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NEW: Visualizing cityscapes of Classical antiquity: from early modern reconstruction drawings to digital 3D models With a case study from the ancient town of Koroneia in Boeotia, Greece by Chiara Piccoli. Paperback; 203x276mm; xiv+314 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (100 colour plates). 53 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918897. £59.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918903. Book contents pageDownload

The amount of 3D modelling applications in archaeology has increased enormously over the last decade. 3D recording techniques allow researchers to quickly and accurately document archaeological evidence, and 3D reconstructions have created new possibilities to communicate the results to a larger public. In this latter case, however, numerous scholars have expressed their concern regarding the ethics of such digital representations, since they give prominence to a crystallized image of the past and do not account for the complexity of the archaeological record. The study presented here aims to make a practical contribution to a new understanding and use of 3D reconstructions, namely as ‘laboratories’ to test hypotheses and visualize, evaluate and discuss alternative interpretations.

In order to do so, an analysis of visual reconstructions of the early and late modern period is presented first, followed by a discussion of current applications of 3D digital reconstructions, with a special focus on cityscapes. Lastly, a practical implementation of a research-driven, intellectually transparent and GIS-based 3D reconstruction is proposed for the urban site of Koroneia, in Boeotia, Central Greece. Specifically, the methodology developed in this work uses tools that are employed in geo-design and modern urban planning in an innovative way, integrating GIS with a rule-based modelling approach. With a strong focus on the automation and iteration of the reconstruction process, our 3D visualization provides an intuitive insight into hidden relationships and associations among data, and allows the creation and evaluation of alternative reconstruction hypotheses.

About the Author
CHIARA PICCOLI is an Italian archaeologist currently employed as a staff member of the Digital Archaeology Research group at the Faculty of Archaeology in Leiden, The Netherlands. Her expertise lies in the applications of 3D modelling techniques and 2D-3D GIS to visualize and analyse archaeological evidence. Her research interests include urban studies, visual studies, and the exploitation of digital tools and new technologies for documentation, visualization, analysis and dissemination. She has participated in several excavations and surveys in Italy, Greece and Morocco. Chiara holds a BA in Cultural Heritage (University of Trento), an MA in Greek and Roman Archaeology (University of Siena) and an MA in Book and Digital Media Studies (Leiden University). She received the Tiele-Stichting Thesis Prize 2011 for the best MA dissertation in the field of Book History in the Netherlands.
From the Archaeological Record to Virtual Reconstruction The Application of Information Technologies at an Iron Age Fortified Settlement (San Chuis Hillfort, Allande, Asturias, Spain) by Juana Molina Salido. x+190 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (126 colour plates). 425 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918750. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918767. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

From the Archaeological Record to Virtual Reconstruction describes the use of New Information Technologies (IT) for the analyses and interpretation of archaeological record of the San Chuis Hillfort (San Martín de Beduledo, Allande, Asturias, Spain). The data gathered during the eight excavation campaigns conducted by Francisco Jordá Cerdá in the sixties and eighties of the 20th century was mechanised and digitalised. Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) of the hillfort was performed, followed by a creation of spatial analysis through the establishment of relations between the elements of the archaeological record. At the end, having studied and investigated the site’s urban evolution throughout its occupation period (890 cal. BP – 530 cal. AD), a virtual reconstruction of the hillfort in its different settlement phases, presenting various evolution scenarios is presented.

In the process a work methodology and a set of computer applications adapted for each step of this research have been established, such as the system for the insertion of records in a database, for planimetry drawings, hillfort virtualisation, and others.

About the Author Juana Molina Salido obtained a PhD in prehistory and archaeology. She has a long experience as an archaeologist, specialising in the application of New Information Technologies in the development of archaeological work, both in the field and in the cabinet. In addition, she is a technical specialist in heritage virtualisation. She is currently collaborating on several research projects at the UNED, the Middle Palaeolithic site of Jarama VI and on the hillfort that is the subject of this book.
CAA2015. Keep The Revolution Going Proceedings of the 43rd Annual Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology edited by Stefano Campana, Roberto Scopigno, Gabriella Carpentiero and Marianna Cirillo. 2 vols, 1160 pages, illustrated throughout in black & white with 3 colour pages (Open Access edition colour throughout). 229 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784913373. £129.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913380. Book contents pageDownload

This volume brings together all the successful peer-reviewed papers submitted for the proceedings of the 43rd conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology that took place in Siena (Italy) from March 31st to April 2nd 2015.

Altogether, within the four days of the conference 280 papers were presented in 48 sections divided into ten macro topics, 113 posters, 7 roundtables and 12 workshops. That number, in itself, has prompted a thought or two. Above all it says that CAA is very much alive and kicking, that it is in robust good health, and that it remains a wholly relevant force in the scientific community, fully engaged with the questions of the day, and a continuing focal point for the profession. All of that speaks well for the motto of CAA 2015: KEEP THE REVOLUTION GOING.

Although the significance of the motto is obvious, it is worth some thoughts. Few would deny that in the past 30 years or so, digital technologies have profoundly revolutionised archaeology – in the office and laboratory, in the field and in the classroom. The progressive introduction of digital techniques in the archaeological process has of course led to a general increase in efficiency. But perhaps more importantly it has provided a spur to the discussion of methodology and through that has strongly influenced not only the way we go about things but also the outcomes that we have been able to achieve.

The pioneering phase in the application of digital techniques in archaeological research has clearly been fruitful and today computer applications such as GIS, databases, remote sensing and spatial analysis as well as virtual and cyber archaeology are deeply embedded within our universities. This is all good, of course, but we must not assume that the task has been completed. An intrinsic revolutionary instinct towards technological development has been awakened. But it will only survive by virtue of the results that it brings about. Or using the words of our Chairman Prof Gary Lock: ‘Computers not only change the way we do things, but more importantly they change the way we think about what we do and why we do it’. The general thrust of this statement can be summed up and reinforced by recalling a quote from the philosopher Don Ihde, who has argued we should never forget that all technologies should be regarded as ‘cultural instruments’, which as well as strategies and methodologies implemented in our researches are also ‘non-neutral’.

So KEEP THE REVOLUTION GOING! is a motto that lays stress on the need to maintain innovation in archaeology through technological advances. But innovation must have at its root the fostering of critical thought and the framing of new archaeological questions. So there is much work still to be done, and fresh challenges to be faced in the months, years and decades ahead. -from the introduction by Stefano Campana and Roberto Scopigno
Off the Beaten Track. Epigraphy at the Borders Proceedings of 6th EAGLE International Event (24-25 September 2015, Bari, Italy) edited by Antonio E. Felle and Anita Rocco. vi+154 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 222 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784913229. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913236. Book contents pageDownload

This volume contains the papers presented during the Meeting ‘Off the Beaten Track – Epigraphy at the Borders’, the sixth in a series of international events planned by the EAGLE, Europeana network of Ancient Greek and Latin Epigraphy international consortium.

The Meeting was held on 24–25 September 2015, with the support of the Department of Classics and Late Antiquity Studies at the University of Bari Aldo Moro (Italy).

During the event, the EAGLE Portal (http://www.eagle-network.eu) was officially launched and presented to the public for the first time. The event was intended to address the issues which arise in digitizing inscriptions characterised by ‘unusual’ features in comparison with the epigraphic norm. Here are collected contributions from several ongoing digital projects raising questions and proposing solutions regarding encoding inscriptions – from the Archaic period to the Middle Ages and beyond, even in languages other than Greek and Latin – which do not fall within those labelled as standard.

The projects involved are the following: ILA – Iscrizioni Latine Arcaiche; The Ancient Graffiti Project; DASI – Digital Archive for the Study of pre-Islamic Arabian Inscriptions; EDB – Epigraphic Database Bari; EDV – Epigraphic Database Vernacular Inscriptions; AshLi – Ashmolean Latin Inscriptions Project.

Reviews:

'...the projects presented in the volume, though very diverse in terms of chronology, geography and focus, share numerous challenges. Some of them are still works in progress and have not yet been launched, others already have a long web presence but nonetheless need to overcome new encoding hurdles. Precisely because of this, the volume will be of interest to digital epigraphists everywhere, also outside the beaten tracks of the Graeco Latin world.' – Ortal-Paz Saar, Utrecht University (Bryn Mawr Classical Review, 2016 View online.)
The Three Dimensions of Archaeology Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September, Burgos, Spain). Volume 7/Sessions A4b and A12 edited by Hans Kamermans, Wieke de Neef, Chiara Piccoli, Axel G. Posluschny and Roberto Scopigno. viii+150 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912932. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912949. Book contents pageDownload

This volume brings together presentations from two sessions organized for the XVII World UISPP Conference that was held from 1-7 September 2014 in Burgos (Spain). The sessions are: The scientific value of 3D archaeology, organised by Hans Kamermans, Chiara Piccoli and Roberto Scopigno, and Detecting the Landscape(s) – Remote Sensing Techniques from Research to Heritage Management, organised by Axel Posluschny and Wieke de Neef. The common thread amongst the papers presented here is the application of digital recording techniques to enhance the documentation and analysis of the spatial component intrinsically present in archaeological data. For a long time the capturing of the third dimension, the depth, the height or z-coordinate, was problematic. Traditionally, excavation plans and sections were documented in two dimensions. Objects were also recorded in two dimensions, often from different angles. Remote sensing images like aerial photographs were represented as flat surfaces. Although depth could be visualized with techniques such as stereoscopes, analysis of relief was troublesome. All this changed at the end of the last century with the introduction of computer based digitization technologies, 3D software, and digital near-surface sampling devices. The spatial properties of the multi-scale archaeological dataset can now be accurately recorded, analysed and presented. Relationships between artefacts can be clarified by visualizing the records in a three dimensional space, computer-based simulations can be made to test hypotheses on the past use of space, remote sensing techniques help in detecting previously hidden features of landscapes, thus shedding light on bygone land uses.
3D Delineation: A modernisation of drawing methodology for field archaeology by Justin J.L. Kimball. 78 pages; illustrated throughout in full colour throughout. 9 2016 Access Archaeology . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784913052. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913069. Book contents pageDownload

A recent trend concerning archaeological research has focused on producing a real-time methodology for 3D digital models as archaeological documentation within the excavation setting. While such methodologies have now firmly been established, what remains is to examine how 3D models can be integrated more fully alongside other forms of archaeological documentation. This work explored one avenue by developing a method that combines the interpretative power of traditional archaeological drawings and the realistic visualisation capacity of 3D digital models. An experiment was initiated during archaeological excavations at Uppåkra, Sweden where photographic data was captured to produce 3D digital models through Photoscan. These models were geospatially located within ESRI’s 3D GIS ArcScene where shapefile editing tools were used to draw overtop of their surfaces in three-dimensions. All drawings closely followed the single context method of drawing, were allotted context numbers, and given descriptive geodatabase attributes. This methodology resulted in the further integration of 3D models alongside other forms of archaeological documentation. The drawings increased the communicative powers of archaeological interpretation by enabling the information to be disseminated in a 3D environment alongside other formats of data that would have otherwise been disconnected in 2D space. Finally, the database attributes permitted the drawings complete integration within the geodatabase, thereby making them available for query and other analytical procedures. Archaeological information is three-dimensional; therefore, archaeologists must begin to approach documentation bearing this in mind. This technique has demonstrated that 3D models are a fluidic form of documentation allowing for accurate preservation of archaeology while enabling new forms of data to be derived all within a limited amount of time. Archaeologists must begin to affect change towards embracing 3D models and their associated applications as a standard tool within the excavator’s toolbox.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Arqueología y Tecnologías de Información Espacial Una perspectiva ibero-americana edited by Alfredo Maximiano Y Enrique Cerrillo-Cuenca. vi+279 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English Abstracts. Access Archaeology . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784913182. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911539. Book contents pageDownload

Papers from the First Iberoamerican Conference on Spatial Archaeology held in 2013 at the University of Cantabria, Spain. The subjects include theoretical contexts of spatial archaeology, relationship between archaeological and ethnographical research, micro-site studies and the interpretation of the environment from archaeo-historical contextualization.

This book is also available to buy in paperback priced £42.00.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

CAA2014. 21st Century Archaeology Concepts, methods and tools. Proceedings of the 42nd Annual Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology edited by F. Giligny, F. Djindjian, L. Costa, P. Moscati and S. Robert. vi+649 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 146 2015. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784911003. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911010. Book contents pageDownload

This volume brings together a selection of papers proposed for the Proceedings of the 42nd Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology conference (CAA), hosted at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University from 22nd to 25th April 2014. The program was divided into different themes and this structure has been maintained in the arrangement of articles in the various chapters of this book. Chapter headings include: Historiography; Field and Laboratory Data Recording; Ontologies and Standards; Internet and Archaeology; Archaeological Information Systems; GIS and Spatial Analysis; Mathematics and Statistics in Archaeology; 3D Archaeology and Virtual Archaeology; Multi-Agent Systems and Complex System Modelling.
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