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NEW: Softstone: Approaches to the study of chlorite and calcite vessels in the Middle East and Central Asia from prehistory to the present edited by Carl S. Phillips and St John Simpson. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+270 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 461 2018 British Foundation for the Study of Arabia Monographs (formerly Society for Arabian Studies Monographs) 20. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919924. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919931. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Stone containers have been made and used in the Middle East for over eleven millennia where they pre-dated the invention of pottery and were widely traded. The appearance or properties of the stone helped govern how stone vessels were valued or used and many classes were strictly utilitarian, being used for storage, cooking or lighting. Others were decorated and at times they were considered valuable exotica, particularly in regions far removed from their source areas. The subject of stone vessels is attracting growing attention but this is the first attempt to bring together different approaches to the study of softstone vessels, particularly but not exclusively those carved from varieties of chlorite, and covering all periods from prehistory to the present.

About the Editors
CARL S. PHILLIPS works in the Université Paris Ouest, specialises in Arabian archaeology and has excavated extensively in Oman, Yemen and the United Arab Emirates.

ST JOHN SIMPSON is a senior curator in the Department of the Middle East at the British Museum, specialises in the archaeology of the Sasanian and early medieval periods and has excavated extensively in the Middle East and Central Asia.
NEW: How Did the Persian King of Kings Get his Wine? The upper Tigris in antiquity (c.700 BCE to 636 CE) by Anthony Comfort and Michał Marciak. Paperback; 175x245mm; iv+148 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (46 plates in colour). (Print RRP £32.00). 457 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919566. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919573. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

How did the Persian King of Kings Get His Wine? the upper Tigris in antiquity (c.700 BCE to 636 CE) explores the upper valley of the Tigris during antiquity. The area is little known to scholarship, and study is currently handicapped by the security situation in southeast Turkey and by the completion during 2018 of the Ilısu dam. The reservoir being created will drown a large part of the valley and will destroy many archaeological sites, some of which have not been investigated. The course of the upper Tigris discussed here is the section from Mosul up to its source north of Diyarbakır; the monograph describes the history of the river valley from the end of the Late Assyrian empire through to the Arab conquests, thus including the conflicts between Rome and Persia. It considers the transport network by river and road and provides an assessment of the damage to cultural heritage caused both by the Saddam dam (also known as the Eski Mosul dam) in Iraq and by the Ilısu dam in south-east Turkey. A catalogue describes the sites important during the long period under review in and around the valley. During the period reviewed this area was strategically important for Assyria’s relations with its northern neighbours, for the Hellenistic world’s relations with Persia and for Roman relations with first the kingdom of Parthia and then with Sassanian Persia.

About the Authors
ANTHONY COMFORT is an independent scholar associated with the Centre for the Study of Greek and Roman Antiquity at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. After a career in the secretariat of the European Parliament, he completed a doctoral dissertation dealing with the roads on the frontier between Rome and Persia at Exeter University under the supervision of Stephen Mitchell. He is a specialist in the use of satellite imagery for archaeology in the Middle East but is now responsible for a project concerning the Roman roads of south-west France, where he lives.

MICHAL MARCIAK, PhD (2012), Leiden University, is an Assistant Professor at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków (Poland). He has published extensively on Northern Mesopotamia, including two monographs Izates, Helena, and Monobazos of Adiabene (Harrassowitz, 2014) and Sophene, Gordyene, and Adiabene: Three Regna Minora of Northern Mesopotamia Between East and West (Brill, 2017). He is currently also the Principal Investigator of the Gaugamela Project (in cooperation with the Land of Nineveh Archaeological Project of the University of Udine, Italy) which is dedicated to the identification of the site of the Battle of Gaugamela (331 BCE).
NEW: Dosariyah: An Arabian Neolithic Coastal Community in the Central Gulf by Philipp Drechsler. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+498 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (110 plates in colour). (Print RRP £80.00).. 454 2018 British Foundation for the Study of Arabia Monographs (formerly Society for Arabian Studies Monographs) 19. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919627. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919634. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £80.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Dosariyah: Reinvestigating a Neolithic coastal community in eastern Arabia describes the work carried out at Dosariyah, located in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia, which took place between 2010 and 2014. It was conducted by the joint German-Saudi Dosariyah Archaeological Research Project (DARP). A wealth of material remains was found during excavations within almost three metres of anthropogenic deposits. Radiocarbon dates and comparative studies of artefacts securely date the occupation of the site into the first centuries of the fifth millennium BC.

The co-occurrence of locally produced artefacts that are technologically and typologically rooted in the local Arabian Middle Neolithic, and imports from southern Mesopotamia is characteristic of Dosariyah. However, the mechanisms behind this distribution of foreign materials along the Arabian Gulf coast, in particular, are still poorly understood. It is the central proposition of this book that the local societies living along the shores of the Arabian Gulf coast played an active role in the acquisition of Ubaid pottery and other objects originating in southern Mesopotamia.

A predominance of imported objects, considered as ‘exotic items’, are understood as integral components of rituals that were part of temporary gatherings of larger groups of people at Dosariyah. Based on the material evidence from the site, such collective social events were embedded in everyday life during the fifth millennium BC.

About the Author
Philipp Drechsler is a research fellow at the University of Tübingen, Germany, where he received his PhD in 2008. Trained in prehistoric archaeology, geology and geography, he has a particular interest in the emergence and the development of food producing – Neolithic – societies on the Arabian Peninsula. His fields of expertise include lithic studies, the analysis of spatial patterns of human behaviour and human action against the background of changing environmental conditions. He is head of the joint German-Saudi Dosariyah Archaeological Research Project (DARP), and has also been invited to participate in research projects in Qatar, V.A.E and Syria.
NEW: Handel in Krisenzeiten: Ägyptisch-mykenische Handelsbeziehungen in der Ramessidenzeit by Birgit Schiller. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+208 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. German text with English summary. (RRP £35.00). 434 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918675. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918682. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book provides an overview of the sites of Mycenaean pottery finds in Egypt and Nubia. Data from thirty-six sites in Egypt and twelve sites in Nubia are presented. The context of the vessels and sherds dates from the reign of Akhenaten (18th Dynasty) to that of Ramesses VI (20th Dynasty). The imported vessels were found in the capital cities as well as in fortresses, other cities and tombs. Stirrup jars and flasks came to light frequently.

Copies of Mycenaean stirrup jars made from clay, faience and stone were also found. The oldest sherd of an imitation vessel was found in Amarna; hence, the Mycenaean vessel shape (stirrup jar prevailing) was copied outside of Mycenaean Greece in the 18th Dynasty and filled with local liquids—possibly oil—and traded with Egypt. Egyptians not only imported vessels from the Levant but also produced imitation vessels themselves. Apparently, these vessels circulated only within Egypt.

Chemical analyses of sherds from different sites reveal that the vessels found in 18th Dynasty contexts were made on the Mycenaean mainland. During the Ramesside period (19th–20th Dynasty) trading contacts with Mycenaean Greece shifted to Cyprus, where high quality Mycenaean pottery was produced.

About the Author
Birgit Schiller studied Egyptology and Classical Archaeology (prioritising Bronze Age Archaeology) at the Humboldt University of Berlin. She completed her MA in Egyptology and wrote her PhD thesis in Classical Archaeology. Her defence of the thesis was made in 2012.

German Description: Dieses Buch gibt eine Übersicht über die in Ägypten und Nubien gefundene mykenische Keramik. An 36 Orten in Ägypten und an 12 verschiedenen Stellen in Nubien kam sie ans Tageslicht. Zeitlich reichen die Funde von der Regierungszeit Echnatons (18. Dynastie) bis zu Ramses VI. (20. Dynastie). Die Gefäße wurden im Wohnbereich, mithin bei den Lebenden, wie auch als Grabbeigabe, für das Leben im Jenseits verwendet. Das militärische Personal wurde ebenfalls mit mykenischen Produkten, vermutlich Öl, versorgt.

Eine Auflistung der Nachahmungen mykenischer Bügelkannen, die aus Ton, Fayence und Stein (Kalzit) gefertigt wurden, findet sich ebenfalls hier. Die älteste Nachahmung (sog. Simple Style-Keramik) stammt aus Amarna, so dass deren Import etwa gleichzeitig mit dem Import der Ware aus dem mykenischen Gebiet beginnt. So sind sie teils aus der Levante kommend mit lokaler Flüssigkeit – vermutlich Öl – nach Ägypten verhandelt worden. Auch die Ägypter haben ihrerseits die Bügelkanne nachgemacht, wobei gerade die Tongefäße wohl eher für den heimischen Markt gedacht waren.

Chemische Analysen des Tons haben ergeben, dass die Keramik, die in Kontexten der 18. Dynastie gefunden wurde, aus dem mykenischen Kernland, der Argolis, stammt. Während der Ramessidenzeit (19.-20. Dynastie) verlagerte sich der Handel nach Zypern, wo hochwertige mykenische Keramik hergestellt wurde.

Die Autorin studierte an der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Ägyptologie und Klassische Archäologie, wo sie den Schwerpunkt auf die Ägäische Bronzezeit legte. Sie schloss das Studium mit dem Magister in Ägyptologie ab und schriebt ihre Doktorarbeit in der Klassischen Archäologie zur mykenischen Keramik in Ägypten. Die Arbeit wurde 2012 verteidigt.
NEW: Indonesian Megaliths: A Forgotten Cultural Heritage by Tara Steimer-Herbet. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+104 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (94 plates in colour). (Print RRP £30.00). 413 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918439. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918446. Book contents pageDownload

Indonesian Megaliths: A forgotten cultural heritage highlights aspects of Indonesian culture which are currently misunderstood and sometimes threatened by destruction. Although they are relatively recent in origin, the Indonesian megaliths offer similarities to their counterparts in the Middle East and Arabia: they reflect the rise to prominence of local chiefs in a context of acculturation which prompted the need to build megalithic monuments to bury the dead, and to honour, commemorate and communicate with ancestors. In societies of oral tradition, these stones punctuate the landscape to transmit the memory of men and social structure from one generation to the next.

Based on scientific documents (articles, archaeological reports) and field visits, this new exploration clarifies various elements of the Indonesian megaliths, including their function in the daily life of the tribes and the use of certain stones for musical purposes (lithophony). In Nias, Sumba and Toraya, the megalith tradition is still alive and ethno-anthropological studies of these three regions provide a unique chance to complement the archaeological perspectives on megalithic monuments abandoned for several centuries in the rest of the Archipelago. The book includes numerous photographs documenting the monuments which were taken during the author’s stay in Indonesia (2010-2013).

About the Author
TARA STEIMER-HERBET is a graduate of Paris 1 - Panthéon La Sorbonne where she carried out her doctoral research on developing a methodological approach to Middle Eastern archaeology. Her research led her to become particularly interested in megalithism, and the way this phenomenon is expressed in the cultural and funerary practices of the Levant and western Arabia during the 4th and 3rd millennia BC. In 2005 she excavated a sanctuary in Hadramawt (Yemen) and since 2010 has focussed on the megalithic phenomenon in Indonesia. Her research efforts currently concentrate on the preservation of megalithic monuments in the Akkar region of Lebanon as well as on characterising the megalithic phenomenon of the 3rd and 2d millennium BC in the Kuwait region of al-Subiya, Dr Steimer currently teaches ‘archaeological methodology’ and ‘megalithism in the world’ at the Laboratory of Prehistoric Archaeology and Anthropology of the University of Geneva, Switzerland.
20% OFF: Travellers in Ottoman Lands The Botanical Legacy edited by Ines Aščerić-Todd, Sabina Knees, Janet Starkey and Paul Starkey. Paperback; 160x230mm; xxii+358 pages; 2 maps, 7 tables, 167 figures (139 plates in colour). (Print RRP £60.00). 438 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919153. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919160. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Spotlight Promotion - Summer Reading. RRP £60.00, OFFER PRICE £48.00 (offer ends 31/08/2018): This collection of around twenty papers has its origins in a two-day seminar organised by the Association for the Study of Travel in Egypt and the Near East (ASTENE) in conjunction with the Centre for Middle Eastern Plants at the Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh (RBGE), with additional support from Cornucopia magazine and the Turkish Consulate General, Edinburgh. This multi-disciplinary event formed part of the Ottoman Horizons festival held in Edinburgh in 2017 and attracted a wide range of participants from around the world, including several from Turkey and other parts of the Middle East.

This splendidly illustrated book focuses on the botanical legacy of many parts of the former Ottoman Empire — including present-day Turkey, the Levant, Egypt, the Balkans, and the Arabian Peninsula — as seen and described by travellers both from within and from outside the region. The papers cover a wide variety of subjects, including Ottoman garden design and architecture; the flora of the region, especially bulbs and their cultural significance; literary, pictorial and photographic depictions of the botany and horticulture of the Ottoman lands; floral and related motifs in Ottoman art; culinary and medicinal aspects of the botanical heritage; and efforts related to conservation.

About the Editors
DR INES AŠČERIĆ-TODD is a Teaching Fellow in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Edinburgh. Her research interests include social and cultural history of the Middle East and the Ottoman Empire, Sufism and dervish orders. She is the author of Dervishes and Islam in Bosnia: Sufi Dimensions to the Formation of Bosnian Muslim Society, in the Brill series ‘The Ottoman Empire and its Heritage’ (Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2015).

DR SABINA KNEES has edited the Flora of the Arabian Peninsula and Socotra, since 2005. Before joining The Centre for Middle Eastern Plants (CMEP) at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE) in 2005, Sabina was a principal editor on the European Garden Flora, and a Stanley Smith Research Fellow based at the RBGE. Sabina is a member of the Horticultural Taxonomy Group (Hortax), the IUCN SSC Arabian Plant Specialist Group and the Executive Committee of the Friends of Socotra.

DR JANET STARKEY has edited the Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies since 2007. A former lecturer at Durham University, she has published extensively on travellers in the Middle East. Her most recent book, The Scottish Enlightenment Abroad: the Russells of Braidshaw in Aleppo and on the Coast of Coromandel (Leiden & Boston: Brill), was published in March 2018.

PROFESSOR PAUL STARKEY, a specialist in Arabic literature and culture, is Emeritus Professor at Durham University and is currently Vice-President of the British Society for Middle Eastern Studies (BRISMES) and Chairman of the Banipal Trust for Arab Literature. His translation of The Book of the Sultan’s Seal by Youssef Rakha won the 2015 Saif Ghobash Banipal Prize for Arabic Literary Translation, and his translation of The Shell by Mustafa Khalifa won a Sheikh Hamad Award for Translation and International Understanding in 2017.
NEW: Egyptian and Imported Pottery from the Red Sea port of Mersa Gawsis, Egypt by Sally Wallace-Jones with contributions from Andrea Manzo, Mary Ownby and Karin Kopetzky. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+186 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (43 colour plates). (Print RRP £32.00). 432 2018 Archaeopress Egyptology 20. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919030. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919047. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The unique site of Mersa Gawasis was a base for seaborne trade along the Red Sea coast during the Middle Kingdom. The Egyptians’ purpose was to trade with Punt for incense and other exotic materials. There is little evidence of any permanent structures at the site apart from man-made caves in which shipping equipment was stored between expeditions. The pottery is, therefore, amongst the most significant evidence for human activity here. Vessel types include many marl C jars, but other kinds of vessels including significant foreign material also occur, some in large quantities. This variety of vessels and the careful reuse of potsherds is central to an understanding of specific and day to day domestic activities and of how the site operated. Mersa Gawasis has many vessel forms of the 12th and Early 13th dynasties. Epigraphic evidence closely dates the site, helping to confirm and underpin an understanding of vessel types and technologies within the ceramic chronology of the period. This volume presents the site’s wide variety of ceramic material, offering also an interpretation of what pottery reveals about activities at the site. The author and excavation photographer have worked together to enhance details of the text with specific photographs.

About the Author
SALLY WALLACE-JONES was born in Norwich, and her interest in archaeology was sparked in childhood by parents who had worked in Egypt and by the Egyptian collection at Norwich Castle Museum where she assisted with the redisplay of the collection. She studied Archaeology and Classics at Manchester University and completed her PhD in the ceramics of Predynastic Egypt. Sally has excavated in many places including Hadrian’s Wall and the Frankish port of Quentovic. She studied with Janine Bourriau and worked for several seasons on the pottery from the Egypt Exploration Society’s Survey of Memphis. She has also worked on the Predynastic pottery at Diospolis Parva for Kathryn Bard’s Boston University excavations, before being asked to take on the ceramic analysis at Mersa Gawasis. She worked as a teacher until 2015 when she began to study for ordination in the Anglican Church, being awarded a BTh degree from Cambridge in 2017. Sally is now part of the clergy team at Hingham in Norfolk. In her spare time, she enjoys continued study of Ancient Egyptian culture as well as travelling, collecting pottery from her travels and playing in a woodwind chamber group. She also speaks on Egyptology to local organisations.
NEW: Navigation et installations lacustres dans les hautes terres du Mexique les cas mexica et tarasque by Alexandra Biar. Paperback; 203x276mm; xvi+292 pages; 217 illustrations; 33 tables (119 colour plates). French text with English summary and foreword (Print RRP £60.00). 54 2018 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 50. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919092. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919108. Book contents pageDownload

In a cultural area where geography conspires against ease of exchange, Mesoamerican societies discovered technical answers adapted to their needs. At a time when the exchange of merchandise and goods relied mainly on human transport, some civilizations turned to a mystical aquatic environment: lakes. This research focuses on the practice of lake navigation and specific facilities that are associated with it. Due to the need for a wholistic approach, this research is situated in a multidisciplinary framework that combines archaeology, ethnology and ethnohistory. Its primary objective is to elaborate the framework of a new research field from the analytical and systematic study of a corpus of eclectic data, about the exploitation of water as a means of transport.

In Mesoamerica, the greatest concentration of lake systems lies in the Mexican highlands. However, only the Mexico and Pátzcuaro Basin were converted into real political economic and cultural centres, with the emergence of the Mexica Empire and Tarascan State in the Late Postclassic period (1350-1521). Why then do archaeologists, ethnologists and historians persist in ignoring the true importance of navigation in their study of the formation and organization of these two civilizations? To what extent can we extract, from the study of boats and lake installations, data that can open new research perspectives?

French description: Dans une aire culturelle où la géographie conspire contre la fluidité des échanges, les sociétés mésoaméricaines ont su trouver des réponses techniques adaptées à leurs besoins. À une époque où l’acheminement de marchandises et de biens s’effectue principalement à dos d’homme, certaines civilisations vont se tourner vers un milieu aquatique mythique : les lacs. Ce travail de recherche s’intéresse donc à la pratique de la navigation lacustre et aux installations spécifiques qui lui sont associées. De par la nécessité d’une approche transversale, ce sujet se positionne dans un cadre pluridisciplinaire, entremêlant archéologie, ethnohistoire et ethnologie. Son objectif premier est de délimiter le cadre d’un nouveau champ de recherche à partir d’une étude analytique et systématique d’un corpus de données éclectiques, autour de l’exploitation d’un mode de transport aquatique.

En Mésoamérique, c’est dans les hautes terres mexicaines que seuls les lacs des Bassins de Mexico et de Pátzcuaro ont été convertis en de véritables centres politiques, économiques et culturels à l’origine de l’émergence de l’Empire mexica et du Royaume tarasque à la période Postclassique (1350-1521). Pourquoi archéologues, historiens et ethnologues continuent donc d’ignorer la véritable importance de la navigation dans l’étude de la formation et de l’organisation de ces deux civilisations ? Dans quelle mesure les données que nous pourrons extraire de l’étude des embarcations et des installations lacustres peuvent-elles ouvrir de nouvelles perspectives de recherches ?
Wealthy or Not in a Time of Turmoil? The Roman Imperial Hoard from Gruia in Roman Dacia (Romania) by Cristian Gazdac and Marin Neagoe. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+182 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 414 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918477. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918484. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Roman imperial hoard from Gruia, Romania (former Roman province of Dacia) is among the largest ever discovered in this part of the Roman Empire. 1,509 silver coins dated from Vespasian to Gordian III were accidentally discovered while digging in a private garden. Wealthy or not in a Time of Turmoil? The Roman Imperial hoard from Gruia in Roman Dacia (Romania) presents a catalogue of each of these coins, photos included, with their complete descriptions. A comparative analysis with other similar hoards throughout the Roman Empire reveals general and specific patterns for hoarding in this period.

At the same time, looking at the prices and salaries around the time the hoard was buried, the authors aim to establish whether such an amount of silver coins could have represented someone’s entire wealth. In addition, analysing the distribution of hoards in the provinces from the Middle and Lower Danube and the history of this area, some possible reasons for concealing and not recovering this hoard are discussed.

One excited aspect emphasised in this book is the presentation of so the called ‘weird’ coins meaning those pieces that have been minted with various errors, by mistake or deliberately, such as engraving errors, coin-die malfunction, plated coins etc.

About the Authors
CRISTIAN GAZDAC is a researcher at the Institute of Archaeology and Art History of the Romanian Academy in Cluj-Napoca. As Associated Professor Habilitus at the University of Cluj-Napoca (Romania), Faculty of History and Philosophy, he teaches on the Roman Economy and Numismatics and on the Analysis of Military Conflicts in Antiquity. Since 2014, he supervises PhD dissertations at the Doctoral School of Security Studies within the same university. In 2017, he joined the team working on the research project Coin Hoards of the Roman Empire at the University of Oxford. He is the editor and the main author of the monographic series Coins from Roman Sites and Collections of Roman Coins from Romania (13 volumes).

MARIN NEAGOE is a researcher and the keeper of the numismatic collection at the Museum of the Iron Gates Region, Drobeta-Turnu Severin (Romania). He has a large experience as a field archaeologist covering the periods from Prehistory to Middle Ages. Among his most important excavations are the Severin Chester (2011-2012) and the amphitheatre near the auxiliary fort of Drobeta (2013-2017). His recently defended PhD dissertation is an archaeological and numismatic monograph on the Chester of Severin and its hinterland during 13th-16th centuries.
FORTHCOMING: Iron Oxide Rock Artefacts in Mesopotamia c. 2600-1200 BC An interdisciplinary study of hematite, goethite and magnetite objects by Martine Marieke Melein. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+258 pages; 49 figures; 52 tables (85 plates in colour). (Print RRP £40.00). 453 2018. ISBN 9781784919641. Book contents pageBuy Now

The flourishing civilisations of Mesopotamia, nowadays Iraq and Syria, imported all kinds of materials from the surrounding regions. Iron oxide rock (hematite, goethite and magnetite) was very popular for weight stones and cylinder seals around 2000 BC. This research aims to determine the region of origin for the raw material, what made people start using iron oxide rock, and what led them to stop using it. To answer these questions, a multidisciplinary approach was applied. Geology and archaeology were combined to identify Northern Syria as the region of origin. Archaeometric research of the production process showed that technological change concurred with the start and end of the use of iron oxide rock. Cuneiform texts yielded, among other information, the earliest description of magnetism known to mankind. Furthermore, element and mineral composition of 50 artefacts from three Dutch collections were determined with modern, non-destructive analysis techniques.

About the Author
Martine Melein grew up in the most southern part of the Netherlands. Her interest in archaeology began when she was very young, and her grandfather told her stories about ancient cultures. When she was 17, she left Maastricht to study archaeology in Leiden. She is the first of her family to have completed an academic education. After finishing her doctoral education in Mesopotamian archaeology, and obtaining a post-academic teaching degree in social science, she lectured on various Ancient Near Eastern subjects at Leiden University, as well as for the general public. During her PhD-research she raised a family and earned money as a housekeeper, lunch lady, educational co-ordinator of Geo- and Bioarchaeology at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and finally assistant to the director of the academic teacher education, also at Vrije Universiteit. She presented her research at several ICAANE and RAI conferences and participated in the international METROLOGIA-research group, as well as in scientific workshops on themes such as metrology and pigments. One of Martine’s major strengths lies in combining scientific disciplines, thus allowing to tell a more complete and balanced story of our past.
FORTHCOMING: The Geography of Trade: Landscapes of competition and long-distance contacts in Mesopotamia and Anatolia in the Old Assyrian Colony Period by Alessio Palmisano. Paperback; 205x290mm; 260pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £48.00). 442 2018. ISBN 9781784919252. Buy Now

From the mid-20th century onwards, consolidated study of the merchant archives from the Old Assyrian trading colony at Kaneš (Kültepe) has not only transformed our understanding of the social, economic and political dynamics of the Bronze Age Near East, but also overturned many preconceived notions of what constitutes pre-modern trade. Despite this disciplinary impact and archaeological investigations at Kültepe and elsewhere, our understanding of this phenomenon has remained largely text-based and therefore of limited analytical scope, both spatially and contextually. This book re-assesses the Old-Assyrian trade network in Upper Mesopotamia and Central Anatolia during the Middle Bronze Age (c. 1970 – 1700 BC) by combining in some analytical detail the archaeology (e.g. material culture, settlement data, etc.) of the region both on its own terms and via a range of spatial approaches. The author offers a comparative and spatial perspective on exchange networks and economic strategies, continuity and discontinuity of specific trade circuits and routes, and the evolution of political landscapes throughout the Near East in the Middle Bronze Age.

About the Author
ALESSIO PALMISANO is a Post-Doctoral Research Associate at UCL Institute of Archaeology and is currently working on a research project examining the relationship between inferred regional demographic trends in the Mediterranean since the appearance of farming and reconstructed land cover in the past. His research so far has been primarily focused on the study of Western Asian and Eastern Mediterranean early complex societies, the analysis of settlement patterns, and the development of bespoke quantitative and computational methods to Archaeology. He also took part, with roles of scientific responsibility, in several campaigns of archaeological fieldwork, primarily in Iraq, Italy, Syria, and Turkey.

Table of Contents (Provisional):
Chapter 1. Introduction
Chapter 2. Theoretical approaches to landscape, political geography and trade
Chapter 3. Upper Mesopotamia and Central Anatolia in the old Assyrian colony period. A review of the documentary historical evidence
Chapter 4. Perspectives on material culture: intra and inter-regional dynamics
Chapter 5. Models of settlement hierarchy
Chapter 6. Landscape-scale models of movement and interaction
Chapter 7. Discussion: landscapes of interaction in Upper Mesopotamia and Anatolia
Chapter 8. Conclusions
Bibliography
FORTHCOMING: Oikèma ou pièce polyvalente: recherches sur une installation commerciale de l’Antiquité grecque by Pavlos Karvonis. Paperback; 203x276mm; 110pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. French text. (Print RRP £30.00). 60 2018. ISBN 9781784919399. Buy Now

This volume discusses the evolution of oikema, which is the most common type of commercial facility in ancient Greece. The study covers a large area including Continental Greece, the Aegean islands, the Ionian islands and the west coast of Asia Minor. The author, after a thorough analysis, proposes a new terminology for commercial and industrial facilities. The book also presents the architectural characteristics and the equipment of oikemata and discusses their location and relationship with other buildings. The ownership, use and maintenance of oikemata are also discussed. It is argued that oikemata provided merchants and craftsmen with a suitable working space and contributed to the gradual abandonment of houses as working places, especially in cities that developed in the Hellenistic period. Their characteristics corresponded perfectly well to the needs of Greek commerce.

PAVLOS KARVONIS studied archaeology in Athens from 1994 to 1998. In 2000, he finished his Masters degree at the University of Paris X-Nanterre and in 2004 he defended a thesis entitled “Lieux et locaux de vente dans la Grèce égéenne du IVe au Ier siècle av. J.-C.” at the same University. In 2006, he worked for the Archaeological Society at Athens, and since 2007 he has been working for the Academy of Athens in the Tabula Imperii Romani program. He has published two volumes on the Aegean islands and Attica, and has published several articles on commercial architecture. He is also preparing the publications of two commercial buildings located on the western shore of the island and participates in a research programme on stone and its use on Delos.

Table of Contents
Avant-propos
English Summary
Nomenclature
Le vocabulaire antique des installations commerciales
Les critères d’identification des pièces polyvalentes
L’apparition de la pièce polyvalente
Les activités attestées dans les pièces polyvalentes
Les caractéristiques des pièces polyvalentes
La gestion des pièces polyvalentes
Les pièces polyvalentes et l’organisation du commerce
Conclusion
Bibliographie
Index des lieux
Index des mots grecs
Index des auteurs anciens
Index des inscriptions
Origine des illustrations
Estudios para la configuración de las facies cerámicas altoimperiales en el Sur de la Península Ibérica edited by P. Ruiz Montes, Ma. V. Peinado Espinosa and Ma. I. Fernández García. Paperback; 210x297mm; ii+284 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (68 colour plates). Spanish text throughout. 403 2018 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 11. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918118. £39.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918125. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £39.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Estudios para la configuración de las facies cerámicas altoimperiales en el Sur de la Península Ibérica explores economy and trade in the south of the Iberian peninsula during the High Roman Empire. Different methodologies, techniques and approaches to archaeological research are applied in the analysis and study of ceramic contexts in several marketplaces or consumption centres in the area. Special attention is given to ceramic facies predominantly characterised by the presence of fine pottery. In addition, the examination of local ceramics points towards a complexity whose interpretation has been biased until a few decades ago by the presence of wares imported from other Mediterranean regions as a result of the intensity of Roman trade. Furthermore, exploration beyond traditional analytical parameters highlights, for example, the relevance of the phenomenon of pottery vessel imitation.

About the Editors
DR PABLO RUIZ MONTES has a doctorate in History from the University of Granada and is a postdoctoral researcher linked to the Department of Prehistory and Archaeology at the University of Granada. His research focuses on the analysis of ceramic facies of Roman times in the Baetica province, and on the study of technology traditions and production processes, particularly in Red Slip wares, in the Western Roman world. Also, in past years, he has developed his research in Italy, at the University of Siena and in archaeological sites such as the Roman colony of Cosa (Ansedonia).

DR Mª VICTORIA PEINADO ESPINOSA has a doctorate in History from the University of Granada. She has worked as associate researcher for both the University of Granada and the University of Perugia. Her line of research has focused on the analysis of the material culture in Roman times, especially common ware pottery. Her works have contributed to better understand these ceramics both in the South of the Iberian Peninsula and in Central Italy. Currently, she combines teaching with archaeological research, and she is involved in several projects studying the Roman Baetica.

DR Mª ISABEL FERNÁNDEZ GARCÍA is Professor of Archeology at the Department of Prehistory and Archeology at the University of Granada. One of her main areas of expertise and focus of her research is the analysis of the production and marketing structures in pottery workshops from Roman times, with special emphasis in the Baetica province. She is a specialist in pottery productions in Hispanic terra sigillata.
Special Place, Interesting Times: The island of Palagruža and transitional periods in Adriatic prehistory by Stašo Forenbaher with contributions by Zlatko Perhoč and Robert H. Tykot. x+194 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (60 colour plates). 421 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918491. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918507. Book contents pageDownload

While one might say that the prehistory of the Adriatic was always in transition, the rhythm of change was not always the same. On several occasions, a series of changes over a relatively short time period resulted in dramatic transformations. Three crucial episodes of change marked the later Adriatic prehistory. The first one, which took place around year 6000 BC, was a transformation of subsistence strategy, transition from hunting and gathering to farming. The second one was a social transformation that played out in the third millennium BC, when for the first time the power of individuals was clearly expressed by material culture. The third episode, inclusion into the classic Mediterranean civilization, coincided with the end of prehistory in the Adriatic region.

During all of those episodes, travel and connectivity with distant lands played an exceptionally important role, and certain places gained particular importance due to their unique geographic location. Palagruža is among the most prominent such places, its importance being out of all proportion to its physical size. Adriatic prehistory cannot be told without mentioning Palagruža, and prehistory of Palagruža cannot be understood without knowing Adriatic prehistory. Due to its strategic position in the very center of the Adriatic Sea, due to the mystery born of distance and isolation, due to its wild and spectacular landscape, Palagruža indeed is a special place. A reflection of its specialty is an unexpected abundance of high-grade archaeological evidence, dating precisely from the three aforementioned periods marked by radical change.

About the Author
STAŠO FORENBAHER is Senior Research Advisor at the Institute for Anthropological Research in Zagreb, Croatia. He studied archaeology at the University of Zagreb (Croatia), and received his PhD from the Southern Methodist University in Dallas (TX). His research interests cover Mediterranean Prehistory with a focus on the Adriatic, and include transition to farming, formation of early elites, archaeology of caves, and lithic analysis. He has excavated at many prehistoric stratified cave sites in the eastern Adriatic, including Pupićina Cave in Istria, Vaganačka Cave in Velebit Mountain, Grapčeva Cave on the island of Hvar, and Nakovana Cave on Pelješac Peninsula. His current fieldwork is focussed on the excavation of Vela Cave on the island of Korčula.
Gifts, Goods and Money: Comparing currency and circulation systems in past societies edited by Dirk Brandherm, Elon Heymans and Daniela Hofmann. vi+228 pages; 73 figures (30 colour plates). 416 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918354. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918361. Book contents pageDownload

The papers gathered in this volume explore the economic and social roles of exchange systems in past societies from a variety of different perspectives. Based on a broad range of individual case studies, the authors tackle problems surrounding the identification of (pre-monetary) currencies in the archaeological record. These concern the part played by weight measurement systems in their development, the changing role of objects as they shift between different spheres of exchange, e.g. from gifts to commodities, as well as wider issues regarding the role of exchange networks as agents of social and economic change. Among the specific questions the papers address is what happens when new objects of value are introduced into a system, or when existing objects go out of use, as well as how exchange systems react to events such as crises or the emergence of new polities and social constellations. One theme that unites most of the papers is the tension between what is introduced from the outside and changes that are driven by social transformations within a given group.

About the Editors
DIRK BRANDHERM studied Archaeology, Classics and Social Anthropology at the universities of Münster, Edinburgh and Freiburg. Most of his work has been in European Bronze and Iron Age archaeology, with one focus on metalwork production and depositional practices. He currently holds a position of Lecturer at Queen’s University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

ELON HEYMANS studied archaeology at the University of Amsterdam and at Tel Aviv University. He completed his PhD in Tel Aviv on the early history of money in the eastern Mediterranean Iron Age, and is currently a postdoctoral researcher at Utrecht University. His focus lies on the archaeology of Greece and the southern Levant, and he is particularly interested in the social, political and historical context of early money use.

DANIELA HOFMANN has obtained her PhD from Cardiff University and is currently Junior Professor at Hamburg University, Germany. She has published extensively on funerary archaeology, as well as the figurines and domestic architecture of the central European Neolithic, but she is also interested in instances of structured deposition and in spheres of exchange.
Axe-heads and Identity An investigation into the roles of imported axe-heads in identity formation in Neolithic Britain by Katharine Walker. xiv+318 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (86 colour plates). 386 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917449. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917456. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The significant body of stone and flint axe-heads imported into Britain from the Continent has been poorly understood, overlooked and undervalued in Neolithic studies, particularly over the past half century. It is proposed, in this study, that the cause is a bias of British Neolithic scholarship against the invasion hypothesis and diffusionist model, and it is sought therefore to re-assess the significance accorded to these objects. The aim is to redress the imbalance by re-focusing on the material, establishing a secure evidence base, and exploring the probable conditions in which these often distinctive items made their way to Britain. The narrative presented here rests upon the argument that imported axe-heads came into what is today called Britain as objects of considerable significance. Specifically, they were items of high symbolic value that played a crucial role in fostering particular ways of thinking about, and addressing, social identity in the Neolithic period. These issues are the context for the study, whose main objectives are the close and detailed cataloguing of relevant material, and a documentation of the investigative work needed to establish the credentials of each artefact.

About the Author
Katharine Walker is a prehistorian who specialises in the Neolithic of northwest Europe. She is Visiting Research Fellow at Bournemouth University, 'Ecademy' Project Officer at the New Forest Centre in Lyndhurst, and a freelance lithics and stone axe specialist. She studied at the Universities of Bristol, Cardiff, and Southampton where she completed a PhD in 2015. Her current research interests focus on materials and material culture, and she has also published on the first metalwork and the origins of social power in The Oxford Handbook of Neolithic Europe (2015). She is an active Committee Member of the Implement Petrology Group, as well as Editor of their newsletter Stonechat.
The Roman Bridge between Dolni Vadin (Bulgaria) and Grojdibodu (Romania) by Dorel Bondoc. vi+108 pages; 174 figures (54 colour plates). 401 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 38. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918071. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918088. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Roman Bridge between Dolni Vadin (Bulgaria) and Grojdibodu (Romania) presents all the available data on the Roman bridge over the Danube which connected Dacia and Moesia at this point. The toponyms Vadin and Grojdibodu themselves mean ‘ford’, a crossing over water, in this case over the Danube. There have been no archaeological excavations at the feet of the bridge but the author has been able to propose positioning, scale and full reconstruction on the basis of a survey of existing remains, known road alignments, old maps and drawings as well as comparison with better-known parallels. The book also includes a catalogue of small finds deriving from the area of the bridge.

This bridge has been ignored for centuries primarily due to the absence of any mention of it in ancient sources, literary or otherwise. It was probably eclipsed by the fame of the bridge from Drobeta, which was constructed by Emperor Trajan between the two Dacian wars, and by the bridge from Sucidava-Oescus which was built later, in the time of Emperor Constantine the Great. Additionally, the bridge is located in a rather obscure place, hardly accessible in the modern era. This work restores this river crossing to its proper significance.

About the Author DOREL BONDOC is an expert archaeologist at the Museum of Oltenia, Craiova, Romania. He obtained a PhD in Ancient History (Roman Archaeology) from the University in Bucharest in 2004. Dorel is a director of the archaeological research projects on the sites of Cioroiu Nou, the fortress of Legio VII Claudia, and Racarii de Jos, the Roman auxiliary fort. Over time he has published many articles and studies, as well as several books.
Worlds Apart Trading Together: The organisation of long-distance trade between Rome and India in Antiquity by Kasper Grønlund Evers. viii+214 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 9 plates in colour. 385 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 32. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917425. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917432. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Worlds Apart Trading Together sets out to replace the outdated notion of ‘Indo-Roman trade’ with a more informed perspective integrating the new findings of the last 30 years. In order to accomplish this, a perspective focusing on concrete demand from the ground up is adopted, also shedding light on the role of the market in long-distance exchange. Accordingly, the analysis conducted demonstrates that an economically highly substantial trade took place between the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean in the 1st–6th cen. CE, altering patterns of consumption and modes of production in both India, South Arabia and the Roman Empire. Significantly, it can be documented that this trade was organised at the centres of demand and supply, in Rome and India, respectively, by comparable urban associations, the transport in-between being handled by equally well-organised private networks and diasporas of seagoing merchants. Consequently, this study concludes that the institution of the market in Antiquity was able to facilitate trade over very long distances, acting on a scale which had a characteristic impact on the economies of the societies involved, their economic structures converging by adapting to trade and the market.

About the Author
Kasper Grønlund Evers holds master’s degrees in History from Lancaster (UK) and Copenhagen, as well as a PhD from the latter. He has previously published a monograph on the Vindolanda Tablets and the ancient economy.
Bodies of Maize, Eaters of Grain Comparing material worlds, metaphor and the agency of art in the Preclassic Maya and Mycenaean early civilisations by Marcus Jan Bajema. vi+352 pages; illustrated throughout in black &white with 22 colour plates. 364 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916916. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916923. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book provides a comparative study of the earliest urban civilisations of the Maya lowlands and the Greek mainland. The focus lies on the art styles of the Late Preclassic lowland Maya and Mycenaean Greece. Building on research from previous comparative studies, the approach used here seeks to combine more traditional iconographic approaches with more recent models on metaphor and the social agency of things. By comparing Maya and Mycenaean art styles through the three aspects of metaphor, semiotics and praxis, their differences and similarities are made clear. The book shows art to have played a more active role in the development of the earliest urban civilisations, rather than passively reflecting economic and political trends. In that way, the social role of art provides a key to understanding the relations between the different factors in the development of the two societies, as they played out at different temporal and geographical scales. To understand this, the notion of distinct Maya and Mycenaean ‘material worlds’, involving both materials and ideas, is proposed, with consequences for models about the earliest urban civilisations in general.
El Sur de la Península Ibérica y el Mediterráneo Occidental: relaciones culturales en la segunda mitad del II milenio a.C. by Juan Manuel Garrido Anguita. 580 pages; illustrated throughout with 181 plates in colour. Spanish text. 34 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916442. £85.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916459. Book contents pageDownload

In ancient times, the first communities, societies and civilizations in the Iberian peninsula, according to archaeological evidence, began to develop following a progressive local evolution tempered by the significance of outside contacts. In order to reconstruct our history, resorting to ancient poets, we strive to distinguish reality from myth in the pursuit of a bond of certainty between the data provided by historical and literary sources and the excavated remains. Greek epics, based on the Illiad and the Odyssey, are the basis for the first speculations that link societies all along the Mediterranean coast, from east to west, with a common thread. However, how many times have we been told about mythical places, such as cities of great splendour and unique cultural progress? Did the land which Plato called Atlantis and Adolf Schulten linked to Tartessos truly exist? These answers may never be revealed (they are not at the forefront of research interests nowadays); for the time being, they are lost into a mythical and legendary world. Nonetheless, they remain alive over time.

Spanish description: En tiempos lejanos, ahora sepultadas bajo la caída de los años, comienzan a formarse las primeras comunidades, sociedades y civilizaciones que se irán desarrollando en la Península Ibérica, por una progresiva evolución local, sin descuidar la atención de los contactos foráneos previa contrastación arqueológica. Refugiándonos en figuras creadas por los antiguos poetas, tratamos de discernir entre lo que comúnmente se ha denominado mito-leyenda y lo real, buscando un vínculo de certeza entre los datos que revelan las fuentes literario-históricas y los vestigios que se desentierran de nuestra primera historia, aquella que tratamos de reconstruir. La épica occidental apoyada en los relatos homéricos de la Ilíada y la Odisea, son la base de las primeras conjeturas que con un hilo, unen a las sociedades que conviven en el Mar Mediterráneo desde Oriente hasta Occidente. Pero ¿cuántas veces hemos oído contar relatos sobre míticas ciudades de gran esplendor e inigualable progreso cultural? ¿Existió aquella tierra denominada por Platón “Atlántida” y que fue asociada por Adolf Schulten a Tartessos? Estas respuestas quizá nunca lleguen a desvelarse (tampoco están en la vanguardia de los intereses de la investigación), por ahora sólo están inmersas en un mundo mítico y legendario, pero es cierto que se mantienen vivas, nostálgicas, con el paso del tiempo.

Knossos and the Near East A contextual approach to imports and imitations in Early Iron Age tombs by Vyron Antoniadis. xii+170 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 14 plates in colour. 351 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916404. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916411. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In this book, Dr Vyron Antoniadis presents a contextual study of the Near Eastern imports which reached Crete during the Early Iron Age and were deposited in the Knossian tombs. Cyprus, Phoenicia, North Syria and Egypt are the places of origin of these imports. Knossian workshops produced close or freer imitations of these objects. The present study reveals the ways in which imported commodities were used to create or enhance social identity in the Knossian context. The author explores the reasons that made Knossians deposit imported objects in their graves as well as investigates whether specific groups could control not only the access to these objects but also the production of their imitations. Dr Antoniadis argues that the extensive use of locally produced imitations alongside authentic imports in burial rituals and contexts indicates that Knossians treated both imports and imitations as items of the same symbolic and economic value.
Lost and Now Found: Explorers, Diplomats and Artists in Egypt and the Near East edited by Neil Cooke and Vanessa Daubney. xx+295 pages; illustrated throughout with 42 plates in colour. 344 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916275. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916282. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Long distance travel and mass tourism are not recent phenomena. This collection of papers from the 2015 ASTENE Conference in Exeter demonstrates that over the centuries many individuals and groups of people have left the safety of their family home and travelled huge distances both for adventure and to learn more about other peoples and places. Some travels were to help establish trade routes, while others were for personal pleasure and knowledge. Many of those who travelled have left little or no record but in a few cases their travels can be determined from the brief encounters they had with other travellers who noted these chance meetings in their journals and diaries, which they later used to inform and write for publication accounts of their own travels and impressions.

The 18 papers in this rich and varied collection include: finding the lost diary of a member of the Prussian scientific expedition to Egypt of 1842-45 that was hiding in ‘plain sight’ among other books; the illustrated journal of a Croatian travelling through Egypt, Nubia and Sudan in 1853-4 and the hardships endured; the competition between Officers of the East India Company to find the fastest trade routes through Syria between India and the Red Sea; and identifying the Dutch artist who made paintings of Constantinople and later travelled to India before joining the Bombay Artillery as a Lieutenant-fireworker. All 18 papers are the product of hours of careful research by their authors among original manuscripts and books tracked down in archives, libraries and private collections around the world.
Stone Vessels in the Near East during the Iron Age and the Persian Period (c. 1200-330 BCE) by Andrea Squitieri. iv+284 pages; illustrated throughout with 50 plates in colour. 318 2017 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 2. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915520. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915537. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book focuses on the characteristics and the development of the stone vessel industry in the Near East during the Iron Age and the Persian period (c. 1200 – 330 BCE). Three main aspects of this industry are investigated. First, the technology behind the manufacture of stone vessels, the tools and techniques, and how these changed across time. Second, the mechanisms of exchange of stone vessels and how these were affected by the changing political landscape through time. Third, the consumption patterns of stone vessels in both elite and non-elite contexts, and how these patterns changed through time. The aim is to evaluate how the formation of new regional states, occurred in the Iron Age I-II, and their subsequent inclusion within large-scale empires, in the Iron Age III and Persian period, transformed the Near Eastern societies by exploring how the stone vessel industry was affected by these transformations. For the period and area under analysis, such a comprehensive study of stone vessels, covering a wide area and connecting this industry to the broader socioeconomic and political landscapes, has never been attempted before.

About the Author:
Andrea Squitieri obtained BA (2006) and MA (2008) at the University of Torino (Italy) in Archaeology of the Near East, with a final dissertation on alabaster vessels in the Mediterranean during the 1st millennium BC. He continued his academic career at the University College, London, where he completed the PhD in 2015 with a thesis on stone vessels in the Iron Age and the Persian period. Andrea has participated in excavation projects in Turkmenistan (Parthian Nisa), Sardinia (Tharros), Syria (Tell Afis), Turkey (Tell Atchana), Israel (Tell es-Safi/Gath) and in Iraqi Kurdistan (Gird-i Bazar and Qalat-i Dinka). Since 2015, he has been a member of the Peshdar Plain Project directed by prof. K. Radner of the Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich (Germany). He is also involved in the project for the study of the stone materials from Shahr-i Sokhta (east Iran), held in the Museum of Oriental Art of Rome (Italy).
Portuguese Intervention in the Manila Galleon Trade The structure and networks of trade between Asia and America in the 16th and 17th centuries as revealed by Chinese Ceramics and Spanish archives by Etsuko Miyata. iv+94 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 310 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915322. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915339. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £22.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In this study of the Portuguese intervention in the Manila Galleon Trade, Etsuko Miyata explores its history through a new approach: the examination of Chinese ceramics. The excavated Chinese ceramics from Mexico City shed light on the nature of Portuguese involvement in this huge sixteenth-century maritime trade network, and also help to clarify the relationship between the Portuguese and the Chinese merchants, who were considered to be rivals.

The book analyzes the change of types and quantity of excavated Chinese ceramics from Mexico City over time. It references the trade depression during the mid seventeenth century, when the ceramic finds from Mexico City suddenly decreased, and the trade between Asia and America seemed to slow down; and it seeks to understand the effect on people from various social backgrounds in both regions.

The study also considers the Atlantic coastal trade in Spain; this featured Chinese ceramic finds from Galician excavation sites. The author postulates a hypothesis that these ceramics did not come into Spain through the Manila Galleon Trade or via Atlantic trade with America, but from Lisbon where the coastal trade route powered a large amount of diverse commerce.
Amphorae from the Kops Plateau (Nijmegen) Trade and supply to the Lower-Rhineland from the Augustan period to AD 69/70 edited by C. Carreras and J. van den Berg. x+404 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 314 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 20. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915421. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915438. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In the year 19 BC, Roman legions arrived in Nijmegen with the aim of conquering the Rhenish territories from the local populations. In addition to the legionaries themselves, the Roman army required a regular provision of staple supplies in order to keep such a war machine in top condition. The archaeological evidence for this provision is a myriad of organic remains (i.e. seeds, bones, pollen) as well as ceramic containers such as amphorae.

One of the first military camps at Nijmegen, together with that on the Hunerberg, was Kops Plateau. This timber fortress – the most northerly military site of the Julio-Claudian period – dating from 12 BC to AD 69, has provided an extraordinary amphora assemblage. At a time when most Roman roads were still only projects, this distant military outpost received amphora products from all over the Mediterranean basin – from Palestine to Greece in the east to Baetica and northern Africa in the west as well as from the Italian core. In addition to amphorae, Kops Plateau also provided a wide repertory of regional vessels whose contents are unknown.

The amphorae from Kops Plateau represent a singular example of Roman military supply in northern Europe at a very early date. Their analysis sheds light on trading routes in the Atlantic regions, and from Gaul to Germany; indeed also on the Claudian invasion of Britain.
Croatia at the Crossroads: A consideration of archaeological and historical connectivity Proceedings of conference held at Europe House, Smith Square, London, 24–25 June 2013 to mark the accession of Croatia to the European Union edited by David Davison, Vince Gaffney, Preston Miracle and Jo Sofaer. iv+264 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 2016 . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915308. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915315. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Croatia has a unique geographical and historical position within Europe, bridging central and south-east Europe. From the Pannonian Plain to the southern Adriatic maritime landscape, interconnectedness flows through Croatia’s history. This dynamic past is increasingly being reflected upon by a new and exciting generation of Croatian scholars who are firmly embedded within a strong national tradition of archaeology but who also look outward to draw insights into the nature of material culture they encounter in Croatia and Croatian identity itself.

Croatia at the Crossroads (24-25 June, Europe House, London) provided the opportunity to reflect upon such interconnectedness and Croatia’s historic place within Europe. This event typified the desire of Croatian archaeologists to engage with such matters on an international level and to situate their scholarship within broader regional dynamics. Following the foundation of the new Croatian state, the opportunities for new forms of engagement have grown. This has stimulated thinking regarding both approaches to archaeology and the potential cultural cross-fertilisation that has resulted in Croatia’s rich archaeological and historical record. This has led to in new, exciting understandings of archaeological material, and this was revealed in contributions to the Croatia at the Crossroads conference.

The papers published here arise from the exceptionally interesting presentations and discussions held in London at the conference. Each of them takes Croatia’s particular interconnectedness in terms of social and cultural relationships with the wider region as the starting point for exploring issues across a broad chronological range, from human origins to modernity. Within this, contributors pick up on a variety of different fields of interconnectedness and forms of interaction including biological, cultural, religious, military, trade, craft and maritime relationships. In many ways, these papers represent opening conversations that explore ways of thinking about new and established data sets that are entering Croatian scholarship for the first time. They also act as a set of complementary discussions that transcend traditional period and national boundaries. We hope that by bringing them together the volume will provide an insight into current trends in Croatian archaeology and stimulate fruitful discussions regarding future directions.
Materials, Productions, Exchange Network and their Impact on the Societies of Neolithic Europe Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain) Volume 13/Session A25a edited by Marie Besse and Jean Guilaine. vi+82 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 305 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784915247. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915254. Book contents pageDownload

Scholars who will study the historiography of the European Neolithic, more particularly with regards to the second half of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century, will observe a progressive change in the core understanding of this period. For several decades the concept of ‘culture’ has been privileged and the adopted approach aimed to highlight the most significant markers likely to emphasise the character of a given culture and to stress its specificities, the foundations of its identity. In short, earlier research aimed primarily to highlight the differences between cultures by stressing the most distinctive features of each of them. The tendency was to differentiate, single out, and identify cultural boundaries. However, over the last few years this perspective has been universally challenged. Although regional originality and particularisms are still a focus of study, the research community is now interested in widely diffused markers, in medium-scale or large-scale circulation, and in interactions that make it possible to go beyond the traditional notion of ‘archaeological culture’. The networks related to raw materials or finished products are currently leading us to re-think the history of Neolithic populations on a more general and more global scale. The aim is no longer to stress differences, but on the contrary to identify what links cultures together, what reaches beyond regionalism in order to try to uncover the underlying transcultural phenomena. From culturalism, we have moved on to its deconstruction. This is indeed a complete change in perspective. This new approach certainly owes a great deal to all kinds of methods, petrographic, metal, chemical and other analyses, combined with effective tools such as the GIS systems that provide a more accurate picture of the sources, exchanges or relays used by these groups. It is also true that behind the facts observed there are social organisations involving prospectors, extractors, craftsmen, distributors, sponsors, users, and recyclers. We therefore found it appropriate to organise a session on the theme ‘Materials, productions, exchange networks and their impact on the societies of Neolithic Europe’.

How is it possible to identify the circulation of materials or of finished objects in Neolithic Europe, as well as the social networks involved? Several approaches exist for the researcher, and the present volume provides some examples.

Social complexity in early medieval rural communities The north-western Iberia archaeological record edited by Juan Antonio Quirós Castillo. vi+134 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 18 colour plates. 300 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915087. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915094. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book presents an overview of the results of the research project DESPAMED funded by the Spanish Minister of Economy and Competitiveness. The aim of the book is to discuss the theoretical challenges posed by the study of social inequality and social complexity in early medieval peasant communities in North-western Iberia. Traditional approaches have defined these communities as poor, simple and even nomadic, in the framework of a self-sufficient economy that prioritised animal husbandry over agriculture. This picture has radically changed over the last couple of decades as a result of important research on the archaeology of peasantry and the critical analysis of ninthand tenth-century documentary evidence that show the complexity of these rural societies. These new records are discussed in the light of a new research agenda centred on the analysis of the emergence of villages, the formation of local elites, the creation of socio-political networks and the role of identities in the legitimation of local inequalities. The nine chapters of this book explore the potential and the limits of the archaeological record to tackle social inequality in rural communities. Those considerations have a wider theoretical and methodological potential and are applicable to other regions and chronologies. The different chapters explore local societies through different methodologies and approaches such as food, settlement patterns, social exclusion, consumption patterns and social practices.

In addition, the book introduces some of the most relevant topics studied currently by Iberian Medieval archaeologists, which are not always accessible to an international audience.
Statio amoena Sostare e vivere lungo le strade romane edited by Patrizia Basso and Enrico Zanini. viii+264 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. All papers in Italian with English abstracts. 295 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784914981. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914998. Book contents pageDownload

The Roman road system was the main service infrastructure for administrative management, economic operation and defense of the empire.

Along with roads, a key element of this infrastructure were the resting places more or less directly linked with vehiculatio / cursus publicus, or with a system run or controlled by the state to ensure essential services (safe stop, supplies, maintenance of horses and other animals) to those traveling on behalf of the public administration.

New archaeological research and new studies on a rich and diverse body of extra-archaeological sources have recently reported the attention of the international scientific community on the subject of parking places, within the more general theme of the smaller settlements in the Roman world and their evolution in late antiquity and early medieval times.

This volume brings together contributions from scholars from three different generations, starting from different sources and methodological approaches, converging towards the construction of an area of common reflection on a theme still relatively underdeveloped. The goal is to lay the foundation for a deepening of the interdisciplinary debate and to develop new research projects.

Italian description:
Il sistema stradale romano rappresentava la principale infrastruttura di servizio per la gestione amministrativa, il funzionamento economico e la difesa dell’impero.

Insieme con le strade, elemento fondamentale di questa infrastruttura erano i luoghi di sosta più o meno direttamente legati con la vehiculatio/cursus publicus, ovvero con il sistema gestito o controllato dallo stato per assicurare i servizi indispensabili (sosta sicura, rifornimenti, cambio dei cavalli, manutenzione di animali e mezzi) a chi viaggiava per conto della pubblica amministrazione.

Nuove ricerche archeologiche e nuovi studi su un ricco e variegato corpus di fonti extra-archeologiche hanno recentemente riportato l’attenzione della comunità scientifica internazionale sul tema dei luoghi di sosta, all’interno della tematica più generale degli insediamenti minori nel mondo romano e della loro evoluzione in epoca tardoantica e altomedievale.

Questo volume raccoglie contributi di studiosi di tre diverse generazioni che, partendo da sistemi di fonti e da approcci metodologici differenti, convergono verso la costruzione di un terreno di riflessione comune su un tema ancora relativamente poco frequentato. L’obiettivo è quello di gettare le basi per un approfondimento del dibattito interdisciplinare e per lo sviluppo di nuovi progetti di ricerca, più organici e specificamente mirati.
Chronological Developments in the Old Kingdom Tombs in the Necropoleis of Giza, Saqqara And Abusir Toward an Economic Decline during the Early Dynastic Period and the Old Kingdom by Leo Roeten. xiv+144 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 280 2016 Archaeopress Egyptology 15. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914608. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914615. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

At the end of the 6th dynasty the 500 year old established order of the Old Kingdom fell apart, which, according to the interpretation given to various contemporary literary sources, started a period of social unrest and economic decline.

The magnitude of the economic investment bestowed by the members of the higher social strata on the monuments that would be the abode for their after-life leads to the hypothesis that an economic decline could also manifest itself in the dimensions of the various architectonic elements of these monuments.

The dimensions of the tombs have been chosen as the subject of this study. The preliminary part of the study is performed on the tombs in the necropolis of Giza. The results of the study are compared with the same measurements in the necropoleis of Saqqara and Abusir. The conclusion is that the economic decline started already at the early dynastic period and not as a result of the caving in of the Old Kingdom.

An interesting ‘side-effect’ of the study is that the dimensions of the tombs can serve as a method to check a dating that has been proposed based on other aspect of the tomb.