​​ We use cookies to enhance your experience on our site. By continuing to use the site you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy & Cookies.​

 
Archaeopress logo
Archaeopress Publishing Ltd, Summertown Pavilion, 18-24 Middle Way, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7LG, England
tel +44 (0) 1865 311914 fax +44 (0) 1865 512231   email: info@archaeopress.com
Monthly AP Alert - join our mailing list today Archaeopress on Facebook Archaeopress on Twitter Archaeopress on Linked In Archaeopress Blog
Home  
|
  Browse by Subject  
|
  Browse by Series  
|
  Catalogues  
|
  Join Our Mailing List  
|
  Visit Our Blog  
|
  Login (Private Customers)  
|
  Login (Institutional Subscriptions)  
|
  View Basket

Search

title, author, ISBN, keyword

Browse for books in the following languages

ARCHAEOPRESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ACCESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ARCHAEOPRESS JOURNALS
DISTRIBUTED
PUBLISHERS
DIGITAL EDITIONS
OPEN ACCESS PLATFORM
Ordering Information
About Us
Publish With Us
Standing Orders
Trade Sales
Contact Us
Request Review Copy
 
Archaeopress: Open Access

 
Open Access content is available to view online or you can download to your chosen device. All content is in PDF format. You are welcome to share Open Access content amongst your colleagues but please be sure to cite it fully and accurately. To learn more about publishing in Archaeopress Open Access please contact info@arhaeopress.com.

How to Download: Navigate to the book/paper of interest and click "Download (pdf)" to open in your browser or right-click on "Download (pdf)" and select "Save Link As..." to download a local copy for offline use. Please note the website is best optimised for use with the following browsers (PC & Mac): Chrome, Firefox

 
Search Open Access    Search by Subject    Search by Series
NEW: Taymāʾ I: Archaeological Exploration, Palaeoenvironment, Cultural Contacts edited by Arnulf Hausleiter, Ricardo Eichmann, Muhammad al-Najem. Hardback; 210x297mm; xii+268 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (66 plates in colour). 499 2018 Taymāʾ: Multidisciplinary Series on the Results of the Saudi-German Archaeological Project 1. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690439. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690446. Book contents pageDownload

Archaeological investigations in the north-western part of the Arabian Peninsula has increased during the last 15 years. One of the major sites in the region is the ancient oasis of Taymāʾ, known as a commercial hub on the so-called Incense Road connecting South Arabia with the Eastern Mediterranean. In the context of this new research a multidisciplinary project by the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) and the Orient Department of the German Archaeological Institute (DAI) has been investigating the archaeology and ancient environment of Taymāʾ since 2004. A major aim of this project was the development of new perspectives of the site and the region, characterised by elaborating the local socio-cultural and economic contexts. So far, Taymāʾ has been known mainly through exogenous sources.

The present volume is the first of the publication series of the Saudi-German archaeological project and focuses on three fundamental aspects of research at Taymāʾ: the current archaeological exploration of the oasis is contextualised with previous and ongoing research within the region, while at the same time offering a first overview of the settlement history of the site, which may have started as early as more than 6000 years ago. New information on the palaeoenvironment has been provided by multiproxy- analysis of sediments from a palaeolake immediately north of the settlement. The results indicate an Early Holocene humid period in the region that is shorter than the so-called African Humid Period. The abrupt aridification at around 8 ka BP, known from other regions in the Near East, is also attested in north-western Arabia. The reconstruction of the past vegetation of the site and its surroundings demonstrates that oasis cultivation at Taymāʾ started during the 5th millennium BCE with grapes and figs, rather than with the date palm. According to hydrological investigations on water resources, groundwater aquifers provided the main source of local water supply. These were exploited through wells, some of which have been identified in the area of the ancient oasis. Finally, since the time of early travellers to Northwest Arabia evidence of cultural contacts has been observed in the records from the site, which had been occupied by the last Babylonian king, Nabonidus (556–539 BCE) for ten years. A historical-archaeological essay on Egypt and Arabia as well as a study on the ambiguous relationship between Assyria and Arabia – characterised by conflict and commerce – shed new light on the foreign relations of ancient Taymāʾ.

About the Editors
ARNULF HAUSLEITER is researcher at the DAI’s Orient Department for the Taymāʾ project, funded by the German Research foundation (DFG). He has been field director of the excavations at Taymāʾ since 2004 and has co-directed the project with Ricardo Eichmann.

RICARDO EICHMANN is director of the Orient Department at the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin. He is the head of the German component of the Taymāʾ project and has co-directed it with Arnulf Hausleiter.

MUHAMMAD AL-NAJEM is head of the Antiquities Office of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) and director of the Museum of Archaeology and Ethnography at Taymāʾ, Province of Tabuk, Saudi Arabia.
NEW: Archaeological Heritage Conservation and Management by Brian J. Egloff. Paperback; viii+330 pages; 8 tables, 34 figures (32 plates in colour). 76 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691054. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691061. Book contents pageDownload

Archaeological heritage conservation is all too often highly conflicted and fraught with pitfalls in part due to a poor understanding of the historical and current underpinnings that guide best practice. When heritage places are managed with international principles in mind the sites stand out as evidencing superior outcomes. The International Scientific Committee on Archaeological Heritage Management expresses concern in the Salalah Guidelines of 2017 with the persistent problems facing archaeological sites that are open to the public. National heritage icons face overwhelming pressure to provide the mainstay of local, national and international tourism economies while in some instances being situated in locations destined for major development or military conflict. Leaders in the field of archaeological heritage conservation, particularly with respect to World Heritage listed properties, assert that economic interests often are at the forefront of management decision making while heritage values are given lesser, if any, consideration. Continuing and future zones of discomfort such as the impact of war, theft of national cultural property, over-development, unconstrained excavation, extreme nationalism, uncontrolled visitation and professionalisation need to be addressed if future generations are to be afforded the same heritage values as are available today.

About the Author
BRIAN J. EGLOFF is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Canberra and has been active in both field research and heritage management since the 1960s. He has undertaken studies on the cultural and ecological base of the Cherokee Nation, the prehistory of Eastern Papua and on Australian Aboriginal land rights as well as participated in projects in Wisconsin, Tasmania, Pohnpei, Mauritius and Laos. His current interests lie in Aboriginal land management and the implement of international heritage conservation and management programmes. Brian’s most recent publications focus on the illicit trade in cultural property.
NEW: Egil’s Saga: Traditional evidence for Brúnanburh compared to Literary, Historic and Archaeological Analyses by John R. Kirby. Paperback; 203x276mm; 58 pages; 12 figures (9 in colour). (Print RRP £22.00). 74 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691092. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691108. Book contents pageDownload

Regarded as the secondary source advocated by some scholars for this battle around Brúnanburh in AD 937, Egil’s Saga Skalla-Grímssonar (collated c. AD 1242-3) becomes problematical when compared with literary, historic and archaeological evidence. Thus, this argument places the saga in a rather awkward position.

In addressing the general veracity of this saga, allegedly ‘written’ by Snorri Sturluson in 1240/1 we must draw a comparison to distinguish reality from fiction. For this article highlights not only the questionable traditions of Egil fighting at Brúnanburh but whether Snorri’s interpretation was motivated by self-interest. More importantly, could other people have gathered together Snorri’s notes and produced Egil’s Saga? Doubts arise as to its authenticity as many scholars have previously expressed the differing literary anomalies within the narrative. Was the saga written by more than one person? Was it embellished by Snorri or others? Where did the Brúnanburh traditions come from? Is it accurate enough to be used as a historic source – a factual reference? The author suggests this approach may identify the incongruities within this saga demonstrating a correct analysis.
NEW: Identifying Brúnanburh: ón dyngesmere – the sea of noise by John R. Kirby. Paperback; 203x276mm; 44 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (13 colour plates). 73 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691078. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691085. Download

Scholars each have their own rationale as to the ‘site’ of this momentous battle. Their thirst for recognition has created diverse arguments, some flooding the media, others proposing to the point of acrimony that they have this ‘site’. The ‘conundrum’ is whether any identification of the ‘site’ is correct for all, apart from the circumspect, have taken assorted place-names similar to Brúnanburh as their starting point.

The author chose to disregard the place-name approach and look at the topographic references in the manuscript. The first references were maritime then latterly landscape leading to field-names which have a more stable base than the constantly changing place-names. He found inconsistences in various positions held by some scholars to that of historical record about Brúnanburh.

One major stumbling block was the phrase “ón dingesmere” which has created controversy, some scholars totally dismissing it but the ‘sea of noise’ appears to have some scientific foundation. Obviously it had some special significance to the Anglo-Saxon’s and their Christian allies and may well have been a kenning. Importantly, ‘who were these allies?’

The challenge for the author was to unearth the correct locale of these historic events. As an archaeologist he decided to interpret the topographic phrases in the manuscript evidence as material culture. The results were surprising.
NEW: Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 3 2018 edited by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Patricia Kögler. Paperback; 210x297mm; xvi+208 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (43 plates in colour). Papers in English and German. 3 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691719. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 2399-1852-3-2019. Book contents pageDownload

ARTICLES
Notes on a Hellenistic Milk Pail – by Yannis Chairetakis
Chasing Arsinoe (Polis Chrysochous, Cyprus): A Sealed Early Hellenistic Cistern and Its Ceramic Assemblage – by Brandon R. Olson, Tina Najbjerb & R. Scott Moore
Hasmonean Jerusalem in the Light of Archaeology – Notes on Urban Topography – by Hillel Geva
A Phoenician / Hellenistic Sanctuary at Horbat Turit (Kh. et-Tantur) – by Walid Atrash, Gabriel Mazor & Hanaa Aboud with contributions by Adi Erlich & Gerald Finkielsztejn
Schmuck aus dem Reich der Nabatäer – hellenistische Traditionen in frührömischer Zeit – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom

ARCHAEOLOGICAL NEWS AND PROJECT
Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project: Excavations at Pyla-Vigla in 2018 – by Thomas Landvatter, Brandon R. Olson, David S. Reese, Justin Stephens & R. Scott Moore
Bookmark: Ancient Gems, Finger Rings and Seal Boxes from Caesarea Maritima. The Hendler Collection – by Shua Amorai-Stark & Malka Herskovitz

BOOK REVIEWS
Nina Fenn, Späthellenistische und frühkaiserzeitliche Keramik aus Priene. Untersuchungen zu Herkunft und Produktion – by Susanne Zabehlicky-Scheffenegger
Raphael Greenberg, Oren Tal & Tawfiq Da῾adli, Bet Yerah III. Hellenistic Philoteria and Islamic al- Ṣinnabra. The 1933–1986 and 2007–2013 Excavations – bY Gabriel Mazor
Mohamed Kenawi & Giorgia Marchiori, Unearthing Alexandria’s archaeology: The Italian Contribution – by Carlo De Mitri
Images of Dionysos, Images for Dionysos: The God’s Terracottas at Cycladic Sanctuaries Taken from Greek Art in Motion edited by Rui Morais, Delfim Leão, Diana Rodríguez Pérez with Daniela Ferreira. Pages 115-126.Download

By Erica Angliker

A recent survey of cult practices in the Cyclades has revealed that Dionysos was worshipped in both the private and public sphere on at least eleven islands of the Cycladic archipelago (Amorgos, Andros, Delos, Ios, Kea, Melos, Mykonos, Naxos, Paros, Siphnos and Thera).2 Six of these (Amorgos, Andros, Delos, Kea, Naxos, Thera) had sanctuaries dedicated to Dionysos, three of which (Amorgos, Kea, Naxos) were of considerable size. The existence of large Dionysian sanctuaries in the archipelago is remarkable because though Dionysos was worshipped throughout Greece, he was generally granted small sanctuaries. Substantial ones, therefore, were exceptional.3 Although not all material retrieved from Cycladic sanctuaries has been fully published, what is currently available offers a unique opportunity to examine tangible traces of the god.
Pavlovsk Imperial Villa and its Collections: From the First Stage of Antiquities Collecting and Archaeology in Russia Taken from Greek Art in Motion edited by Rui Morais, Delfim Leão, Diana Rodríguez Pérez with Daniela Ferreira. Pages 441-452.Download

By Anastasia Bukina and Anna Petrakova

The paper deals with the collection of the Empress Maria Fyodorovna (1759-1828), the spouse of Pavel Petrovich, who reigned from 1796 to 1801 as Paul the 1st. The collection is now in the Pavlovsk State Museum-Reserve near St. Petersburg, located in the picturesque valley of the river Slavyanka. The land was presented in 1777 to the Gran Duke Paul by his mother (Empress Catherine the Great) to celebrate the birth of her first grandson – the heir of throne and the future Emperor Alexander the 1st. The Court architect Charles Cameron designed an English park and pavilions, romantic ruins and a palace in a shape of an elegant Palladian mansion to which later wings were added.1 Due to its beauty and history the Pavlovsk ensemble is now an object of the UNESCO World Heritage.
NEW: Hellenistic Alexandria: Celebrating 24 Centuries Papers presented at the conference held on December 13–15 2017 at Acropolis Museum, Athens edited by Christos S. Zerefos and Marianna V. Vardinoyannis. Hardback; 205x290mm; xx+296 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (56 plates in colour). 493 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690668. £68.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690675. Book contents pageDownload

Hellenistic Alexandria: Celebrating 24 Centuries presents the proceedings of a conference held at the Acropolis Museum in Athens, on December 13–15, 2017, and includes high-level dialogues and philosophical discussions between international experts on Hellenistic Alexandria. The goal was to celebrate the 24 centuries which have elapsed since its foundation and the beginning of the Library and the Museum of Alexandria. The conference was divided into two parts, to include in the first part archaeology, history, philosophy, literature, art, culture and legal issues and in the second part science, medicine, technology and environment. A total of 28 original and peer-reviewed articles point to the importance of the brilliantly-original ideas that emerged during the Hellenistic age and the curious modernity of the whole atmosphere of the time. The range of presented topics covers a variety of new data on the foundation of Alexandria to comparison between Ptolemaic Alexandria and Ptolemaic Greece through philosophy, culture and drama to the forgotten revolution of science, medicine and the prevailing climatological and geophysical conditions throughout the Hellenistic Period. The conference and its proceedings were co-sponsored by the Μarianna V. Vardinoyannis Foundation, the Acropolis Museum, the Alexandria Center for Hellenistic Studies at Bibliotheca Alexandrina and the Mariolopoulos-Kanaginis Foundation for the Environmental Sciences.

The Publication also celebrates the 10th anniversary of the Alexandria Center for Hellenistic Studies, a joint collaboration between the Bibliotheca Alexandrina, the Vardinoyannis Foundation and the University of Alexandria. Scholars from around the world follow the Center’s programme in various specialisations, ranging from historyliterature- art, to archaeology and architecture-philosophy, and science.

About the Editors
Christos Zerefos is Head of Research Centre for Atmospheric Physics and Climatology, Academy of Athens and president-elect of the General Assembly of the Hellenic Foundation for Research and Innovation; Professor of Atmospheric and Environmental Physics at the Universities of Athens and Thessaloniki; Visiting Professor, Universities of Minnesota and Boston; Samarbeidspartnere (Scientific Collaborator), University of Oslo. He is known for his research into ozone, UV, ozone-climate interactions and climate-extreme events. He is member of the Academy of Athens, Academia Europaea, Norwegian Academy of Sciences and Letters, European Academy of Sciences, Russian Academy of Natural Sciences and other distinguished scientific societies. He is recipient of the UNEP Global Ozone Award, 1997 and of a number of distinctions, awards and medals from WMO/UNEP, and various scientific societies (e.g. Blaise Pascal Medal, European Academy of Sciences; AGU Kaufman Award; European and Balkan Physics Societies’ Award; European Union Prize for Cultural Heritage-Europa Nostra Award, and others). He received the Award Certificate and Letter from UNEP and IPCC for substantial contribution to the reports of IPCC, which shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with the former Vice President of USA, Al Gore (December 2007). He is honorary professor, Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki; has an honorary doctoral degree from the Physics Department, University of Patras; honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters, university division of the American College ANATOLIA, Thessaloniki. He has supervised 50 MSc and 30 PhD degrees and has originated eight international research centres. His research work in peer-reviewed scientific journals is acknowledged widely by the scientific community. (For more see www.christoszerefos.com/)

Marianna V. Vardinoyannis is a Goodwill Ambassador of UNESCO for the protection of children, founder and president of the ‘Marianna V. Vardinoyannis Foundation’, of the ‘ELPIDA Friends’ Association of Children with cancer
NEW: Art of the Ancestors: Spatial and temporal patterning in the ceiling rock art of Nawarla Gabarnmang, Arnhem Land, Australia by Robert G. Gunn. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+902 pages; illustrated in full colour throughout. 492 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690705. £150.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690712. Book contents pageDownload

This volume presents a new systematic approach to the archaeological recording and documentation of rock art developed to analyse the spatial and temporal structure of complex rock art panels. Focusing on the ceiling art at Nawarla Gabarnmang, one of the richest rock art sites in Arnhem Land the approach utilised DStretch-enhanced photographs to record 1391 motifs from 42 separate art panels across the ceiling. Harris Matrices were then built to show the sequence of superimpositions for each art panel. Using common attributes, including features identified by Morellian Method (a Fine Art method not previously employed in archaeological rock art studies), contemporaneous motifs within panels were then aggregated into individual layers. The art layers of the various panels were then inter-related using the relative and absolute chronological evidence to produce a full relative sequence for the site as a whole. This provided a story of the art that began some 13,000 years ago and concluded around 60 years ago, with a major change identified in the art some 450 years ago. The method was shown to be invaluable to the resolution of many difficult issues associated with the identification of motifs, their superimpositions and the development of art sequences.

About the Author
Dr Robert Gunn is a consultant archaeologist with over 35 years’ experience and who specialises in the recording and management of Australian Aboriginal rock art. He has published over 50 papers and monographs, mostly on areas of rock art research. He has worked throughout Australia with research interests in Arnhem Land, Central Australia, Western Victoria, south-western regions of Western Australia, and Far Western NSW. This work has involved the collection of both archaeological and ethnographic information and, consequently, he has worked closely with senior Aboriginal custodians and traditional owners. Robert completed his PhD at Monash University, Australia, in 2007. He is currently a Research Fellow affiliated with Monash Indigenous Study Centre, Monash University, and the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage.
NEW: Human Mobility in Archaeology: Practices, Representations and Meanings Ex Novo: Journal of Archaeology, Volume 3, 2018 edited by Maja Gori, Martina Revello Lami and Alessandro Pintucci. 3 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691214. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload

It has been abundantly demonstrated that theories and paradigms in the humanities are influenced by historical, economic and socio-cultural conditions, which have profoundly influenced archaeology’s representation of migration. This was mostly conceived as the study of the movement of large and homogenous population groups, whose identity was often represented as ethnically characterized. The present-day shift of attention from collective to individual agency and the countless facets of migration goes hand in hand with new socio-political and cultural scenarios such as the extraordinary migratory flows into Europe, shifting boundaries, alternative forms of citizenship and identity, and the emergence of emotive reactionism.

The third issue of Ex Novo gathers multidisciplinary contributions addressing mobility to understand patterns of change and continuity in past worlds; reconsider the movement of people, objects, and ideas alongside mobile epistemologies, such as intellectual, scholarly or educative traditions, rituals, practices, religions and theologies; and provide insights into the multifaceted relationship between mobile practices and their shared meanings and how they are represented socially and politically.

Table of Contents
Maja GORI, Martina REVELLO LAMI & Alessandro PINTUCCI
Editorial: Practices, Representations and Meanings of Human Mobility in Archaeology

Paraskevi ELEFANTI & Gilbert MARSHALL
Mobility during the Upper Palaeolithic Greece: Some Suggestions for the Argolid Peninsula

Maurizio CRUDO
Greek Migrations along the Ionian Coast (Southern Italy)

Anna RAUDINO
Variation in Material Culture: Adoption of Greek Ceramics in an Indigenous Sicilian Site (8th century BC)

Maria ÁLVAREZ-FOLGADO
The Jewish Diaspora in the Roman Empire. Diaspora, Social Agents and Social Networks: Towards the Creation of a New Analytical Toolkit

Domiziana ROSSI
A Road to Fīrūzābād

Marijn STOLK
Exploring Immigrant Identities: The Link between Portuguese Ceramics and Sephardic Immigrants in 17th Century Amsterdam

Jesùs GARCÍA SANCHEZ
From War Material Culture to Popular Heritage, and Beyond. The PSP “Cancelli di Venosa” as paradigms of Object Biography Theory.

Reviews
A. Falcone & A. D’Eredità (eds.) ARCHEOSOCIAL L’Archeologia Riscrive il Web: Esperienze, Strategie e Buone Pratiche, Rende (CS): Dielle Editore, 2018, 195 pp. Reviewed by Paola DI GIUSEPPANTONIO DI FRANCO
NEW: Practices of Personal Adornment in Neolithic Greece Πρακτικές Προσωπικής Κόσμησης στη Νεολιθική Ελλάδα by Fotis Ifantidis. Paperback; xxxvi+596 pages; 121 figures + fully illustrated catalogue (31 plates in colour). Greek text with English Summary. 75 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691139. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691146. Book contents pageDownload

The objective of this book is the reconsideration of the practices of personal adornment during the Neolithic period in Greece, through the assemblage, extensive bibliographic documentation, and critical evaluation of all the available data deriving from more than a hundred sites in the mainland and the Aegean islands –an archaeological archive of wide geographical and chronological scope. In addition, a thorough study of the personal ornament corpus from the Middle-Late Neolithic Dispilio in Kastoria, an important lakeside settlement in north-western Greece, was conducted.

The book begins with an overview of the anthropological and archaeological literature on theoretical and methodological issues concerning practices of personal adornment. Then follows an examination of the problems and key points of study regarding personal adornment in Neolithic Greece, as well as a critical evaluation of the methodological approaches and classification schemes that have been applied in previous archaeological works. Subsequently, the technologies and processes of production, consumption, recycling, deposition, and distribution of personal ornaments in Neolithic Greece are discussed. Finally, the social correlates of personal adornment are explored, as they are reflected in the choice of different raw materials (shell, clay, bone, stone, and metal) and ornament types (beads, pendants, annulets, and so forth).

About the Author
FOTIS IFANTIDIS studied archaeology at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. His academic research is focused on personal adornment practices in prehistory, and on the interplay between photography and archaeology, with case studies the Athenian Acropolis, the ancient city of Kalaureia on the island of Poros, and the Neolithic settlements of Dispilio and Koutroulou Magoula. Among his publications are Spondylus in Prehistory (co-authored with M. Nikolaidou), Camera Kalaureia (co-authored with Y. Hamilakis) and Archaeographies: Excavating Neolithic Dispilio.

Greek description
Στόχος του βιβλίου είναι η επανεξέταση των πρακτικών προσωπικής κόσμησης κατά τη νεολιθική περίοδο στην Ελλάδα μέσω της επανεκτίμησης των διαθέσιμων στοιχείων που προέρχονται από περισσότερες από εκατό ανεσκαμμένες νεολιθικές θέσεις, καθώς και η λεπτομερειακή μελέτη του corpus κοσμημάτων που προέρχονται από τη λιμναία θέση της Μέσης-Νεότερης Νεολιθικής περιόδου στ&#
NEW: Le classi ceramiche della “tradizione mista” a Kos nel Tardo Bronzo IA by Salvatore Vitale. Paperback; 203x276mm; 232 pages; 24 tables, 13 colour plates, 38 black & white line drawings, 24 black & white plates. Italian text with English abstract. 51 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918859. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918866. Book contents pageDownload

This volume focuses on the pottery classes of the ‘Entangled Tradition’, recovered at the settlement of the ‘Serraglio’ on Kos during the early Late Bronze Age period. The results reveal new information on the chronology, typology, and decoration of Koan Painted Fine (PF) and Painted Medium-Coarse to Coarse (PMC-C) ceramics. Moreover, the analysis of manufacturing processes and consumption patterns contributes to a better comprehension of the socio-cultural and political context in which Koan entangled classes were produced.

The data presented in this volume indicate that PF and PMC-C ceramics represent a unique case of fully entangled classes in the Aegean, which merge features of the Koan ‘Local Tradition’ with characteristics of the Minoan potting tradition into a new technological and stylistic language. Contacts between these different cultures are explained based on the theoretical model provided by ‘human mobility’. The specific Koan cultural synthesis was endorsed and promoted by the local elites of the ‘Serraglio’, who aimed to participate in the ‘new environment’ determined by the economic and cultural expansion of Neopalatial Crete.

In this respect, the manufacture of Koan entangled classes served a dual role. On the one hand, using transport containers made in the PMC-C class, Koan products were exported and exchanged throughout the Aegean. In addition, the finer vessels of the Koan ‘Entangled Tradition’ were utilized for promoting Minoan-type social practices at the ‘Serraglio’. Through these practices, Koan elites reshaped their identity and portrayed an image of higher status within the local social arena.

About the Author
Dr SALVATORE VITALE completed his MA in Classical Literature and PhD in Classical Archaeology at the University of Pisa in 2001 and 2007. After his PhD, Dr Vitale held post-doctoral and research fellowships at the Universities of Calabria, Cincinnati, and Pisa and at the Italian Archaeological School at Athens.

Dr Vitale has taught Aegean Archaeology at the University of Milan and the Italian Archaeological School at Athens, as well as Greek and Roman Archaeology at the University of Pisa. At Pisa, he has also served as one of the editors of the journal ΑΓΩΓΗ.

Since 2009, Dr Vitale has been the director of the ‘Serraglio, Eleona, and Langada Archaeological Project’ (SELAP), a research endeavour under the auspices of the Italian Archaeological School at Athens. In addition, he is currently a senior staff and a chief pottery expert for the Mitrou Archaeological Project in Phthiotida and the Palace of Nestor Excavations at Pylos.
Palmyra, Pastoral Nomads, and City-State Kings in the Old Babylonian Period: Interaction in the Semi-Arid Syrian Landscape by Kristina J. Hesse. Pages 1-9 from Palmyrena: City, Hinterland and Caravan Trade between Orient and Occident Jørgen Christian Meyer, Eivind Heldaas Seland and Nils Anfinset.Download

Abstract: The aim of the paper is to inhabit the semi-arid landscape of Palmyrena in the Old Babylonian period, by describing some of the surveyed archaeological remains and relate this to inhabit and events in this area described in ancient documents. Some examples from the area of Jebel Bishri will also be discussed. Besides landscape surveys and climate studies, the research draws upon several ancient tablets describing the interaction between pastoral nomads and urban societies originating from the Mari Archives during the reign of Zimri-Lim and Yasmah-Addu. The study shows that pastoral nomadic tribes, called the Suteans, inhabited these mountainous areas, which in this period might have been wetter than today and sparsely covered with bushy woodland. These people were engaged in escorting caravans through the desert, but they also had a reputation as raiders, hence the Jebel Bishri plateau was avoided by travellers. Palmyra, was an important stop over for caravans and an advanced station guarding the desert route between Mari and Qatna, and seems to have been located within the territory of the latter. The settled and nomadic people of Palmyra were engaged as messengers as well as in pastoralism, escorting, guarding, and with the provisioning of caravans.
Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture: Subscription Portal for Online Access by One volume published annually. Edited by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph (Heads of Editorial Board). ISBN 2399-1844-PORTAL. Download

Welcome to the online portal for access to volumes of the Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture (JHP).

For the Hellenistic Period ceramics and other commodities of daily life represent probably the most neglected objects in archaeological research. Yet, the study of Hellenistic material culture has intensified during the last twenty years, with a focus clearly on what is by far the largest category of finds, pottery. Meanwhile research has gained momentum, but still there has unfortunately been no parallel development in the media landscape. Apart from monographs, the publication of conference proceedings, which usually follow several years after the event, have remained the principal method of disseminating research results. Still lacking is a publication appearing regularly and at short intervals, that focusses research on Hellenistic pottery and is easily accessible.

The Journal of Hellenistic Pottery – JHP – wants to close this gap.

JHP is scheduled to appear once a year, more often if necessary. It should provide a forum for all kinds of studies on Hellenistic pottery and everyday objects. Apart from professional articles, the journal will contain book reviews, short presentations of research projects (including dissertations) and general news. The Editorial Board is headed by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph.

Access journal issues and articles via the links below:

JHP Volumes:

JHP Volume 1, 2016
JHP Volume 2, 2017
JHP Volume 3, 2018
NEW: CAA2016: Oceans of Data Proceedings of the 44th Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology edited by Mieko Matsumoto and Espen Uleberg. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+562 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (228 plates in colour). 495 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917302. £95.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917319. Book contents pageDownload

CAA2016: Oceans of Data gives an up-to-date overview of the field of archaeology and informatics. It presents ground-breaking technologies and best practice from various archaeological and computer science disciplines. The articles in this volume are based on the foremost presentations from the 44th Computer Applications in Archaeology Conference 2016, held in Oslo. The theme of CAA2016 was ‘Exploring Oceans of Data’, alluding to one of the greatest challenges in this field: the use and reuse of large datasets that result both from digitalisation and digital documentation of excavations and surveys.

The volume contains 50 peer-reviewed and highest-ranked papers that are divided in eight parts, including an introduction and seven chapters. The introduction sets the stage with Oceans of Data (C.-E. Ore) and Theorising the Digital (S. Perry and J. S.Taylor), discussing the current status of overall CAA research. These two papers present the current developments, challenges, and potential that lies ahead from different perspectives. Ore points to the importance of common authority systems and ontologies. Common conceptual data models will ease curation and secure long-term reusability. Perry and Taylor address the need to bring together theoretical and digital archaeology. In the following chapters, different topics are presented under the headings Ontologies and Standards, Field and Laboratory Data Recording and Analysis, Archaeological Information Systems, GIS and Spatial Analysis, 3D and Visualisation, Complex Systems Simulation, and Teaching Archaeology in the Digital Age.

About the Editors
Mieko Matsumoto is a member of the scientific staff at the Museum of Cultural History, the University of Oslo. With an education and research background from Japan, Norway, and Poland, she is an archaeologist with a wide knowledge of international lithic technology. Her research specialty focuses on the European Palaeolithic and the Norwegian Stone Age. She is a long-standing member of CAA International and CAA-Norway, with numerous publications on ICT and archaeology.

Espen Uleberg is the coordinator of the Digital Documentation Section at the Museum of Cultural History, the University of Oslo. With an education and research background from Germany and Norway, he is an archaeologist working with digitising museum collections since the early 1990s. He has international experience and knowledge over the use of field GIS and databases. He was chair of the organising committee of CAA2016, and is a long-standing member of CAA International and CAA-Norway, with numerous publications on ICT and archaeology.
NEW: Bronze Age Metalwork: Techniques and traditions in the Nordic Bronze Age 1500-1100 BC by Heide W. Nørgaard. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+502 pages; 290 figures (244 plates in colour). 474 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690194. £85.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690200. Book contents pageDownload

Bronze ornaments of the Nordic Bronze Age (neck collars, belt plates, pins and tutuli) were elaborate objects that served as status symbols to communicate social hierarchy. The magnificent metalwork studied here dates from 1500-1100 BC. An interdisciplinary investigation of the artefacts was adopted to elucidate their manufacture and origin, resulting in new insights into metal craft in northern Europe during the Bronze Age. Based on the habitus concept, which situates the craftsmen within their social and technological framework, individual artefact characteristics and metalworking techniques can be used to identify different craft practices, even to identify individual craftsmen. The conclusions drawn from this offer new insights into the complex organisation of metalcraft in the production of prestige goods across different workshops. Several kinship-based workshops on Jutland, in the Lüneburg Heath and Mecklenburg, allow us to conclude that the bronze objects were a display of social status and hierarchy controlled by, and produced for, the elite – as is also seen in the workshops on Zealand. Within the two main metalworking regions, Zealand and central Lower Saxony, workshops can be defined as communities of practice that existed with an extended market and relations with the local elite. Attached craft, in the sense that the craftspeople fully depended on a governing institution and produced artefacts as a manifestation of political expression, was only detected on Zealand between 1500-1300 BC.

The investigation presented here showed that overall results could not be achieved when concentrating only on one aspect of metalwork. Highly skilled craft is to be found in every kind of workshop, as well as an intensive labour input. Only when considering skill in relation to labour input and also taking into account signs of apprenticeship and cross-craft techniques, as well as the different categories of mistakes in crafting, can a stable image of craft organisation be created.

About the Author
HEIDE W. NØRGAARD is a postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Archaeology and Heritage Studies at the University of Aarhus, Denmark, where she graduated and received her PhD in 2014. With the background as an educated goldsmith, she is working with metal artefacts trying to solve craft technical problems from the Bronze to the early Iron Ages in Northern Europe. Heide W. Nørgaard is currently working on reconstructing the earliest metal trading routes towards Scandinavia, based on over 500 lead isotope analysis of the first half of the 2nd millennium BC.
NEW: Etnicidad vs. Aculturación: Las necrópolis castellanas de los siglos V-VI d.C. y el asentamiento visigodo en la Península Ibérica. Una mirada desde la meseta sur by Rafael Barroso Cabrera. Paperback; 203x276mm; 238 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Spanish text with English summary. (Print RRP £35.00). 72 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690798. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690804. Book contents pageDownload

The Visigoth settlement in the Iberian Peninsula and its relationship with the archaeological record of the 5th-6th centuries AD continues to be one of the most controversial issues in Spanish archaeology. The controversy relates to politics as much as it relates to archaeological research with two points remaining particularly controversial: the alleged use of the Visigoth past by the Francoist intelligentsia as an ideological affirmation of the regime and the contribution of archaeologist Julio Martínez Santa-Olalla in supporting and enabling this re-interpretation of Visigothic archaeology.

The purely archaeological aspect of the controversy relates to an archaeological interpretation, stemming from the ranks of the so-called New Archeology, of the Castilian necropoleis containing grave goods of Pontic-Danubian type. This interpretation places special emphasis on social and cultural phenomena above the ethnic criteria defended by the Vienna School.

This volume approaches the ideological question that underlies these controversies, as well as their repercussions in the direction adopted by later archaeological investigations in relation to the history of Spain. The author attempts to deconstruct the work of Martínez Santa-Olalla and places it in the context of the scientific production of his time. At the same time, it relativizes the role played by the Visigoth period in the Francoist ideological construction.

Once the discussion is framed in these terms, the author dedicates his study to a refutation of the cultural interpretation of the phenomenon of the Visigothic necropoleis of the Castilian plateau based on the archaeological data and by comparing this data with literary sources. The study also addresses two other historical problems that could be related to the Gothic settlement in the Castilian plateau: the creation of the bishopric of Segovia and the flourishing of the city of Toledo.

El asentamiento visigodo en la Península Ibérica y su relación con el registro arqueológico de los siglos V-VI d.C. continúa siendo en la actualidad una de las cuestiones más controvertidas de la arqueología española. Gran parte de esa controversia tiene que ver con aspectos que trascienden a la propia investigación arqueológica y nos sitúan en el plano de la política. Así, a la hora de abordar el problema hay dos puntos que han resultado especialmente polémicos: la presunta utilización del pasado visigodo por parte de la intelectualidad franquista como afirmación ideológica del régimen y la contribución del arqueólogo burgalés Julio Martínez Santa-Olalla en la fijación del esquema de arqueología visigoda.

Por otro lado, el aspecto puramente arqueológico de la controversia tiene que ver con la interpretación que desde las filas de la denominada New Archaeology se viene realizando de las necrópolis castellanas con ajuares de tipo póntico-danubiano. Dicha interpretación hace especial hincapié en fenómenos sociales y culturales por encima de los criterios étnicos defendidos por la Escuela de Viena. El presente estudio aborda de forma lúcida la cuestión ideológica que subyace detrás de la polémica, así como las repercusiones que ha tenido en la posterior dirección adoptada por la investigación arqueológica en relación con la propia historia de España. En este sentido, el autor realiza un ejercicio de deconstrucción de la figura de Martínez Santa-Olalla y lo sitúa en el contexto de la producción científica de su época. Al mismo tiempo, relativiza el papel desempeñado por el periodo visigodo en la construcción ideológica franquista.

Una vez situada la discusión en estos términos, el autor dedica su estudio a una refutación de la interpretación en clave cultural del fenómeno de las necrópolis visigodas de la meseta castellana desde los propios datos arqueológicos y a partir del cotejo de estos datos con los testimonios que proporcionan las fuentes literarias. Además, el presen
NEW: Han Dynasty (206BC–AD220) Stone Carved Tombs in Central and Eastern China by Chen Li. Paperback; 203x276mm; xiv+216 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (146 colour plates). (Print RRP £58.00). 71 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690774. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690781. Book contents pageDownload

Han Dynasty (206 BC–AD 220) stone carved tombs were constructed from carved stone slabs or a combination of moulded bricks and carved stones, and were distributed in Central and Eastern China. Such multi-chambered stone tombs were very popular among the Han people, but they were entirely new, and were a result of outside stimuli rather than an independent development within China. The stone carved tombs were a result of imitating royal rock-cut tombs, while the rock-cut tombs were stimulated by foreign examples. Moreover, many details of stone carved tombs also had Western features. These exotic elements reflected the desire to assimilate exotica within Chinese traditions. Some details within stone carved tombs showed high level of stone working technologies with Western influences. But in general the level of stone construction of the Han period was relatively low. The methods of construction showed how unfamiliar the Western system was to the Han artisans. Han Dynasty stone carved tombs were hybrids of different techniques, including timber, brick and stone works. From these variations, Han people could choose certain types of tombs to satisfy their specific ritual and economic needs. Not only structures, but also pictorial decorations of stone carved tombs were innovations. The range of image motifs was quite limited. Similar motifs can be found in almost every tomb. Such similarities were partly due to the artisans, who worked in workshops and used repertoires for the carving of images. But these also suggest that the tombs were decorated for certain purposes with a given functional template. Together with different patterns of burial objects and their settings, such images formed a way through which the Han people gave meaning to the afterworld. As the Han Empire collapsed, stone carved tombs ceased being constructed in the Central Plains. However, they set a model for later tombs. The idea of building horizontal stone chamber tombs spread to Han borderlands, and gradually went further east to the Korean Peninsula. In this book, the origins, meanings and influences of Han Dynasty stone carved tombs are presented as a part of the history of interactions between different parts of Eurasia.

About the Author
Chen Li, DPhil (Oxon.), is an assistant professor at the School of Humanities, Tongji University (Shanghai, China). His main research interests include art and archaeology of early China, structures and contents of Chinese tombs, as well as interactions between Central China and Inner Asia. He has published English and Chinese articles in different peer-reviewed journals or edited volumes. His article Rethinking the origins of Han Dynasty stone carved tombs won the 2014 Young Scholar Award, European Association for Chinese Studies. Currently he leads a research project Constructing Stone Tombs in Early Imperial China funded by the National Social Science Foundation of China.
'Men, Friends': The Sociological Mechanics of Xenophontic Leaders Winning Subordinates as Friends Taken from At the Crossroads of Greco-Roman History, Culture, and Religion: Papers in Memory of Carin M. C. Green edited by Sinclair W. Bell and Lora L. Holland. Pages 31-44.Download

By Robert Holschuh Simmons

Inquiries into the skills and effectiveness of leaders described in Xenophon’s works, particularly the Anabasis and Cyropaedia, have been popular in the past few decades, not just in classics, but also in the fields of political science, management, and public administration. Some of that attention has been dedicated to the particular techniques that Xenophon’s featured leaders use to win over their subordinates. One technique is their use of friendship (φιλία). What it actually means for a subordinate to perceive a leader as a 'friend' (φίλος), though, and not just an advocate, well-wisher, or panderer, tends not to be thoroughly explored...
Invisible Value or Tactile Value? Steatite in the Faience Complexes of the Indus Valley Tradition Taken from Walking with the Unicorn: Social Organization and Material Culture in Ancient South Asia edited by Dennys Frenez, Gregg M. Jamison, Randall W. Law, Massimo Vidale and Richard H. Meadow. Pages 389-394.Download

By Heather M.-L. Miller and Jonathan Mark Kenoyer

Objects made of faience (composition, frit or siliceous paste) were found across much of Eurasia for millennia, yet this material is hardly known today. Faience or siliceous paste objects were made with many different recipes and production methods, but there is an unusual, apparently unique, variation in faience composition for some objects in the Indus. Some Indus siliceous paste objects include steatite (talc) fragments, invisible on the surface and requiring laboratory analysis for detection. These invisible inclusions could have been valued as a symbol of Indus identity, as is suggested for other uses of steatite during the Indus period. Alternatively, these inclusions could be of technological value; although strength or special compositional requirements do not seem to fit this case, Kenoyer’s recent experiments suggest the addition of small amounts of steatite aids in the workability of some types of siliceous paste. Is this an either/or situation, or could both of these values be considerations in the addition of steatite fragments? This is an important option to consider beyond the usual oppositional approach to production and consumption explanations for material choices, and one that requires extra thought in archaeological research design and analysis.
The River: Peoples and Histories of the Omo-Turkana Area edited by Timothy Clack and Marcus Brittain. Paperback; 210x210mm; xii+186 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (121 colour plates). 480 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690330. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690347. Book contents pageDownload

The Omo-Turkana area is unlike any place on earth. Spanning parts of Ethiopia, South Sudan and Kenya, the area is today home to a unique diversity of peoples and cultures. Extraordinary fossil finds from the locale have illuminated the evolutionary origins of our species and archaeological and historical evidence has demonstrated it has been a dynamic crossroads of peoples, languages and identities for millennia. Over the past two decades, development interventions have transformed the environment and presented a threat to local forms of material and intangible heritage. Many local groups now face challenges to the long-term sustainability of their traditional ways of life. This sumptuously illustrated book brings together a remarkable collection of the world’s leading archaeologists, ecologists, historians and ethnographers who specialise in the locale. Recognising the Omo-Turkana area as a crucial resource of global heritage, the authors also acknowledge its current vulnerability.

‘The current socio-economic and political happenings in the Omo-Turkana Basin are profoundly disturbing. Showcasing the area’s global importance, this compilation is a timely and crucial landmark in the pages of African history and archaeology’. - Dr Richard Leakey, Turkana Basin Institute

‘Written by eminent scholars, this book showcases the rich and unique heritage of the Lower Omo Valley from prehistory to the present’. - Prof Tekle Hagos, Addis Ababa University

‘This collection of essays highlights the deep history of the Omo-Turkana basin, and the material and cultural traditions of the region’s inhabitants past and present. The reader is treated to rich, textured insights into the remarkable heritage of this part of the African continent, the many environmental and political challenges facing today’s inhabitants, and their continuing resilience in the face of adversity’. - Prof Paul Lane, University of Cambridge

Naturvorstellungen im Altertum Schilderungen und Darstellungen von Natur im Alten Orient und in der griechischen Antike edited by Florian Schimpf, Dominik Berrens, Katharina Hillenbrand, Tim Brandes and Carrie Schidlo. ii+285 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (56 colour plates). German text. 411 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918255. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918262. Book contents pageDownload

Everyone who investigates pre-modern concepts of nature cannot avoid a critical reflection on the ancient understandings of it. Here, “nature” is understood in the sense of a seemingly untouched space, largely independent of human culture. While this concept of “nature” is prevalent in modern times, the reconstruction of ancient ideas is difficult in that concepts of nature, if at all present, emphasize other aspects. For example, the Greek term φύσις in pre-Hellenistic times defines the nature of a thing rather than an untouched environment. A word for “nature” in this sense has not been handed down to us in the remaining texts of the Ancient Near East and Classical Antiquity. Nevertheless, such concepts can certainly be reconstructed from descriptions of nature to be found in literature and the representations of natural elements in art.

The present volume aims at identifying these concepts of nature in texts as well as in archaeological remains of the Ancient Near Eastern and the Greek culture from the Archaic to the Hellenistic period. Contributions from the fields of archaeology and philology are juxtaposed for each time period in chronological order. This arrangement provides a good overview of the concepts of nature prevailing throughout different period and cultures.

GERMAN DESCRIPTION: Der Begriff „Natur“ wird in modernen, mitteleuropäischen Gesellschaften meist im Sinne eines vermeintlich unberührten Raumes verstanden, der weitgehend unbeeinflusst von menschlicher Kultur ist. Für vormoderne Kulturen lassen sich solche Vorstellungen bzw. Konzepte sehr viel schwieriger nachweisen, da beispielsweise ein Wort für „Natur“ mit der eben genannten Bedeutung in den erhaltenen Texten des Alten Orients und der griechischen Antike so nicht überliefert zu sein scheint. Gleichwohl werden durchaus Naturelemente in der antiken Literatur, der Flächenkunst sowie in antiken Monumenten beschrieben bzw. abgebildet sowie als integrative Bestandteile genutzt und funktionalisiert. Daraus lassen sich Konzepte von „Natur“ herausarbeiten und rekonstruieren. Der vorliegende Band möchte solche „Naturkonzepte“ in Texten, Artefakten und Denkmälern des Alten Orients und des griechischen Kulturraumes von der Archaik bis in den Hellenismus identifizieren und einen Überblick über die jeweils in einem bestimmten Zeit- und Kulturraum vorherrschenden Vorstellungen sowie deren diachrone Entwicklung geben.

About the Editors
FLORIAN SCHIMPF studied Classical Archaeology and History at the universities of Frankfurt and Istanbul, whilst gaining practical experiences by participating in excavations in Priene (Turkey), Portugal and on the Balkans. In 2013 he joined the Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature” at the University of Mainz with a project on natural sanctuaries in ancient Greece and Asia Minor. His research interests lie in the fields of religious history, Greek cult practices and metrology.

DOMINIK BERRENS studied Classical Philology and Biology at the University of Freiburg. From 2013-2017 he was part of the Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature” at the University of Mainz, where he received his doctorate with a dissertation on social insects in antiquity in 2016. Since October 2017 he has been a postdoctoral researcher working on the project “NOSCEMUS – Nova Scientia: Early Modern Science and Latin” funded by the European Research Council at the University of Innsbruck. His research interests lie in pre-modern scientific texts and ancient drama.

KATHARINA HILLENBRAND studied Classical Philology and German Studies at the Universities of Würzburg and Frankfurt. In 2014 she joined the Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature” at the University of Mainz with a project on concepts of volcanic phenomena in Roman antiquity. Currently she is working at the department of Classical Philology at the University o
Paisajes de la campaña pampeana (siglos XIX y XX): Abordajes desde la Arqueología rural en Argentina edited by Carlos Landa, Virginia Pineau, Emanuel Montanari and Jimena Doval. Paperback; 175x245mm; 244 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (63 plates in colour). Spanish text with English abstracts. 70 2018 South American Archaeology Series 32. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690156. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690163. Book contents pageDownload

This volume presents a series of papers designed to offer a summary of ongoing research across Argentina that can come under the broad heading of Rural Archaeology.

Table of Contents
Editorial – by C. Landa, V. Pineau, E. Montanari y J. Doval
Introducción – by F. Brittez
La vida cotidiana y su materialidad en Alexandra Colony. Alejandra, Santa Fe, Argentina – by I. Dosztal
"La 26 al fondo": historias de un lugar – by S. Lanzelotti y G. Acuña
Los estancieros y/o hacendados en el San Vicente de mediados del siglo XIX a principios del siglo XX – by M. López, M. Torres Núñez y M. Vommaro
Entre estancias ganaderas y comercios rurales: Arqueología histórica en Magdalena (Buenos Aires). Los sitios El Santuario I y Estancia Bertón. – by M. S. García Lerena
Excavando la casa del juez: arqueología histórica en el sitio “Estancia el Rosario” Ayacucho, Buenos Aires – by F. Gómez Romero
El espacio fronterizo y el poblamiento rural del sur bonaerense desde una perspectiva arqueológica (segunda mitad del siglo XIX) – by V. Bagaloni
A través de una década de arqueología rural en el norte pampeano: pulperías, caminos, puestos y poblados (fines del siglo XIX y principios del XX – by C. Landa, V. Pineau, J. Doval, L. Coll, E. Montanari, A. Andrade, F. Caretti y A. Rearte
Aprovechamiento de vertebrados terrestres por las poblaciones humanas que habitaron la costa del Golfo San Matías (Río Negro, Argentina) durante el Holoceno tardío by Hernán A. Marani. Paperback; 175x245mm; 284 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (109 plates in colour). Spanish text with English abstract. 69 2018 South American Archaeology Series 31. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690118. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690125. Book contents pageDownload

This book presents the results and discussion of archaeofaunal studies which took place in the northern San Matías Gulf (Rio Negro Province) during the last six years, focussing on terrestrial mammals and birds. The general objective of this research is to determine what was the mode of operation of terrestrial vertebrates (small and big), and the importance that they had in the survival of human populations that occupied the coastline during the late Holocene (last 3000 years).
Quebrando rocas, una aproximación metodológica para el estudio del cuarzo en contextos arqueológicos de Córdoba (Argentina) by Eduardo Pautassi. Paperback; 175x205mm; vi+214 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (73 plates in colour). Spanish text. 68 2018 South American Archaeology Series 30. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690095. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690101. Book contents pageDownload

This book offers a valuable contribution to the development of a methodology to address the study of archaeological quartz artifacts, combining various analytical tools to study these objects so that we might better understand the technological strategies of hunting societies who made use of this raw material.

La meta de este libro es aportar al desarrollo de una metodología para abordar el estudio de artefactos arqueológicos de cuarzo, focalizándose en la combinación de diversas herramientas analíticas que permitan estudiar estos utensilios y contribuir así a una mejor comprensión de las estrategias tecnológicas de las sociedades cazadoras recolectoras que hicieron uso de esta materia prima. Ello implica, por un lado, evaluar el potencial de dicha roca para la producción de instrumentos líticos, considerando las distintas técnicas de talla, así como analizar las propiedades y cualidades de los filos para la realización de diversas actividades de incidencia sobre la materia en general, considerando a las de corte y raspado, en particular. Con el fin de someter a prueba esta propuesta, es que se abordarán como caso de estudio las estrategias tecnológicas implementadas por los grupos cazadores-recolectores que habitaron en el Valle de Calamuchita (provincia de Córdoba) durante el Holoceno medio y tardío, estudiando allí el rol cumplido por el cuarzo como materia prima, así como el uso y manufactura de artefactos de cuarzo en dicho contexto particular. Consta de tres partes principales: la primera de ellas aborda el enfoque metodológico y consta de cinco capítulos; la segunda parte comprende los resultados obtenidos luego de la aplicación de estos desarrollos metodológicos a través de programas experimentales tanto de manufactura como de uso de instrumentos sobre cuarzo ; por último, la tercer parte incluye la aplicación de los resultados obtenidos en el análisis de un caso de estudio en sitios arqueológicos de Calamuchita.
Technologie du harponnage sur la côte Pacifique du désert d’Atacama (nord du Chili) by Benjamín Ballester Riesco. Paperback; 203x276mm; 78 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (25 plates in colour); French text, Abstracts in English and Spanish, Foreword in Spanish. 67 2018 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 52. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690279. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690286. Download

These objects do not have a single purpose. This is the central premise that guides the research within this book. Throughout the volume the reader will follow a representation of a marine hunter-gatherer society, a projection deriving from one of its iconic and most important material assets, the harpoon. This very technical object will be studied not only for its most evident function - hunting at sea – and the work delves into the structural, symbolic, technological and world-building aspects of the human societies that used them. To achieve this goal the text begins with a judgment about the role of marine hunting, its prey, and the agents involved in different coastal societies on the American continent, in order to create a comprehensive framework of reference for the subject. It continues by focussing on clarifying, defining and discussing the concept of harponage from technology compared with other historical and ethnographic cases of marine hunters across the globe. A typology of harpoon points from the Atacama Desert is presented, with classification based on their technical attributes, constituent units, composition features and articulation mechanisms, in order to evaluate the chronological scope and geographical distribution of each one of the types of harpoon heads from the last 7000 years of coastal history. The text then explores the multiple values and meanings of the harpoons of the Atacama Desert. The book finally examines the social reasons that influenced the development of an incredibly sophisticated and complex technology of marine hunting. Inferences that take it out of the sea and away from hunting, towards hypotheses that seek answers in the cultural determinism stemming from technical decisions, to utilise technology as another mechanism to establish and strengthen social bonds in the construction of worlds between different agents and collectives, and no longer as a simple tool to satisfy subsistence needs.

Les objets n’ont pas un seul objectif. Prémisse centrale qui guide le dénouement de ce livre. Dans les pages suivantes le lecteur trouvera une réflexion sur une société des chasseurs-collecteurs marins à partir d’un de ces biens matériaux iconiques et un des plus importantes, le harpon. Cet objet technique sera étudié hors de sa fonction la plus évidente, au-delà de la chasse marine, pour pénétrer les aspects structurels, symboliques, technologiques et de construction du monde de ces collectifs humains. Pour entreprendre ce défi, le texte nous submerge dans un premier temps dans une révision critique sur le rôle de la chasse marine, leurs proies et les agents impliqués dans ces activités et dans différentes sociétés côtières du continent américain, afin de pourvoir un cadre de référence adéquate sur cette thématique. Dans un deuxième moment, nous nous centrons dans l’éclaircissement, la définition et la concrétisation du concept de harponnage depuis la technologie comparée avec d’autres cas historiques et ethnographiques de chasseurs-cueilleurs du monde. Une typologie de têtes de harpon pour le désert d’Atacama est ensuite présentée, fondée sur leurs solutions techniques, leurs unités constitutives, leurs normes de composition et leurs mécanismes d’articulation, pour évaluer ensuite la portée chronologique et la distribution géographique de chaque type au cours des dernières 7000 années d’histoire littorale. Par la suite, le texte tente d’explorer les multiples valeurs et significations des harpons du désert d’Atacama. Dans sa partie finale, notre récit aborde les raisons sociales qui ont permis le développement d’une technologie de chasse marine aussi sophistiquée et complexe. Interprétations qui nous emmènent hors de la mer et loin de la chasse, vers des hypothèses qui cherchent des réponses sur les contraintes culturelles qui se trouvent derrière les décisions techniques, pour concevoir à la technologie comme un mécanisme employé afin d’établir les liens sociaux dans la construction
Early Maritime Cultures in East Africa and the Western Indian Ocean Papers from a conference held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (African Studies Program) 23-24 October 2015, with additional contributions by Akshay Sarathi. Paperback; 203x276mm; viii+228 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (60 plates in colour). 66 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917128. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917135. Book contents pageDownload

The East African coast and the Western Indian Ocean are regions of global historical significance. This volume contains papers first presented at the conference, Early Maritime Cultures of the East African Coast, held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on October 23-24, 2015. Rather than limiting publication to the proceedings of the conference, additional contributions were solicited to expand the scope of the research presented and to place East Africa in its broader geographic and cultural contexts. The resulting volume focuses broadly on East Africa and the Western Indian Ocean and unites the papers under the general themes of movement and connection.

These papers represent a multi-disciplinary effort to examine East Africa and the Western Indian Ocean. Multiple lines of evidence drawn from linguistics, archaeology, history, art history, and ethnography come together in novel ways to highlight different aspects of the region’s past and offer innovative avenues for future research. The papers cover a diverse array of topics, including but not limited to: subsistence, watercraft traditions, trade and exchange (especially concerning the Silk Routes), migration, food ways, and familial relationships. This volume is unique in that it includes some speculative research as well, intended to present novel methods to deal with data-poor topics and to start important conversations about understudied topics.

The goal of this volume is to showcase aspects of the complex cultures and histories of this vast region and to emphasize its importance to world history. Ideally, it will generate scholarly and popular interest in the histories and cultures of the region and bring to the fore Africa’s and the Western Indian Ocean’s important (yet often overlooked) role in world historical narratives. It may also serve as a more advanced introduction to East Africa’s and the Western Indian Ocean’s history of interaction with other regions of the Old World and as a survey of methods used to understand the region’s past.

About the Editor
AKSHAY SARATHI is a graduate student of Archaeology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research interests include the zooarchaeology of maritime adaptations, Indian Ocean trade and exchange, and East African coastal archaeology. More specifically, his current research project focuses on the island of Zanzibar, where he has excavated the sites of Unguja Ukuu, Kizimkazi Dimbani, and Kuumbi Cave. Data from these sites will form the basis of his dissertation, which will examine how dietary preferences changed over time at each site in response to various stimuli over time. He currently resides in Madison, WI (USA) with his two feline overlords.
Digital Imaging of Artefacts: Developments in Methods and Aims edited by Kate Kelley and Rachel K. L. Wood. Paperback; 203x276mm; 190 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (80 plates in colour). 65 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690255. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690262. Book contents pageDownload

This volume brings together new lines of research across a range of disciplines from participants in a workshop held at Wolfson College, Oxford, on 23rd May 2017. In light of rapid technological developments in digital imaging, the aim in gathering these contributions together is to inform specialist and general readers about some of the ways in which imaging technologies are transforming the study and presentation of archaeological and cultural artefacts. The periods, materials, geography, and research questions under discussion therefore are varied, but the contributions are united in shared interests surrounding the aims of these techniques for imaging objects: what advantages do they offer, whether in research or museum contexts, what limitations are still faced, and how can technological development encourage new types of research and public engagement?

About the Editors
Dr KATE KELLEY received her Doctorate of Philosophy in Assyriology from the University of Oxford in 2018 and is a specialist in the socio-economic history of early Mesopotamia. She is a Research and Teaching Fellow at the University of British Columbia (2018–19), and formerly a Research Associate at the Oriental Institute, Oxford for the project Seals and Their Impressions in the Ancient Near East (2016–17). Kate has been working for the Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative since 2012, including digitizing cuneiform tablets in the Louvre, the National Museum of Scotland, and the Yale Babylonian Collection.

Dr RACHEL K. L. WOOD is Lecturer in Classical Archaeology at Corpus Christi College, Oxford and a Junior Research Fellow at Wolfson College, specialising in the art and archaeology of ancient Iran. In her previous position as a postdoctoral researcher with the British Museum and University of Oxford project Empires of Faith, she was an assistant curator of the Ashmolean Museum’s exhibition Imagining the Divine: art and the rise of world religions (October 2017–February 2018).
Hatra: Il territorio e l’urbanistica Prefazione di Roberta Venco Ricciardi by Enrico Foietta. Paperback; 203x276mm; x+560 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (140 plates in colour). Italian text; Introduction and chapter summaries in English. 64 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690057. £88.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690064. Book contents pageDownload

The ancient city of Hatra is located 80 km southwest of the modern city of Mosul. The site reached its apogee during the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD, arriving at the striking dimensions of c. 300 hectares and into a new role as the capital of a significant buffer state between the Parthian and Roman empires.

This volume is devoted to the study of the landscape surrounding Hatra and of the development of this important city, drawing on published information gathered by Iraqi and foreign expeditions, as well as unpublished data garnered from over fifteen years of fieldwork at the site by the Italian Archaeological Expedition.

The study of the landscape comprehends the morphology, hydrology and geology of the region and offers new proposals regarding the exploitation of natural resources and the development of regional and local routes through the territory under Hatra’s political and military control during the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD.

The analysis of Hatra as an urban centre consists of a detailed study of the city’s hydrology, street network and urban areas, with the purpose of detecting the principles behind the planning and development of the city. The main elements of the urban space are treated in this book: the Temenos area and the Small Shrines, the Necropoles, the Fortifications, the Houses, and the Palaces. Due to the cross-referencing of archaeological, historical and epigraphic data, new ideas have been proposed regarding the chronological phases of urbanism at Hatra, from its foundation up to the destruction of the city by the Sasanian army in AD 241.

La città di Hatra si trova nella Jazira irachena a circa 80 km a sud-ovest di Mosul. Il centro raggiunse il suo apogeo durante il II-III sec. d.C., toccando l’impressionante estensione di quasi 300 ettari e divenendo la capitale di un influente stato cuscinetto, collocato tra l’impero partico e l’impero romano.

Questo volume è dedicato allo studio del territorio e dell’urbanistica di questo importante sito antico, impiegando contestualmente informazioni edite, raccolte dalle varie missioni irachene e straniere che si sono avvicendate sul terreno, e inedite, provenienti dal vasto Archivio della Missione Archeologica Italiana a Hatra in più di quindici anni di ricerche sul campo.

Lo studio del territorio definisce un quadro dettagliato della morfologia, idrologia e geologia della regione e dell’area prossima al centro, oltre a proporre alcune nuove ipotesi interpretative sullo sfruttamento delle risorse ambientali, sull’articolazione della rete viaria periurbana e regionale e sull’estensione del territorio sottoposto al controllo politico e militare della città durante il II e III sec. d.C.

L’analisi urbanistica comprende uno studio approfondito dell’idrologia cittadina, della rete stradale e delle aree urbane, allo scopo di individuarne le principali caratteristiche ed eventuali regole nella pianificazione e nello sviluppo della città. Nel libro sono inoltre analizzati i principali elementi che compongono il tessuto urbano: il Temenos e i templi minori, le necropoli, le difese cittadine, le case e i palazzi. Grazie all’utilizzo contestuale del dato archeologico, storico ed epigrafico, è stato inoltre possibile formulare nuove ipotesi sulle fasi urbanistiche e sulla cronologia di Hatra dalla fondazione alla sua distruzione, avvenuta per mano sasanide nel 241 d.C.

ENRICO FOIETTA è dottore di ricerca e borsista presso l’Università degli Studi di Torino. È membro di varie missioni archeologiche nel Vicino Oriente (Siria e Iran). Attualmente collabora attivamente con la Missione Archeologica Congiunta Italo-Iraniana in Khuzistan (ICAR - CRAST), con la Missione Archeologica Italiana a Hatra, con il Centro Ricerche Archeologiche e Scavi di Torino (CRAST) e la Missione Franco-Siriana a Europos-Dura (CNRs Paris).
Warts and All: The Paratexts in the Iowa Lucan Taken from At the Crossroads of Greco-Roman History, Culture, and Religion edited by Sinclair W. Bell and Lora L. Holland. Pages 249-260.Download

By Samuel J. Huskey

In the introduction to his edition of Lucan, A. E. Housman raises our hopes of finding a new manuscript of the Pharsalia: 'It may be that somebody roaming through a library will one day stumble upon a hidden treasure . . . ' A couple of years after I graduated from the University of Iowa, exciting news came from Iowa City. The librarians in the Special Collections of the university’s Main Library had, in fact, stumbled upon a hidden treasure: a 15th-century manuscript of Lucan. Before anyone becomes too hopeful, it is important to remember the rest of what Housman had to say about such a prospect: '. . . but those are not the quarters from which Lucan most needs help nor from which most help is to be had.'