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NEW: Softstone: Approaches to the study of chlorite and calcite vessels in the Middle East and Central Asia from prehistory to the present edited by Carl S. Phillips and St John Simpson. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+270 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 461 2018 British Foundation for the Study of Arabia Monographs (formerly Society for Arabian Studies Monographs) 20. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919924. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919931. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Stone containers have been made and used in the Middle East for over eleven millennia where they pre-dated the invention of pottery and were widely traded. The appearance or properties of the stone helped govern how stone vessels were valued or used and many classes were strictly utilitarian, being used for storage, cooking or lighting. Others were decorated and at times they were considered valuable exotica, particularly in regions far removed from their source areas. The subject of stone vessels is attracting growing attention but this is the first attempt to bring together different approaches to the study of softstone vessels, particularly but not exclusively those carved from varieties of chlorite, and covering all periods from prehistory to the present.

About the Editors
CARL S. PHILLIPS works in the Université Paris Ouest, specialises in Arabian archaeology and has excavated extensively in Oman, Yemen and the United Arab Emirates.

ST JOHN SIMPSON is a senior curator in the Department of the Middle East at the British Museum, specialises in the archaeology of the Sasanian and early medieval periods and has excavated extensively in the Middle East and Central Asia.
NEW: The Roman Pottery Manufacturing Site in Highgate Wood: Excavations 1966-78 by A E Brown and H L Sheldon. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+392 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (70 plates in colour). (Print RRP £60.00). 456 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 43. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919788. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919795. Book contents pageDownload

Excavations over a period of eight years uncovered at least ten pottery kilns, waster heaps, ditches and pits, but only a few definite structures. The pottery from the site indicates a period of operation extending from the first half of the 1st century AD to the later 2nd century. The pottery made at the site included initially a vegetable tempered handmade ware, but subsequently the bulk of it consisted of a grog tempered ware and then pottery in a sandy fabric which is well known from assemblages in London. The type of kiln varied with the pottery fabric; there was possible evidence for a pre-Roman pit firing, and later kilns set in ditches were of the twin flued type, eventually replaced by the more familiar above ground kilns with raised floors. Changes in pottery fabric were reflected in different methods of clay preparation, which led to changes in the function of the various ditches, the stratigraphy of which, along with the variation in the fabrics, was significant in enabling the four broad phases into which the site has been divided, to be proposed.

The report includes a very detailed analysis of the forms and fabrics of the pottery made at Highgate. Finds of prehistoric flintwork and pottery during the excavation, and of material of later date, together with the observation of earthworks and historical research, have been used to show the place of the pottery kilns as an element in the exploitation of the woodland of northern London over the last eight thousand years.

About the Authors
TONY BROWN was a member of the academic staff of the University of Leicester for over thirty years, moving there in 1964 as an Assistant Staff Tutor (Organising Tutor for Leicestershire). In 1966 he became Organising Tutor for Northamptonshire and in 1968 Staff Tutor in Archaeology. From 1990 he held a joint appointment with the School of Archaeological Studies, retiring in 2001 as an Emeritus Reader. During the earlier part of this period he engaged in rescue excavations for the Department of the Environment (Roman pottery kilns at Harrold in Bedfordshire and the Roman small town of Towcester in Northamptonshire), thereafter co
NEW: Dosariyah: An Arabian Neolithic Coastal Community in the Central Gulf by Philipp Drechsler. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+498 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (110 plates in colour). (Print RRP £80.00).. 454 2018 British Foundation for the Study of Arabia Monographs (formerly Society for Arabian Studies Monographs) 19. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919627. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919634. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £80.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Dosariyah: Reinvestigating a Neolithic coastal community in eastern Arabia describes the work carried out at Dosariyah, located in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia, which took place between 2010 and 2014. It was conducted by the joint German-Saudi Dosariyah Archaeological Research Project (DARP). A wealth of material remains was found during excavations within almost three metres of anthropogenic deposits. Radiocarbon dates and comparative studies of artefacts securely date the occupation of the site into the first centuries of the fifth millennium BC.

The co-occurrence of locally produced artefacts that are technologically and typologically rooted in the local Arabian Middle Neolithic, and imports from southern Mesopotamia is characteristic of Dosariyah. However, the mechanisms behind this distribution of foreign materials along the Arabian Gulf coast, in particular, are still poorly understood. It is the central proposition of this book that the local societies living along the shores of the Arabian Gulf coast played an active role in the acquisition of Ubaid pottery and other objects originating in southern Mesopotamia.

A predominance of imported objects, considered as ‘exotic items’, are understood as integral components of rituals that were part of temporary gatherings of larger groups of people at Dosariyah. Based on the material evidence from the site, such collective social events were embedded in everyday life during the fifth millennium BC.

About the Author
Philipp Drechsler is a research fellow at the University of Tübingen, Germany, where he received his PhD in 2008. Trained in prehistoric archaeology, geology and geography, he has a particular interest in the emergence and the development of food producing – Neolithic – societies on the Arabian Peninsula. His fields of expertise include lithic studies, the analysis of spatial patterns of human behaviour and human action against the background of changing environmental conditions. He is head of the joint German-Saudi Dosariyah Archaeological Research Project (DARP), and has also been invited to participate in research projects in Qatar, V.A.E and Syria.
NEW: A Kerma Ancien Cemetery in the Northern Dongola Reach Excavations at site H29 by Derek A. Welsby. Hardback; 210x297mm; xviii+226 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (103 colour plates). English text with Arabic summary. (Print RRP £58.00). 443 2018 Sudan Archaeological Research Society Publication 22. ISBN 9781784919313. £58.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is the final report on the excavations of a Kerma Ancien cemetery discovered by the Sudan Archaeological Research Society during its Northern Dongola Reach Survey conducted between 1993 and 1997. It is one of the very few cemeteries of this date to have been fully excavated and provides interesting data on funerary culture as practised in a rural environment, to be compared with the extensive information available from investigations of the cemetery associated with the metropolis of Kerma 100km to the north. It includes a range of specialist reports on all categories of artefacts recovered as well as on the physical anthropology, archaeobotany and archaeozoology.

About the Author
DEREK A. WELSBY has directed excavations and surveys in Sudan since 1982. These have included all-period surveys in the Northern Dongola Reach and at the Fourth Cataract as a component of the Merowe Dam Archaeological Salvage Project. Major excavations have been undertaken within the capital of the medieval kingdom of Alwa at Soba East and in the Kushite town and cemetery at Kawa. Surveys have also been undertaken along Sudan’s first railway between Wadi Halfa and Kerma dating to the late 19th century.
NEW: Egyptian and Imported Pottery from the Red Sea port of Mersa Gawsis, Egypt by Sally Wallace-Jones with contributions from Andrea Manzo, Mary Ownby and Karin Kopetzky. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+186 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (43 colour plates). (Print RRP £32.00). 432 2018 Archaeopress Egyptology 20. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919030. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919047. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The unique site of Mersa Gawasis was a base for seaborne trade along the Red Sea coast during the Middle Kingdom. The Egyptians’ purpose was to trade with Punt for incense and other exotic materials. There is little evidence of any permanent structures at the site apart from man-made caves in which shipping equipment was stored between expeditions. The pottery is, therefore, amongst the most significant evidence for human activity here. Vessel types include many marl C jars, but other kinds of vessels including significant foreign material also occur, some in large quantities. This variety of vessels and the careful reuse of potsherds is central to an understanding of specific and day to day domestic activities and of how the site operated. Mersa Gawasis has many vessel forms of the 12th and Early 13th dynasties. Epigraphic evidence closely dates the site, helping to confirm and underpin an understanding of vessel types and technologies within the ceramic chronology of the period. This volume presents the site’s wide variety of ceramic material, offering also an interpretation of what pottery reveals about activities at the site. The author and excavation photographer have worked together to enhance details of the text with specific photographs.

About the Author
SALLY WALLACE-JONES was born in Norwich, and her interest in archaeology was sparked in childhood by parents who had worked in Egypt and by the Egyptian collection at Norwich Castle Museum where she assisted with the redisplay of the collection. She studied Archaeology and Classics at Manchester University and completed her PhD in the ceramics of Predynastic Egypt. Sally has excavated in many places including Hadrian’s Wall and the Frankish port of Quentovic. She studied with Janine Bourriau and worked for several seasons on the pottery from the Egypt Exploration Society’s Survey of Memphis. She has also worked on the Predynastic pottery at Diospolis Parva for Kathryn Bard’s Boston University excavations, before being asked to take on the ceramic analysis at Mersa Gawasis. She worked as a teacher until 2015 when she began to study for ordination in the Anglican Church, being awarded a BTh degree from Cambridge in 2017. Sally is now part of the clergy team at Hingham in Norfolk. In her spare time, she enjoys continued study of Ancient Egyptian culture as well as travelling, collecting pottery from her travels and playing in a woodwind chamber group. She also speaks on Egyptology to local organisations.
NEW: Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture: Subscriptions and Back-Issues One volume published annually edited by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph (Heads of Editorial Board). ISBN 2399-1844-HOME. Book contents pageBuy Now

For the Hellenistic Period ceramics and other commodities of daily life represent probably the most neglected objects in archaeological research. Yet, the study of Hellenistic material culture has intensified during the last twenty years, with a focus clearly on what is by far the largest category of finds, pottery. Meanwhile research has gained momentum, but still there has unfortunately been no parallel development in the media landscape. Apart from monographs, the publication of conference proceedings, which usually follow several years after the event, have remained the principal method of disseminating research results. Still lacking is a publication appearing regularly and at short intervals, that focusses research on Hellenistic pottery and is easily accessible.

The Journal of Hellenistic Pottery – JHP – wants to close this gap.

JHP is scheduled to appear once a year, more often if necessary. It should provide a forum for all kinds of studies on Hellenistic pottery and everyday objects. Apart from professional articles, the journal will contain book reviews, short presentations of research projects (including dissertations) and general news. The Editorial Board is headed by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph.

SUBSCRIBE: click here to subscribe (2018: Volume 3, 1 issue).

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Print Subscriptions:
Private individuals: £30
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eJournal available as a free PDF download in Archaeopress Open Access upon publication of the printed edition.

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An up-to-date contents listing for the journal is available online here: JHP contents 2016-2017


BACK-ISSUES (Available in print and as free-to-download PDF eJournals)

JHP Volume 1, 2016
JHP Volume 2, 2017

FORTHCOMING: Winifred Lamb: Aegean Prehistorian and Museum Curator by David W. J. Gill. Paperback; 148x210mm; 340pp. (Print RRP £30.00). 448 2018 Archaeological Lives . ISBN 9781784918798. Buy Now

Winifred Lamb was a pioneering archaeologist in Anatolia and the Aegean. She studied classics at Newnham College, Cambridge, and subsequently served in naval intelligence alongside J. D. Beazley during the final stages of the First World War. As war drew to a close, Sydney Cockerell, Director of the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, invited Lamb to be the honorary keeper of Greek antiquities. Over the next 40 years she created a prehistoric gallery, marking the university’s contribution to excavations in the Aegean, and developed the museum’s holdings of classical bronzes and Athenian figure-decorated pottery. Lamb formed a parallel career excavating in the Aegean. She was admitted as a student of the British School at Athens and served as assistant director on the Mycenae excavations under Alan Wace and Carl Blegen. After further work at Sparta and on prehistoric mounds in Macedonia, Lamb identified and excavated a major Bronze Age site at Thermi on Lesbos. She conducted a brief excavation on Chios before directing a significant project at Kusura in Turkey. She was recruited for the Turkish language section of the BBC during the Second World War, and after the cessation of hostilities took an active part in the creation of the British Institute of Archaeology at Ankara.

About the Author
David Gill is Professor of Archaeological Heritage at the University of Suffolk and Visiting Research Fellow in the School of History at the University of East Anglia. He is a former Rome Scholar at the British School at Rome, and Sir James Knott Fellow at Newcastle University. He was responsible for the Greek and Roman collections at the Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge, before moving to Swansea University where he was Reader in Mediterranean Archaeology. In 2012 he received the Outstanding Public Service Award from the Archaeological Institute of America for his research on cultural property.

Table of Contents (Provisional)
Introduction
Chapter 1 - The Lamb Family and Early Years
Chapter 2 - Cambridge and Classics
Chapter 3 - The Hope Vases and Naval Intelligence
Chapter 4 - The First Year in Athens (1920–21)
Chapter 5 - Prehistory and the Fitzwilliam Museum
Chapter 6 - Mycenae, Sparta and Macedonia
Chapter 7 - The Fitzwilliam Museum: Developing the Classical Collections
Chapter 8 - The Eastern Aegean: Lesbos and Chios
Chapter 9 - Anatolia and Kusura
Chapter 10 - The War Years
Chapter 11 - The British Institute of Archaeology at Ankara
Bibliography
Index
FORTHCOMING: The Mycenaean Cemetery at Clauss, Near Patras The people, their material remains and culture in context by Constantinos Paschalidis with contributions by Photini J. P. McGeorge and Wiesław Więckowski. Paperback; 205x290mm; 600pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (Print RRP £90.00). 436 2018. ISBN 9781784919191. Buy Now

This work comprises the study of the finds from the excavation of the University of Ioannina and the Archaeological Society at Athens in the Mycenaean cemetery of Clauss near Patras, carried out between 1988-1992 under the direction of Professor Thanassis Papadopoulos. During the excavation project, fifteen chamber tombs were located and researched in detail, to be added to those already known from the pre-war excavations by Nikolaos Kyparissis.

The presentation of the topic expands into seven thematic chapters, proceeding from the whole to the parts – and then returning to the whole. Thus, one progresses from the general review of the cemetery space and the sites, to the analytical description of the excavation, to remarks on the architecture, to the study of the finds, to the analysis of the burial customs and, finally, to the narration of the overall history of the cemetery according to chronological period and generation of its people. The last chapter is an addendum including a brief presentation of the anthropological analysis of the skeletal material, composed by Drs Photini J.P. McGeorge and Wiesław Więckowski.

The Mycenaean Cemetery at Clauss, Near Patras presents fragments of the life and death of some members of a local community that lived for almost four centuries at the western end of the Mycenaean world.

About the Author
Constantinos Paschalidis was born in Athens in 1973. He studied History at the Ionian University, Corfu, and Archaeology at the University of Ioannina, where he successfully composed his doctoral thesis on the Mycenaean cemetery at Clauss, near Patras.

Since 1992 he has participated and worked for several archaeological projects (excavations, surveys and study-seasons) in Crete, Keos, Kythnos, Achaea, Argolid, Kefalonia, Ithaca, Corfu, Chalkidiki in Greece, as well as at the sites of Ghor as Safi and Tell Kafrein in Jordan. He has been Curator of Antiquities at the Department of Prehistoric, Egyptian, Cypriot and Oriental Collections of the National Archaeological Museum at Athens, and since 2012 he has been Secretary at the Central Archaeological Council of the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports.

Table of Contents (provisional)
Prologue by Professor Thanassis Papadopoulos; Preface – Acknowledgements; Introduction – The Methodology of Research; Chapter 1. The Mycenaean period in Achaea; Chapter 2. Description of tombs; Chapter 3. The setting and architecture of the tombs; Chapter 4. Catalogue of the finds from the cemetery; Chapter 5. The finds from the cemetery—analysis ; Chapter 6. Funerary customs in the cemetery; Chapter 7. The people and society of Clauss—overview and history of the cemetery ; Chapter 8. Bioarchaeological approach to the human remains from Clauss; Appendix. Tables of data; List of Figures; List of Tables; General Abbreviations ; Bibliography
FORTHCOMING: Handel in Krisenzeiten: Ägyptisch-mykenische Handelsbeziehungen in der Ramessidenzeit by Birgit Schiller. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+208 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. German text with English summary. (RRP £35.00). 434 2018. ISBN 9781784918675. Book contents pageBuy Now

This book provides an overview of the sites of Mycenaean pottery finds in Egypt and Nubia. Data from thirty-six sites in Egypt and twelve sites in Nubia are presented. The context of the vessels and sherds dates from the reign of Akhenaten (18th Dynasty) to that of Ramesses VI (20th Dynasty). The imported vessels were found in the capital cities as well as in fortresses, other cities and tombs. Stirrup jars and flasks came to light frequently.

Copies of Mycenaean stirrup jars made from clay, faience and stone were also found. The oldest sherd of an imitation vessel was found in Amarna; hence, the Mycenaean vessel shape (stirrup jar prevailing) was copied outside of Mycenaean Greece in the 18th Dynasty and filled with local liquids—possibly oil—and traded with Egypt. Egyptians not only imported vessels from the Levant but also produced imitation vessels themselves. Apparently, these vessels circulated only within Egypt.

Chemical analyses of sherds from different sites reveal that the vessels found in 18th Dynasty contexts were made on the Mycenaean mainland. During the Ramesside period (19th–20th Dynasty) trading contacts with Mycenaean Greece shifted to Cyprus, where high quality Mycenaean pottery was produced.

About the Author
Birgit Schiller studied Egyptology and Classical Archaeology (prioritising Bronze Age Archaeology) at the Humboldt University of Berlin. She completed her MA in Egyptology and wrote her PhD thesis in Classical Archaeology. Her defence of the thesis was made in 2012.

German Description: Dieses Buch gibt eine Übersicht über die in Ägypten und Nubien gefundene mykenische Keramik. An 36 Orten in Ägypten und an 12 verschiedenen Stellen in Nubien kam sie ans Tageslicht. Zeitlich reichen die Funde von der Regierungszeit Echnatons (18. Dynastie) bis zu Ramses VI. (20. Dynastie). Die Gefäße wurden im Wohnbereich, mithin bei den Lebenden, wie auch als Grabbeigabe, für das Leben im Jenseits verwendet. Das militärische Personal wurde ebenfalls mit mykenischen Produkten, vermutlich Öl, versorgt.

Eine Auflistung der Nachahmungen mykenischer Bügelkannen, die aus Ton, Fayence und Stein (Kalzit) gefertigt wurden, findet sich ebenfalls hier. Die älteste Nachahmung (sog. Simple Style-Keramik) stammt aus Amarna, so dass deren Import etwa gleichzeitig mit dem Import der Ware aus dem mykenischen Gebiet beginnt. So sind sie teils aus der Levante kommend mit lokaler Flüssigkeit – vermutlich Öl – nach Ägypten verhandelt worden. Auch die Ägypter haben ihrerseits die Bügelkanne nachgemacht, wobei gerade die Tongefäße wohl eher für den heimischen Markt gedacht waren.

Chemische Analysen des Tons haben ergeben, dass die Keramik, die in Kontexten der 18. Dynastie gefunden wurde, aus dem mykenischen Kernland, der Argolis, stammt. Während der Ramessidenzeit (19.-20. Dynastie) verlagerte sich der Handel nach Zypern, wo hochwertige mykenische Keramik hergestellt wurde.

Die Autorin studierte an der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Ägyptologie und Klassische Archäologie, wo sie den Schwerpunkt auf die Ägäische Bronzezeit legte. Sie schloss das Studium mit dem Magister in Ägyptologie ab und schriebt ihre Doktorarbeit in der Klassischen Archäologie zur mykenischen Keramik in Ägypten. Die Arbeit wurde 2012 verteidigt.
Atlas of Ceramic Fabrics 1 Italy: North-East, Adriatic, Ionian. Bronze Age: Impasto by Valentina Cannavò and Sara Tiziana Levi. Paperback; 175x245mm; viii+142 pages; 25 figures, 16 tables and 16 colour plate section containing 167 illustrations. 427 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918590. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918606. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £29.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Atlas Of Ceramic Fabrics 1. Italy: North-East, Adriatic, Ionian. Bronze Age: Impasto presents and interprets the petrographic composition of Bronze Age Impasto pottery (23rd-10th centuries BCE) found in the eastern part of Italy. This is the first of a series of Atlases organised according to geographical areas, chronology and types of wares. In this book 935 samples from 63 sites are included, which comprise material obtained as a result of almost 30 years of interdisciplinary archaeological, technological and archaeometric research by the authors’ team. 73 petrographic fabrics (the potters’ ‘recipes’) are defined and presented, on their lithological character – a tool that can be used to compare the different components of the ceramic pastes and to check provenance of non-local pots.

The volume is organised in chapters focused on methodology, fabric description and distribution, followed by the archaeological implications and the database, with contributions by Daniele Brunelli and Andrea Di Renzoni. Illustrations and descriptions of the fabrics and a complete list of the samples are included in order to provide a rigorous and transparent presentation of the data. The archaeological implications are discussed within the topics such as technology, variability, standardisation, chronology, function, social organisation, circulation, style, typology and cultural identity. It is hoped that this work will be considered as another stepping-stone in demostrating that, in archaeology, technological variability is as important as morphological and stylistic distinctions.

About the Authors
VALENTINA CANNAVÓ’S research focuses on the archaeometric investigation of ancient pottery. She is a research fellow at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia where she obtained a PhD in archaeological science (2010). Valentina teaches pottery technology (Ferrara University) and applied geoarchaeology (Modena and Reggio Emilia University) to the graduate students. She is in charge of the database of prehistoric pottery and since 2009 she has been the director of the field laboratory of the excavation at San Vincenzo Stromboli (Aeolian Islands).

SARA T. LEVI’S research focuses on the ancient pottery through an integrated archaeological, technological and archaeometric approach, and on the Bronze Age of central Mediterranean. She obtained a PhD in archaeology at Sapienza University in Rome (1996). Her findings have been published in several scientific journals and books, including a volume on the Italo- Mycenaean pottery (2014). Since 2015 she has been teaching archaeology at Hunter College in New York, after spending eight years at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia as professor of archaeological methodology. Since 2009 she leads the interdisciplinary archaeological investigations at San Vincenzo Stromboli (Aeolian Islands) and at Cannatello (Agrigento). Both projects hold international field schools for students as well.
Estudios para la configuración de las facies cerámicas altoimperiales en el Sur de la Península Ibérica edited by P. Ruiz Montes, Ma. V. Peinado Espinosa and Ma. I. Fernández García. Paperback; 210x297mm; ii+284 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (68 colour plates). Spanish text throughout. 403 2018 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 11. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918118. £39.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918125. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £39.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Estudios para la configuración de las facies cerámicas altoimperiales en el Sur de la Península Ibérica explores economy and trade in the south of the Iberian peninsula during the High Roman Empire. Different methodologies, techniques and approaches to archaeological research are applied in the analysis and study of ceramic contexts in several marketplaces or consumption centres in the area. Special attention is given to ceramic facies predominantly characterised by the presence of fine pottery. In addition, the examination of local ceramics points towards a complexity whose interpretation has been biased until a few decades ago by the presence of wares imported from other Mediterranean regions as a result of the intensity of Roman trade. Furthermore, exploration beyond traditional analytical parameters highlights, for example, the relevance of the phenomenon of pottery vessel imitation.

About the Editors
DR PABLO RUIZ MONTES has a doctorate in History from the University of Granada and is a postdoctoral researcher linked to the Department of Prehistory and Archaeology at the University of Granada. His research focuses on the analysis of ceramic facies of Roman times in the Baetica province, and on the study of technology traditions and production processes, particularly in Red Slip wares, in the Western Roman world. Also, in past years, he has developed his research in Italy, at the University of Siena and in archaeological sites such as the Roman colony of Cosa (Ansedonia).

DR Mª VICTORIA PEINADO ESPINOSA has a doctorate in History from the University of Granada. She has worked as associate researcher for both the University of Granada and the University of Perugia. Her line of research has focused on the analysis of the material culture in Roman times, especially common ware pottery. Her works have contributed to better understand these ceramics both in the South of the Iberian Peninsula and in Central Italy. Currently, she combines teaching with archaeological research, and she is involved in several projects studying the Roman Baetica.

DR Mª ISABEL FERNÁNDEZ GARCÍA is Professor of Archeology at the Department of Prehistory and Archeology at the University of Granada. One of her main areas of expertise and focus of her research is the analysis of the production and marketing structures in pottery workshops from Roman times, with special emphasis in the Baetica province. She is a specialist in pottery productions in Hispanic terra sigillata.
London’s Waterfront 1100–1666: excavations in Thames Street, London, 1974–84 by John Schofield, Lyn Blackmore and Jacqui Pearce, with Tony Dyson. Hardback; 210x297mm; xxiv+514 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (132 colour plates). English text with summaries in French and German. 422 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918378. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918385. Book contents pageDownload

London’s Waterfront 1100–1666: excavations in Thames Street, London, 1974–84 presents and celebrates the mile-long Thames Street in the City of London and the land south of it to the River Thames as an archaeological asset. The argument is based on the reporting of four excavations of 1974–84 by the Museum of London near the north end of London Bridge: Swan Lane, Seal House, New Fresh Wharf and Billingsgate Lorry Park. Here the findings of the period 1100–1666 are presented.

Buildings and property development on sixteen properties south of Thames Street, on land reclaimed in many stages since the opening of the 12th century, include part of the parish church of St Botolph Billingsgate. The many units of land reclamation are dated by dendrochronology, coins and documents. They have produced thousands of artefacts and several hundred kilos of native and foreign pottery. Much of this artefactual material has been published, but in catalogue form (shoes, knives, horse fittings, dress accessories, textiles, household equipment). Now the context of these finds, their deposition in groups, is laid out for the first time. Highlights of the publication include the first academic analysis and assessment of a 13th- or 14th-century trumpet from Billingsgate, the earliest surviving straight trumpet in Europe; many pilgrim souvenirs; analysis of two drains of the 17th century from which suggestions can be made about use of rooms and spaces within documented buildings; and the proposal that one of the skeletons excavated from St Botolph’s church is John Reynewell, mayor of London in 1426–7 and a notable figure in London’s medieval history.

The whole publication encourages students and other researchers of all kinds to conduct further research on any aspect of the sites and their very rich artefactual material, which is held at the Museum of London’s Archaeological Archive. This is a significantly large and varied dataset for the archaeology and history of London in the period 1100 to 1666 which can be continuously interrogated for generations to come.

About the Authors
JOHN SCHOFIELD was an archaeologist at the Museum of London from 1974 to 2008. He has written several well-received books on the archaeology of London and of British medieval towns; and as Cathedral Archaeologist for St Paul’s Cathedral, archaeological accounts of the medieval and Wren buildings.

LYN BLACKMORE is a Senior Ceramics and Finds Specialist who has worked for MOLA and its predecessors since 1986. During this time she has established the Anglo-Saxon fabric type series for London, has contributed to the Type-Series of London Medieval Pottery and has published widely on aspects of post- Roman pottery. Her special research interests are the development of London and the role of local, regional and imported pottery and finds in trade and exchange. In 2009–14 she was Assistant Treasurer of the Medieval Pottery Research Group and in 2017 was elected co-editor of its journal Medieval Ceramics, a role she first held in 1989–94.

JACQUI PEARCE is a Senior Ceramics Specialist with MOLA, focusing especially on medieval and later pottery, on which she has published widely. She joined the Museum of London’s Department of Urban Archaeology in 1977 and has played a major role in the development and publication of the Type-Series of London Medieval Pottery. She has served as Joint Editor of Medieval Ceramics, as well as of Post-Medieval Archaeology and is currently Joint Editor of English Ceramic Circle Transactions. In 2017 she was elected President of the Society for Post-Medieval Archaeology.

TONY DYSON was the principal documentary historian and general editor at the Department of Urban Archaeology of the Museum of London from 1974 to 1998.

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Special Place, Interesting Times: The island of Palagruža and transitional periods in Adriatic prehistory by Stašo Forenbaher with contributions by Zlatko Perhoč and Robert H. Tykot. x+194 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (60 colour plates). 421 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918491. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918507. Book contents pageDownload

While one might say that the prehistory of the Adriatic was always in transition, the rhythm of change was not always the same. On several occasions, a series of changes over a relatively short time period resulted in dramatic transformations. Three crucial episodes of change marked the later Adriatic prehistory. The first one, which took place around year 6000 BC, was a transformation of subsistence strategy, transition from hunting and gathering to farming. The second one was a social transformation that played out in the third millennium BC, when for the first time the power of individuals was clearly expressed by material culture. The third episode, inclusion into the classic Mediterranean civilization, coincided with the end of prehistory in the Adriatic region.

During all of those episodes, travel and connectivity with distant lands played an exceptionally important role, and certain places gained particular importance due to their unique geographic location. Palagruža is among the most prominent such places, its importance being out of all proportion to its physical size. Adriatic prehistory cannot be told without mentioning Palagruža, and prehistory of Palagruža cannot be understood without knowing Adriatic prehistory. Due to its strategic position in the very center of the Adriatic Sea, due to the mystery born of distance and isolation, due to its wild and spectacular landscape, Palagruža indeed is a special place. A reflection of its specialty is an unexpected abundance of high-grade archaeological evidence, dating precisely from the three aforementioned periods marked by radical change.

About the Author
STAŠO FORENBAHER is Senior Research Advisor at the Institute for Anthropological Research in Zagreb, Croatia. He studied archaeology at the University of Zagreb (Croatia), and received his PhD from the Southern Methodist University in Dallas (TX). His research interests cover Mediterranean Prehistory with a focus on the Adriatic, and include transition to farming, formation of early elites, archaeology of caves, and lithic analysis. He has excavated at many prehistoric stratified cave sites in the eastern Adriatic, including Pupićina Cave in Istria, Vaganačka Cave in Velebit Mountain, Grapčeva Cave on the island of Hvar, and Nakovana Cave on Pelješac Peninsula. His current fieldwork is focussed on the excavation of Vela Cave on the island of Korčula.
Le classi ceramiche della “tradizione mista” a Kos nel Tardo Bronzo IA by Salvatore Vitale. 208 pages; illustrations in colour and black & white. Italian text.. 51 2018. ISBN 9781784918859. Download

This volume focuses on the pottery classes of the “Entangled Tradition” recovered at the settlement of the “Serraglio” on Kos during the late Bronze Age and into the Iron Age. The results reveal new information on the chronology, typology, and decoration of Koan Painted Fine (PF) and Koan Painted Medium-Coarse to Coarse (PMC-C), ceramics. Moreover, the fresh analysis of the chaîne opératoire used to manufacture these classes and the assessment of consumption patterns contribute to a wider understanding of the socio-cultural and political implications of the Koan pottery assemblage during the early part of the late Bronze Age.

The data presented in this volume indicate that PF and PMC-C ceramics represent a unique case of fully entangled classes in the Aegean, which merged features of the Koan “Local Tradition” with characteristics of the Minoan and Minoanizing potting traditions of Crete and the Cyclades into a new technological and stylistic language. Contacts between these different cultures are explained based on the theoretical model provided by “human mobility”. The specific Koan cultural synthesis, however, was endorsed and promoted by the local elites at the settlement of the “Serraglio”, which aimed to participate in the “new environment” determined by the economic and cultural expansion of Neopalatial Crete.

In this respect, the manufacture of Koan Entangled classes served a dual scope. On the one hand, using transport containers made in the PMC-C class, Koan products were exported and exchanged throughout the Aegean. In addition, the finer vessels of the Koan “Entangled Tradition” were utilized for promoting Minoan-type social practices at the “Serraglio”. Through these practices, Koan elites aimed to redefine their identity and portray an image of higher status within the local social arena.

About the Author
Dr. Salvatore Vitale completed his MA in Classical Literatures and PhD in Classical Archaeology at the University of Pisa in 2001 and 2007 respectively, under the supervision of Professors M. Benzi and Giampaolo Graziadio. After completion of his PhD, Dr. Vitale held post-doctoral and research fellowships at the Universities of Calabria, Cincinnati, and Pisa and at the Italian Archaeological School at Athens.

Since 2009, he has been the director of the “Serraglio, Eleona, and Langada Archaeological Project” (SELAP), a research endeavor carried out under the auspices of the Italian Archaeological School at Athens. The main goal of SELAP is to provide new information on the island of Kos from the Final Neolithic until the Late Protogeometric period.
Agia Varvara-Almyras: An Iron Age Copper Smelting Site in Cyprus edited by Christina Peege in collaboration with Philippe Della Casa and Walter Fasnacht. xii+294 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (100 colour plates). 415 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918156. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918163. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Iron Age copper smelting site situated near the Cypriot village Agia Varvara is of particular importance among the ancient copper processing places in the Near East because it has revealed spatial as well as technological aspects of copper production in a hitherto rarely-seen depth of detail. Agia Varvara-Almyras: an Iron Age Copper Smelting Site in Cyprus presents the results of a comprehensive post-excavation analysis of the stratigraphy (part I), also of the geology, metallurgical materials (furnaces, tuyeres), finds (pottery, furnace lining, stone tools), as well as a synthesis of the copper smelting technology at Agia Varvara-Almyras (part II).

The excavation analysis not only focuses on pyrotechnical information from individual furnaces, but also provides a detailed study of the spatial organisation as well as of the living conditions on the smelting site. An elaborate reconstruction of the features in a 3D model allows the visualisation of formerly-dispersed loci of copper production. Based on this virtual rebuilding of the hillock named Almyras, it becomes clear that archaeometallurgy must be unchained, and the idea of an ‘operational chain’ must be replaced by a more multidimensional research strategy labelled as an ‘operational web’. The present volume aims to stimulate future excavations which pay attention to the reasons behind the exploitation of the riches of the island, as well as to the needs of the markets where the final product was very likely to have been appreciated as a strategic commodity, by power players operating on the island as well as by ordinary people in need of a repair to an everyday commodity which had broken.

About the Editors
CHRISTINA PEEGE graduated at the Department of Classical Archaeology at the University of Zurich. She started her academic career as a research assistant at the Chair of Ancient History in Zurich, and as a scientific collaborator at the Mint Cabinet in the City of Winterthur. After having participated in archaeological excavations conducted by cantonal archaeology services in Switzerland, she started as a trench supervisor under the auspices of Walter Fasnacht at the excavation of Agia Varvara-Almyras. She completed her doctoral studies with this comprehensive publication of the excavation results at the University of Zurich in January 2017.

PHILIPPE DELLA CASA graduated in Roman Provincial Archaeology before taking his PhD with a thesis on the Bronze Age necropolis of Velika Gruda, Montenegro in 1994. He then engaged in a series of large Adriatic and Alpine projects on settlement survey and excavation, landscape history, as well as social and economic archaeology including mining archaeology. Since 2002, he has held the Chair of Prehistoric Archaeology at the University of Zurich as a full professor.

WALTER FASNACHT graduated in primary and secondary teaching before the award of his master’s degree in Prehistoric Archaeology and Geology at the University of Zurich. He is the director of the Almyras Excavation Cyprus. He has been lecturer in archaeometallurgy at the Universities of Fribourg and Zurich, curator of archaeology at the Swiss National Museum, researcher at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research as well as a member of the Swiss School of Archaeology in Eretria, Greece. He founded the Swiss Association of Experimental Archaeology and is an active teacher and educator.
Mosaici funerari tardoantichi in Italia Repertorio e analisi by Luigi Quattrocchi. iv+ 114 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (19 plates in colour). Italian text with English summary. 400 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917999. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918002. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £20.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The potential of tomb mosaics as an academic resource has often been underestimated and consequently they have only been partially analysed not only in Italy but also throughout the Western Mediterranean. This work is intended to shed a new light on these finds, which are often incomplete, lost, or little studied.

The first part of the book presents the history of previous studies on the subject and briefly explains the structure of the corpus. The corpus, in turn, is organised according to current Italian administrative regions, specifically: Sardegna, Sicilia, Puglia, Campania, Lazio, Marche, and Friuli Venezia Giulia. Every region is then further divided following current provinces and municipalities.

This work does not aim to present merely a compilation of data in a catalogue; thus the second part of the book focuses specifically on tomb mosaics found in the Italic peninsula and major islands, and provides information on their geographic distribution, dating, typology, place of discovery and iconography, and considers the potential identification of individual workshops.

The purpose of the book is to bring tomb mosaics to greater consideration, since they have not survived in academic literature to the same extent as did their rich villa or domus counterparts. This work does not therefore aspire to be a complete analysis of the subject, but rather a starting point which can be both useful and a stimulus for future studies.

Italian Description
Il mosaico funerario è una particolare tipologia musiva spesso sottovalutata e poco studiata. Le origini sono da ricercarsi, probabilmente, nell’antica regione della Bizacena, attuale Tunisia, a partire dagli ultimi decenni del III secolo d.C. Nel IV secolo iniziò l’esportazione dei cartoni musivi funerari nel resto del Mediterraneo occidentale, raggiungendo l’Italia e la Spagna; in entrambi i casi però il mosaico funerario non riscosse particolare successo. La richiesta maggiore di questo nuovo monumento funerario avveniva da parte dei cristiani, e solo in minima parte dai pagani. In questo libro si cerca di fare ordine sui mosaici funerari presenti nell’odierno territorio italiano, catalogando tutte le evidenze musive, sia oggigiorno scomparse che ancora in situ, per cercare di delineare un’analisi sul fenomeno che ha, in maniera seppur ridotta, investito la Penisola italiana e le sue Isole maggiori. Infatti le testimonianze musive si concentrano in zone dove particolari condizioni hanno permesso la loro messa in posa. La prima parte è dedicata al repertorio dei sessanta mosaici funerari dell’attuale Italia, ognuno catalogato secondo una scheda pensata e studiata per rendere più agevole possibile la consultazione. La seconda parte è invece incentrata sullo studio d’insieme del fenomeno dei mosaici funerari in Italia, nella quale si cerca di fare chiarezza e dare dei punti fermi su questa categoria di mosaici. L’analisi conclusiva cerca di spiegare il perché in Italia, pur essendoci condizioni apparentemente favorevoli alla produzione delle coperture tombali musive, non si siano trovati che poche testimonianze musive funerarie se paragonate a quelle ritrovate nel Nord Africa e in special maniera in Bizacena.

LUIGI QUATTROCCHI (1988) ha conseguito la Laurea Triennale in Beni Culturali presso l’università degli Studi di Cagliari, ha proseguito gli studi conseguendo la Laurea Magistrale in Archeologia presso l’Università di Pisa e ha concluso gli stessi con il Dottorato presso l’Universidad Carlos III de Madrid con cotutela presso l’Università degli Studi di Sassari. Le sue linee di ricerca si incentrano sullo studio del fenomeno del mosaici funerario all’interno del bacino del Mediterraneo occidentale e sulla produzione musiva della Sardegna, Spagna e Nord Africa.
Considering Creativity: Creativity, Knowledge and Practice in Bronze Age Europe edited by Joanna Sofaer. x+164 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (33 colour plates). 387 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917548. £33.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917555. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £33.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Creativity is embedded in human history. Indeed, it is impossible to understand material change and the development of the new without invoking creativity. The location, exploration and analysis of creativity should therefore be of particular concern to archaeologists. This volume engages with this challenge by focusing on the outcomes of creativity – material culture – and an exploration of creative practice. The European Bronze Age provides a useful focus for discussions of the outcomes of creativity because in this period we see the development of new and pre-existing materials that we take for granted today, in particular textiles and bronze. We also see new ways of working with existing materials, such as clay, to create novel forms. In both new and existing materials it is frequently possible to see the growth of technical skill, to produce complex forms and elaborate decorated surfaces.

The papers in this volume view Bronze Age objects through the lens of creativity in order to offer fresh insights into the interaction between people and the world, as well as the individual and cultural processes that lie behind creative expression. Many have their origin in the international conference Creativity: An Exploration Through the Bronze Age and Contemporary Responses to the Bronze Age held at Magdalene College, University of Cambridge in 2103 as part of the HERA-funded project Creativity and Craft Production in Middle and Late Bronze Age Europe. Contributions span the early to late Bronze Age, deal with a range of materials including textiles, metal, and ceramics, and reflect on data from across the continent including Iberia, Scandinavia, Central and Eastern Europe. This breadth illustrates the wideranging importance and applicability of creativity as an heuristic concept. The volume further develops a range of theoretical and methodological directions, opening up new avenues for the study of creativity in the past.
Egyptian Predynastic Anthropomorphic Objects A study of their function and significance in Predynastic burial customs by Ryna Ordynat. iv+120 pages; 101 illustrations presented in colour and black & white (12 colour plates). 45 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917784. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917791. Book contents pageDownload

Anthropomorphic objects from the Egyptian Predynastic have been a topic of frequent study and debate, from the time they were first excavated until today. These objects, including human figurines, hippopotamus tusks, tag amulets and combs carved with the human image, continue to fascinate and perplex scholars today. Objects such as these form part of the extensive and distinctive iconographic imagery of Predynastic Egypt, and are often interpreted solely in the context of their symbolic or iconographic significance.

The aim of this study is to examine these anthropomorphic objects in terms of their original context in order to determine what role they played in Predynastic burials – a useful method, as most of these objects are found in graves. A database comprising all provenanced anthropomorphic Predynastic objects and their placement in the grave, in addition to the details of each grave, has been composed in order to conduct a detailed analysis. The analysis is geared to answer the question of whether it is possible to determine the function of these objects from the available data, and if so, what the results could tell us about burial practices and rituals in Predynastic Egypt.

It became clear from the results that the context, especially the specific placement of the object in the grave, can reflect significantly the meaning and function of anthropomorphic objects. The placement and function seems to have depended on the type of object: for instance, figurines had different placements and meanings to tusks and tags. Ultimately, it appears that anthropomorphic objects, especially figurines, were personal items with which the deceased were identified and buried by their relations and friends. They may have served as magical or protective items, or as representations of ancestors or the deceased individuals themselves. This conclusion is significant, as it confirms the previous assumptions about the functions of anthropomorphic objects in Predynastic graves through a thorough analysis of available data, making a contribution to our understanding of Predynastic burial rituals.
The Lamps of Late Antiquity from Rhodes 3rd–7th centuries AD by Angeliki Katsioti. ii+676 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 384 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917463. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917470. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £80.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The city of Rhodes was an important harbour in the Hellenistic period, and although its political role in the Roman period was significantly diminished, it never ceased to be a key hub for trade. The catastrophic earthquake of 515 AD marked the transition from the Late Roman to the Early Byzantine period in Rhodes. The glorious ancient city shrunk in size; its streets, which had been laid out according to the Hippodamian grid, were encroached upon and large basilicas were founded on the sites of ancient sanctuaries. A significant portion of the city has been uncovered over the past few years by rescue excavation, revealing houses, mansions, streets and extensive cemeteries, all yielding a large quantity of finds. This study focuses on the recording, study and publication of the corpus of the Late Antique lamps dating from the 3rd to the 7th centuries as found in these rescue excavations in the town of Rhodes. The lamps of this period from Rhodes and the other Dodecanesian islands are nearly unknown in the bibliography. The aim here is to present the diachronic changes in the artistic sensibility and preferences of this particular market. An integral component in this process are topographical observations regarding the Early Byzantine town of Rhodes, giving some details about the extent of the building remains. In addition, facets of the economic and commercial activities of the island during Late Antiquity are highlighted. Subjects such as the transformation/adaptation of the ancient city to new circumstances are also debated. For some lamps, analyses of the clay have been undertaken and the results are presented.

About the Author
Dr Angeliki Katsioti works for the Greek Ministry of Culture and Sports at the Ephorate of Antiquities of the Dodecanese, as a Head of the Department of Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Sites, Monuments, Research and Museums. Her main research interests are Late Roman archaeology, as well as Byzantine art and iconography.
Innovative Approaches and Explorations in Ceramic Studies edited by Sandra L. López Varela. vi+144 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (44 colour plates). 380 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917364. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917371. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Innovative Approaches and Explorations in Ceramic Studies celebrates thirty years of Ceramic Ecology, an international symposium initiated at the 1986 American Anthropological Association meeting at the suggestion of Frederick R. Matson. For almost twenty-five years, Dr. Charles Kolb organized the symposium to discuss multiple theoretical and methodological approaches to ceramic studies around the world. By fostering interdisciplinary interactions, the symposium has pushed the boundaries of what can be understood about the human experience through the creative and systematic study of ceramics. Contributions in this volume explore the application of instrumental techniques and experimental studies to analyze ceramics and follow innovative approaches to evaluate our methods and theories in our quest to learn about the societies we dedicate our studies to.

About the Author
Sandra L. Lopez Varela (PhD, University of London, 1996; RPA, since 2005) is a professor at the Faculty of Philosophy and Literature, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Motivated by her studies of Maya pottery in the Usumacinta region, she extended her analytical approach to the study of Maya formative ceramics in northern Belize. Her current research studies concentrate on the effects of social development policies and institutional economics to combat poverty on nonindustrial technologies, an interest that developed from her ethnoarchaeological studies of griddle making at Cuentepec, in the State of Morelos. The transdisciplinary and international approach to her research has brought together scientists from apparently unrelated fields to archaeology and to contribute to modern social inquiry, a dialogue that awarded her the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Prize from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in 2012, with the project ‘Sustaining Heritage in the Future Cities of Development: archaeological analysis of institutional solutions to poverty’. Deriving from this innovative project she is developing a mobile application, ‘Alternative Mexico’, financed by UNAM, to empower and promote local communities’ definition of cultural heritage in Mexico’s City metropolitan area. Her international recognition to advance our knowledge of the past was recognized with her election to hold the Archaeology Seat of the American Anthropological Association (2011–2014). She has served as President of the Society for Archaeological Sciences (2009–2011) and as Treasurer of the Sociedad Mexicana de Antropología (2015-2017). In 2009, she joined the Mexican Academy of Sciences, Arts, Technology, and Humanities.
Ceramic manufacturing techniques and cultural traditions in Nubia from the 8th to the 3rd millennium BC Examples from Sai Island by Giulia D’Ercole. xviii+186 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (33 colour plates). 41 2017 Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 96. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916718. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916725. Book contents pageDownload

In Sudan the first ceramic containers appeared at the beginning of the 9th millennium BC, with the earliest dates c. 8700 BC from Sorourab 2, in Central Sudan, and c. 8600 BC from the district of Amara West, in Northern Sudan.

This book presents a comprehensive critical analysis of diverse ceramic assemblages from Sai Island, in the Middle Nile Valley of Northern Sudan, on the border between ancient Upper and Lower Nubia. The assemblages included in this study cover about five millennia, spanning the period c. 8000 to c. 2500 BC. They go from the initial appearance of ceramic technology within hunting-fishing-gathering communities living in permanent or semi-permanent settlements (locally named ‘Khartoum Variant’ or ‘Mesolithic’ horizon: c. 7600–4800 BC), through the ceramic productions of the first ‘Neolithic’ pastoral societies (Abkan horizon: c. 5550−3700 BC), to those of the Pre-Kerma Nubian culture (c. 3600−2500 BC).

A thorough stylistic macroscopic observation of the finds is integrated with a solid technological approach by means of archaeometric petrographic (OM), mineralogical (XRPD) and chemical (XRF) analyses. Data are discussed and compared across a broad geographical area, including Lower and Upper Nubia, Central Sudan and the Egyptian Western Desert. They provide an original synthesis and interpretation of the ceramic traditions in Nubia and Sudan and propose a critical review of the debate on the invention of pottery and the functional and cultural reasons for the emergence of the ceramic technology.
Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 2 2017 edited by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph (Heads of Editorial Board). xii+220 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 2 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 2399-1844-2-2017. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 2399-1852-2-2017. Book contents pageDownload

Table of Contents

Articles:
• Nadia Aleotti, Rhodian Amphoras from Butrint (Albania): Dating, Contexts and Trade
• Donald T. Ariel, Imported Hellenistic Stamped Amphora Handles and Fragments from the North Sinai Survey
• Ofra Guri-Rimon, Stone Ossuaries in the Hecht Museum Collection and the Issue of Ossuaries Use for Burial
• Gabriel Mazor & Walid Atrash, Nysa-Scythopolis: The Hellenistic Polis
• Hélène Machline & Yuval Gadot, Wading Through Jerusalem’s Garbage: Chronology, Function, and Formation Process of the Pottery Assemblages of the City’s Early Roman Landfill
• Kyriakos Savvopoulos, Two Hadra Hydriae in the Colection of the Patriarchal Sacristy in Alexandria
• Wolf Rudolph & Michalis Fotiadis, Neapolis Scythica – Simferopol – Test Excavations 1993

Archaeological News and Projects:
• »Dig for a Day« with the Archaeological Seminars Institute

Reviews:
• John Lund, A Study of the Circulation of Ceramics in Cyprus from the 3rd Century BC to the 3rd Century AD (by Brandon R. Olson)
• Gloria London, Ancient Cookware from the Levant. An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective (by John Tidmarsh)
• Michela Spataro & Alexandra Villing (eds.), Ceramics, Cuisine and Culture: The Archaeology and Sience of Kitchen Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World (by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom)
• James C. R. Gill, Dakhleh Oasis and the Western Desert of Egypt under the Ptolemies (by Andrea M. Berlin)
• Anna Gamberini, Ceramiche fini ellenistiche da Phoinike. Forme, produzioni, commerce (by Carlo De Mitri)
• Maja Mise, Gnathia and Related Hellenistic Ware on the East Adriatic Coast (by Patricia Kögler)
• Jens-Arne Dickmann & Alexander Heinemann (eds.), Vom Trinken und Bechern. Das antike Gelage im Umbruch (by Stella Drougou)
Imágenes de centauros en los vasos áticos de figuras negras y de figuras rojas Siglos VIII A.C. – IV A.C. by María Herranz. 298 pages; 15 graphs, 124 tables (all in colour). Spanish text with English summary.. 38 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916831. £54.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916848. Book contents pageDownload

The centaur, a hybrid being with the body of horse and a human head and torso, first appeared in the mountains of Thessaly. This was the Greek horse-breeding region and it seemed natural for the centaur to have originated there, in the heart of this exclusive heritage of the landed gentry. Centaurs belonged to the spheres of heroic mythology, with clear ties to the values of the aristocracy.

This book is composed of a catalogue divided into nine chapters. Each chapter comprises catalogue entries for a number of black-figure and red-figure Attic vases. The division into chapters is based on the various types of centaurs and different conflicts, either among themselves or against a hero. In addition to the catalogue is a chapter on images and statistics. Each of these nine chapters corresponds to a section of catalogue entries and statistics, as the information refers to two examples in each section, one in black figures and another in red figures. The highlighted examples illustrate the variety of different vase types (amphorae, lekythoi, etc.) and their chronology (550-500 BC, 500-450 BC). The statistics are likewise divided into black and red figures, and various themes, such as the centaur Pholos and the banquet, or Herakles and Nessos. For each of these themes or groups of examples, a table is given showing the number of vases (amphorae, lekythoi, etc.) and their place in the chronology (550-500 BC, 500-450 BC, etc.).

The Hunting Farmers: Understanding ancient human subsistence in the central part of the Korean peninsula during the Late Holocene by Seungki Kwak. xii+118 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (45 colour plates). 37 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916756. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916763. Book contents pageDownload

The transition from foragers to farmers and the role of intensive rice agriculture have been among the most controversial subjects in Korean archaeology. However, the relatively high acidity of sediment in the Korean peninsula has made it impossible to examine faunal/floral remains directly for tracing the subsistence change. For this reason, many of the studies on the transition heavily relied on the shell middens in coastal areas, which reflect only a small portion of the overall subsistence in the Korean Peninsula. The subsistence behaviors recorded in numerous large-scale inland habitation sites have been obscured by the overall separation between hunter-gatherer and intensive rice farmer. This research investigates the role of intensive rice farming as a subsistence strategy in the central part of the prehistoric Korean peninsula using organic geochemical analysis and luminescence dating on potsherds. The central hypothesis of this research is that there was a wide range of resource utilization along with rice farming around 3,400-2,600 BP. This hypothesis contrasts with prevailing rice-based models, where climatically driven intensive rice agriculture from 3,400 BP is thought to be the dominant subsistence strategy that drove social complexity. This research focuses on four large-scale inland habitation sites that contain abundant pottery collections to evaluate the central hypothesis as well the prevailing rice-centred model. This research produced critical data for addressing prehistoric subsistence in the Korean peninsula and established a detailed chronology of subsistence during 3,400-1,800 BP.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point.
Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.
Ancient Engineering: Selective Ceramic Processing in the Middle Balsas Region of Guerrero, Mexico by Jennifer Meanwell. xiv+352 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 36 2017 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 48. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916503. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916510. Book contents pageDownload

This volume has two main objectives: establishing a chronology of the Middle Balsas and detailing the region’s pottery production methods. The author posits that pottery intended for different functions was often deliberately made and/or decorated in ways that were chosen to make the vessels more appropriate for their intended functions. More specifically, this study determines whether any of the pottery production patterns identified in the region are linked to specific constraints imposed by the materials during the process of pottery manufacture. For example, it examines whether variables such as vessel shape and wall thickness correlate with the clay types and processing techniques determined during thin section analysis of the ancient sherds. Additionally, certain production behaviours are identified that are characteristic of the entire region and that can be used as markers of local tradition.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

L’artisanat dans les cites antiques de l’Algérie (Ier siècle avant notre ère –VIIe siècle après notre ère) by Touatia Amraoui. xx+426 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with one plate in colour. French text with English summary. 357 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 26. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916671. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916688. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Normally dealt with in a rather limited way, through the examination of a particular activity or geographical zone, the artisans of ancient North Africa are here, for the first time, the subject of an entire book. Focusing on urban production in Algeria during Antiquity, this critical study brings together new documentation drawn up on the basis of field data and the consultation of archives from a long history of survey in Algeria and France. This synthesis reviews the archaeological sites with workshops by defining their activities, at the same time as analyzing how they operated and looking at them typologically. Based on a comparison with documented workshops in the Western Roman world, the study of the techniques highlights the very strong similarities between the Roman regions but also the specific local variations of the methods used in Africa at this time. Maghreb ethnography shows the permanence of certain practices over time while attempting to reconstruct the "chaîne opératoire". Although it is still difficult to obtain an overall picture both from a spatial and a chronological point of view of the artisanal topography, the data reveals the existence of varied artisanal and commercial activities in urban areas throughout Antiquity.

French description: Abordé généralement de façon ponctuelle à travers une activité particulière ou une zone géographique donnée, l’artisanat en Afrique du nord antique fait ici pour la première fois l’objet d’un ouvrage. Centrée sur la production urbaine en Algérie durant l’Antiquité, cette étude critique rassemble une nouvelle documentation élaborée à partir des données de terrain et de la consultation des archives à partir d’un long travail d’enquête en Algérie et en France. La synthèse fait le point sur les sites archéologiques présentant des ateliers en définissant leur activité tout en analysant leur fonctionnement et leur typologie. En s’appuyant sur une comparaison avec les découvertes d’ateliers dans le monde romain occidental, l’étude des techniques met en évidence les similitudes très fortes entre les régions romaines mais aussi les spécificités locales des méthodes employées en Afrique durant cette période. L’ethnographie maghrébine montre quant à elle la permanence de certaines pratiques à travers le temps tout en complétant l’essai de restitution de la « chaîne opératoire ». S’il est encore difficile d’avoir une vision d’ensemble tant d’un point de vue spatial que chronologique de la topographie artisanale, les données recensées révèlent l’existence d’activités artisanales et commerciales variées incluses dans l’ensemble du domaine urbain tout au long de l’Antiquité.

Biographie: Actuellement membre de l’École des Hautes Études Hispaniques et Ibériques de la Casa de Velázquez à Madrid et à partir d’octobre 2017, chercheur au Centre Camille Jullian (CNRS, Aix-en-Provence), Touatia Amraoui est docteur en Histoire et Archéologie de l’Université Lumière Lyon 2. Elle est l’auteur d’articles sur l’artisanat et l’économie dans le Maghreb antique. Elle a collaboré à plusieurs projets de recherche internationaux en Algérie, au Maroc, en France, en Espagne et en Angleterre.
Tarascan Pottery Production in Michoacán, Mexico An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective by Eduardo Williams. xii+170 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 355 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916732. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916749. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Pottery is one of humankind’s most important inventions. It is thousands of years old, and it is fair to say that without it the development of civilization as we know it would not have been possible. Food preparation and storage, religion and ritual, wine-making, trade, art, and architecture, among many other human achievements, were all aided by pottery, an artificial material that lent itself to the elaboration of all kinds of objects: vessels, figurines, roof tiles, water pipes, fishnet weights, and tablets inscribed with the earliest forms of writing, to name but a few; a veritable litany of human creativity. This book examines a contemporary pottery tradition in Mesoamerica, but also looks back to the earliest examples of cultural development in this area. By means of ethnographic analogy and ceramic ecology, this study seeks to shed light on a modern indigenous community and on the theory, method and practice of ethnoarchaeology; undoubtedly one of the most important aspects of archaeological research in Mexico today.
El Sur de la Península Ibérica y el Mediterráneo Occidental: relaciones culturales en la segunda mitad del II milenio a.C. by Juan Manuel Garrido Anguita. 580 pages; illustrated throughout with 181 plates in colour. Spanish text. 34 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916442. £85.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916459. Book contents pageDownload

In ancient times, the first communities, societies and civilizations in the Iberian peninsula, according to archaeological evidence, began to develop following a progressive local evolution tempered by the significance of outside contacts. In order to reconstruct our history, resorting to ancient poets, we strive to distinguish reality from myth in the pursuit of a bond of certainty between the data provided by historical and literary sources and the excavated remains. Greek epics, based on the Illiad and the Odyssey, are the basis for the first speculations that link societies all along the Mediterranean coast, from east to west, with a common thread. However, how many times have we been told about mythical places, such as cities of great splendour and unique cultural progress? Did the land which Plato called Atlantis and Adolf Schulten linked to Tartessos truly exist? These answers may never be revealed (they are not at the forefront of research interests nowadays); for the time being, they are lost into a mythical and legendary world. Nonetheless, they remain alive over time.

Spanish description: En tiempos lejanos, ahora sepultadas bajo la caída de los años, comienzan a formarse las primeras comunidades, sociedades y civilizaciones que se irán desarrollando en la Península Ibérica, por una progresiva evolución local, sin descuidar la atención de los contactos foráneos previa contrastación arqueológica. Refugiándonos en figuras creadas por los antiguos poetas, tratamos de discernir entre lo que comúnmente se ha denominado mito-leyenda y lo real, buscando un vínculo de certeza entre los datos que revelan las fuentes literario-históricas y los vestigios que se desentierran de nuestra primera historia, aquella que tratamos de reconstruir. La épica occidental apoyada en los relatos homéricos de la Ilíada y la Odisea, son la base de las primeras conjeturas que con un hilo, unen a las sociedades que conviven en el Mar Mediterráneo desde Oriente hasta Occidente. Pero ¿cuántas veces hemos oído contar relatos sobre míticas ciudades de gran esplendor e inigualable progreso cultural? ¿Existió aquella tierra denominada por Platón “Atlántida” y que fue asociada por Adolf Schulten a Tartessos? Estas respuestas quizá nunca lleguen a desvelarse (tampoco están en la vanguardia de los intereses de la investigación), por ahora sólo están inmersas en un mundo mítico y legendario, pero es cierto que se mantienen vivas, nostálgicas, con el paso del tiempo.

Le guerrier, le chat, l’aigle, le poisson et la colonne: la voie spiralée des signes Approche sémiologique, structurale et archéologique du disque de Phaistos by Serge Collet. 90 pages; 15 tables, 1 colour illustration. French text with English Abstract and Foreword. 6 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916169. £19.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916176. £10.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £19.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Phaistos Disc is one of the most studied documents of the Minoan civilization, enticing scholars and simple enthusiasts with the mysterious aura that envelops it and with its singularity among Minoan scriptures. It has entered the collective imagination, both at academic and popular levels. Representations of the Disc can be found abundantly in popular culture, from appearances in Mickey Mouse comics to a prop amidst the curios on the tables of a television magician.

It is this very overexposure that risks undermining the understanding of an object that is, first and foremost, an archaeological artefact found in a chronological and cultural context. Much has been said and much and has been written about the Disc. Collet brings a new approach. It’s not a deciphering but an interpretation, a depiction of the Minoan Weltanschauung through the symbols on the Disc and their connections with reality. This begins with the spiral-shaped construction of the inscription and its possible temporal allusions, and moves on to a structuralist view of use of the signs, and in which the repetitions take on almost ritual significance. Hence it is a pictorial interpretation rather than syllabic, whereby the pictograph is not intended as a rigid reproduction of logical discourse, but rather a path.

About the Author:
Serge Collet (1950-2016) was a French scientist who became known for his interdisciplinary research on early sea-dependent societies. His main study “Uomini e Pesce, La caccia al pesce spada tra Scilla e Cariddi” as well as his publications with SAGE Publications over the years, as well as his several contributions to international conferences (inter alia funded by the EU and FAO) gave substantial examples as to what contributions maritime ethnology and archaeology can make for the preservation of cultures and the seas over the millennia.
Excavations at the Mycenaean Cemetery at Aigion – 1967 Rescue Excavations by the late Ephor of Antiquities, E. Mastrokostas by Thanasis I. Papadopoulos and Evangelia Papadopoulou-Chrysikopoulou. vi+124 pages; illustrated throughout with 26 plates in colour. 343 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916183. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916190. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In this monograph the authors present the finds of four Mycenaean chamber tombs, from the rescue excavation of Ephor Mastrokostas at Aigion in 1967. Unfortunately, no diary or any other information, regarding the architecture or the burial customs, was found. However, it is highly possible that they were similar to eleven tombs which were systematically excavated by Papadopoulos in 1970. In contrast with them, the four tombs produced a much greater number of finds, indicating richer burials. Furthermore, some of these finds are unique (e.g. “thronos”-straight-sided alabastron with unusual paneled decoration), rare (e.g. askoi) and exceptional (e.g. cylindrical stirrup jars) in the Achaean Mycenaean ceramic repertory, while the total absence of terracotta figurines as well as the rarity of small objects is surprising. Taken together the excavated tombs make a total of 15, but the actual number may be greater. It is noteworthy that the material is stylistically different and generally earlier from that of western Achaea. The supplementary information, provided by this publication, strengthens the evidence that this important Achaean cemetery was used for a long time (LHII-IIIC) and that the inhabitants had connections with the Argolid as well as with other areas to the east, especially with the Dodecanese.