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NEW: Narratives and Journeys in Rock Art: A Reader edited by George Nash and Aron Mazel. Paperback; 175x245mm; xiv+686 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (81 plates in colour). (Print RRP £75.00). 484 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915605. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915612. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £75.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Why publish a Reader? Today, it is relatively easy and convenient to switch on your computer and download an academic paper. However, as many scholars have experienced, historic references are difficult to access. Moreover, some are now lost and are merely references in later papers. This can be frustrating. This book provides a series of papers from all over the world that extend as far back as the 1970s when rock art research was in its infancy. The papers presented in the Reader reflect the development in the various approaches that have influenced advancing scholarly research.

About the Editors
GEORGE NASH is an Associate Professor at Geosciences Centre of Coimbra University (u. ID73-FCT), Polytechnic Institute of Tomar (IPT), Portugal. Dr Nash is a specialist in openair rock art and contemporary street art and has recently undertaken fieldwork and research in Andean Chile, the Negev Desert in southern Israel, central Portugal and Wales.

ARON MAZEL is a Reader in Heritage Studies at Newcastle University, United Kingdom. Dr Mazel has done extensive recording of rock art in the uKhahlamba-Drakensberg (South Africa) and Northumberland (United Kingdom).
FORTHCOMING: Art of the Ancestors: Spatial and temporal patterning in the ceiling rock art of Nawarla Gabarnmang, Arnhem Land, Australia by Robert G. Gunn. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+902 pages; illustrated in full colour throughout. (Print RRP £150.00). 492 2018. ISBN 9781789690705. Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents a new systematic approach to the archaeological recording and documentation of rock art developed to analyse the spatial and temporal structure of complex rock art panels. Focusing on the ceiling art at Nawarla Gabarnmang, one of the richest rock art sites in Arnhem Land the approach utilised DStretch-enhanced photographs to record 1391 motifs from 42 separate art panels across the ceiling. Harris Matrices were then built to show the sequence of superimpositions for each art panel. Using common attributes, including features identified by Morellian Method (a Fine Art method not previously employed in archaeological rock art studies), contemporaneous motifs within panels were then aggregated into individual layers. The art layers of the various panels were then inter-related using the relative and absolute chronological evidence to produce a full relative sequence for the site as a whole. This provided a story of the art that began some 13,000 years ago and concluded around 60 years ago, with a major change identified in the art some 450 years ago. The method was shown to be invaluable to the resolution of many difficult issues associated with the identification of motifs, their superimpositions and the development of art sequences.

About the Author
Dr Robert Gunn is a consultant archaeologist with over 35 years’ experience and who specialises in the recording and management of Australian Aboriginal rock art. He has published over 50 papers and monographs, mostly on areas of rock art research. He has worked throughout Australia with research interests in Arnhem Land, Central Australia, Western Victoria, south-western regions of Western Australia, and Far Western NSW. This work has involved the collection of both archaeological and ethnographic information and, consequently, he has worked closely with senior Aboriginal custodians and traditional owners. Robert completed his PhD at Monash University, Australia, in 2007. He is currently a Research Fellow affiliated with Monash Indigenous Study Centre, Monash University, and the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage.
FORTHCOMING: Aesthetics, Applications, Artistry and Anarchy: Essays in Prehistoric and Contemporary Art A Festschrift in Honour of John Kay Clegg, 1935-2015 edited by Jillian Huntley and George Nash. Paperback; 205x290mm; 190pp; 100 figures, 5 tables (colour and black & white throughout). (Print RRP £35.00). 496 2019. ISBN 9781784919986. Buy Now

Scholar and artist John Clegg made a pioneering contribution to the study of rock art. He was the first in the Australian academy to teach rock art research as a dedicated subject (Sydney University 1965-2000), supervising the first graduate students with such specialty, subsequently supporting their careers. He is honoured here for much more than his novelty and the contributions in this monograph pay homage to the late John Kay Clegg’s diverse influence. Rock art researchers from around the globe traverse topics such as aesthetics, the application of statistical analyses, frontier conflict and layered symbolic meanings, the deliberate use of optical illusion, and the contemporary significance of ancient and street art. They cover rock art assemblages from Columbia, South Africa, Europe and across Clegg’s beloved Australia. They interrogate descriptive and analytic concepts such as repainting, memorialisation and graffiti, as well as questioning the ethical impactions of research practices touching rock art as a part of its study. The tributes in this book are necessarily as individual as the man they honour, and John Clegg was certainly an individual. The longevity of ideas and perspectives Clegg brought to the pursuit of rock art research is demonstrated in this collection of works. Clegg’s continued relevance is testament to the value and magnitude of his contribution. He is a deserving subject for a Festschrift.

About the Editors
DR. JILLIAN HUNTLEY is a Research Fellow at the Place Evolution Rock Art Heritage Unit in the Centre for Social and Cultural Research at Griffith University, Australia. She specialises in the physiochemical characterization of rock art and other archaeological pigments and has been privileged in recent years to work on high-profile Australasian finds. A field archaeologist by trade, Jillian has 15 years’ experience in public archaeology and has worked with Aboriginal peoples across Australia since 2001 recording rock art as part of both research and commercial projects. Best known as an archaeological scientist, Jillian has published on diverse topics relating to rock art from the complex impacts of mining to pseudoarchaeology.

DR. GEORGE NASH is an Associate Professor at the Museum of Prehistoric Art, Quaternary and Prehistory Geosciences Centre, Maçao, Portugal. George has been a professional archaeologist for the past 25 years and has undertaken extensive fieldwork on prehistoric rock-art and mobility art in Chile, Denmark, Indonesia, Malaysia, Norway, Sardinia, Spain and Sweden. Between 1994 and 1997 he directed excavations at the La Hougue Bie passage grave on Jersey, one of Europe’s largest Neolithic monuments and has also directed preliminary excavations at Westminster Hall, London. He has also written and edited many books on prehistoric art and monumentality including the most recent book entitled ‘Archaeologies of Rock Art: South American Perspectives’ (2018). In the recent past George has been involved in a number of major rock-art recording and interpretation projects, the most being in the Central Negev region of southern Israel and in central Andean Chile. In his native Wales, he is convener for the Welsh Rock art Organisation (WRAO). In addition to fieldwork, he has also written and presented programmes on European rock-art and contemporary graffiti for the BBC.

Table of Contents
Foreword – Claire Smith
Prologue – Jillian Huntley
Introduction – Jo McDonald
AESTHETICS
Rock Art and the Possibility of Sensitive Cognition in the Ancient Americas – Reinaldo Morales Jr. and Howard Risatti
Rock art in the landscape: John Clegg’s path – Thomas Heyd
APPLICATIONS
Rock engravings in western New South Wales: A comparative analysis of the Panaramitee Tradition site of Sturts Meadows – Natalie R. Franklin
The Rock Art of Aboriginal Australia from Pleistocene to the Present – Josephin
FORTHCOMING: Funerary Archaeology and Changing Identities: Community Practices in Roman-Period Sardinia by Mauro Puddu. Paperback; 205x290mm; 210pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £40.00). 472 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . ISBN 9781789690002. Buy Now

Three main research-questions intertwine in this volume. These are, first, the theoretical issue of how we can infer identities from archaeology; second, what is the material relationship between Sardinia's communities and the Roman world's power and culture when looking at the burial evidence on the ground; third, how our interpretive frameworks of today's world and symbolic structure can affect our understanding of the past. This book attempts to answer these three questions by analysing in detail the funerary evidence from mostly-unpublished burial sites from southern and central Sardinia that can become key to an alternative interpretation of the island and of other Roman Provinces. The questions are answered throughout the book by drawing on social studies, particularly post-colonial approaches to the history of the past, interpretive frameworks on the Roman world, and semiotic theories. By looking in-depth at the archaeological evidence from Sardinia's burials, this book retrieves the active and creative role played by the local communities in shaping back the Roman-world within the specific material and historical conditions they lived in.

About the Author
MAURO PUDDU has spent most of his years as an archaeologist researching Sardinia. After studying at the Universita degli Studi di Cagliari for his BA in Cultural Heritage and his first Masters in Classical Archaeology, he decided to broaden up his research horizons by taking a second Masters at University College London in Theoretical Archaeology. He applied the knowledge acquired in Italy and the United Kingdom to research the funerary practices of Roman-period Sardinia during his PhD at the University of Cambridge, which he has recently completed. During a decade of research, the author has taken part in numerous successful archaeological projects, including the excavation of “La Sella del Diavolo”, Cagliari, run by the Soprintendenza archeologica di Cagliari; the Al-Mafjar Project in Jericho, Palestine, run by Birzeit University and the Khalili Research Centre, University of Oxford; and the Interamna Lirenas Project, run by the University of Cambridge. While working on his future research projects and publications, the author has been working as an archaeologist around London and Cambridge for the last three years, taking part in a vast number of projects, including the excavation of the Westminster School next to Westminster Abbey.

Table of Contents (Provisional)
PREFACE
1. ROMAN-PERIOD SARDINIA: A SEMIOTIC THEORY OF IDENTITY
2. BURIALS OF SARDINIA: METHODOLOGY OF DATA COLLECTION
3.FUNERARY PRACTICE AND THE URBAN COMMUNITIES OF SULCI
4.FUNERARY PRACTICE AND RURAL COMMUNITIES OF MASULLAS
5. FUNERARY PRACTICES AND URBAN COMMUNITIES IN KARALES
6. CONNECTING THE DOTS: SULCI, MASULLAS, KARALES AND THE MEDITTERRANEAN
7. SARDINIA’S COMMUNITIES AND THE MEDITERRANEAN AT LARGE
APPENDIX 1
APPENDIX 2: COARSE WARE TYPOLOGY OF CERAMICS FROM MASULLAS
NEW: Grabados rupestres en La Mancha centro: documentación y estudio de un patrimonio desconocido Rock engravings in La Mancha center: documentation and study of an unknown heritage by Rocío Ramiro Rodero, Víctor Manuel López-Menchero Bendicho, Ángel Marchante Ortega, Ángel Javier Cárdenas Martín-Buitrago, Pedro Miguel García Zamorano and Jorge Onrubia Pintado. Paperback; 203x276mm; 116 pages; illustrated throughout with 67 plates in colour. Spanish text with English abstract. 63 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919962. £36.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919979. Book contents pageDownload

This book deals with the documentation and interpretation of the rock sites located in La Mancha center (Spain), from the detailed study of the symbols that have been engraved in the rock. These sites, from historical times, can provide valuable information for the study of the mentalities and beliefs of the popular classes during the Modern Age, strongly influenced by the atmosphere created after the Counter-Reformation. Crosses, calvaries, orbs, human and animal representations, letters, cup-marks and game boards make up an authentic symbolic universe, of clear Christian roots, whose understanding is possible to achieve even though it requires collaboration between multiple fields of knowledge such as archaeology, theology, numismatics, heraldry, architecture, sculpture, painting...

Unfortunately, researchers have paid scant attention to the issue at hand, assuming paradigms that from our point of view should be reviewed, such as the authorship of the petroglyphs or their chrono-cultural affiliation. The study of the rock formations located in La Mancha center can shed light on these and other subjects, providing a good starting point in order to improve the documentation and interpretation of historical rock engravings in other parts of the world.

El presente libro aborda la documentación e interpretación de las estaciones rupestres localizadas en La Mancha centro (España), a partir del estudio pormenorizado de los símbolos que han sido grabados en la roca. Estas estaciones, de época histórica, pueden proporcionar valiosa información para el estudio de las mentalidades y creencias de las clases populares durante la Edad Media y la Edad Moderna, fuertemente influenciadas por la atmósfera creada tras la Contrarreforma. Cruces, calvarios, orbes, representaciones humanas y de animales, letras, cazoletas y tableros de juego conforman un auténtico universo simbólico, de clara raíz cristiana, cuya comprensión es posible alcanzar aunque requiere de la colaboración entre múltiples ramas del saber como la arqueología, la teología, la numismática, la heráldica, la arquitectura, la escultura, la pintura...

Desafortunadamente, hasta el momento los investigadores han prestado escasa atención al tema que nos ocupa, asumiendo paradigmas que desde nuestro punto de vista deben ser revisados, como la autoría de los petroglifos o su adscripción crono-cultural. El estudio de las estaciones rupestres localizadas en La Mancha centro puede arrojar luz sobre estos y otros temas, proporcionando un buen punto de partida de cara a mejorar la documentación e interpretación de los grabados rupestres de época histórica en otros puntos del mundo.
Giving the Past a Future: Essays in Archaeology and Rock Art Studies in Honour of Dr. Phil. h.c. Gerhard Milstreu edited by James Dodd and Ellen Meijer. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+300 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (96 plates in colour). 61 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919702. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919719. Book contents pageDownload

This volume celebrates the work of Dr. Phil. h.c. Gerhard Milstreu in his 40th year as director of Tanum Museum of Rock Carving and Rock Art Research Centre, Underslös, Sweden. Here, a feast of scholarly contributions from across Europe, at all levels of study have been collected. Each and every one of the chapters addresses aspects connected to the work Gerhard has done over the last 40 years. Through their words and images, these pay respect to and acknowledge Gerhard’s achievements in the fields of rock art documentation, research, international collaboration and outreach. Gerhard has striven from the outset to: promote the importance of the image within archaeology, increase public interest and involvement with prehistoric art, and to encourage the next generation to continue the work. Thus, many authors think very deeply about the images, how we interpret them and how we record them, particularly in light of recent advances in technology. Others explore how Gerhard has fostered dissemination and public involvement. The range of countries and subjects represented; France, Italy, Holland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark and the UK; reflects the success of Gerhard’s focus on international collaboration and dialogue. Given Gerhard’s emphasis on giving the past a future, it is appropriate that leading up and coming scholars, from all levels of higher education, are also present and have the opportunity to present their latest research.

About the Editors
JAMES DODD is currently a PhD scholar at the Department of Archaeology and Heritage Studies, Aarhus University, Denmark. Originally educated at Durham University, James is a specialist in the study, analysis and documentation of the prehistoric rock art of Scandinavia. During the past few years, he has worked extensively in the field, becoming versed in the archaeology of the areas with various museums and institutions in the Scandinavian countries, in particular Bornholms Museum, Denmark. His current PhD project investigates the extent of homogeneity or diversity within Southern Tradition rock art. In addition to high-level statistical analyses and GIS, James is undertaking the largest programme of surface-based rock art documentation ever conducted in Denmark, on the island of Bornholm. Advances in technology are brought into the field with processing of image-based models occurring on site using remote access to cluster processing on the Danish e-Infrastructure Collaboration’s High Performance Computer: Abacus 2.0.

ELLEN MEIJER has been working with the documentation of rock carvings for the past 22 years. She has learned the ins and outs of documentation at Tanums Hällristningsmuseum Underslös. Since 2011, she has worked for projects on rock art documentation at the Swedish Rock Art Research Archives and the University of Gothenburg, as a research assistant, as well as a field supervisor teaching courses in rock art documentation organized by University of Gothenburg in collaboration with Swedish Rock Art Research Archives and The Scandinavian Society for Prehistoric Art. She has been jointly responsible for the development and implementation of digital documentation of rock art through Structure from Motion and optical laser scanning within the Tanum World Heritage Area and published in Adoranten, the peer reviewed Rock Art Magazine of The Scandinavian Society for Prehistoric Art.

Both James and Ellen are members of the Board of The Scandinavian Society for Prehistoric Art.
Marcadores gráficos y territorios megalíticos en la Cuenca interior del Tajo: Toledo, Madrid y Guadalajara by Mª Ángeles Lancharro Gutiérrez. 346 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (222 plates in colour). 46 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917975. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917982. Book contents pageDownload

The aim of this work is to analyze Late Prehistoric graphical markers, comprising paintings, engravings, Megalithic elements, and other portable objects. All of them can be described as post-paleolithic or Schematic Art over various surfaces. The chosen area, the inland region of the Tajo inner basin (Spain), was especially appealing for several reasons, such as the lack of scholarship on the subject, the lack of information on the geographical location of the archaeological sites, and the extended ignorance about the sites’ materials and relationships.

The methodology is based on systematic registration of all archaeological sites. This is studied from an Archaeology Landscape perspective through Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis. It tests geographical markers according to their strategic location (pre-eminence and visibility) and their relationship with other funerary, habitable and resources sites. This has allowed parietal surfaces (megaliths, caves, shelters) and mobile pieces to be given coordinate position for the first time in the region, which has demonstrated abundant and complex prehistoric graphical markers. The results achieved allow the extrapolation of settlement models, explained in chapter VI. Generally, shelters divide the territory by geographical units where the settlers have access to a variety of economic resources and transit networks.

About the Author
Dr. María Ángeles Lancharro has a BA in History from the University of Alcalá (Spain) and received her PhD in Prehistory from the same university. Her research interests include landscape archaeology, megalithic territories and their symbolism, Prehistoric Rock Art in the Iberian Peninsula and Late Prehistory in the inner basin of the Tajo river. Additionally, she specialises in databases, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and spatial analysis. Her work is focused on territorial analysis from rock shelters, habitats, necropoli, areas of exploitation and resources. Dr. Lancharro has an extensive teaching experience and has participated in several excavations in Spain and southern France aimed at the compared study of Megalithic and Schematic Art. Her findings have been published in different peer-reviewed journals and books, and she has participated in a number of archaeological conferences.

Spanish description:
El objetivo de este trabajo es el estudio de los marcadores gráficos de la Prehistoria Reciente, entre los que se incluyen pinturas, grabados, elementos megalíticos y elementos mobiliares que responden a la descripción de Arte Esquemático o Postpaleolítico sobre diferentes soportes. Se eligió como zona de estudio la cuenca interior del Tajo a su paso por las provincias interiores (España), de especial interés por su carencia de valoraciones conjuntas y desde luego, por la escasa información acerca del posicionamiento geográfico de estos yacimientos y el desconocimiento bastante generalizado de sus contenidos y relaciones contextuales. El método de trabajo se ha fundamentado en la recogida sistemática de todos los yacimientos registrados. El estudio se ha llevado a cabo con nuevas tecnologías como los Sistemas de Información Geográfica (SIG), desde una perspectiva de la Arqueología del Paisaje. Se han efectuado diversos análisis establecidos sobre su posición estratégica (preeminencia y visibilidad) y su relación con otros yacimientos de carácter funerario, habitacional y recursos de explotación. Esto ha permitido que los soportes parietales (abrigos, cuevas y megalitos), así como piezas mobiliares, se hayan georreferenciado por primera vez en la región, dando muestras de la abundancia y complejidad de estas grafías prehistóricas.

Los resultados nos han permitido extrapolar modelos de implantación en el territorio, expuestos en el capítulo VI. En general, existe una tendencia a delimitar el territorio en unidades geográficas caracterizadas, en las que las sociedade
The Cutting Edge: Khoe-San rock-markings at the Gestoptefontein-Driekuil engraving complex, North West Province, South Africa by Jeremy Charles Hollmann. xx+394 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 40 2017 Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 97. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917036. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917043. Book contents pageDownload

This book addresses the rock engravings on the wonderstone hills just outside Ottosdal, North West province, South Africa. Wonderstone is remarkable rock that is smooth, shiny and very easy to mark. The wonderstone occurs only on two adjacent farms, Gestoptefontein and Driekuil, and thus the rock art on the wonderstone outcrops is referred to as the Gestoptefontein- Driekuil complex (GDC). This rock art is now the only remaining trace of what must once have been a much larger complex of engravings. Sadly, much of the rock art has been destroyed in the course of mining activities, with very few records. The largest remaining outcrop is still threatened by potential mining activities. The study attempts to bring this disastrous and unacceptable situation to the attention of the public and the heritage authorities, who have so far failed to respond to applications to grant the sites protection. It therefore has two main aims: to locate and record as much of the rock art as possible and to understand the significance of the outcrops in the lives of the people who made them.

Based on the rock art itself, as well as what little historical evidence is available, it is argued that the rock art was made by Khoe-San people during the performance of important ceremonies and other activities. The rock art has two main components: engravings of referential motifs and a gestural, or performative, element. The referential motifs depict a range of things: anthropomorphs and zoomorphs, decorative designs, items of clothing, as well as ornaments and decorations. The gestural markings were made by rubbing, cutting and hammering the soft wonderstone, probably in the course of a range of activities that people carried out on the outcrops.
Le massif de Lovo, sur les traces du royaume de Kongo Volume 1 by Geoffroy Heimlich. xiv+196; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white with 76 plates in colour. French text. 500+ page annex volume available online as a free-to-download PDF. 35 2017 Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 95. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916343. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916350. Book contents pageDownload

Unlike the Sahara or Southern Africa, the rock art of Central Africa is still largely unknown today. Despite being reported as early as the 16th century by Diego del Santissimo Sacramento, the rock art of the Kongo Central, an area encompassing parts of modern day Angola, Cabinda, the Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Gabon, has never been widely researched and its age remains uncertain.

Populated by the Ndibu, one of the Kongo subgroups, the Lovo massif is in the north of the ancient kingdom of Kongo. Even though this kingdom has, since 1500 AD, been one of the best documented in Africa, from historical sources as well as ethnographic and anthropological sources for the more recent periods, it remains largely unrecognized archaeologically. With 102 sites inventoried (including 16 ornate caves), it contains the largest concentration of rock art sites in the region, representing more than 5000 rock art images.

Crossing ethnological, historical, archaeological and mythological points of view, this book illustrates that rock art played an important part in Kongo culture. Like historical sources or oral traditions, it can provide historians with important documentation and contribute significantly to the reconstruction of Africa's past.

French description: À la différence des arts rupestres du Sahara ou d’Afrique australe, ceux d’Afrique centrale restent encore aujourd’hui largement méconnus. Bien que signalé dès le XVIe par Diego del Santissimo Sacramento, l’art rupestre du Kongo Central n’a jamais fait l’objet d’une recherche de grande ampleur et son âge reste toujours incertain. Peuplé par les Ndibu, un des sous-groupes kongo, le massif de Lovo se trouve dans le nord de l’ancien royaume de Kongo. Même si ce royaume est, à partir de 1500, l’un des mieux documentés de toute l’Afrique tant par les sources historiques que par les sources ethnographiques et anthropologiques pour les périodes plus récentes, il reste largement méconnu sur le plan archéologique. Avec 102 sites inventoriés (dont 16 grottes ornées), il contient la plus importante concentration de sites rupestres de toute la région, ce qui représente plus de 5000 images rupestres. En croisant les points de vue ethnologique, historique, archéologique et mythologique, j’ai pu montrer que l’art rupestre a bel et bien une part importante dans la culture kongo. Au même titre que les sources historiques ou les traditions orales, il peut apporter aux historiens une documentation de premier plan et contribuer à reconstruire le passé de l’Afrique.

Biographie: Expert au comité de l’ICOMOS pour l’art rupestre (CAR) et pour la gestion du patrimoine archéologique (ICAHM), Geoffroy Heimlich est docteur en archéologie auprès de l’Université Libre de Bruxelles et en histoire auprès de l’Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. Sous la codirection de Pierre de Maret et Jean-Loïc Le Quellec, sa recherche doctorale a porté sur l’art rupestre du Kongo Central, en République démocratique du Congo. Il est actuellement chercheur associé, en France, à l’Institut des mondes africains (IMAF) et, en Belgique, au Centre de recherches en archéologie et patrimoine (CReA-Patrimoine) de l’Université Libre de Bruxelles et au Musée royal de l’Afrique centrale de Tervuren, ainsi qu’en Afrique du Sud, Honorary research fellow au Rock Art Research Institute de l’Université de Witwatersrand, à Johannesburg. Depuis 2016, il est également directeur de la mission archéologique « Lovo » du Ministère français des Affaires étrangères, en République démocratique du Congo et en Angola.
Working with the Past: Towards an Archaeology of Recycling edited by Dragoş Gheorghiu and Phil Mason. viii+134 pages; illustrated throughout with 21 plates in colour. 346 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916299. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916305. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Recycling is a basic anthropological process of humankind. The reutilization of materials or of ideas from the Past is a process determined by various natural or cultural causes. Recycling can be motivated by a crisis or by a complex symbolic cause like the incorporation of the Past into the Present.

What archaeology has not insisted upon is the dimensional scale of the process, which operates from the micro-scale of the recycling of the ancestors’ material, up to the macro-scale of the landscape.

It is well known that there are direct relations between artefacts and landscapes in what concerns the materiality and mobility of objects. An additional relation between artefact and landscape may be the process of recycling. In many ways artefact and landscape can be considered as one aspect of material culture, perceived at a different scale, since both have the same materiality and suffer the same process of reutilisation.

This book invites archaeologists to approach the significant process of recycling within the archaeological record at two different levels: of artefacts and of landscape.
L’arte rupestre dell’età dei metalli nella penisola italiana: localizzazione dei siti in rapporto al territorio, simbologie e possibilità interpretative edited by Renata Grifoni Cremonesi & Anna Maria Tosatti. 276 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Italian text. 26 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784915568. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915575. Book contents pageDownload

This volume presents the proceedings of the conference “L’arte rupestre dell’età dei metalli nella penisola italiana: localizzazione dei siti in rapporto al territorio, simbologie e possibilità interpretative” that took place in Pisa at the Cantiere delle Navi di Pisa under the aegis of the Soprintendenza Archeologica della Toscana and of the University of Pisa on 15th June 2015. The addressed issues were related to the Post-Pleistocene rock art along the Apennine ridge; in recent years more and more evidence has been identified, which is different from the magnificent evidence found in the Alps such as, for example, the well-known Monte Bego and Val Camonica. This evidence, despite various and peculiar features, can be all related to the iconographic field whose main expressions are anthropomorphic figures, weapons, daggers, halberds and several other symbols, all similarly stylised. A peculiarity of these manifestations is their location in small shelters inappropriate for habitation or in places suitable for supervising mountain and territory roads, bearing comparison to evidence from Western Mediterranean coastal areas. An interpretative possibility has emerged: these sites could have been not only ceremonial places, but also spaces linked to the socio-economic fields or perhaps to the power of communities that occupied these territories.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Myths about Rock Art by Robert G. Bednarik. ii+218 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 278 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914745. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914752. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Rather than considering the myths supposedly depicted in the world’s rock art, this book examines the myths archaeologists and others have created about the meanings and significance of rock art. This vast body of opinions dominates our concepts of the principal surviving cultural manifestations of early worldviews. Here these constructs are subjected to detailed analysis and are found to consist largely of misinterpretations. From the misidentification of natural rock markings as rock art to mistaken interpretations, from sensationalist claims to pareidolic elucidations of iconographies, the book presents numerous examples of myths researchers have created about pre-Historic ‘art’. The claims about a connection between rock art and the neuropathologies of its producers are assessed, and the neuroscience of rock art interpretation is reviewed. The book presents a comprehensive catalogue of falsities claimed about palaeoart, and it endeavours to explain how these arose, and how they can be guarded against by recourse to basic principles of science. It therefore represents a key resource in the scientific study of rock art.

About the Author:
Robert G. Bednarik is the Convener and Editor-in-Chief of the International Federation of Rock Art Organisations and is affiliated with Hebei Normal University, China. His principal research interests are the origins of the human ability to create constructs of reality, the evolution of humans, and in a variety of fields providing supplementary information in that quest, including the world’s rock art. He has produced more than 1350 academic publications.
Archaeology with Art edited by Helen Chittock and Joana Valdez-Tullett. xx+176 pages; illustrated in black & white throughout with 7 colour plates. 293 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914929. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914936. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Archaeology with Art is the result of a 2013 Theoretical Archaeology Group (TAG) conference session that aimed to merge the perspectives of artists and archaeologists on making art. It explores the relationship between archaeology and art practice, the interactions between materials and practitioners, and the processes that result in the objects and images we call ‘art’. The book offers new approaches to the study of creative practices in archaeology, ranging from experimental investigations to philosophical explorations and contains a diverse set of papers that use insights from contemporary art practice to examine the making of past artworks.

About the editors:
Joana Valdez-Tullett is an archaeologist currently finishing a PhD thesis at the University of Southampton, funded by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT). She has been studying prehistoric art since 2003 in several countries and is currently interested in the social and cultural connections of late prehistoric Atlantic façade, which led to the widespread phenomenon of Atlantic Rock Art.

Helen Chittock is an archaeologist, who has recently finished writing a PhD thesis on decorative practices in Iron Age Britain as the holder of an AHRCfunded Collaborative Doctoral award with the British Museum and University of Southampton. Her wider research interests encompass the study of Celtic Art across northwest Europe.
The White Lady and Atlantis: Ophir and Great Zimbabwe Investigation of an archaeological myth by Jean-Loïc Le Quellec. x+320 pages; highly illustrated in colour throughout. 291 2016. ISBN 9781784914707. £55.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This meticulous investigation, based around a famous rock image, the ‘White Lady’, makes it possible to take stock of the mythical presuppositions that infuse a great deal of scientific research, especially in the case of rock art studies. It also highlights the existence of some surprising bridges between scholarly works and literary or artistic productions (novels, films, comic strips, adventure tales).

The examination of the abbé Breuil’s archives and correspondence shows that the primary motivation of the work he carried out in southern Africa like that of his pupil Henri Lhote in the Tassili was the search for ancient, vanished ‘white’ colonies which were established, in prehistory, in the heart of the dark continent. Both Breuil and Lhote found paintings on African rocks that, in their view, depicted ‘white women’ who were immediately interpreted as goddesses or queens of the ancient kingdoms of which they believed they had found the vestiges. In doing this, they were reviving and nourishing two myths at the same time: that of a Saharan Atlantis for Henri Lhote and, for the abbé, that of the identification of the great ruins of Zimbabwe with the mythical city of Ophir from which, according to the Bible, King Solomon derived his fabulous wealth.

With hindsight we can now see very clearly that their theories were merely a clumsy reflection of the ideas of their time, particularly in the colonial context of the Sahara and in the apartheid of South Africa. Without their knowledge, these two scholars’ scientific production was used to justify the white presence in Africa, and it was widely manipulated to that end. And yet recent studies have demonstrated that the ‘White Lady’ who so fascinated the abbé Breuil was in reality neither white nor even a woman. One question remains: if such an interpenetration of science and myth in the service of politics was possible in the mid-20th century, could it happen today?
Art and Architecture in Neolithic Orkney Process, Temporality and Context by Antonia Thomas. xvi+258 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 272 University of the Highlands and Islands Archaeology Institute Research Series 1. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914332. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914349. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Neolithic sites of Orkney include an impressive number of stone-built tombs, ceremonial monuments and – uniquely for northern Europe – contemporary dwellings. Many of these buildings survive in a remarkable state of preservation, allowing an understanding of the relationship between architectural space and the process of construction that is rarely achievable. Until recently, however, relatively little has been known about the decoration of these sites.

This book addresses that gap to offer a groundbreaking analysis of Neolithic art and architecture in Orkney. Focussing upon the incredible collection of hundreds of decorated stones being revealed by the current excavations at the Ness of Brodgar, it details the results of the author’s original fieldwork both there and at the contemporary sites of Maeshowe and Skara Brae, all within the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site.

It provides the first major discussion of Orkney’s Neolithic carvings, and uses these as a springboard to challenge many of the traditional assumptions relating to Neolithic art and architecture. By foregrounding the architectural context of mark-making, this book explores how both buildings and carvings emerge though the embodied social practice of working stone, and how this relates to the wider context of life in Neolithic Orkney.

Reviews:

‘Art and Architecture in Neolithic Orkney is a handsome volume; it is well illustrated and clearly set out. It is designed to be read from cover to cover but in fact there is a lot of detail here and it also makes for an excellent ‘dipping’ book. The main thrust, as you might guess, is to provide an overview of the amazing suite of decorated stones found within the structures of Neolithic Orkney through detailed studies of these three key sites. Within each site, particular case studies are set out. It is a comprehensive piece of work, taking us first through a history of the archaeological study of art, and then providing a brief guide to the Neolithic art of Britain and Ireland.
…There is a lot to take in. There is a lot to think about. It is a book that will linger and enrich any exploration of the remains of Neolithic Orkney. The ‘art’ itself is just wonderful, it was clearly an integral part of the lives of our Neolithic ancestors.’
–Caroline Wickham‐Jones (The Orcadian, November 10th, 2016)

'The book offers a compelling account of a little-known aspect of the Orcadian Neolithic, and will make a significant contribution to understanding the artistic endeavour of communities that settled this island archipelago some 5,000-6,000 years ago, fusing architecture with art.' –George Nash (Current Archaeology, Issue 326, May 2017)
Rock Art of the Vindhyas: An Archaeological Survey Documentation and Analysis of the Rock Art of Mirzapur District, Uttar Pradesh by Ajay Pratap. xiv+172; highly illustrated throughout with 68 colour plates. 244 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912451. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912468. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Rock paintings and petroglyphs are a record of human memories. No doubt, this function defines in essence all archaeological objects. Yet some objects such as tools, beyond their symbolic value, are clearly fashioned for their utility. How does rock art as an object fashioned by human hands then differ from tools? What utility does it have beyond its symbolic value? The Vindhyan corpus of rock paintings has provided us with a very valuable opportunity to be answering such questions.
Archival Theory, Chronology and Interpretation of Rock Art in the Western Cape, South Africa by Siyakha Mguni. vi+156 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 20 2016 Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 93. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784914462. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914479. Book contents pageDownload

Since absolute dating of rock art is limited, relative chronologies remain useful in contextualising interpretations of ancient images. This book advocates the archival capacity of rock art and uses archival perspectives to analyse the chronology of paintings in order to formulate a framework for their historicised interpretations. The Western Cape painting sequence is customarily accepted to include the hunter-gatherer phase from c. 10,000 BP, pastoralism from c. 2,000 BP and finally the historical-cum-colonial period several centuries ago. Painting traditions with distinct depiction manners and content are conventionally linked to these broad periods. This study evaluates this schema in order to refine the diverse hunter-gatherer, herder and colonial era painting contexts and histories. Using superimpositions as one analytical tool, the notion of datum aided the referencing and correlation of layered imagery into a relative sequence. Although broad differences separate painting traditions, and these variations are generally indistinguishable within a single tradition, it is clear that the long-spanning hunter-gatherer segment of painting in this region reflects a hitherto unrecognised sub-tradition. Some painted themes such as elephants, fat-tailed sheep, handprints and possibly finger dots occur within various levels of the sequence, which this study views as shared graphic fragments occurring between and across traditions and sub-traditions. Through the archival concept of respect des fonds such observable complexities were clarified as coherent graphic narratives that run through the entire chronological sequence of the Western Cape rock paintings. Probing archaeological, ethnographic and historical sources revealed that while these themes remained fundamentally consistent throughout the stratigraphic sequence as preferred subject matter, their meanings might have transformed subliminally from earlier to later periods, possibly reflecting layered shifts in the socio-economic, cultural and political circumstances of the region. Fundamentally, the framework of image histories shown by the choice and sustenance of specific themes is understood to mean that their significance and specific graphic contexts throughout the chronological sequence are pivoted and mirrored through the long established hunter-gatherer rock paintings which predate periods of contact with other cultures. The resulting sequence and interpretation of these painted themes is a descriptive and organisational template reflecting the original organic character in the creation of the paintings and ordered cultural continuities in the use of animal/human symbolism. This book’s agenda in part involves reviewing the Western Cape’s changing social and historical landscape to show variation in painting over time and to project possible interpretative transformations. Painting sequences and cultural (dis)continuities are thus intricately entwined and can be disentangled through a recursive analytical relationship between archaeology, ethnography and history. This amalgamated analytical approach produces historicised narratives and contextual meanings for the rock paintings.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point.

Palaeoart and Materiality The Scientific Study of Rock Art edited by Robert G. Bednarik, Danae Fiore, Mara Basile, Giriraj Kumar and Tang Huisheng. ii+254 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 6 colour plates. 267 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914295. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914301. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book contains a series of selected papers presented at two symposia entitled ‘Scientific study of rock art’, one held in the IFRAO Congress of Rock Art in La Paz, Bolivia, in June 2012, the other held in the IFRAO Congress in Cáceres, Spain, in September 2015; as well as some invited papers from leading rock art scientists. The core topic of the book is the presentation of scientific approaches to the materiality of rock art, ranging from recording and sampling methods to data analyses. These share the fact that they provide means of testing hypotheses and/or of finding trends in the data which can be used as independent sources of evidence to support specific interpretations. The issue of the materiality of visual productions of the distant past, which in archaeological theory has attracted much attention recently and has stimulated much conceptual debate, is addressed through a variety of scientific approaches, including fieldwork methods, laboratory work techniques and/or data analysis protocols. These, in turn, will provide new insights into human agency and people-image engagements through the study of rock art production, display and use.

About the Editors:
Robert G. Bednarik is the Convener and Editor-in-Chief of the International Federation of Rock Art Organisations and is affiliated with Hebei Normal University, China. His principal research interests are the origins of the human ability to create constructs of reality, the evolution of humans, and in a variety of fields providing supplementary information in that quest, including the world’s rock art. He has produced more than 1350 academic publications.

Dr Danae Fiore is a researcher at Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas, Argentina, and a lecturer at Universidad de Buenos Aires. Her main interests are focused on the archaeology of rock art, portable art and body art viewed from technological, economic and cognitive perspectives; hunter-gatherer archaeology; archaeological theory and methods; and visual archaeology (the study of indigenous material culture through ethnographic photographs).

Dr Mara Basile is an archaeologist and a researcher at the National Council of Scientific and Technical Research, Argentina. She has been a member of the Archaeological Project Chaschuil Abaucán (www.proyectopacha.com.ar) since 2002. Her main research interest is to delineate the visual languages that circulated in different expressive media over time in the region of Fiambalá (Catamarca, Argentina).

Dr Giriraj Kumar is Professor in Rock Art Science and Indian Culture and Founding Secretary General and Editor, Rock Art Society of India (estd. 1990), carrying out scientific research on early Indian petroglyphs and their dating in collaboration with Australian and other scientists. He published a book on Indian rock art and more than eighty research papers on Stone Age Indian rock art and culture.

Dr Tang Huisheng is the Director of the International Centre of Rock Art Dating and Conservation, Hebei Normal University, China. He also teaches as a Professor at the of Archaeology Department of Nanjing Normal University. His principal interests are the rock art of China and its dating, and the Chinese Neolithic period.


Rock Art Studies: News of the World V edited by Paul Bahn, Natalie Franklin, Matthias Strecker and Ekaterina Devlet. viii+364 pages; highly illustrated throughout with 102 colour plates. 242 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913533. £70.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913540. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £70.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This is the fifth volume in the series Rock Art Studies: News of the World. Like the previous editions, it covers rock art research and management across the globe over a five-year period, in this case the years 2010 to 2014 inclusive. The current volume once again shows the wide variety of approaches that have been taken in different parts of the world, although one constant has been the impact of new techniques of recording rock art. This is especially evident in the realm of computer enhancement of the frequently faded and weathered rock imagery that is the subject of our study. As has been the case in past volumes, this collection of papers includes all of the latest discoveries, including in areas hitherto not known to contain rock art. The latest dating research reported in this fifth volume, sometimes returning surprisingly early results, serves to extend our knowledge of the age of rock art as well as highlight the limits of current models for its development around the world.
Post-Palaeolithic Filiform Rock Art in Western Europe Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain) Volume 10/Session A18b edited by Fernando Coimbra and Umberto Sansoni. vi+88 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. 6 papers in English, 1 in French, all papers with abstracts in English and French. 235 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784913687. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913687. Book contents pageDownload

Filiform rock art appears as a spontaneous technique, more simple and immediate than pecking, good either for autonomous strands of expression, or for sketches and first drafts regarding works of painting or pecking. According to the order of presentation of the session’s papers during the XVII IUPPS (UISPP) Conference in Burgos, the articles published here are the following: Late prehistoric incised rock art in southern Europe: a contribution for its typology, by Fernando A. Coimbra, where the author presents a preliminary typology of this kind of rock art, divided in two groups (geometric and figurative), approaching not only common themes to several countries, but also some examples that have only a regional character; Filiform rock art in mount Bego (Tende, Maritime Alps, France), by Nicoletta Bianchi, which analyses some cases where pecked carvings overlap filiforms, therefore pre-dating pecked engravings and studies the interaction of the two carvings tradition; Filiform figures in the rock art of Valcamonica from Prehistory to the Roman age, by Umberto Sansoni, Cinzia Bettineschi and Silvana Gavaldo, that provides a general corpus of the figurative incised rock art of Valcamonica with a quantitative and qualitative approach, by considering the typological variety, the long-lasting chronological dating and the strong relation with the local pecked rock art of the Camunian filiforms; Threadlike engravings of historical period on the rocks and plaster of churches and civic buildings. Some comparisons and proposals of interpretation, by Federico Troletti, which presents the incised engravings exclusively of historical time located in some sites of Valcamonica – the area of Campanine di Cimbergo and Monticolo di Darfo; The rock art from Figueiredo (Sertã, Portugal): typology, parallels and chronology, by Fernando A. Coimbra and Sara Garcês, focusing vi on the description of the engravings from three carved rocks with incised motives from the place of Figueiredo, in central Portugal, which were studied during different fieldworks. Two other papers of researchers that couldn’t attend the Conference were also presented: The filiform rock art from Kosovo, by Shemsi Krasniqi, which presents recent findings from Kosovo with a similar typology of figures from other European countries; The filiform rock engravings of the Parete Manzi of Montelapiano (Chieti, Italy), by Tomaso Di Fraia, which analyses the problematic of incised rock art from a rock shelter in the centre of Italy.
Public Images, Private Readings: Multi-Perspective Approaches to the Post-Palaeolithic Rock Art Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain) Volume 5 / Session A11e edited by Ramón Fábregas Valcarce and Carlos Rodríguez-Rellán. vi+70 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. All papers in English, abstracts in English and French. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912895. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912901. Book contents pageDownload

A significant number of Holocene societies throughout the world have resorted at one time or another to the making of paints or carvings on different places (tombs, rock-shelters or caves, openair outcrops). The aim of the session A11e. Public images, private readings: multi-perspective approaches to the post-Palaeolithic rock art, which was held within the XVII World UISPP Congress (Burgos, September 1-7 2014), was to put together the experiences of specialists from different areas of the Iberian Peninsula and the World. The approaches ranged from the archaeological definition of the artistic phenomena and their socioeconomic background to those concerning themselves with the symbolic and ritual nature of those practices, including the definition of the audience to which the graphic manifestations were addressed and the potential role of the latter in the making up of social identities and the enforcement of territorial claims. More empirical issues, such as new recording methodologies and data management or even dating were also considered during this session.

Quality Management of Cultural Heritage: problems and best practices Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September, Burgos, Spain). Volume 8 / Session A13 edited by Maurizio Quagliuolo and Davide Delfino. 80 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 226 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912956. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912963. Book contents pageDownload

From Lascaux to Shanidar caves, from Malta temples to Stonenge (and the ‘new’ one...), from Serra da Capivara to Foz Coa park, from Australia to North Africa’s Rock Art, from Pechino to Isernia excavations, from the Musée de l’Homme in Paris to the Museum of Civilization in Quebéc, from Çatal Hüyük to the Varna village, from the Rift Valley to the Grand Canyon, most problems have to be fronted in a common perspective. But which perspective? Is it possible to have a common point of view on different values, different sites, different methodologies? The Scientific Commission for the Quality Management of Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sites, Monuments and Museums© set up at UISPP by initiative of the author (UISPP-PPCHM) is aimed to examine these issues and propose solutions acceptable to all those who want to contribute to common understanding of our past history.

The only certainty in fact is our Past. It is undoubted that it happened, it is undoubted that its consequences are in place today, it is undoubted that it is affecting persons, social groups or larger structures in some ways also when it is disregarded. The help of specialists from different Countries and the exchange of opinions with other colleagues from other fields and/or organizations is then needed in order to: discuss the reasons and possibilities for preservation and use of Sites, Monuments and Museums; let the management of Rock Art Sites and Parks, Prehistoric excavations, Museums and Interpretations Centres and related structures open to the public to be made according to criteria agreed at an International level, both in normal and critical conditions; enhance standards in preserving, communicating and using Sites, Monuments and Museums; involve the public and diffuse awareness; analyse tourism benefits and risks at these destinations; introduce new opportunities for jobs and training; develop networks on these topics in connection with other specialized Organizations.

This session aimed to ask: what is your experience? Which problems would you like to address? What solutions can be considered?

Intellectual and Spiritual Expression of Non-Literate Peoples Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September, Burgos, Spain): Volume 1 / Session A20 edited by Emmanuel Anati. xiv+386 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. 212 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912819. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912826. Book contents pageDownload

This volume presents the proceedings of the session ‘Intellectual and Spiritual Expression of Non-literate Peoples’ part of the XVII World UISPP Congress, held in Burgos (Spain), the 4th September 2014. The session brought together experts from various disciplines to share experience and scientific approaches for a better understanding of human creativity and behaviour in prehistory.
The Enigmatic World of Ancient Graffiti Rock Art in Chukotka. The Chaunskaya Region, Russia by Margarita Kir’yak (Dikova). Translated by Richard L. Bland. vi+160 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 7 colour plates. 194 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911881. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911898. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This monograph is devoted to small forms of engraving on stone. It summarizes the archaeological material obtained during the course of excavations at the Rauchuvagytgyn I site (dated to 2500 years ago) in northern Chukotka. The book analyzes the content and semantics of the pictorial resources, and ethnic identification is made. The interpretive part of the study raises issues of an ideological character and brings one closer to the inaccessible realm of ideas and concepts of the ancients. This well-illustrated book is directed primarily toward archaeologists, ethnographers, historians, and fine art experts but will also be of interest to a broad range of readers.

About the author:
Dr Margarita Kiry’ak is one of the foremost archaeologists of far Northeast Asia (Chukotka). She has been conducting archaeological research in Chukotka for more than 30 years, during which time she has published four books in Russia, Great Britain, and the U.S., and 115 scholarly articles in Russia, the U.S., Italy, and Korea.
Prehistoric Art as Prehistoric Culture Studies in Honour of Professor Rodrigo de Balbín-Behrmann edited by Primitiva Bueno-Ramírez and Paul G. Bahn. x+180 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 197 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912222. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912239. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Professor Rodrigo de Balbín has played a major role in advancing our knowledge of Palaeolithic art, and the occasion of his retirement provides an excellent opportunity to assess the value of prehistoric art studies as a factor in the study of the culture of those human groups which produced this imagery. The diverse papers in this volume, published in Professor de Balbín’s honour, cover a wide variety of the decorated caves which traditionally defined Palaeolithic art, as well as the open-air art of the period, a subject in which he has done pioneering work at Siega Verde and elsewhere. The result is a new and more realistic assessment of the social and symbolic framework of human groups from 40,000 BP onwards.
Ritual Landscapes and Borders within Rock Art Research Papers in Honour of Professor Kalle Sognnes edited by Heidrun Stebergløkken, Ragnhild Berge, Eva Lindgaard and Helle Vangen Stuedal. i-viii, 1-188 pages, illustrated in colour throughout. 190 2015. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784911584. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911591. Download

Ritual landscapes and borders are recurring themes running through Professor Kalle Sognnes' long research career. This anthology contains 13 articles written by colleagues from his broad network in appreciation of his many contributions to the field of rock art research. The contributions discuss many different kinds of borders: those between landscapes, cultures, traditions, settlements, power relations, symbolism, research traditions, theory and methods.

We are grateful to the Department of Historical studies, NTNU; the Faculty of Humanities; NTNU, The Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters and The Norwegian Archaeological Society (Norsk arkeologisk selskap) for funding this volume that will add new knowledge to the field and will be of importance to researchers and students of rock art in Scandinavia and abroad.
To See the Invisible Karelian Rock Art by Arsen Faradzhev. iv+19 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white.ISBN 9781784911249. Book contents pageDownload

This contribution considers 25 years of discovery of the possible origins and development of the Rock Art Tradition to create Karelian Rock Art images under the open sky through the analysis of different types of intercessions into the horizontal surface of granite rocks.

Karelian petroglyphs are located-at the eastern bank of the Onega Lake and 300 km to the north, close to the southern bank of the White Sea. One of them, the “New Zalavruga,” was discovered by the expedition of U.Savvateev under the Neolithic cultural layer and sterile sand layer in 1963-1968. This is a great and very rare opportunity to obtain direct dating of the end of the tradition to create Karelian Rock Art images around 5-6 ka ago. Therefore, the task was to find the “Invisible” evidences of the tradition’s origins and development similar to both regions via the different use of context.
Art as Metaphor: The Prehistoric Rock-Art of Britain edited by Aron Mazel, George Nash and Clive Waddington. 53 2007. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781905739165. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916022. £14.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Buy Now

Enigmatic, esoteric and fascinating, the rock-art of the British Isles has for a long time been a well-kept secret. However, over the last few decades hundreds of new rock art panels have been discovered and several regional surveys have been carried out. This volume brings together a carefully selected collection of papers that cover British prehistoric rock-art from over 10000 years ago.
World Rock Art: The Primordial Language Third Revised and updated edition by Emmanuel Anati. vi+180 pages; illustrated throughout with drawings and photographs in colour and black and white. 58 2010. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781905739318. £19.95 (No VAT). Institutional Price £19.95 (Exc. UK VAT) Buy Now

This volume is a basic introduction to rock art studies. It marks the starting point of the new methodology for rock art analysis, based on typology and style, first developed by the author at the Centro Camuno di Studi Preistorici. This book demonstrates the beginnings of a new discipline, the systematic study of world rock art. This edition is a revised and updated version of Anarti’s classic text, first published in English in 1993. Additions have been made and a major new category of rock art has been included.
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