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NEW: Palmyrena: Palmyra and the Surrounding Territory from the Roman to the Early Islamic period by Jørgen Christian Meyer. x+220 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (143 plates in colour). 377 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917074. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917081. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is the first investigation of the relationship between Palmyra and its surrounding territory from the Roman to the early Islamic period since D. Schlumberger’s pioneer campaigns in the mountains northwest of Palmyra in the late 1930s. It discusses the agricultural potential of the hinterland, its role in the food supply of the city, and the interaction with the nomadic networks on the Syrian dry steppe. The investigation is based on an extensive joint Syrian-Norwegian surface survey north of Palmyra in 2008, 2010 and 2011 and on studies of satellite imagery. It contains a gazetteer of 70 new sites, which include numerous villages, estates, forts, stations and water management systems.

About the Author:
Dr Phil. Jørgen Christian Meyer is professor in Ancient History at the Department of Archaeology, History, Cultural Studies and Religion, University of Bergen, Norway. From 2008 to 2013 he was head of the project entitled Palmyrena: City, Hinterland and Caravan Trade between Orient and Occident.
NEW: Current Approaches to Collective Burials in the Late European Prehistory Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain) Volume 14/Session A25b edited by Tiago Tomé, Marta Díaz-Zorita Bonilla, Ana Maria Silva, Claudia Cunha and Rui Boaventura. xii+128 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Available both in print and Open Access. 374 2017. ISBN 9781784917210. £25.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The present volume originated in session A25b (‘Current Approaches to Collective Burials in the Late European Prehistory’) of the XVII World Congress of the International Union of the Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sciences (UISPP), held in Burgos in September 2014.

Collective burials are quite a common feature in Prehistoric Europe, with the gathering of multiple individuals in a shared burial place occurring in different types of burial structures (natural caves, megalithic structures, artificial caves, corbelled-roof tombs, pits, etc.). Such features are generally associated with communities along the agropastoralist transition and fully agricultural societies of the Neolithic and Chalcolithic.

For a long time, human skeletal remains exhumed from collective burials were dismissed as valuable sources of information, their studies being limited mostly to morphological assessments and subsequent classification in predefined ‘races’. They currently represent a starting point for diversified, often interdisciplinary, research projects, allowing for a more accurate reconstruction of funerary practices, as well as of palaeobiological and environmental aspects, which are fundamental for the understanding of populations in the Late Prehistory of Europe and of the processes leading to the emergence of agricultural societies in this part of the world.

The articles in this volume provide examples of different approaches currently being developed on Prehistoric collective burials of southern Europe, mostly focusing on case studies, but also including contributions of a more methodological scope.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
NEW: Autour de l’infanterie d’élite macédonienne à l’époque du royaume antigonide Cinq études militaires entre histoire, philologie et archéologie by Pierre O. Juhel. x+278 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. French text. 373 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917326. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917333. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents five articles relating to military studies in the context of Macedonia of the Antigonids. Combining literary studies and archaeological research, the author proposes several new concepts on Hellenistic Macedonian military studies. Originally conceived as separate journal articles supporting a more general publication on the Macedonian army of Alexander the Great, it became clear it would be more useful and valuable to publish the articles together in one volume as they closely reference each other. Articles consider the Macedonian phalanx, Antigonid Redcoats, heavy infantry and defensive weaponry under the following headings: I. La nature de la phalange macédonienne ou quand la science recule; II. Antigonid Redcoats. L’infanterie d’élite de l’armée du royaume de Macédoine à l’époque hellénistique. Histoire et iconographie; III. ‘Infanterie lourde’ : une notion entre armement et ordonnance tactique; IV. Remarques philologiques et historiques sur l’ambivalence de termes relatifs aux institutions militaires macédoniennes chez les historiens de l’Antiquité; V. Deux nouvelles armes défensives de l’époque hellénistique.

French Description:
Ces cinq études militaires résultent essentiellement de développements présentés dans le manuscrit doctoral de l’auteur, L’Armée du royaume de Macédoine à l’époque hellénistique (323-148 av. J.-C.). Les troupes « nationales », présenté en Sorbonne le 11 janvier 2007. L’idée première avait été de les publier sous forme d’articles. Mais ce projet se heurtait à une difficulté. Ces textes se faisant écho, il s’avèrerait difficile d’attendre la diffusion du premier d’entre eux pour présenter les suivants tout en faisant exactement référence à un voire à plusieurs textes en cours de publication. Aussi apparut-il qu’il valait mieux les réunir en un recueil dont la cohérence serait assurée par un thème commun : l’histoire et l’archéologie militaire de l’époque hellenistique, tout particulièrement dans le cadre de la Macédoine des Antigonides.

Pierre Olivier Juhel est docteur en histoire et civilisation de l’Antiquité de l’Université Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV). Il est également titulaire d’une maîtrise de philosophie de l’Université Paris I (Panthéon–Sorbonne). Auteur de profession, il est spécialiste de l’histoire militaire de la fin de l’époque napoléonienne. En parallèle, dans la foulée de son doctorat consacré à l’armée macédonienne après Alexandre le Grand, il poursuit ses travaux académiques sur la Macédoine antique.
NEW: Hillforts and the Durotriges A geophysical survey of Iron Age Dorset by Dave Stewart and Miles Russell. viii+176 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (115 colour plates). 372 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917159. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917166. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Hillforts are among the most dramatic and visually striking of prehistoric monuments in the British Isles. Dorset, in southern England, is particularly rich in these Iron Age earthwork enclosures, with over 30 examples being so far recorded, including the internationally famous sites of Maiden Castle, Hod Hill, Badbury Rings and Hambledon Hill. Many have been the subject of archaeological investigation, such as the excavations conducted at Maiden Castle in the 1930s by Tessa and Mortimer Wheeler, but few have, to date, been intensively examined.

This volume sets out the results of a detailed programme of non-intrusive geophysical survey conducted across the Dorset hillforts, generating detailed subsurface maps of archaeological features, in the hope of better resolving the phasing, form and internal structure of these iconic sites. The dataset presented here not only helps to change our perception of what hillforts were, how they functioned and what went on within them, but also provides a way of assessing their longevity, reconsidering how they were perceived and reused in subsequent periods. Given the oft-cited association between the Dorset enclosures and the Durotriges tribe, who are thought to have occupied the area in the Later Iron Age, serious consideration is also for the first time given to the belief that hillforts formed the focus of conflict between the native tribes and the armies of imperial Rome in the first century AD.
NEW: Elements of Continuity: Stone Cult in the Maltese Islands by George Azzopardi. x+94 pages; 41 figs. In black & white. 370 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916954. £18.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916961. £9.60 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Stones can serve an infinite array of functions both when they are worked and when they are left in a ‘raw’ state. Depending on their function, stones can also be meaningful objects especially when they act as vehicles of ideas or instruments of representation. And it is, therefore, in their functional context, that the meaning of stones can be best grasped.

The stones dealt with in this study are non-figural (or aniconic) or, sometimes, semi-figural. They come from ritual contexts and, as such, act as a material representation of divine presence in their role as betyls. But it is not mainly the representational aspect of these stones that this study seeks to highlight. As material representations of divine presence that are also worshipped, these particular stones form part of a phenomenon that seems to know no geographical or temporal boundaries. They are of a universal character.

It is this universal character of theirs that seems to qualify these stones as elements forming part of the phenomenon of continuity: continuity across different cultures and in different places along several centuries. It is this phenomenon which this study seeks to highlight through a study of these stones. The Maltese islands are presented as a case study to demonstrate the phenomenon of continuity through a study of these stones. Worship of stones in representation of divine presence is found on the Maltese islands since prehistoric times. But the practice survived several centuries under different cultures represented by unknown communities during the islands’ prehistory and the Phoenicians / Carthaginians and the Romans in early historic times.
NEW: Die Ausrüstung der römischen Armee auf der Siegessäule des Marcus Aurelius in Rom Ein Vergleich zwischen der skulpturalen Darstellung und den archäologischen Bodenfunden by Boris Alexander Nikolaus Burandt. iv+412 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. German text. 369 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 28. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916930. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916947. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The reliefs of the column of Marcus Aurelius in Rome are used extensively for the illustration of Roman soldiers. However, despite the fact that in the last decades a number of sites at the Danube Limes have been analyzed, where numerous militaria from the Markomannic Wars have emerged, there is no comparison between this work of official Roman art and the archaeological finds. This book aims to address this lacuna. Each piece of equipment of the Roman soldier is analyzed in its sculptural representation and compared with the existing finds as well as supplementary comparisons with secondary sources. The result is a broad picture of the Roman army under Marcus Aurelius and of Rome's depiction of their forces in state propaganda. In addition, the present work comprehensively separates the antique parts of the frieze from the additions made during the late Renaissance for the first time and thus provides a solid basis for future archaeological and art historical evaluations.

About the Author
Boris A. N. Burandt studied Archeology of the Roman Provinces, Classical Archeology, History of Art and Ancient History at the University of Cologne, and specialized early in Roman military equipment. After completing his studies he was research assistant at the Morphomata International Center for Advanced Studies and in three projects of the German Archaeological Institute as well as a trainee of the State Office for National Heritage Conservation in the Rhineland. He also participated in various excavations and campaigns in Germany, Italy and North Africa. Since 2017 he has undertaken research at the Goethe-University in Frankfurt on the Main about Roman memorabilia in the context of gladiator fights and chariot races. This book is based on his PhD thesis, which was written between 2012 and 2015 at the University of Cologne.

German Description:
Die Reliefs der Marcussäule in Rom bilden seit Langem vielfach verwendete Vorlagen zur Illustration römischer Soldaten. Doch obwohl in den letzten Dekaden mehrere Fundplätze am Donaulimes aufgearbeitet wurden, an denen zahlreiche Militaria aus den Markomannenkriegen zutage gekommen sind, fehlt bislang ein Vergleich zwischen den Arbeiten der offiziellen römischen Staatskunst und den archäologischen Bodenfunden. Diesen Mangel soll nun das vorliegende Werk beheben. Jeder Ausrüstungsgegenstand des römischen Soldaten wird in seiner skulpturalen Darstellung analysiert und mit den vorliegenden Funden sowie ergänzenden Sekundärquellen verglichen. Es entsteht somit ein umfangreiches Bild der römischen Armee unter Marcus Aurelius und von Roms Umgang mit dem Militär in der staatlichen Propaganda. Außerdem separiert das vorliegende Werk erstmals umfassend die antiken Partien des Friesbandes von den Ergänzungen der Spätrenaissance und legt somit eine solide Basis für künftige archäologische und kunsthistorische Auswertungen.

Boris A. N. Burandt studierte Archäologie der römischen Provinzen, Klassische Archäologie, Kunstgeschichte und Alte Geschichte an der Universität zu Köln und spezialisierte sich früh auf die Erforschung römischer Militärausrüstung. Nach seinem Studium war B. Burandt Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am Internationalen Kolleg Morphomata und in drei Projekten des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts sowie Volontär des Rheinischen Amtes für Bodendenkmalpflege. Außerdem nahm er an diversen Ausgrabungen und Kampagnen in Deutschland, Italien und Nordafrika teil. Seit 2017 forscht B. Burandt an der Goethe-Universität in Frankfurt am Main zu römischen Memorabilien im Kontext von Gladiatorenkämpfen und Wagenrennen. Das vorliegende Buch basiert auf seiner Dissertation, die zwischen 2012 und 2015 an der Universität zu Köln entstanden ist.
NEW: Remembered Places, Forgotten Pasts The Don Drainage Basin in Prehistory by Tim Cockrell. xii+222 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (10 colour plates). 366 2017. ISBN 9781784917012. £32.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

South Yorkshire and the North Midlands have long been ignored or marginalized in narratives of British Prehistory. In Remembered Places, Forgotten Pasts, largely unpublished data is used for the first time in a work of synthesis to reconstruct the prehistory of the earliest communities across the River Don drainage basin. The author uses a relational approach to account for the complex and sophisticated interaction between people and materiality. Monuments and material culture are considered together, in relation to the diverse landscapes across which they were deposited in the distant past. The memory of significant places along lines of movement are central to the approach taken, combined with the changing character of the land which supported people. Virtually absent in recent narratives, the forgotten prehistoric pasts of the region are now able to be approached on a systematic basis. The author concludes that a region that was the centre of dynamic interaction between mobile groups in its earliest phase gave way to a pastoral lifestyle facilitated by extensive wetlands. These wetlands were connected by waterways and gorges. Thus connected, the wetlands were located to either side of its drier, centrally defining feature, the Magnesian Limestone ridge.
NEW: A Life in Norfolk's Archaeology: 1950-2016 Archaeology in an arable landscape by Peter Wade-Martins. xviii+380 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (87 plates in colour). Casebound with dust jacket. 358 2017 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916572. £24.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916589. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This is a history of archaeological endeavour in Norfolk set within a national context. It covers the writer’s early experiences as a volunteer, the rise of field archaeology as a profession and efforts to conserve the archaeological heritage against the tide of destruction prevalent in the countryside up to the 1980s when there was not even a right of access to record sites before they were lost. Now developers often have to pay for an excavation before they can obtain planning consent. The book features progress with archaeology conservation as well as the growth of rescue archaeology as a profession both in towns and in the countryside. Many of the most important discoveries made by aerial photography, rescue excavations and metal detecting from the 1970s onwards are illustrated. The last section covers the recent growth of the Norfolk Archaeological Trust as an owner of some of the most iconic rural sites in Norfolk. The book concludes with a discussion of some issues facing British field archaeology today.

About the author
Peter Wade-Martins obtained a PhD studying the evidence for the history of rural settlement in Norfolk from the Anglo- Saxon period through the Middle Ages up to the enclosures. This involved what was then a new technique of collecting sherds of pottery off ploughed fields and from that evidence working out where people lived in a parish at different periods from the seventh to the nineteenth centuries. He also excavated two deserted villages revealing evidence for the first time about village life in Norfolk in the Middle Ages. He followed this by excavating a high-status Anglo- Saxon settlement at North Elmham, where it was possible to work out the plans of Anglo-Saxon timber buildings from patterns left by their post-holes in the subsoil.

Then, as County Field Archaeologist for Norfolk from 1973 to 1999, he organised and ran a county service for field archaeology developing a Sites and Monuments Record, an aerial photography programme, which made many startling discoveries, and a series of rescue excavations on a wide range of sites from prehistoric to medieval. His passion for countryside conservation led him to organise a number of ground-breaking conservation projects often trying to move a lot faster than English Heritage seemed willing to go.

Having retired early as County Field Archaeologist in 1999, he became the first Director of the Norfolk Archaeological Trust where he was instrumental in raising funds to buy an Iron Age fort, most of the Roman town at Caistor near Norwich, the remarkably well preserved Roman fort at Burgh Castle, a medieval castle and a complete monastery. All of them have been opened to the public. His one regret was that he didn’t have the opportunity to buy a deserted medieval village for the Archaeological Trust as well.

His other countryside interests include writing books on the decline and revival of the Manx mountain sheep, The Manx Loghtan Story (1990), the decline and eventual extinction of the old Norfolk Horn sheep, Black Faces (1993) and, with others, a two-volume work on Britishmade toy farm vehicles Farming in Miniature (2013 and 2014). His particular interest here has been to see how farm machinery familiar to each generation of farmers has been represented by contemporary toy makers. Other interests have included the creation of a photo archive of some 3,000 pictures of crofting life on the Isle of Eigg in the Inner Hebrides where his family have been regular visitors. He has also kept a flock of sheep since 1978.

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FORTHCOMING: Alexandria and Qumran: Back to the Beginning by Kenneth Silver. xxvi+586 pages; 42 figures, 11 maps and plans (24 plates in colour). 381 2017. ISBN 9781784917289. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This year, 2017, marks 70 years since the discovery of the famous Dead Sea Scrolls at Khirbet Qumran by the Dead Sea in 1947. The Dead Sea Scrolls are one of the most well-known archaeological discoveries of the 20th century. This book addresses the proto-history and the roots of the Qumran community and of the Dead Sea Scrolls in the light of contemporary scholarship in Alexandria, Egypt. Alexandria, as the centre for Hellenistic Jews and the location of the Library of Alexandria, forms a key to understanding the theme of the book. The relationship of this context to the thoughts of the Essenes, the Jewish philosopher Philo of Alexandria, the Jewish Therapeutae of Egypt living in the neighbourhood of Alexandria and the Pythagoreans are especially studied in this work. Historical sources (both Jewish and Classical authors) and archaeological evidence are taken into account in the wider Graeco-Roman context. The connection between the Jewish Therapeutae in the Lake Mareotis region and the Palestinian Essenes is explained by the ‘Jewish Pythagoras’ based on the idea that the movements share the same philosophical tradition based on Judaism and Pythagoreanism. The prototypes of the Dead Sea Scrolls are explained in their Egyptian context, in association with the Library of Alexandria, the Egyptian temple manuals, and the formation of libraries in the Hellenistic period including that of Qumran.

About the Author:
Dr Kenneth Silver is a historian and professional archaeologist, who has lived and worked for decades in the Near East. He is a specialist in Hellenistic and Roman archaeology, history and numismatics. He has worked with archaeological material in Israel, Egypt, Jordan, Syria and Turkey. He has previously published a number of scientific articles and monographs in this field. His current research interests include the study of early Jewish-Christian relations and the history of early Christianity. Presently he is the director of a survey and mapping project in Northern Mesopotamia studying the border zone between the late Roman/ Byzantine Empire and Persia.
FORTHCOMING: Innovative Approaches and Explorations in Ceramic Studies edited by Sandra L. López Varela. vi+144 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (44 colour plates). 380 2017. ISBN 9781784917364. £28.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Innovative Approaches and Explorations in Ceramic Studies celebrates thirty years of Ceramic Ecology, an international symposium initiated at the 1986 American Anthropological Association meeting at the suggestion of Frederick R. Matson. For almost twenty-five years, Dr. Charles Kolb organized the symposium to discuss multiple theoretical and methodological approaches to ceramic studies around the world. By fostering interdisciplinary interactions, the symposium has pushed the boundaries of what can be understood about the human experience through the creative and systematic study of ceramics. Contributions in this volume explore the application of instrumental techniques and experimental studies to analyze ceramics and follow innovative approaches to evaluate our methods and theories in our quest to learn about the societies we dedicate our studies to.

About the Author
Sandra L. Lopez Varela (PhD, University of London, 1996; RPA, since 2005) is a professor at the Faculty of Philosophy and Literature, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Motivated by her studies of Maya pottery in the Usumacinta region, she extended her analytical approach to the study of Maya formative ceramics in northern Belize. Her current research studies concentrate on the effects of social development policies and institutional economics to combat poverty on nonindustrial technologies, an interest that developed from her ethnoarchaeological studies of griddle making at Cuentepec, in the State of Morelos. The transdisciplinary and international approach to her research has brought together scientists from apparently unrelated fields to archaeology and to contribute to modern social inquiry, a dialogue that awarded her the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Prize from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in 2012, with the project ‘Sustaining Heritage in the Future Cities of Development: archaeological analysis of institutional solutions to poverty’. Deriving from this innovative project she is developing a mobile application, ‘Alternative Mexico’, financed by UNAM, to empower and promote local communities’ definition of cultural heritage in Mexico’s City metropolitan area. Her international recognition to advance our knowledge of the past was recognized with her election to hold the Archaeology Seat of the American Anthropological Association (2011–2014). She has served as President of the Society for Archaeological Sciences (2009–2011) and as Treasurer of the Sociedad Mexicana de Antropología (2015-2017). In 2009, she joined the Mexican Academy of Sciences, Arts, Technology, and Humanities.
FORTHCOMING: Natter’s Museum Britannicum: British gem collections and collectors of the mid-eighteenth century by John Boardman, Julia Kagan and Claudia Wagner with contributions by Catherine Phillips. iv+304 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Casebound with dust jacket. 379 2017. ISBN 9781784917272. £55.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The German gem-engraver, medallist, and amateur scholar Lorenz Natter (1705- 1763), was so impressed by the size and quality of the collections of ancient and later engraved gems which he found in Britain that he proposed the publication of an extraordinarily ambitious catalogue – Museum Britannicum – which would present engravings and descriptions of the most important pieces. He made considerable progress to this end, producing several hundred drawings, but in time he decided to abandon the near completed project in the light of the apparent lack of interest shown in Britain. Only one of the intended plates in its final form ever appeared, in a catalogue which he published separately for Lord Bessborough’s collection. On Natter’s death the single copy of his magnum opus vanished mysteriously, presumed lost forever.

All hope of recovering Natter’s unpublished papers seemed vain, and their very existence had come to be doubted. Yet they were to be found more than two hundred years after his death, in Spring 1975, when the classical scholar and renowned expert in gems, Oleg Neverov, chanced upon them at the bottom of a pile of papers in the archives of the State Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg. Neverov and his colleague Julia Kagan carried out the initial research on the Hermitage manuscripts and produced the first published account of this archival treasure.

The present volume builds upon their earlier work to produce the first comprehensive publication of Museum Britannicum, offering full discussion in English and presenting Natter’s drawings and comments alongside modern information on the gems that can be identified and located through fresh research. This book is the result of a ten-year collaboration between scholars on the Beazley Archive gems research programme at Oxford’s Classical Art Research Centre and the State Hermitage Museum. It fulfills Natter’s vision for the Museum Britannicum – albeit two and a half centuries late – to the benefit of art historians, cultural historians, curators, and gem-lovers of today.
FORTHCOMING: Latrina: Roman Toilets in the Northwestern Provinces of the Roman Empire by Stefanie Hoss. ii+152 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (56 colour plates). 378 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 31. ISBN 9781784917258. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents a selection of papers and case studies first presented at a conference designed to focus on the toilets of the Northwestern provinces of the Roman Empire, taking place at Radboud University on the 1st and 2nd of May 2009. Papers demonstrate the value of scientific analysis of waste to understand the food habits and diseases of the Roman users of the toilet, while elsewhere questions on how to find the necessary expertise and financing for such investigations were raised.

It is impossible at this time to write a definitive history of toilets and toilet-use in Roman times. Much more research is needed to get a clear view of all aspects surrounding human waste removal during the Roman period. While the basics of the architectural aspects of Roman toilets are better known by now, other aspects have been only touched upon briefly. It is hoped that this conference and its proceedings volume will not be the last on this subject in the Northwestern provinces, but just a start for this interesting research topic.
FORTHCOMING: Immagini del tempo degli dei, immagini del tempo degli uomini Un’analisi delle iconografie dei mesi nei calendari figurati romani e bizantini e del loro contest storico-culturale by Ciro Parodo. viii+338 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Italian text with English summary. 376 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 30. ISBN 9781784917340. £42.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

A characteristic shared by the Roman and Byzantine illustrated calendars is that they represent the twelve months of the year, referable to an iconographic repertoire which is divided into three themes: the astrological-astronomical, the festive-ritual and the rural-seasonal. With regard to the first type, the months are depicted through images of the signs of the zodiac, often associated with images of the guardian deities of the months; the second category includes depictions of the months that refer to some important religious festivals; finally, the third theme includes images of the months that allude to the most important work activities performed in the countryside. The figurative calendars, which in most cases are made on mosaics, are characterized by a wide distribution in terms of time, concentrated between the 3rd and 6th century, and geography, with the areas of greatest attestation consisting of Italy, Africa Proconsularis, Greece and Arabia. With regard to the architectural context, the calendars from the West are prevalently documented in the domus, while those from the East are particularly attested in ecclesiastical buildings. The aim of research presented in this volume is the in-depth study of the connections between the meaning of the iconography of the Roman and Byzantine illustrated calendars and their historical and cultural context.

About the Author:
Ciro Parodo (1978) received a Degree and a Post-Graduate Degree in Archaeology at the University of Cagliari (Italy), and a PhD in Classical Archaeology at the Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen (Germany). He focuses his research on two principal domains: the study of Greek and Roman Iconography as a means of understanding the social and cultural issues of the Classical World, and the reception of Classical Antiquity in the Modern and Contemporary Age. Italian Description: La caratteristica comune dei calendari figurati romani e bizantini consiste nella rappresentazione dei dodici mesi dell’anno, riferibile a un repertorio iconografico articolato in tre temi: quelli di tipo astrologico-astronomico, festivo-rituale e rurale-stagionale. Per quanto riguarda la prima tipologia, i mesi sono raffigurati mediante le immagini dei segni zodiacali, spesso associate a quelle delle divinità tutelari mensili; la seconda categoria include quelle raffigurazioni dei mesi che si riferiscono ad alcune importanti festività religiose; la terza tematica, infine, comprende quelle immagini dei mesi che alludono alle più rilevanti attività lavorative svolte in ambito campestre. I calendari figurati, realizzati nella maggioranza dei casi su mosaico, si contraddistinguono per un’ampia distribuzione in senso temporale, con una concentrazione cronologica fra il III e il VI secolo d.C., e geografico, con le aree di maggior attestazione costituite dall’Italia, l’Africa Proconsularis, la Grecia e l’Arabia. In merito invece al contesto architettonico, i calendari di provenienza occidentale sono documentati in prevalenza presso le domus, mentre per quanto concerne quelli orientali, sono attestati in particolare negli edifici ecclesiastici. L’obiettivo della ricerca presentata in questo volume si focalizza sull’approfondimento delle connessioni esistenti tra il significato dell’iconografia dei calendari figurati romani e bizantini e il loro contesto storico- culturale.

Ciro Parodo (1978) ha conseguito la Laurea e la Scuola di Specializzazione in Archeologia presso l’Università di Cagliari (Italia) e il Dottorato di Ricerca in Archeologia Classica presso l’Eberhard- Karls-Universität di Tübingen (Germania). Focalizza la sua ricerca su due ambiti principali: lo studio dell’iconografia greca e romana come strumento per analizzare le problematiche socio- culturali del mondo classico e l’indagine delle dinamiche di ricezione dell’antichità classica nell’età moderna e contemporanea.
FORTHCOMING: La ceca de Ilduro by Alejandro G. Sinner. 189 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English summary. 375 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 29. ISBN 9781784917234. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The minting of coinage in a territory without previous monetary history or tradition reflects a series of political, social and cultural changes that took place in order to make it possible. Such changes can be traced in the archaeological record thanks to elements apparently as different as coins, ceramics, epigraphy, funerary rites or architecture; these changes thus emerge as some of the most significant points in the colonization process that took place throughout the second century B.C. and at the beginning of the next century in the valley of Cabrera de Mar (ancient Ilduro) and the Laietani territory.

This book is exclusively devoted to the mint of Ilduro, its main goal being to study not only the issues produced by the workshop in detail, but also the role that this coinage had in the monetarization of a changing society, that of the Laietani, which had never previously needed to use coinage. To do so, the author of this study endeavours to answer the following questions in as much depth as possible: Who minted the coins? Why? What for? How? Where? When? How many?

With the aim of answering the aforementioned questions, this volume has been organized into ten chapters divided in three broader sections dedicated to studying, specifically, each one of the aspects involved in the production of this mint. The chapters considering the location of the workshop and the legends used are fundamental to answer the questions of who minted the coins and where. On the other hand, aspects such as metrology, typology and the technique (metallographic analysis) used by the mint are essential to understand how the coins were minted, and also to put forward a hypothesis as regards the use given to the coin issues discussed in the present study. Finally, the chapters dedicated to the production, classification and chronology of the issues should answer such important questions as when and how much money was put into circulation.

This is a book that, in addition to increasing our knowledge of Iberian numismatics, brings us closer to the evolution and production of the coin issues minted in present-day northeastern Spain in general and to the Ilduro workshop in particular.

About the author:
Prof. Alejandro G. Sinner holds a B.A. degree in History, and M.A. degree in Archaeology and a Ph.D. in Society and Culture (2014) from the University of Barcelona. He is currently an Assistant Professor in Roman Art and Archaeology in the Department of Greek and Roman Studies at the University of Victoria.

Prof. Sinner’s research focuses on the social and cultural history of Roman Spain and the western provinces. His main research lines include Iberian Numismatics and epigraphy, identity construction, cultural change, and pre-Roman languages in the Iberian Peninsula. Despite being at an early stage in his academic career, Prof. Sinner’s publication record includes two books and over a dozen articles in national and international journals. Since 2006 he has been involved in the excavations of the ancient site of Ilduro in Cabrera de Mar (Catalonia) where he is currently directing a research project and leading an international archaeological field school.


Spanish description: La acuñación de moneda en un territorio sin historia ni tradición monetaria previa supone que se ha producido una serie de cambios políticos, sociales y culturales para hacerla posible. Tales cambios pueden detectarse en el registro arqueológico gracias a elementos aparentemente tan distintos como dicha moneda, la cerámica, la epigrafía, los ritos funerarios o la arquitectura, y se perfilan como algunos de los puntos más relevantes para entender el proceso de colonización que tuvo lugar a lo largo del siglo II a. C. e inicios de la centuria siguiente en el valle de Cabrera de Mar, así como en el territorio layetano.

Este libro, dedicado exclusivamente a estudiar la ceca de Ilduro, tiene c
FORTHCOMING: Parian Polyandreia: The Late Geometric Funerary Legacy of Cremated Soldiers’ Bones on Socio-Political Affairs and Military Organizational Preparedness in Ancient Greece by Anagnostis P. Agelarakis. xii+400 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (58 colour plates). 375 2017. ISBN 9781784917197. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This book centres on the anthropological study of two late 8th century BC monumental graves, designated as T144 and T105, at the ancient necropolis of Paroikia at Paros. The study investigates inter-island features of the human record, observable as ingrained traces in the skeletal record. These have particular significance as they may relate to Parian endeavours in the northern Aegean to colonise Thasos.

Through the ‘Paros Polyandreia Anthropological Project,’ it was possible to gain insights into aspects of the human environment and experience in the Parian context. A considerable population sample of cremated male individuals was available, shedding light on trends that would have involved Thasos; and discerning further facets of the human condition during the Late Geometric to the Early Archaic periods in the ancient Hellenic world.

The report integrates the basic anthropological data, evaluations and assessments derived from the study of the human skeletal record of Polyandreia T144, and T105. Bioarchaeological and forensic anthropological research results include the morphometric analyses of biological developmental growth and variability in relation to manifestations of acquired skeleto-anatomic changes, along with inquiries into the demographic dynamics, and the palaeopathologic profile of the individuals involved. Such intra-site juxtaposition afforded the possibility to deliberate on issues of the intended purpose, function, and symbolic meaning of the two funerary activity areas, and to reflect on the organizational abilities and capacities of the Parians in political and military affairs.

Moreover, inter-site evaluations of the burial grounds of Orthi Petra of Eleutherna-Crete, Plithos of Naxos, Athenian Demosion Sema, Pythagoreion of Samos, and Rhodes make possible comparisons of taphonomic conditions, with cremated materials’ metric analyses, and reflections on aspects of the funerary customs and practices of the interring of cremated war dead.
FORTHCOMING: The Chambered Tombs of the Isle of Man A study by Audrey Henshall 1971-1978 edited by Frances Lynch and Peter Davey. iv+176 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (25 colour plates). 371 2017. ISBN 9781784914684. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This is the first book ever devoted to the chambered tombs of the Isle of Man and, though there are no more than nine surviving monuments, they are of considerable interest and importance because of the central location of the island in the north Irish Sea where cultural influences and traditions of tomb building are mixed – and no doubt populations too.

These monuments, still impressive reminders of the past in our contemporary landscape, belong to the early 4th millennium BC when farming, one of the most significant movers of change in society, first came to the Isle of Man. These vast stone chambers speak of the power of ancestors, the continuity of family groups and the importance of the land and territory which sustained them.

Work on this book was begun in the 1960s by Audrey Henshall, the foremost authority on these monuments in Britain. It has been edited and brought up to date for publication by Frances Lynch and Peter Davey and contains a comprehensive study of previous work on the tombs, new plans and commentary on each site, and also a review of the associated finds from excavation. Appendices provide the final reports on previously unpublished excavations at King Orry’s Grave and Ballaharra.
Geology for Archaeologists A short introduction by J.R.L. Allen. viii+140 pages; illustrated in colour and black & white (28 colour plates). 363 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916879. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916886. £11.99 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This short introduction aims to provide archaeologists of all backgrounds with a grounding in the principles, materials, and methods of geology. Sections include coverage of main rock-forming minerals and classes of rocks. Geological maps and structures are introduced, and the elements of geological stratigraphy and dating are explained and related to archaeological experience. Fluvial and coastal environments are important archaeological landscapes and their formation processes, sediments and topography are outlined. Stone for building, implement-making, tool-making, and making mortar are all discussed, followed by an introduction to clays and ceramics. A final chapter introduces metallurgical landscapes: metalliferous ores, mining and smelting, and metal-making industries. Each chapter ends with a short reading list, and many have selected case-histories in illustration of the points made. Included is a glossary of technical terms.

About the author
Emeritus Professor John Allen is currently a Visiting Research Fellow in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Reading. He took a degree in Geology at the University of Sheffield and for many years taught Geology at Reading, where his chief interests were in the sedimentology of fluvial deposits (especially the Devonian Old Red Sandstone) and in sedimentary processes and structures. In the 1980s he turned his attention to modern estuarine sediments, and became increasingly interested in the archaeology of British coastal environments, especially those of the Severn and other estuaries, where he showed in collaboration with professional archaeologists that an appreciation of geological processes is essential to an understanding of the archaeological sites and their landscapes. His contributions to postgraduate courses in Geoarchaeology at Reading stress the importance of an understanding of geological principles, maps, and materials, especially rocks and minerals, to the refinement and resolution of numerous archaeological problems.
LAUNCH OFFER: Proceedings of the XI International Congress of Egyptologists, Florence, Italy 23-30 August 2015 edited by Gloria Rosati and Maria Cristina Guidotti. xiv+738 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 100 plates in colour. Papers in English and Italian. 335 2017 Archaeopress Egyptology 19. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916008. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916015. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Special launch offer: £60 (RRP £90). Offer ends 30/11/2017.
The Egyptian Museum of Florence, in collaboration with the University of Florence, hosted the Eleventh International Congress of Egyptologists which took place from 23rd to 30th August 2015, under the patronage of the IAE – International Association of Egyptologists.

This volume publishes 136 papers and posters presented during the Congress. Topics discussed here range from archaeology, religion, philology, mummy investigations and archaeometry to history, offering an up-to-date account of research in these fields.

About the Author:
Gloria Rosati is Associate Professor of Egyptology at the University of Florence, Department of History, Geography, Archaeology, Fine and Performing Arts. Her research topics are Middle Kingdom history and art, as well as funerary texts and rituals. Gloria has been working in Egypt, at El-Sheikh Abadah / Antinoupolis, in both Roman town and at necropoleis, in the temple of Ramesses II, and in the Theban necropolis, Asasif.

Maria Cristina Guidotti is the Director of the Florence Egyptian Museum, and is a specialist in Egyptian pottery from the Pharaonic and Graeco-Roman periods. In her publications she studied material from the Florence collections, from excavations at Saqqara, from the funerary temple of Thutmosis IV-western Thebes, and from the Roman town of Antinoupolis.


A hardback edition will be available in November/December. Download the order form here and return by post of fax to pre-order at the special rate £90.00 including free shipping in UK & Europe (£10 ROW). Payment will be processed when the book is ready to ship.

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Bridging Times and Spaces: Papers in Ancient Near Eastern, Mediterranean and Armenian Studies Honouring Gregory E. Areshian on the occasion of his sixty-fifth birthday edited by Pavel S. Avetisyan and Yervand H. Grekyan. xx+404 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 371 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916992. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917005. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Bridging Times and Spaces is composed of papers written by colleagues of Professor Gregory E. Areshian on the occasion his 65th birthday reflecting the breadth and diversity of his scholarly contributions. The range of presented papers covers topics in Near Eastern, Mediterranean and Armenian archaeology, theory of interpretation in archaeology and art history, interdisciplinary history, historical linguistics, art history, and comparative mythology. The volume opens with an extensive interview given by Gregory Areshian, in which Gregory outlines the pathways of his academic career, archaeological discoveries, different intellectual quests, and the organic connections between research questions that he explored across different social sciences and the humanities, stressing the importance of periodizations in interdisciplinary history as well as his views on holism and interdisciplinary studies.

About the Editors Pavel Avetisyan is a former student of Gregory Areshian during his study at the Yerevan State University in 1975-1980; he now leads together with Gregory and Kristine Martirosyan-Olshansky the joint Armenian-American archaeological team at the excavations of the Neolithic settlement at Masis Blur, Armenia. Pavel received his PhD in 2003 (Chronology and Periodization of the Middle Bronze Age of Armenia) and D.Sc. in 2014 (Armenian Highland during the 24-9th centuries BC. The Dynamics of Socio-Cultural Transformations, according to Archaeological Data). His areas of research are Old World archaeology and the Neolithic and Iron Age cultures of Transcaucasia, devoting his studies also to the periodizations and chronology of the Bronze and Iron Ages of Transcaucasia. Professor Avetisyan is the Director of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia and Professor at the Yerevan State University.

Yervand Grekyan is a leading researcher at the Institute of Oriental Studies, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia and Associate Professor at the Armenian State Pedagogical University. He received his PhD in 2002 (History of the Mannean Kingdom) and defended his habilitation thesis on the structure of the Urartian Kingdom at the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia in 2016 (Biainili-Urartu. State and Society). Dr Grekyan’s interests are ancient history and culture of the Near East and especially of the Armenian Highland in the Late Bronze and Iron Ages.
Foreigners and Outside Influences in Medieval Norway edited by Stian Suppersberger Hamre. ii+124 pages; illustrated throughout (14 plates in colour). Available both in print and Open Access. 368 2017. ISBN 9781784917050. £16.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Foreigners and Outside Influences in Medieval Norway results from an international conference held in Bergen, Norway, in March 2016, entitled ‘Multidisciplinary approaches to improving our understanding of immigration and mobility in pre-modern Scandinavia (1000-1900)’. The articles in this volume discuss different aspects of immigration and foreign influences in medieval Norway, from the viewpoint of different academic disciplines. The book will give the reader an insight into how the population of medieval Norway interacted with the surrounding world, how and by whom it was influenced, and how the population was composed.

About the Editor
Dr Stian Suppersberger Hamre is a biological anthropologist with a BA in palaeoanthropology from the University of New England, Australia, and an MSc in forensic anthropology from Bournemouth University, England. His PhD research at the Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Bergen, Norway, has focussed on different aspects of the medieval population in Norway. From 2013, his main interest has been to improve our understanding of pre-modern immigration, mobility and population composition in Norway, with a special emphasis on bringing different disciplines together to illuminate these topics and to complement his own research as a biological anthropologist.

PDF available as a free download in Archaeopress Open Access. Click here to view.
The Mycenaean Cemetery at Agios Vasileios, Chalandritsa, in Achaea by Konstantina Aktypi with contributions by Olivia A. Jones and Vivian Staikou. xii+296 pages; 287 figures, 8 tables, 3 maps (163 plates in colour). 367 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916978. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916985. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Mycenaean chamber-tomb cemetery at Agios Vasileios, near Chalandritsa in Achaea, was first investigated by Nikolaos Kyparissis in the late 1920s, followed by small-scale research in 1961 by Efthimios Mastrokostas. In the years 1989–2001 more rescue excavations were conducted by the Greek Archaeological Service, revealing 30 chamber tombs, some looted. Based mostly on the latest research, this study is the first major presentation of the cemetery and its finds. The topographical data are presented in chapter A, including the most important ancient sites in the region. Chapters B to E deal with the 45 chamber tombs and with the assemblage of the 260 artefacts found in them. The chipped stone assemblage and the ground stone implements are presented in chapter F by Vivian Staikou. Chapter G, by Olivia A. Jones, deals with the human skeletal remains, focussing on burial customs and practices. Chapters H and I handle the discussion and the concluding remarks, respectively. A series of 3D representations and photorealistic illustrations are presented, based on the original plans and architectural drawings of the tombs, to produce a visual appreciation of the important cemetery, unfortunately no longer visible.

About the Author
Konstantina Aktypi obtained her BA in Archaeology at the National Kapodistrian University of Athens and Certificates in Heritage Management, Administration, and Developing Communication Skills and Responses to Crisis. She has participated in projects of intensive archaeological survey and systematic excavations in Achaea and Aitoloakarnania. Since 1995, she has been working as an archaeologist in the Ephorate of Antiquities of Achaea, conducting rescue excavations in the region dating from the Early Bronze Age to the Roman period. From 2002 to 2011 she worked at the excavations of the Mycenaean settlement and chamber tomb cemetery at Voudeni, also holding a supervisorial position for the major restoration works there. Her current research interests include the study of the chamber tombs at Voudeni, an Early Bronze Age settlement near Patras and the two best preserved tholos tombs in Achaea, in the prehistoric cemetery at Rhodia. She is also working on educational programs, introducing students to the art of Archaeology.

Olivia A. Jones obtained a bachelor’s degree in Anthropology and History at West Virginia University and a Masters in Aegean Archaeology at University College London. She has worked in academic and contract archaeology projects in the United States and Greece. She is currently completing her doctoral research at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. Her research interests include applying a bioarchaeological approach to Mycenaean mortuary practices.

Vivian Staikou is an archaeologist of the Ephorate of Aitoloakarnania and Lefkada. She studied Archaeology and Fine Arts in the National Kapodistrian University of Athens and received an MA in Prehistoric Archaeology from the University of Crete. Over the years she has carried out archaeological fieldwork in Attica, Achaea, Aitoloakarnania and Lefkada. Her current research interests include lithic technologies, the Palaeolithic of Western Greece and the archaeology of the island of Lefkas. She also has a particular interest in developing educational programs for children.
Encounters, Excavations and Argosies Essays for Richard Hodges edited by John Mitchell, John Moreland and Bea Leal. iv+358 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 365 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916817. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916824. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Richard Hodges is one of Europe’s preeminent archaeologists. He has transformed the way we understand the early Middle Ages, and has put the past to work for the present, through a sequence of paradigmatic excavations in England, Italy and Albania. Encounters, Excavations and Argosies pays tribute to him with a series of reflections on some of the themes and issues which have been central to his work over the last forty years. The contributors are colleagues, many his students, above all friends of the man whose ideas, example, trust, and loyalty have touched and inspired us all.

About the Authors
John Mitchell first met Richard Hodges at Castel San Vincenzo in 1981, a jobbing art-historian dropping by to assess some excavated fresco-fragments, was hooked and has been working with him ever since, in Molise, southern Albania and more recently in Tuscany. He is Professor in the History of Art (emeritus) at the University of East Anglia.

John Moreland took his first Archaeology tutorial with Richard Hodges at the University of Sheffield in 1977. Richard also supervised his PhD, and they worked closely together on excavations at Roystone Grange (Derbyshire), San Vincenzo al Volturno (Italy), and Butrint (Albania). He is Professor of Historical Archaeology at the University of Sheffield.

Bea Leal studied metalwork at Camberwell Art College and history of art at the University of East Anglia, finishing her PhD there (on Images of Architecture in Late Antiquity) in 2016. Her interests are in the art and architecture of the late antique and early medieval Mediterranean, and especially the early Islamic period.
Bodies of Maize, Eaters of Grain Comparing material worlds, metaphor and the agency of art in the Preclassic Maya and Mycenaean early civilisations by Marcus Jan Bajema. vi+352 pages; illustrated throughout in black &white with 22 colour plates. 364 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916916. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916923. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book provides a comparative study of the earliest urban civilisations of the Maya lowlands and the Greek mainland. The focus lies on the art styles of the Late Preclassic lowland Maya and Mycenaean Greece. Building on research from previous comparative studies, the approach used here seeks to combine more traditional iconographic approaches with more recent models on metaphor and the social agency of things. By comparing Maya and Mycenaean art styles through the three aspects of metaphor, semiotics and praxis, their differences and similarities are made clear. The book shows art to have played a more active role in the development of the earliest urban civilisations, rather than passively reflecting economic and political trends. In that way, the social role of art provides a key to understanding the relations between the different factors in the development of the two societies, as they played out at different temporal and geographical scales. To understand this, the notion of distinct Maya and Mycenaean ‘material worlds’, involving both materials and ideas, is proposed, with consequences for models about the earliest urban civilisations in general.
AP2017: 12th International Conference of Archaeological Prospection 12th-16th September 2017, University of Bradford edited by Benjamin Jennings, Christopher Gaffney, Thomas Sparrow and Sue Gaffney. vi+280 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (177 plates in colour). Available both in print and Open Access. 362 2017. ISBN 9781784916770. £35.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is a product of the International Conference of Archaeological Prospection 2017 which was hosted by the School of Archaeological and Forensic Sciences at the University of Bradford. This event marked a return to the location of the inaugural conference of archaeological prospection which was held in Bradford in 1995. The conference is held every two years under the banner of the International Society for Archaeological Prospection.

The Proceedings of 12th International Conference of Archaeological Prospection draws together over 100 papers addressing archaeological prospection techniques, methodologies and case studies from around the world. Including studies from over 30 countries distributed across Africa, North America, South America, Asia and Europe; the collection of articles covers a diverse range of research backgrounds and situations. At this particular ICAP meeting, specific consideration has been given to emerging techniques and technologies in the fields of inter-tidal and marine archaeological prospection, and low altitude archaeological prospection.

The papers within this volume represent the conference themes of: Techniques and new technological developments; Applications and reconstructing landscapes and urban environments; Integration of techniques and inter-disciplinary studies, with focus on visualisation and interpretation; Marine, inter-tidal and wetland prospection techniques and applications; Low altitude prospection techniques and applications; Commercial archaeological prospection in the contemporary world.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Time and Stone: The Emergence and Development of Megaliths and Megalithic Societies in Europe by Bettina Schulz Paulsson. xiv+376 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (71 plates in colour). 361 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916855. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916862. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This analysis is concerned with the dating of megaliths in Europe and is based on 2410 available radiocarbon results from pre-megalithic and megalithic sites, the megaliths' contemporaneous contexts and the application of a Bayesian statistical framework. It is, so far, the largest existing attempt to establish a supra-regional synthesis on the emergence and development of megaliths in Europe. Its aim is to assist in the clarification of an over 200-year-old, ongoing research debate.

About the Author
Dr. Bettina Schulz Paulsson obtained her MA in Prehistoric Archaeology/American Anthropology in 2005 at the Humboldt /Freie Universität in Berlin/Germany and her PhD in 2013 at the graduate school “Human development in Landscapes”/ Christian-Albrechts Universität Kiel. Recently, she has been appointed to the Department of History, at the University of Gothenborg/Sweden as a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Research Fellow, funded under the EC’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Initiative. Her main research is on the Neolithic, with a particular focus on scientific dating, megaliths, rock art studies, cognitive archaeology and symbolic systems.
Shifting Sand: Journal of a cub archaeologist, Palestine 1964 by Julian Berry. ii+88 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white with 21 plates in colour. 359 2017 Archaeological Lives . ISBN 9781784916596. £18.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Shifting Sand is the journal of Julian Berry, then a 17-year-old archaeologist, written on-site during excavations in Deir Alla, Jordan, in 1964. The dig was organized by the University of Leiden and led by Dr Henk Franken who was looking to find a material context for Old Testament narratives, and to build a stratigraphic chronology to mark the transition from the Bronze through to the early Iron Ages based mainly around pottery finds.

When the author was working on the site, three clay tablets were discovered from the late Bronze Age with early Canaanite inscriptions, that when translated in 1989 showed that Deir Alla was the Biblical Pethor, and that it had been attacked by Israelites from Pithom in Egypt. Later a wall inscription was found in Aramaic dating to 880-770BCE referencing the prophet Balaam.

Berry was as much interested by what was going on above ground as below, and kept a detailed journal of the daily lives of the archaeologists and life in the camp. The dig also had many fascinating and famous archaeologists visiting, including Father Roland de Vaux, and Diana Kirkbride.

During breaks from the dig Berry went on a number of journeys in Jordan, Lebanon and Syria and he describes their cities, but also the very tranquil agricultural countryside that he found at that time. He discovered adventure when a drunk taxi driver tried to murder him as he resisted his advances; later he was caught up in a revolt against Hafez al-Assad in Homs, father of Bashir, and was asked by a taxi driver if he had come to Damascus to see the public hanging.

Above all this book should be read as fascinating insight into the lives of archaeologists over 50 years ago, and the very close links between the European team, the Arab workmen, and the daily life in a simple mud-brick village.

About the Author
Julian Berry was born in 1946; his father was a sugar refiner and his mother an artist and interior decorator. At the age of nine he was consigned to boarding school, first to Twyford, and then to Winchester, where his father hoped he would become a fly-fisherman. In fact he developed two key interests at school, archaeology and letterpress printing. He was able to escape at the age of 17, as soon as he had learnt that he had got into Oxford, and with the help of Sir Mortimer Wheeler he signed up to join a Dutch dig in Jordan, where he arrived in January 1964.

This book is about his youthful experiences as an archaeologist, and his travels at the time around Jordan, Syria, and Lebanon.

After Oxford he went on to found a letterpress book printing company, The Compton Press, which produced over 500 editions before its demise in 1980 along with virtually all of the British letterpress book production industry.

He went on to work in marketing and became fascinated by the use of ‘data science’ as we now call it to predict human behaviour. This led to his founding a company that develops software solutions for marketers, where he is currently employed.


Road Archaeology in the Middle Nile Volume 2: Excavations from Meroe to Atbara 1994 by Michael Mallinson and Laurence Smith. xii+182 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. English text with five-page Arabic summary. 348 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916466. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916473. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The first season of survey work in 1993 was undertaken in advance of the construction of the North Challenge Road initially between Geili and Atbara. This work was carried out in the SARS concession area from BM98, opposite the Pyramids of Meroe, to Atbara. A total of 170 sites were recorded and this was published in the first volume of Road Archaeology in the Middle Nile (Mallinson et al. 96). In addition, a report was prepared advising the Sudan National Committee for Roads and Bridges of areas which were likely to be damaged by the road construction. The following year it was indicated that due to the advanced development of the road design no rerouting would be possible.

In response to this a rescue season was proposed to excavate the sites clearly at risk in the remaining few months before construction and grading began. A limited amount of funds was provided by the Haycock Fund and within this resource a project was assembled with SARS directed by Laurence Smith and Michael Mallinson. As a total of eight sites with 30 archaeological structures appeared directly on the road line a methodology was needed that would permit these to be properly excavated and recorded in the available time of three weeks that the funds would accommodate.
For the Gods of Girsu (ARABIC EDITION) City-State Formation in Ancient Sumer by Sébastien Rey. 90pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 252 2017. ISBN 9781784916893. £25.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

New Arabic edition for 2017. Download contents page above for full Arabic description. For the English language edition please follow this link.

For the Gods are the opening words or incipit of the first inscribed votive artefacts dedicated to the principal deities of the Sumerian pantheon. They commemorate the construction or renovation of cities, temples, rural sanctuaries, border steles, in sum all the symbolically charged features of archaic states belonging thus metaphorically to supernatural tutelary overlords.

Girsu (present-day Tello) is one of the earliest known cities of the world together with Uruk, Eridu, and Ur, and was considered to be in the 3rd Millennium the sanctuary of the Sumerian heroic god Ningirsu who fought with the demons of the Kur (Mountain) and thus made possible the introduction of irrigation and agriculture in Sumer. Girsu was the sacred metropolis and central pole of a city-state that lay in the Southeasternmost part of the Mesopotamian floodplain.

The pioneering explorations carried out between 1877 and 1933 at Tello and the early decipherment of the Girsu cuneiform tablets were ground-breaking because they revealed the principal catalytic elements of the Sumerian takeoff – that is, a multiplicity and coalescence of major innovations, such as the appearance of a city– countryside continuum, the emergence of literacy, of bronze manufacture, and the development of monumental art and architecture.

Because of the richness of information related in particular to the city’s spatial organization and geographical setting, and thanks to the availability of recently declassified Cold War space imagery and especially the possibility to launch new explorations in Southern Iraq, Girsu stands out as a primary locale for re-analyzing through an interdisciplinary approach combining archaeological and textual evidence the origins of the Sumerian city-state.

About the Author:
Sébastien Rey is Lead archaeologist at the British Museum (Iraq Emergency Heritage Management Training Program) and Codirector of Tello-Girsu (Southern Iraq).
Interpreting the Seventh Century BC Tradition and Innovation edited by Xenia Charalambidou and Catherine Morgan. viii+460pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 326 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915728. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915735. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book has its origin in a conference held at the British School at Athens in 2011 which aimed to explore the range of new archaeological information now available for the seventh century in Greek lands. It presents material data, combining accounts of recent discoveries (which often enable reinterpretation of older finds), regional reviews, and archaeologically focused critique of historical and art historical approaches and interpretations. The aim is to make readily accessible the material record as currently understood and to consider how it may contribute to broader critiques and new directions in research. The geographical focus is the old Greek world encompassing Macedonia and Ionia, and extending across to Sicily and southern Italy, considering also the wider trade circuits linking regional markets. The book does not aim for the pan- Mediterranean coverage of recent works: given that much of the latest innovative and critical scholarship has focused on the western Mediterranean in particular, it is necessary to bring old Greece back under the spotlight and to expose to critical scrutiny the often Athenocentric interpretative frameworks which continue to inform discussion of other parts of the Mediterranean.