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NEW: Dosariyah: An Arabian Neolithic Coastal Community in the Central Gulf by Philipp Drechsler. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+498 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (110 plates in colour). (Print RRP £80.00).. 454 2018 British Foundation for the Study of Arabia Monographs (formerly Society for Arabian Studies Monographs) 19. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919627. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919634. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £80.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Dosariyah: Reinvestigating a Neolithic coastal community in eastern Arabia describes the work carried out at Dosariyah, located in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia, which took place between 2010 and 2014. It was conducted by the joint German-Saudi Dosariyah Archaeological Research Project (DARP). A wealth of material remains was found during excavations within almost three metres of anthropogenic deposits. Radiocarbon dates and comparative studies of artefacts securely date the occupation of the site into the first centuries of the fifth millennium BC.

The co-occurrence of locally produced artefacts that are technologically and typologically rooted in the local Arabian Middle Neolithic, and imports from southern Mesopotamia is characteristic of Dosariyah. However, the mechanisms behind this distribution of foreign materials along the Arabian Gulf coast, in particular, are still poorly understood. It is the central proposition of this book that the local societies living along the shores of the Arabian Gulf coast played an active role in the acquisition of Ubaid pottery and other objects originating in southern Mesopotamia.

A predominance of imported objects, considered as ‘exotic items’, are understood as integral components of rituals that were part of temporary gatherings of larger groups of people at Dosariyah. Based on the material evidence from the site, such collective social events were embedded in everyday life during the fifth millennium BC.

About the Author
Philipp Drechsler is a research fellow at the University of Tübingen, Germany, where he received his PhD in 2008. Trained in prehistoric archaeology, geology and geography, he has a particular interest in the emergence and the development of food producing – Neolithic – societies on the Arabian Peninsula. His fields of expertise include lithic studies, the analysis of spatial patterns of human behaviour and human action against the background of changing environmental conditions. He is head of the joint German-Saudi Dosariyah Archaeological Research Project (DARP), and has also been invited to participate in research projects in Qatar, V.A.E and Syria.
NEW: Études Mésopotamiennes – Mesopotamian Studies: N°1 – 2018 edited by Vincent Déroche, Maria Grazia Masetti-Rouault and Christophe Nicolle. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+330 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in English and French, abstracts in Arabic and Kurdish. (Print RRP £52.00). 449 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919412. £52.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919429. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £52.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The first volume of the series EMMS, Études Mésopotamiennes – Mesopotamian Studies presents a collection of articles, communications and preliminary reports representing the advancement, in recent years, of human sciences - archaeological, historical, philological and cultural researches –concerning ancient Mesopotamia area studies. It contains the first results of some excavation and survey programs carried out by different European teams namely in the Kurdistan region of Iraq, developed since the reopening of this large territory to international research after the long pause due to war. The volume includes also studies, debates, reflections preparing and illustrating the new trends of the research launched now in Mesopotamia. Marked by the continuity of the scientific traditions, they show the changes induced by the evolution of mentalities and by new methods, techniques and instruments of work. The proceedings of an international congress held in Paris in 2013, show also the orientation of Iraqi archaeologists’ researches, and their perceptions of the new, possible collaboration starting now in the region. In the same spirit, to allow a better circulation and sharing of their contents, the texts are accompanied by large summaries translated into Arabic and Kurdish.

About the Editors
VINCENT DÉROCHE is a former alumnus of the École Normale Supérieure, former member of the École française d’Archéologie d’Athènes, researcher at the Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), currently Directeur de recherche, Directeur adjoint or the UMR 8167, « Orient & Méditerranée », for the part « Monde byzantin ». Elected to the chair of « Littérature byzantine » at Sorbonne Université, and to the chair « Christianisme byzantin » at the École pratique des Hautes Études (Paris).

MARIA GRAZIA MASETTI-ROUAULT, a specialist of Late Bronze - Iron Age Mesopotamian cultures, is Directeur d’études (Professor) in the École Pratique des Hautes Études PSL, Sorbonne University in Paris, where she helds the Chair of « Religions of the Syro- Mesopotamian societies: Archaeology and History ». Since 2005, she is co-director of the Syro-French Archaeological Mission in Tell Masaikh and its region (Syrian Lower Middle Euphrates area) and, since 2015, she is also Director of the French Archaeological Mission in Qasr Shemamok (Iraqi Kurdistan).

CHRISTOPHE NICOLLE is an archaeologist specialist of pre-classical Middle East archaeology, working in different regions (Northern Mesopotamia, Northern Levant, South Levant), participating or directing several excavations or surveys over periods ranging mainly from the Chalcolithic to the Late Bronze Age. Former member of the French Institute of the Near East (IFPO), researcher at the National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), he works actually in a team of the Collège de France (Paris).
NEW: Archaeological Explorations in Syria 2000-2011 Proceedings of ISCACH-Beirut 2015 edited by Jeanine Abdul Massih and Shinichi Nishiyama in collaboration with Hanan Charaf and Ahmad Deb. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+452 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (124 colour plates). (Print RRP £65.00). 452 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919474. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919481. Book contents pageDownload

Syria has been a major crossroads of civilizations in the ancient Near East since the dawn of human kind. Until the current crisis began in 2011, Syria was one of the foremost pioneers in the investigation of past human knowledge, diversity, and identity. However, due to the ongoing war, archaeological excavations came to an abrupt halt. Since then, there have been countless alarming reports of damage or destruction inflicted on archaeological, historical, and museum sites.

The International Syrian Congress on Archaeology and Cultural Heritage (ISCACH), held December 3-5, 2015 in Beirut, Lebanon, was designed to bring together international scholars who have directed or participated in archaeological expeditions in Syria, and colleagues from Syria. By doing so, not only could the results of years of archaeological investigations and cultural heritage management in Syria be shared and discussed, but also a spirit of friendship and collaboration could be fostered and strengthened during this turbulent period.

The Congress focussed on the scientific aspects of each explored site and region allowing researchers to examine in detail each heritage site, its characteristics and identity. Archaeological Explorations in Syria 2000-2011: Proceedings of ISCACH-Beirut 2015 consists of two parts. The first part presents the results of archaeological investigations conducted between 2000 and 2010. The second part comprises abstracts of papers and posters presented during the Congress. It is hoped that this book will represent an important contribution to the scientific dialogue between international and Syrian scholars, and will appeal to the general public interested in the culture and history of Syria.

About the Editors
JEANINE ABDUL MASSIH is professor in art and archaeology at the Lebanese University. She specializes in Hellenistic and Roman settlements, town planning, and architecture. She co-directed the excavations of Cyrrhus (Aleppo, Syria) on behalf of the Lebanese University and the DGAMS and coordinated many field and research projects in Syria and Lebanon. Since 2014, she has been in charge of the excavations and management of the Quarries of Baalbek (Lebanon) and of a survey project on the Southern Beqaa (Lebanon).

SHINICHI NISHIYAMA is associate professor at Chubu University, Japan. He specializes in the Iron Age culture of the ancient Near East, especially in the northern Levant. He has participated in various archaeological projects in the Near East and Central Asia including Syria, Turkey, Iran, Egypt, Afghanistan, and Tajikistan. He was also involved in the UNESCO-led cultural heritage projects in Afghanistan and Tajikistan. He currently co-directs archaeological projects in Iraqi Kurdistan (Yasin Tepe) and in Lebanon (Southern Beqaa).

HANAN CHARAF is assistant professor in art and archaeology at the Lebanese University. She specializes in Near Eastern history and archaeology during the Bronze and Iron Ages in the central Levant. Her research interests include Bronze Age ceramic production and distribution, Bronze Age Cypriot pottery imported to Lebanon, supra and intraregional trade (exchange commodities and routes) in the Levant during the Bronze Age, and cultural characteristics of the transitional period Late Bronze Age-Iron Age in the central Levant.

AHMAD DEB holds a PhD in archaeology and is currently Head of the Department of the Historical Buildings and Archaeological Documentation at the Directorate General of Antiquities of Syria. He directed the Syrian excavations of Tell Nahr El-Arab (Tell Al-Shamiyeh) between 2011 and 2018. He specializes in Bronze Age settlements and burials in the Near East. Today, he dedicates his time to saving and documenting Syrian endangered cultural heritage.
NEW: ARAMAZD Subscriptions and Back-Issues Armenian Journal of Near Eastern Studies (AJNES) edited by Aram Kosyan (Editor–in–Chief). One volume published annually in 1-2 issues. 11 2017. ISBN 1829-1376-HOME. Book contents pageBuy Now

Established in 2006 by the Association for Near Eastern and Caucasian Studies in corporation with Institute of Oriental Studies and Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography (National Academy of Sciences of Armenia) AJNES is the only periodical in the Republic of Armenia devoted exclusively to the investigation of ancient and medieval cultures of the Near East and the Caucasus. Articles appearing in its pages are contributions of scholars of international reputation in history, archaeology, philology, art, religion and science.

Archaeopress was pleased to take on publishing duties in 2017, handling subscriptions for future volumes and back-issue sales. Subscriptions are available in print and online with special rates for private individuals.

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FORTHCOMING: Rural Cult Centres in the Hauran as Part of a Broader Network of the Near East (100 BC–AD 300) by Francesca Mazzilli. Paperback; 220pp; illustrated throughout in black & white with 3 colour plates. 464 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . ISBN 9781784919542. Buy Now

The book challenges earlier scholars’ emphasis on the role played by local identities and Romanisation in religion and religious architecture in the Roman Empire through the first comprehensive multidisciplinary analysis of rural cult centres in the Hauran (southern Syria) from the pre-Roman to the Roman period (100 BC-AD 300). The Hauran is an interesting and revealing object of study because it has been a geographical crossroads between different cultures over time. Inspired by recent theories on interconnectivity and globalisation, the monograph argues that cult centres and the Hauran itself are part of a human network at a macro level on the basis of the analysis of archaeological, architectural, sculptural and epigraphic evidence and landscape. As a result of this multi-disciplinary approach, the author also re-assesses the social meaning of these sanctuaries, discusses the identity of the elite group that contributed financially to the building of sanctuaries, and attempts to reconstruct ritual and economic activities in cult centres. This work re-evaluates the significance of contacts between the elite of the Hauran and other cultures of the Near East in shaping cult sites, and it includes the first catalogue of rural cult centres of the Hauran (in the appendix).

About the Author
DR FRANCESCA MAZZILLI has been a Roman pottery specialist for the Cambridge Archaeological Unit at the University of Cambridge since March 2015. She holds a PhD in Archaeology from the University of Durham for her thesis Beyond Religion: Cultural Exchange and Economy in Syria. Over the last ten years she has worked as an archaeologist in England, Italy and Jordan. Her main research interests are Roman religion, architecture, landscape, theory and pottery. She has presented papers covering these topics in various international conferences in Europe. Together with Dies Van Der Linde she is currently co-editing the book titled Dialectics of Religion in the Roman World. She has been a member of Theoretical Roman Archaeological Conference (TRAC) standing committee and of the Theoretical Roman Archaeological Journal (TRAJ) editorial team since March 2017.

Table of Contents (Provisional):
Chapter 1 - Introduction
Chapter 2 - The geographical and historical background of the Hauran
Chapter 3 - Rural cult centres in their pre-provincial political context
Chapter 4 - ‘A religious cultural identity’ of the Hauran in the pre-provincial period
Chapter 5 - ‘A rural religious cultural identity’ of the Hauran in the provincial period
Chapter 6 - Rural cult centres as meeting places for their religious and economic function
Chapter 7 - Conclusion
Bibliography
Appendix
Gazetteer
FORTHCOMING: Iron Oxide Rock Artefacts in Mesopotamia c. 2600-1200 BC An interdisciplinary study of hematite, goethite and magnetite objects by Martine Marieke Melein. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+258 pages; 49 figures; 52 tables (85 plates in colour). (Print RRP £40.00). 453 2018. ISBN 9781784919641. Book contents pageBuy Now

The flourishing civilisations of Mesopotamia, nowadays Iraq and Syria, imported all kinds of materials from the surrounding regions. Iron oxide rock (hematite, goethite and magnetite) was very popular for weight stones and cylinder seals around 2000 BC. This research aims to determine the region of origin for the raw material, what made people start using iron oxide rock, and what led them to stop using it. To answer these questions, a multidisciplinary approach was applied. Geology and archaeology were combined to identify Northern Syria as the region of origin. Archaeometric research of the production process showed that technological change concurred with the start and end of the use of iron oxide rock. Cuneiform texts yielded, among other information, the earliest description of magnetism known to mankind. Furthermore, element and mineral composition of 50 artefacts from three Dutch collections were determined with modern, non-destructive analysis techniques.

About the Author
Martine Melein grew up in the most southern part of the Netherlands. Her interest in archaeology began when she was very young, and her grandfather told her stories about ancient cultures. When she was 17, she left Maastricht to study archaeology in Leiden. She is the first of her family to have completed an academic education. After finishing her doctoral education in Mesopotamian archaeology, and obtaining a post-academic teaching degree in social science, she lectured on various Ancient Near Eastern subjects at Leiden University, as well as for the general public. During her PhD-research she raised a family and earned money as a housekeeper, lunch lady, educational co-ordinator of Geo- and Bioarchaeology at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and finally assistant to the director of the academic teacher education, also at Vrije Universiteit. She presented her research at several ICAANE and RAI conferences and participated in the international METROLOGIA-research group, as well as in scientific workshops on themes such as metrology and pigments. One of Martine’s major strengths lies in combining scientific disciplines, thus allowing to tell a more complete and balanced story of our past.
FORTHCOMING: The Geography of Trade: Landscapes of competition and long-distance contacts in Mesopotamia and Anatolia in the Old Assyrian Colony Period by Alessio Palmisano. Paperback; 205x290mm; 260pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £48.00). 442 2018. ISBN 9781784919252. Buy Now

From the mid-20th century onwards, consolidated study of the merchant archives from the Old Assyrian trading colony at Kaneš (Kültepe) has not only transformed our understanding of the social, economic and political dynamics of the Bronze Age Near East, but also overturned many preconceived notions of what constitutes pre-modern trade. Despite this disciplinary impact and archaeological investigations at Kültepe and elsewhere, our understanding of this phenomenon has remained largely text-based and therefore of limited analytical scope, both spatially and contextually. This book re-assesses the Old-Assyrian trade network in Upper Mesopotamia and Central Anatolia during the Middle Bronze Age (c. 1970 – 1700 BC) by combining in some analytical detail the archaeology (e.g. material culture, settlement data, etc.) of the region both on its own terms and via a range of spatial approaches. The author offers a comparative and spatial perspective on exchange networks and economic strategies, continuity and discontinuity of specific trade circuits and routes, and the evolution of political landscapes throughout the Near East in the Middle Bronze Age.

About the Author
ALESSIO PALMISANO is a Post-Doctoral Research Associate at UCL Institute of Archaeology and is currently working on a research project examining the relationship between inferred regional demographic trends in the Mediterranean since the appearance of farming and reconstructed land cover in the past. His research so far has been primarily focused on the study of Western Asian and Eastern Mediterranean early complex societies, the analysis of settlement patterns, and the development of bespoke quantitative and computational methods to Archaeology. He also took part, with roles of scientific responsibility, in several campaigns of archaeological fieldwork, primarily in Iraq, Italy, Syria, and Turkey.

Table of Contents (Provisional):
Chapter 1. Introduction
Chapter 2. Theoretical approaches to landscape, political geography and trade
Chapter 3. Upper Mesopotamia and Central Anatolia in the old Assyrian colony period. A review of the documentary historical evidence
Chapter 4. Perspectives on material culture: intra and inter-regional dynamics
Chapter 5. Models of settlement hierarchy
Chapter 6. Landscape-scale models of movement and interaction
Chapter 7. Discussion: landscapes of interaction in Upper Mesopotamia and Anatolia
Chapter 8. Conclusions
Bibliography
NEW: Composite Artefacts in the Ancient Near East Exhibiting an imaginative materiality, showing a genealogical nature edited by Silvana Di Paolo. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+96 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (19 colour plates). 424 2018 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 3. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918538. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918545. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Composite Artefacts in the Ancient Near East: Exhibiting an imaginative materiality, showing a genealogical nature examines the complex relationship between environment, materials, society and materiality with particular reference to the composite artefacts in the ancient Near East. On the one hand are the objective and natural attributes of materials, possibly exalted from their transformation: a form of fascination immanent in all kind of technical activity which promotes the transition from the ordinary into an ‘extra-ordinary’ realm, imbuing the object with new meaning. On the other hand is the idea that properties of materials are not fixed attributes of ‘matters’, but are processual as well as relational: the qualities of artefacts are subjective and are included in the worldview of artisans making them, as well as in the mind of who observes who appreciate them. Thus, the craftsmanship is oriented towards the achievement of sophisticated products through assemblage techniques and the blending of contrasting properties and qualities of materials. The term ‘composite’ is a combination of the power of technology and the ability to form new images: the strict relationship between creativity, technology and manufacture produces novel interactions and solutions.

Although the primary concern of this volume is to provide specific case studies in which theoretical assumptions and hypotheses can be applied to the ancient evidence, most of the papers take not only the general perspective, such as the relationship between materials and humans, but also a defined body of evidence – material, textual and visual through which they address the issue. This volume represents a first attempt to conceptualise the construction and use of composite artefacts: the richness of approaches, the development of new issues depending on specific case studies, and the overturning of widely accepted ideas, show the interest towards this category of objects and the opportunity to enlarge this field study in the future.

About the Editor
SILVANA DI PAOLO (PhD Rome 2001) is, since 2001, researcher at the Institute for Studies of Ancient Mediterranean of the Italian National Council of Research (CNR). She is the director of the Series Biblioteca di Antichità Cipriote, scientific board member of al-Sharq (published in Paris) and editorial board member of Rivista di Studi Fenici published by ISMA. As CNR researcher she is co-coordinator of different projects in collaboration with European and non-European foreign institutions. She is a co-director of the QANATES project in the Iranian Kurdistan. She has written extensively on the relationship between art and power, location and styles of workshops, social meaning of works of art, as well as on material culture of the 2nd millennium BC. Silvana is currently working on the concepts of similarity in assemblages of artifacts and routinisation of the artisanal production in the ANE, as well as on the applications of the shape and semantic analysis on Mesopotamian glyptics.

20% OFF: Commemorating Conflict: Greek Monuments of the Persian Wars by Xavier Duffy. viii+210 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 10 plates in colour. 412 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918392. £21.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918408. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £26.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Spotlight Promotion - Summer Reading. RRP £26.00, OFFER PRICE £21.00 (offer ends 31/08/2018): This study is concerned with how the Greek peoples, of primarily the classical period, collectively commemorated the Persian Wars. The data presented here are public monuments, which include both physical and behavioural commemorations. The aim of this work is to reveal and present the methods by which Greeks of the fifth century BC commemorated the Persian Wars. Several trends have drawn attention away from studies presenting commemorative practices in their entirety: the focus on singular monument types, individual commemorative places, a particular commemorating group or specific battle, and an overemphasis on Athenian commemorations. This project works towards rectifying this issue by highlighting the variations in commemorative traditions. This holistic approach to the data, which is inclusive in its remit of commemorative objects, places, and groups, allows for a more complete representation of the commemorative tradition. What emerges from this study is the compilation of all known ancient Greek monuments to commemorate the battles of Marathon, Salamis, Artemisium, Thermopylae and Plataea.

About the Author
XAVIER DUFFY graduated with a PhD in the commemoration of ancient Greek warfare in 2016 from the University of Birmingham’s School of Classics, Ancient History and Archaeology. Xavier has taught Classical Archaeology at the University of London and University of Winchester and has a keen interest in material culture. This interest was nurtured while working as Assistant Collections Manager at the British Museum from 2009-2017. This book is the result of Xavier’s postgraduate research on the commemorations of the Persian Wars specifically.

Table of Contents
PREFACE; 1: INTRODUCTION; 2: CONTEXTUALISING THE COMMEMORATIONS OF THE PERSIAN WARS; 3: COMMEMORATIVE GROUPS AND COMMEMORATIVE PLACES; 4: MONUMENTS BY TYPE; 5: THE MONUMENTS AND THE EVIDENCE; BIBLIOGRAPHY
Palmyrena: Palmyra and the Surrounding Territory from the Roman to the Early Islamic period by Jørgen Christian Meyer. x+220 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (143 plates in colour). 377 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917074. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917081. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £44.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is the first investigation of the relationship between Palmyra and its surrounding territory from the Roman to the early Islamic period since D. Schlumberger’s pioneer campaigns in the mountains northwest of Palmyra in the late 1930s. It discusses the agricultural potential of the hinterland, its role in the food supply of the city, and the interaction with the nomadic networks on the Syrian dry steppe. The investigation is based on an extensive joint Syrian-Norwegian surface survey north of Palmyra in 2008, 2010 and 2011 and on studies of satellite imagery. It contains a gazetteer of 70 new sites, which include numerous villages, estates, forts, stations and water management systems.

About the Author:
Dr Phil. Jørgen Christian Meyer is professor in Ancient History at the Department of Archaeology, History, Cultural Studies and Religion, University of Bergen, Norway. From 2008 to 2013 he was head of the project entitled Palmyrena: City, Hinterland and Caravan Trade between Orient and Occident.
ARAMAZD: Armenian Journal of Near Eastern Studies Volume XI.1-2 2017: Institutional Customers edited by Aram Kosyan (Editor–in–Chief). 11 2017. ISBN 1829-1376-11-2017-INST. Book contents pageBuy Now

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For the Gods of Girsu (ARABIC EDITION) City-State Formation in Ancient Sumer by Sébastien Rey. 90pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 252 2017. ISBN 9781784916893. £25.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

New Arabic edition for 2017. Download contents page above for full Arabic description. For the English language edition please follow this link.

For the Gods are the opening words or incipit of the first inscribed votive artefacts dedicated to the principal deities of the Sumerian pantheon. They commemorate the construction or renovation of cities, temples, rural sanctuaries, border steles, in sum all the symbolically charged features of archaic states belonging thus metaphorically to supernatural tutelary overlords.

Girsu (present-day Tello) is one of the earliest known cities of the world together with Uruk, Eridu, and Ur, and was considered to be in the 3rd Millennium the sanctuary of the Sumerian heroic god Ningirsu who fought with the demons of the Kur (Mountain) and thus made possible the introduction of irrigation and agriculture in Sumer. Girsu was the sacred metropolis and central pole of a city-state that lay in the Southeasternmost part of the Mesopotamian floodplain.

The pioneering explorations carried out between 1877 and 1933 at Tello and the early decipherment of the Girsu cuneiform tablets were ground-breaking because they revealed the principal catalytic elements of the Sumerian takeoff – that is, a multiplicity and coalescence of major innovations, such as the appearance of a city– countryside continuum, the emergence of literacy, of bronze manufacture, and the development of monumental art and architecture.

Because of the richness of information related in particular to the city’s spatial organization and geographical setting, and thanks to the availability of recently declassified Cold War space imagery and especially the possibility to launch new explorations in Southern Iraq, Girsu stands out as a primary locale for re-analyzing through an interdisciplinary approach combining archaeological and textual evidence the origins of the Sumerian city-state.

About the Author:
Sébastien Rey is Lead archaeologist at the British Museum (Iraq Emergency Heritage Management Training Program) and Codirector of Tello-Girsu (Southern Iraq).
Medieval Urban Landscape in Northeastern Mesopotamia by Karel Nováček, Miroslav Melčák, Lenka Starková and Narmin Ali Muhammad Amin with contributions by Jan Petřík and Emily Neumeier. viii+206 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 302 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915186. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915193 . £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

More than fifteen sites of either confirmed or conjectured urban status existed between the 6th and 19th centuries in the particular region of northeastern Mesopotamia, bounded by the rivers Great Zāb, Little Zāb and Tigris. This present study concentrates on the investigation of this urban network. The archaeological substance of the deserted sites is mostly very well preserved in the relief of the arid steppe environment and can be excellently identified in satellite images of several types. The archaeological investigation of these settlements, augmented by a revised historical topography, offers a unique opportunity for the holistic study of the diversity, temporal dynamics and mutual relationships within the urban network that developed in the hinterland of Baghdad and Samarra, the two largest super-centres of the Old World.

This collective monograph puts together archaeological and historical data available for the individual sites, including analyses of pottery obtained by surface survey. The materially rich final report of the three-year project is supplemented by an interpretative chapter that focuses on detailed topographical comparisons of the sites, their landscape contexts, and the dynamics of the urban system within the framework of studies on Near-Eastern Islamic-period cities.

About the authors: Karel Nováček is associate professor of medieval archaeology in the Department of History, Palacky University Olomouc, combining in his research backgrounds in archaeology and history of architecture. Last eleven years, his field work is focussed on landscape archaeology and built environment of the Islamic period in Northern Mesopotamia

Miroslav Melčák is a research fellow at the Oriental Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague. He studied Arabic language and Islamic Studies at Charles University in Prague, where he obtained his PhD in 2009. His main research interests include charitable foundations (awqaf) in Syria and Egypt and Islamic urbanism of Northern Mesopotami

Lenka Starková received her PhD from the University of West Bohemia Plzeň, Department of Archaeology, where she presently works as assistant professor of the landscape archaeology. She is specialized in remote sensing, analysis of satellite imagery, airborne laser scanning and GIS

Narmin Ali Muhammad Amin is professor of archaeology at University of Salahaddin, Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan, and also a research fellow in CRNS Paris (UMR 8167 – Orient et Méditerranée). Her main area of research is the Islamic period and Eastern Christian monasteries in Iraqi Kurdistan

Jan Petřík graduated in 2011 from the interfaculty double-major programme combining geology with archaeology at the Masaryk University in Brno. He is currently involved in research oriented in archeometry, geoarcheology of artifacts and sites from the Neolithic period up to the 20th century

Emily Neumeier received her PhD from the University of Pennsylvania, presently, she hold an ACLS Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Humanities at The Ohio State University. She is a historian of Islamic art and architecture, specializing in the visual culture and built environment of the Ottoman Empire.
Parcours d’Orient Recueil de textes offert à Christine Kepinski edited by Bérengère Perello et Aline Tenu. xiv+242 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 9 colour plates. Papers in French and English; all abstracts in both French and English. 294 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914585. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914592. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume contains 23 articles written by 26 authors in order to express the extent of their respect and friendship for Christine Kepinski. The topics addressed in their papers reflect the scientific work of Christine Kepinski, who always promoted interdisciplinary approaches and developed multi-scale analysis from the object itself to regional study. Several papers are directly connected to fieldwork she conducted in Iraq and in Turkey: Haradum and the Middle Euphrates area, Tilbeshar and Kunara. Others are devoted to material study, notably glyptic, seals and sealing practices. Others evoke Syria: she never directed archaeological excavation there but she always integrated Syria in her studies. Finally, some are inspired by Christine Kepinski’s interest for urban life. The chronological time span of the book as well as the various specialisations of the authors clearly show the great value of her scientific background guided by her taste for the Orient.

Reviews:

'In total, the 23 written contributions in French or English not only reflect the interests of [Christine Kepinski], but they do justice to her fine work.' - Daniel Bonneterre, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières (Histara les comptes rendus (translated from the French), 2017) - read the full review here: http://histara.sorbonne.fr/cr.php?cr=3125
Managing Archaeological Collections in Middle Eastern Countries A Good Practice Guide by Dianne Fitzpatrick. x+115 pages; black & white throughout. 290 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914882. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914899. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £26.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Collections management practice is an often ignored aspect of archaeological research and salvage activities in many Middle Eastern countries, yet literally thousands of artefacts are recovered every year with no real strategies for managing them sustainably into the future. In this guide, archaeologist Dianne Fitzpatrick sees archaeological collections management not in terms of a last-ditch effort to solve on-site storage crises and preservation problems at the end of a project, but as a means of integrating achievable good-practice strategies into research designs and site management plans from the start, or for that matter, at any time that assist project directors and local Antiquities Directorates.

Strategies designed to protect and preserve ensure the cultural significance and research potential of artefacts is maintained throughout the archaeological process and encourages those creating, managing and preserving archaeological collections to work toward the same goals. Merging together conservation-led principles with current on-site practice in a practical manner, Managing Archaeological Collections in Middle Eastern Countries aims to be a good practice standard or checklist.

About the Author:
Dianne Fitzpatrick completed her Bachelor of Archaeology at La Trobe University in Melbourne. Her studies allowed her to explore the discovery of the historic and prehistoric past by studying archaeological objects created by our ancestors. To better engage in the archaeological process she studied contemporary field archaeology at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, zooarchaeology and ancient technologies. Her studies also focused on the archaeology of ancient civilizations examining the methods and theories used to generate archaeological knowledge. The skills she developed allowed her to critically evaluate the way to set up research projects for collecting, analysing artefacts and interpreting material remains which underpinned her doctoral research at the University of Melbourne completed in 2015. She has worked as an excavator and independent researcher at Neolithic, Neo-Assyrian, Hellenistic and Bronze Age/Iron Age archaeological sites in Israel, Jordan, Syria and Turkey.
For the Gods of Girsu: City-State Formation in Ancient Sumer by Sébastien Rey. vi+76 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 252 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913892. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913908. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

For the Gods are the opening words or incipit of the first inscribed votive artefacts dedicated to the principal deities of the Sumerian pantheon. They commemorate the construction or renovation of cities, temples, rural sanctuaries, border steles, in sum all the symbolically charged features of archaic states belonging thus metaphorically to supernatural tutelary overlords.

Girsu (present-day Tello) is one of the earliest known cities of the world together with Uruk, Eridu, and Ur, and was considered to be in the 3rd Millennium the sanctuary of the Sumerian heroic god Ningirsu who fought with the demons of the Kur (Mountain) and thus made possible the introduction of irrigation and agriculture in Sumer. Girsu was the sacred metropolis and central pole of a city-state that lay in the Southeasternmost part of the Mesopotamian floodplain.

The pioneering explorations carried out between 1877 and 1933 at Tello and the early decipherment of the Girsu cuneiform tablets were ground-breaking because they revealed the principal catalytic elements of the Sumerian takeoff – that is, a multiplicity and coalescence of major innovations, such as the appearance of a city– countryside continuum, the emergence of literacy, of bronze manufacture, and the development of monumental art and architecture.

Because of the richness of information related in particular to the city’s spatial organization and geographical setting, and thanks to the availability of recently declassified Cold War space imagery and especially the possibility to launch new explorations in Southern Iraq, Girsu stands out as a primary locale for re-analyzing through an interdisciplinary approach combining archaeological and textual evidence the origins of the Sumerian city-state.

About the Author:
Sébastien Rey is Lead archaeologist at the British Museum (Iraq Emergency Heritage Management Training Program) and Codirector of Tello-Girsu (Southern Iraq).

Reviews:
‘As a whole, this book is a useful instrument which crowns the beginning of works in the site after many years of impasse. It has the particular value of being a concise and clever synthesis of the works previously conducted on the site of Tello enriched by the new data and modern methodology, which, at the same time and in a linear way, tries to respect the Sumerian perspective on the surrounding landscape.’ – Angela Greco (BIBLIOTHECA ORIENTALIS LXXIV N° 5-6, September-December 2017)
A History of Syria in One Hundred Sites edited by Y. Kanjou and A. Tsuneki. viii+452 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 247 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913816. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913823. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £80.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents the long history of Syria through a jouney of the most important and recently-excavated archaeological sites. The sites cover over 1.8 million years and all regions in Syria; 110 academics have contributed information on 103 excavations for this volume. Based on these contributions the volume offers a detailed summary of the history of Syria, a history as important as any in terms of the development of human society. It is hoped that this knowledge will offer not only an increased understanding of the country but also act as a deterrent to the destruction of Syrian cultural heritage and facilitate the protection of Syrian sites.

Reviews:

'When Syria's magnificent cultural heritage came under threat, editors Kanjou and Tsuneki mobilised more than 110 international academics, working in all regions of the country, to produce this exhaustive reference book. ...[A] wonderful source to be endlessly mined by scholars and enthusiasts alike.' - Nicholas Bartos (Current World Archaeology, Issue #84, 2017)
The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions edited by Konstantinos Kopanias and John MacGinnis. xviii+456 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 245 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913939. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913946. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £80.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Kurdistan is home to some of the most important archaeological sites in the world, ranging from the Stone Age to the most recent past. While in earlier decades this exceptional potential did not receive the degree of attention which it merited, the past ten years has seen a burgeoning of cuttingedge archaeological field projects across the region. This volume, the outcome of a conference held at the University of Athens in November 2013, presents the results of this research. For the first time the archaeological inventory of the region is being systematically documented, laying the foundations for intensive study of the region’s settlement history. At the same time the area has seen a flourishing of excavations investigating every phase of human occupation. Together these endeavours are generating basic new data which is leading to a new understanding of the arrival of mankind, the development of agriculture, the emergence of cities, the evolution of complex societies and the forging of the great empires in this crucible of mankind.

About the Editors:
Dr. Konstantinos Kopanias studied at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Paris- Lodron University of Salzburg and the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen. He worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Athens, as adjunct faculty at the University of Crete and as an Allgemeiner Referent at the German Archaeological Institute in Athens. He works as an Assistant Professor at the Department of History and Archaeology of the University of Athens for the subject of Ancient Civilizations of the Eastern Mediterranean. Since 2011 he is the director of the excavation of the University of Athens in Tell Nader and Tell Baqrta in the Kurdistan Region in Iraq. He has coorganized several international conferences and published extensively on various aspects of the archaeology of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Near East.

Dr. John MacGinnis did both his degree and his PhD at Cambridge University and is a specialist in the archaeology and inscriptions of ancient Babylonia and Assyria, on which he has published extensively. He has worked on sites across the middle east, including Cyprus, Egypt, Iraq, Syria, Sudan and Turkey. For fifteen years he was a field director at the site of Ziyaret Tepe, the ancient Assyrian provincial capital of Tušhan. He has worked on many sites in Iraq, particularly in Iraqi Kurdistan, and has since 2011 been Archaeological Advisor to the High Commission for Erbil Citadel Revitalisation. He is currently based at the British Museum as Lead Archaeologist in a training scheme for archaeologists from across the whole of Iraq and is also a Research Associate at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research.
Palmyrena: City, Hinterland and Caravan Trade between Orient and Occident Proceedings of the Conference held in Athens, December 1-3, 2012 edited by Jørgen Christian Meyer, Eivind Heldaas Seland and Nils Anfinset. vi+184 pages; illustrated throughout with 74 colour plates. 230 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912796. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912802. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume brings together papers presented at a conference in Athens in December 2012 as a part of the Syrian-Norwegian research project Palmyrena: City, Hinterland and Caravan Trade between Orient and Occident. They reflect international research and fieldwork that was going on until the outbreak of the Syrian civil war: Interaction between pastoralism and urban societies in the Bronze Age (K. Hesse), relationship between the merchants and the Palmyrene elite (M. Sommer), the caravan route from Palmyra and the market for the goods (M. Gawlikowski), mechanisms of trade along the Silk Roads from China (M. Żuchowska), a Palmyrene diaspora in Rome and the Mediterranean network (T. Terpstra), road systems between Palmyra and the Mediterranean (P. Mior), Palmyra compared with other large cities in the East (C. Bührig), the use of magnetometry, satellite photo and radar to reveal covered structures in the city (R. Linck), a historiographical analysis of M. I. Rostovtzeff’s impact on the study of religious cult (P. Alipov), a critical discussion of the excavations of the “Hellenistic” town in Palmyra, and finds of glass (C. Ertel and R. Ployer), the ceramic material from Palmyra (C. Römer-Strehl), a new house tomb in the northern necropolis (K. Saito), vessels from banquet scenes (S. Miyashita), the genetic composition and health of the population based on osteoarchaeological and dental analysis (T. Nakahashi, K. Yoshimura, S. Wu, T. Nakahashi, S. Saito), cereal crop production in the hinterland of Palmyra based on a pollen-analysis and radiocarbon dating from a mudbrick (K. Krzywinski, J. Krzywinski).

About the Editors:
Jørgen Christian Meyer is professor in Ancient history at the University of Bergen. From 2008 to 2013 he was head of the joint Syrian-Norwegian project, “Palmyrena: City, Hinterland and Caravan Trade between Orient and Occident”. His research interests are the relations between Palmyra and the hinterland, and the connections between the Mediterranean world and the Indian Ocean and Central Asia.

Eivind Heldaas Seland is associate professor of premodern global history at the University of Bergen. He was member of the project “Palmyrena: City, Hinterland and Caravan Trade between Orient and Occident”, and is head of the research project “Mechanisms of cross-cultural interaction: Networks in the Roman Near East” (2013-2016). His research interests are the Near East and the Indian Ocean in the preslamic period, including Palmyrene trade.

Nils Anfinset is associate professor in Archaeology at the University of Bergen. He was member of the project “Palmyrena: City, Hinterland and Caravan Trade between Orient and Occident”. His research interests are pastoral nomadism, Neolithic, Chalcolithic and early Bronze Age in the Middle East, and metallurgy.
Medieval Rural Settlements in the Syrian Coastal Region (12th and 13th Centuries) by Balázs Major. xvi+270 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 205 2016 Archaeolingua Central European Archaeological Heritage Series 9. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912048. £52.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912055. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £52.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is the result of more than a dozen years of research in the field of the hitherto unstudied medieval settlement pattern of the Syrian coastal region in the 12th and 13th centuries. The conclusions presented in this work were reached with the combined use of several source types including medieval documents, travellers’ accounts, former research, map evidence, toponymy, archive and satellite photographs, oral sources and extensive archaeological field surveys accompanied by documentation between the years 2000 and 2015. After enumerating the historical events that influenced the settlement pattern of the coast, its centres, including the towns and castles (with special regard to the smaller fortifications of the countryside that seem to have been a Frankish introduction to the area) are analysed. Following the detailed examination of the written sources and the architectural material preserved at these lesser sites, a closer look at the villages and their environment aims to draw a general picture on the density of settlements and their basic characteristics. The book also discusses communication lines and provides an assessment of the medieval population that inhabited the region in the 12th and 13th centuries. The text is accompanied by a collection of maps, plan drawings, tables and illustrations on a selected number of sites visited during the field surveys.

Reviews:

'...Major supplies a goldmine of photographs, diagrams and archaeological drawings, all of which stand as testimony to the rigour of his and his team’s research and which will doubtlessly be invaluable resources for future historians.
Overall, this is an impressive and hardworking text, of high value. It is only to be hoped that the current horrendous situation in Syria might resolve itself swiftly so that Major can continue this ground-breaking work.'
– Nicholas Morton (Medieval Archaeology, 2017)
Monumental Earthen Architecture in Early Societies: Technology and power display Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September, Burgos, Spain): Volume 2 / Session B3 edited by Annick Daneels. iv+64 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. 213 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912833. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912840. Book contents pageDownload

The theme of the symposium is the archaeology of earthen architecture in pre- and protohistoric cultures, with an emphasis on constructive techniques and systems, and diachronic changes in those aspects. The main interest is in monumental architecture (not domestic), where it is better possible to appreciate the building strategies that show raw earth to be as noble a material as stone or wood, but with its very own characteristics which required the development of original solutions and construction techniques. The scope on monumental buildings also allows analyzing the political, social and economical factors that made such architecture a recognized expression of societal values and political power.
Metallurgical Production in Northern Eurasia in the Bronze Age by Stanislav Grigoriev. 831 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 6 2015 Access Archaeology . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912758. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912369. Book contents pageDownload

Copper is the first metal to play a large part in human history. This work is devoted to the history of metallurgical production in Northern Eurasia during the Bronze Age, based on experiments carried out by the author and analyses of ancient slag, ore and metal. It should be noted that archaeometallurgical studies include a huge range of works reflecting different fields of activity of ancient metallurgists. Often, all that unites these is the term ‘metallurgy’. This work considers the problems of proper metallurgy, i.e. extracting metal from ore. A number of accompanying operations are closely connected with it, such as charcoal-burning, ore dressing, furnace constructing, and preparation of crucibles. In some instances the author touches upon these operations; however the main topic of the work is the smelting process. The closing stage of the metallurgical production is metalworking including various casting and forging operations, and also auxiliary operations: making of crucibles, casting molds, stone tools for metal forging. These problems are, as a rule, out of frameworks of this research.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Bronze ‘Bathtub’ Coffins In the Context of 8th-6th Century BC Babylonian, Assyrian and Elamite Funerary Practices by Yasmina Wicks. vi+168 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 181 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911744. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911751. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is dedicated to a small number of unique bronze ‘bathtub’ coffins found in 8th–6th century BC Babylonian, Assyrian and Elamite burial contexts. Usually treated as an incidental aspect of the burial process, these fascinating burial receptacles have until now garnered little in the way of academic interest. Here the author takes the opportunity to further explore the coffins, drawing together the widely dispersed information on their archaeological contexts, investigating the method and place of their manufacture, and establishing a possible date range for their production and use. To progress towards an understanding of the bronze ‘bathtub’ coffin burials within the broader context of regional funerary practices, they are then incorporated into an analysis of Neo-Babylonian, Neo-Assyrian and Neo-Elamite funerary ritual and belief. Finally the coffins are placed within the historical framework of these regions’ socio-political interaction in an attempt to establish whether they represent a shared funerary tradition. Underpinning this study is the principle that mortuary evidence is the product of intentional behaviour; that the bronze ‘bathtub’ coffins represent a deliberate choice by the burying group and each would have featured in an emotionally and symbolically charged burial act.
Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 44 2014 Papers from the forty-seventh meeting, London, 26–28 July 2013 edited by Robert Hoyland and Sarah Morris. 357 pages; illustrated in colour and black and white.. PSAS44 2014. ISBN 9781905739806. £65.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Please refer to the ‘contents’ button for a pdf listing of the titles of the published papers.
Languages of Southern Arabia Supplement to the Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 44 2014 edited by Orhan Elmaz and Janet C.E. Watson. 153 pages.. PSAS. ISBN 9781905739813. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Please refer to the ‘contents’ button for a pdf listing of the titles of the published papers.
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