​​ We use cookies to enhance your experience on our site. By continuing to use the site you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy & Cookies.​

 
Archaeopress logo
Archaeopress Publishing Ltd, Summertown Pavilion, 18-24 Middle Way, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7LG, England
tel +44 (0) 1865 311914 fax +44 (0) 1865 512231   email: info@archaeopress.com
Monthly AP Alert - join our mailing list today Archaeopress on Facebook Archaeopress on Twitter Archaeopress on Linked In Archaeopress Blog
Home  
|
  Browse by Subject  
|
  Browse by Series  
|
  Catalogues  
|
  Join Our Mailing List  
|
  Visit Our Blog  
|
  Login (Private Customers)  
|
  Login (Institutional Subscriptions)  
|
  View Basket

Search

title, author, ISBN, keyword

Browse for books in the following languages

ARCHAEOPRESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ACCESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ARCHAEOPRESS JOURNALS
DISTRIBUTED
PUBLISHERS
DIGITAL EDITIONS
OPEN ACCESS PLATFORM
Ordering Information
About Us
Publish With Us
Standing Orders
Trade Sales
Contact Us
Request Review Copy

The Archaeological Heritage of Oman

Published in co-operation with the Ministry of Heritage and Culture, Sultanate of Oman, this numbered book series presents monographs and excavation reports.

Series co-ordinator: Dennys Frenez (University of Bologna)

Standing order reference: AHO

Request a standing order

NEW: The First Peoples of Oman: Palaeolithic Archaeology of the Nejd Plateau by Jeffrey I. Rose, Yamandú H. Hilbert, Anthony E. Marks and Vitaly I. Usik. Paperback; 210x297mm; xvi+198 pages; 142 figures; 27 tables (90 colour pages). 558 2019 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 5. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692846. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692853. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In Dhofar, the southern Governorate of the Sultanate of Oman, the deep canyons cutting the Nejd plateau once flowed with perennial rivers, feeding wetland environments, forests, and grasslands across the now desiccated interior. The first peoples of Oman flourished along these waterways, drawn to the freshwater springs and abundant game, as well as the myriad chert outcrops with which to fashion their hunting implements and other tools. The landscapes of the Nejd Plateau are a natural museum of human prehistory, covered in carpets of chipped stone debris. The archaeological evidence presented in this work encompasses the cultural remains of over a million years of successive human occupations, from the Lower Palaeolithic to the Late Palaeolithic. Once considered an evolutionary backwater or merely a migratory way station, the archaeology of Dhofar requires a fundamental reconsideration of the role of Southern Arabia in the origin and dispersal of our species.

About the Authors
Jeffrey I. Rose, Research Scholar at the Ronin Institute, is specialized in the prehistory of North Africa and Southwest Asia. His research interests include modern human origins, stone tool technology and archaeogenetics. In recognition of his team’s discoveries in Oman, in 2012 Dr. Rose was named National Geographic’s Emerging Explorer.

Yemandù H. Hilbert, Associated Researcher at the Archeorient laboratory of French CNRS, has worked on the field across Eurasia and North Africa since 2005 and is specialized on the Late Paleolithic of Dhofar. His research interests include ethnography, prehistoric archaeology and physical paleoanthropology.

Anthony E. Marks, Conducted pioneering prehistoric research in the Nile Valley and southern Levant, producing seminal works on the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic periods in these regions. Since 2003, Prof. Marks has focused his research activities in the United Arab Emirates and Oman.

Vitaly I. Usik, Senior Researcher in the Ukraine National Academy of Sciences, is specialized in lithic technology, refitting and site survey and excavations. With more than four decades of fieldwork experience, he has carried out technological studies on a wide range of lithic assemblages from Northeast Africa, the Levant, Arabia and western Eurasia.
NEW: Messages from the Past: Rock Art of Al-Hajar Mountains by Angelo E. Fossati. Paperback; 210x297mm; xxx+304 pages; 398 figures; 10 maps; 1 table (215 colour pages). (Print RRP £58.00). 557 2019 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 4. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692860. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692877. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £58.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Turtles, ibexes, ships, inscriptions... Thousands of engraved and painted figures intrigue visitors in the wadis of Al-Hajar Mountains. Who created these enigmatic figures and when were they made? What are their hidden meanings? For the first time, this volume tries to answer these questions. It is the result of the archaeological surveys and investigations undertaken by the author over the last ten years under the patronage of the Ministry of Heritage and Culture. In this book, the author takes the reader on an in-depth journey into the various themes present in the rock art of Oman. He offers theories on the chronology and interpretation, while exploring the landscape setting of the decorated panels and how best to research these. Several beautiful photographs and scientific tracings of the rock art accompany the text. The volume closes offering to enthusiasts and tourists a series of guided visits with GPS maps to the most interesting and visible rock art sites protected by Royal Decrees of the Sultanate.

About the author
Angelo E. Fossati is an Italian archaeologist specialized in rock art studies. He teaches Prehistory and Protohistory at the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart in Milan (Italy) and researches mainly on Alpine megalithism and pre-Roman inscriptions. Dr Fossati has conducted rock art documentation and studies in several countries including Italy, France, Portugal and the USA. He has been consultant for the UNESCO Word Heritage Center and is President of «Footsteps of Man» an Italian rock art society member of the International Federation of Rock Art Organizations. The author has published several papers and books on various rock art traditions. In Oman, he has conducted numerous surveys and documentation works under the patronage of the Ministry of Heritage and Culture in several areas of Al-Hajar Mountains.
NEW: Taming the Great Desert: Adam in the Prehistory of Oman by Guillaume Gernez and Jessica Giraud. Paperback; xiv+128 pages; 106 figures (colour throughout). (Print RRP £30.00). 538 2019 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 3. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691801. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691818. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Located at the margins of the Rub Al-Khali desert, a place of interactions between settled and nomadic populations, the Adam oasis occupies a pivotal role in the history of Oman. However, almost nothing was known about its foundation and early developments. In 2006, the French Archaeological Mission in Central Oman began the exploration of the area. After ten years of field research using innovative methods and technologies, much is now revealed about the importance of Adam in the prehistory and early history of Oman. This is the first monograph about the research carried out at Adam and it includes seven chapters written by specialists directly involved in the field activities. Each major period is described in detail, including evidence of Palaeolithic occupation, Neolithic settlements, Early and Middle Bronze Age necropolises, Iron Age ritual sites and also an ethnographic study of the traditional water sharing within the oasis.

About the Authors
GUILLAUME GERNEZ is associate professor of Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne and Director of the French Archaeological Mission in Central Oman. A former researcher at the French Institute for the Near East in Beirut, he specializes in protohistoric periods, material culture and funerary customs. For more than fifteen years, he has participated in archaeological excavations, surveys and material studies in Syria, Lebanon, Iraq and Oman. He has published books on the prehistory and antiquity of Lebanon (2010) and the history and early developments of weapons in the ancient Near and Middle East (2017).

JESSICA GIRAUD is associated researcher at the Laboratory Archaeology and Sciences of Antiquity (CNRS / University Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne) and is CEO and founder of the company ArCHaios — Archaeology, Culture & Heritage. She has been working on the archaeology of Oman for fifteen years, researching mainly on landscape archaeology in the Ja’alan province and in the Adam oasis, where she conducted the very first surveys and excavations. Since 2012, she has worked in Kurdistan as Director of the French Archaeological Mission to the Governorate of Sulaimaniyah (Iraq), and she continues to work in Oman at Adam and Quriyat.
NEW: Magan – The Land of Copper Prehistoric Metallurgy of Oman by Claudio Giardino. Paperback; 210x297mm; xviii+182 pages; 150 figures, 14 tables (colour throughout). (Print RRP £40.00). 537 2019 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 2. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691788. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691795. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The development of a prehistoric civilization in the Sultanate of Oman was strongly connected with the exploitation and the use of copper. The Oman Peninsula has several rich copper ore deposits that have been exploited since prehistoric times. The earliest evidence of metallurgical activities in Oman dates back to the end of the Neolithic period in the 4th millennium BC. Thanks to the availability of this precious raw material, Oman became one of the main copper sources for the entire Middle East during the Bronze Age. The cuneiform texts of Mesopotamia referred to Oman as the Land of Magan, a region where the precious copper was found in fabulous abundance. This volume describes the geography and environments of Oman, its rich copper ore deposits and the ancient mining and smelting techniques, and it also includes an overview of the physical properties of the different metals exploited in antiquity and of the analytical techniques used in archaeometallurgy. Moreover, the author presents for the first time a comprehensive and detailed typology of the metal objects discovered at sites in Oman dating to the millennia from the Neolithic up to the Early Iron Age, emphasizing the development of advanced alloying techniques in order to obtain artefacts with specific proprieties and appearance.

About the Author
CLAUDIO GIARDINO is Associate Professor of Prehistory and Protohistory at the University of Salento (Lecce, Italy), where he also teaches Prehistoric Archaeometallurgy at the Post-graduate School of Archaeology. He has participated in archaeological projects in many regions of Europe and Asia working on several aspects of archaeometallurgy. He has conducted extensive research on the beginning and early developments of copper-based technologies at several sites in the Sultanate of Oman, from the Neolithic period (Ras Al-Hamra and Wadi Shab) up to the Bronze and the Iron Ages (Ras Al-Hadd, Ras Al-Jinz, Al-Safah and Daba). He is the author of numerous scientific publications on prehistory and ancient metallurgy, including a handbook on the use of metals in the ancient world, books on mining and metallurgical spheres in the West Mediterranean, and studies on the early metallurgy of Southeastern Arabia.
NEW: Dhofar Through the Ages An Ecological, Archaeological and Historical Landscape by Lynne S. Newton and Juris Zarins. Paperback; 210x297mm; xvi+132 pages; 61 figures, 47 tables (colour throughout). 521 2019 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 1. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691603. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691610. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Dhofar, the southern governorate of Oman, lies within a distinctive ecological zone due to the summer Southwest Monsoon. It is home to numerous indigenous succulent plants, the most famous of which is frankincense (Boswellia sacra). The region, tied in the past to both Oman and Yemen, has a long and distinguished archaeological past stretching back to the Lower Paleolithic ca. 1.5 my BP. Dhofar is also home to a distinctive people, the Modern South Arabian Languages speakers (MSAL) since at least the last 15,000 years. Ancient Zafar (Al-Habudi), now called Al-Baleed, and its successor Salalah was and is the province’s largest city. From the seventh century onwards until the arrival of the Portuguese in 1504 AD Al-Baleed dominated the central southern Arabian coastline politically and economically. Archaeological surveys and excavations in the governorate, beginning in 1954, have brought to light Dhofar’s ancient past.

About the Authors
LYNNE S. NEWTON received her doctorate from the University of Minnesota with research on the Iron Age and Islamic periods in the Mahra Governorate of Yemen. Since 2007, she has co-directed excavations at the Medieval port of Al-Baleed and the general archaeological survey of Dhofar. Between 2011 and 2014, she was Curator of Maritime History at the National Museum of Qatar. The author published numerous research articles on Dhofar and the Mahra Governate, including also her doctorate A Landscape of Pilgrimage and Trade in Wadi Masila Yemen (2009) and is co-author of the Atlas of Archaeological Survey in Governorate of Dhofar, Sultanate of Oman (2013).

JURIS ZARINS is retired Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology at Missouri State University. He has excavated sites from the Lower Paleolithic to the Ottoman period in Mesopotamia (Turkey and Iraq) and more recently in the Arabian Peninsula, with a specific focus on the development of pastoral nomadism in Arabia and the origins of the Bedouin. Between 1992 and 2011, he worked in the Sultanate of Oman to uncover the Medieval port of al-Baleed and to conduct a general archaeological survey of Dhofar. The author has published many scientific research articles, including Dhofar: The Land of Incense (2001) and The Domestication of Equids in Ancient Mesopotamia (2014).
end of results