see how farm machinery familiar to each generation of farmers has been represented by contemporary toy makers. Other interests have included the creation of a photo archive of some 3,000 pictures of crofting life on the Isle of Eigg in the Inner Hebrides where his family have been regular visitors. He has also kept a flock of sheep since 1978.

Reviews
'What a life in Norfolk's archaeology! The book is destined to become an essential archaeological reference and to join other classics of archaeological autobiography, among them Sir Mortimer Wheeler's Still Digging and Philip Rahtz's Living Archaeology. An absolute must-read.' - Edward Biddulph (Current Archaeology #336, March
Los yacimientos olvidados: registro y musealización de campos de batalla by Mario Ramírez Galán. 434 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (145 colour plates). Spanish text. 39 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917098. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917104. Book contents pageDownload

Los yacimientos olvidados: registro y musealización de campos de batalla is a project that aims to encompass all aspects of battlefield archaeology, in order to be a reference work in this study area. Therefore, a detailed historiographical study about this branch of archaeology has been made, from early origins until the present day, allowing us to gain a deeper understanding of the evolution of battlefield archaeology. Two methodologies, archaeological and museographical, are proposed for the treatment of this particular type of archaeological site. In order to prove the viability of both methodologies, a theoretical application has been carried out in two research examples from different periods, demonstrating both the project’s methodological validity and reinforcing our theories.

Two registers were made regarding battlefields - one historical and another archaeological. The purpose of this was to catalogue all possible existing sites in the interior of the Iberian Peninsula from Roman times through to the Spanish Civil War, which will hopefully serve as a point of reference for future researchers. Through this book, people will be able to understand the great potential of Spanish battlefields and their heritage. Furthermore, Spain could be regarded as a very important country regarding battlefield archaeology.

Spanish Description:
Los yacimientos olvidados: registro y musealización de campos de batalla es un trabajo que recoge todos los aspectos referentes a la arqueología de campos de batalla, con el objetivo de ser una obra de referencia en esta área de estudio. En ella se ha llevado a cabo un estudio historiográfico pormenorizado de esta rama de la arqueología, remontándose hasta los orígenes de la misma, permitiendo comprender su evolución hasta nuestros días. Se han planteado dos propuestas metodológicas, arqueológica y museográfica, para el tratamiento de esta tipología de yacimiento. Para comprobar la viabilidad de ambas metodologías se realizó una aplicación teórica en dos casos de estudio de distinta época, lo que nos permitió ver su validez y reforzar nuestras teorías.

Para esta obra elaboramos dos registros de campos de batalla, uno de tipo histórico y otro de tipo arqueológico, con el objetivo de catalogar todos los posibles yacimientos existentes en interior peninsular desde la época romana hasta la Guerra Civil, sirviendo así de punto de partida para futuros investigadores. A través de este libro se puede comprobar el gran potencial que posee España en campos de batalla y que podría situarse entre los países más destacados.