​​ We use cookies to enhance your experience on our site. By continuing to use the site you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy & Cookies.​

 
Archaeopress logo
Archaeopress Publishing Ltd, Summertown Pavilion, 18-24 Middle Way, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7LG, England
tel +44 (0) 1865 311914 fax +44 (0) 1865 512231   email: info@archaeopress.com
Monthly AP Alert - join our mailing list today Archaeopress on Facebook Archaeopress on Twitter Archaeopress on Linked In Archaeopress Blog
Home  
|
  Browse by Subject  
|
  Browse by Series  
|
  Catalogues  
|
  Join Our Mailing List  
|
  Visit Our Blog  
|
  Login (Private Customers)  
|
  Login (Institutional Subscriptions)  
|
  View Basket

Search

title, author, ISBN, keyword

Browse for books in the following languages

ARCHAEOPRESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ACCESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ARCHAEOPRESS JOURNALS
DISTRIBUTED
PUBLISHERS
DIGITAL EDITIONS
OPEN ACCESS PLATFORM
Ordering Information
About Us
Publish With Us
Standing Orders
Trade Sales
Contact Us
Request Review Copy
NEW: The Mycenaean Cemetery at Achaia Clauss near Patras People, material remains and culture in context by Constantinos Paschalidis with contributions by Photini J. P. McGeorge and Wiesław Więckowski. Paperback; 205x290mm; xxiv+510 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (277 plates in colour). (Print RRP £90.00). 436 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919191. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919207. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Mycenaean Cemetery at Achaia Clauss near Patras: People, material remains and culture in context comprises the study of the finds from the excavation of the Mycenaean cemetery of Clauss near Patras, carried out by the University of Ioannina and the Archaeological Society at Athens from 1988 to 1992, under the direction of Professor Thanassis Papadopoulos. In the course of the excavation project, fifteen chambered tombs were located and researched in detail, to be added to those already known from the pre-war excavations by Nikolaos Kyparissis. The presentation of the topic expands into seven thematic chapters: from a general review of the cemetery space and the sites, to analytical description of the excavation, remarks on the architecture, study of the finds, analysis of the burial customs and finally, narration of the overall history of the cemetery according to chronological period and generation of its occupants. The eighth and last chapter is an addendum including a brief presentation of the anthropological analysis of the skeletal material by Photini J. P. McGeorge and Wiesław Więckowski. The Mycenaean cemetery at Achaia Clauss near Patras presents fragments of the life and death of some members of a local community that existed for almost four centuries at the western end of the Mycenaean world.

About the Author
CONSTANTINOS PASCHALIDIS was born in Athens in 1973. He studied History at the Ionian University, Corfu, and Archaeology at the University of Ioannina, where he successfully composed his doctoral thesis on the Mycenaean cemetery at Clauss, near Patras. Starting in 1992 he has participated in and worked for several archaeological projects (excavations, surveys and study-seasons) in Crete, Keos, Kythnos, Achaea, Argolid, Kefalonia, Ithaca, Corfu, Chalkidiki in Greece, as well as at the sites of Ghor as Safi and Tell Kafrein in Jordan. Since 2002 he is a Curator of Antiquities at the Department of Prehistoric, Egyptian, Cypriot and Near Eastern Collections of the National Archaeological Museum at Athens, and from 2012 he holds the position of Secretary at the Central Archaeological Council of the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports. Paschalidis.
NEW: Etnicidad vs. Aculturación: Las necrópolis castellanas de los siglos V-VI d.C. y el asentamiento visigodo en la Península Ibérica. Una mirada desde la meseta sur by Rafael Barroso Cabrera. Paperback; 203x276mm; 238 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Spanish text with English summary. (Print RRP £35.00). 72 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690798. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690804. Book contents pageDownload

The Visigoth settlement in the Iberian Peninsula and its relationship with the archaeological record of the 5th-6th centuries AD continues to be one of the most controversial issues in Spanish archaeology. The controversy relates to politics as much as it relates to archaeological research with two points remaining particularly controversial: the alleged use of the Visigoth past by the Francoist intelligentsia as an ideological affirmation of the regime and the contribution of archaeologist Julio Martínez Santa-Olalla in supporting and enabling this re-interpretation of Visigothic archaeology.

The purely archaeological aspect of the controversy relates to an archaeological interpretation, stemming from the ranks of the so-called New Archeology, of the Castilian necropoleis containing grave goods of Pontic-Danubian type. This interpretation places special emphasis on social and cultural phenomena above the ethnic criteria defended by the Vienna School.

This volume approaches the ideological question that underlies these controversies, as well as their repercussions in the direction adopted by later archaeological investigations in relation to the history of Spain. The author attempts to deconstruct the work of Martínez Santa-Olalla and places it in the context of the scientific production of his time. At the same time, it relativizes the role played by the Visigoth period in the Francoist ideological construction.

Once the discussion is framed in these terms, the author dedicates his study to a refutation of the cultural interpretation of the phenomenon of the Visigothic necropoleis of the Castilian plateau based on the archaeological data and by comparing this data with literary sources. The study also addresses two other historical problems that could be related to the Gothic settlement in the Castilian plateau: the creation of the bishopric of Segovia and the flourishing of the city of Toledo.

El asentamiento visigodo en la Península Ibérica y su relación con el registro arqueológico de los siglos V-VI d.C. continúa siendo en la actualidad una de las cuestiones más controvertidas de la arqueología española. Gran parte de esa controversia tiene que ver con aspectos que trascienden a la propia investigación arqueológica y nos sitúan en el plano de la política. Así, a la hora de abordar el problema hay dos puntos que han resultado especialmente polémicos: la presunta utilización del pasado visigodo por parte de la intelectualidad franquista como afirmación ideológica del régimen y la contribución del arqueólogo burgalés Julio Martínez Santa-Olalla en la fijación del esquema de arqueología visigoda.

Por otro lado, el aspecto puramente arqueológico de la controversia tiene que ver con la interpretación que desde las filas de la denominada New Archaeology se viene realizando de las necrópolis castellanas con ajuares de tipo póntico-danubiano. Dicha interpretación hace especial hincapié en fenómenos sociales y culturales por encima de los criterios étnicos defendidos por la Escuela de Viena. El presente estudio aborda de forma lúcida la cuestión ideológica que subyace detrás de la polémica, así como las repercusiones que ha tenido en la posterior dirección adoptada por la investigación arqueológica en relación con la propia historia de España. En este sentido, el autor realiza un ejercicio de deconstrucción de la figura de Martínez Santa-Olalla y lo sitúa en el contexto de la producción científica de su época. Al mismo tiempo, relativiza el papel desempeñado por el periodo visigodo en la construcción ideológica franquista.

Una vez situada la discusión en estos términos, el autor dedica su estudio a una refutación de la interpretación en clave cultural del fenómeno de las necrópolis visigodas de la meseta castellana desde los propios datos arqueológicos y a partir del cotejo de estos datos con los testimonios que proporcionan las fuentes literarias. Además, el presen
NEW: Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 3 2018 edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). Paperback; vi+526 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (107 colour plates). 3 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690316. £60.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690323. £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now


NEW: KOINON: The International Journal of Classical Numismatic Studies Volume 1, 2018 Inaugural Issue edited by Nicholas J. Molinari (General Editor); Shawn Caza, Lloyd W.H. Taylor (Associate Editors). Paperback; 220x280mm; vi+152 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (45 plates in colour). 1 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690293. £35.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690309. £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

As the name indicates, KOINON is a journal that encourages contributions to the study of classical numismatics from a wide variety of perspectives. The journal will include papers concerning iconography, die studies, provenance research, forgery analysis, translations of excerpts from antiquarian works, specialized bibliographies, corpora of rare varieties and types, ethical questions on laws and collecting, book reviews, and more. The editorial advisory board is made up of members from all over the world, with a broad range of expertise covering virtually all the major categories of classical numismatics from archaic Greek coinage to late Medieval coinage.

Table of contents for the inaugural issue:
Why a New Journal in Classical Numismatics? An Editorial by Nicholas J. Molinari

GREEK NUMISMATICS
Sophocles’ Trachiniae and the Apotheosis of Herakles: The Importance of Acheloios and Some Numismatic Confirmations – by Nicholas J. Molinari
Provenance Lost and Found: Alfred Bourguignon – by John Voukelatos
A Philip III Tetradrachm Die Pair Recycled by Seleukos I – by Lloyd W.H. Taylor
Blundered Era Date on Coin of Arados, Civic Year 119 – by Martin Rowe

ROMAN NUMISMATICS
Sotto l’egida di Minerva: Echi monetali delle imprese britanniche da Cesare ai Severi – by Luigi Pedroni
A Doubted Variety of M. Aemilius Scaurus and P. Plautius Hypsaeus Vindicated – by Jordan Montgomery and Richard Schaefer
Redating Nepotian’s Usurpation and the Coinage of Magnentius – by Shawn Caza
A previously unrecorded reverse for Constantine I – by Victor Clark

ORIENTAL NUMISMATICS
The Dating and the Sequence of the Persid Frataraka Revisited – by Wilhelm Müseler
The Kilwa Coins of Sultan al-Ḥasan ibn Sulaymān in their Historical Context – by N.J.C. Smith
An Introduction to Parthian Silver Fractions, The Little Anomalies of Arsacid Coinage – by Bob Langnas
An interesting denaro tornese of the Barons Revolt of 1459-1464 and some considerations regarding Nicola II di Monforte – by Andrei Bontas

A CATALOG OF NEW VARIETIES
NEW: Die Bleifunde der römisch-republikanischen Anlage von Sanisera, Menorca Archäologische und archäometrische Analyse by Regine Müller. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+248 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (54 plates in colour). 462 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 46. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919887. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919894. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume includes the archaeological and archaeometrical analysis of the lead finds from the Roman Republican military fort of Sanisera in northern Minorca. The fort was built after the Roman conquest of the island in 123 BC and abandoned during the last third of the 1st century BC. By correlating typological-archaeological and scientific methods, the site’s unusual large number of lead objects/artefacts are examined within their find context and reviewed for superregional connections to contemporary sites within the Mediterranean. Furthermore, based upon the results of the find analyses as well as the examination of written sources, the site’s embedding within the historical context of the development of the late Roman Republic and early Imperial times is presented, especially in respect to the conquest of the Mediterranean and the consolidation of the Roman authority there.

Die vorliegende Arbeit umfasst die archäologische und archäometrische Analyse der Bleifunde der römisch-republikanischen Militäranlage von Sanisera im Norden Menorcas. Die Anlage entstand nach 123 v. Chr. in Folge der Eroberungen der Baleareninseln und wurde spätestens im letzten Drittel des 1. Jh. v. Chr. aufgegeben. Anhand der Korrelation typologisch-archäologischer und naturwissenschaftlicher Methoden wird hier die ungewöhnlich hohe Anzahl von Bleifunden aus der Anlage innerhalb ihres Fundkontextes analysiert und auf überregionale Verbindungen zu kontemporären Fundorten im Mittelmeerraum überprüft. Darüber hinaus erfolgt - basierend auf den Ergebnissen der Fundanalyse sowie der Auswertung von Schriftquellen - die Einbindung der Anlage in den historischen Kontext der späten römischen Republik und frühen Kaiserzeit, besonders im Zusammenhang mit der Eroberung des Mittelmeerraums und der Konsolidierung der römischen Vorherrschaft dort.

About the Author
REGINE MÜLLER studied Early- and Prehistorical Archaeology, Medieval History and Philosophy at the Justus-Liebig-University in Giessen. Her Magister thesis encompassed the archaeological analyses of the early medieval graveyard of Sindelsdorf, district of Weilheim-Schongau. The author participated at the excavations of the Roman military fort in Sanisera, Menorca for several years. Resulting from this, the study of the site’s lead objects within the frame of a PhD thesis at the Goethe-University in Frankfurt was undertaken. She still researches isotope analyses of lead slingshots and has been working for several years now as an archaeologist in Germany.

REGINE MÜLLER hat an der Justus-Liebig-Universität in Gießen Vor- und Frühgeschichte, Mittlere Geschichte und Philosophie studiert. Ihre Magisterarbeit behandelte die archäologische Analyse des frühmittelalterlichen Gräberfeldes von Sindelsdorf, Kr. Weilheim-Schongau. Aus der mehrjährigen Grabungstätigkeit in der römischen Militäranlage von Sanisera im Norden Menorcas ging die vorliegende Untersuchung zu deren Bleifunden im Rahmen einer Dissertation an der Goethe-Universität-Frankfurt hervor. Die Studien zur Bleiisotopenanalyse, vornehmlich von Schleuderbleien, setzte sie auch im Anschluss an die Dissertation weiter fort. Seit mehreren Jahren ist sie in Deutschland als Archäologin tätig.
NEW: To Die in Style! The Residential Lifestyle of Feasting and Dying in Iron Age Stamna, Greece by Gioulika-Olga Christakopoulou. Paperback; 175x245pp; ii+77 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 445 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919351. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919368. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £22.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Symposium in Stamna both as a concept and as a process involved the presence of prominent citizens of the social establishment, as testified by the large cauldrons, tripod jars and tripod vessels present. This study re-examines the cemeteries studied to date, isolating tombs with unique architecture or peculiar structures with individual features, in order to investigate the complex identity of the elite group ideologies.

The finding and studying of such a large number of PRG tombs (500 ca) presents a good representative example for discussing the perception of death, and how it was confronted through the mourning ritual. The data also presents an opportunity to examine the creation of individual and collective memory in a population that operated in this privileged location, redefining as such the cultural landscape of the Protogeometric era. The pre-existing theoretical framework, the methodology of the managing and displaying of grief and their correlation with already-studied and exalted geographical parallels, integrate Stamna into the cultural chain of populations ruled by an overall-systematic design of a particular cultural ideology.

About the Author
GIOULIKA-OLGA CHRISTAKOPOULOU was born in Patras in 1968 and holds a degree in History and Archaeology from the University of Ioannina, and a PhD in Archaeology from the National Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. For the past twenty-five years she has been working as an archaeologist in the Ephorate of Antiquities in Achaia, Greece. She also worked as a Lecturer until 2014, teaching ‘Ancient Monumental Topography’ in the Department of Museology, Museography and Exhibition Planning, at the University of Applied Studies, Western Greece. She has dedicated special attention to the study of the Iron Age in Ancient Stamna, Aetolia, and her research and publications focus on the population movement, burial architecture and burial rituals of this period.
NEW: Repensar el colonialismo: Iberia, de colonia a potencia colonial edited by Beatriz Marín-Aguilera. Paperback; 148x210mm; 416 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Spanish text. 24 2018. ISBN 9788416725137. £15.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

This book brings together historians, anthropologists and archaeologists to rethink colonialism in a cross-sectional way, from ancient times to contemporary times.

El libro “Repensar el colonialismo. Iberia, de colonia a potencia colonial” reúne historiadores, antropólogos y arqueólogos para repensar el colonialismo de una manera transversal, desde la época antigua hasta la época contemporánea. Desde el estudio de la cultura material y de fuentes escritas hasta el trabajo en archivos, los y las autoras analizan las imbricadas relaciones socioeconómicas, culturales y de poder existentes entre las comunidades colonizadoras y las colonizadas.
NEW: The Palace Lady’s Summerhouse and other inside stories from a vanishing Turkey by Patricia Daunt. Hardback with Dust Jacket; 210x260mm; 304 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. 5 2017. ISBN 9780995756601. £25.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

From Istanbul's palatial old embassies to its glorious Bosphorus summerhouses, from Ottoman Paris to Ankara's Art Deco, from rainforest mansions to a mad mosque in the mountains... a diplomat's wife reveals their secret histories. This book brings together essays by Patricia Daunt written over the past 25 years for Cornucopia Magazine. It concludes with her latest article, on the magnificent ruins of Aphrodisias, newly listed as a World Heritage Site but long one of her greatest loves. The images are by internationally renowned photographers, including Fritz von der Schulenburg, Simon Upton, Cemal Emden and Jean-Marie del Moral. Foreword by John Julius Norwich.

About the Author
Patricia Daunt is a writer, married to a former ambassador to Turkey, Sir Timothy Daunt; they first met when both were stationed at the British Embassy in Ankara in 1960. Over the past sixty years she has travelled widely in Turkey, often on horse or foot, acquiring a deep knowledge of its history and civilizations. She has introduced parties of enthusiasts to Turkey's archaeological and architectural treasures, as well as its indigenous plants and trees. But her abiding interest remains the ancient city of Aphrodisias. Since 1993, she has been chairman of the Friends of Aphrodisias Trust, a British charity that supports archaeological projects at the site, in the southwest of Turkey.

Reviews
".a record of her expertise and enthusiasms, whose coffee-table dimensions belie its scholarly contents."--Yasmine Seale (Times Literary Supplement) (03/01/2018)

"[This is] much more than a beautifully illustrated book: it's about the people who lived - and live - in these buildings... a love letter to a country and to a world that has been almost completely swallowed up by tourism, new money and development.""--Owen Matthews (The Spectator) (12/01/2017)

Table of Contents
Foreword

PALACES OF DIPLOMACY
1 The Winter Palaces The Pera Embassies

WINDOW ON THE BOSPHORUS
2 Boating with Billy
3 The Summer Palaces: The Bosphorus Embassies
4 The Jewel Box: The Çürüksulu Mehmet Pasha Yalı
5 The Vizier’s Retreat: The Kıbrıslı Yalı
6 A Room for the Books: Ahmed Vefik Pasha’s Library
7 Water’s Edge: The Hekimbaşı Yalı
8 The Talk of the Bosphorus: The Zeki Pasha Yalı
9 Some Enchanted Evenings: The Ratip Efendi Yalı
10 The House that Came out of the Blue: The Germen Yalı
11 In the Spirit’s Wake: Sumahan on the Water
12 The Palace Lady’s Summerhouse: The Ethem Pertev Yalı

TRAVELS IN ANATOLIA
13 The Country Houses that Ride the Storm
14 The Lake that Time Forgot
15 Sublime Portals The Great Mosque and Hospital of Divriği

SECRET ANKARA
16 A Brave New World The Embassies’ Big Move to Ankara
17 Fly in the Face of Fashion Ankara’s Hidden Assets

PARIS A LA TURQUE
18 Treasures of a Lost Dynasty
19 From Lunacy to Diplomacy 276

APHRODISIAS REBORN
20 City of Aphrodite

Acknowledgements and glossary
Index
FORTHCOMING: The Hypogeum of the Aurelii A new interpretation as the collegiate tomb of professional scribae by John Bradley. Paperback; 205x290mm; xiv+192 pages; 4 tables, 136 figures (81 plates in colour). (Print RRP £38.00). 486 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 50. ISBN 9781789690477. Buy Now

The Hypogeum of the Aurelii: A new interpretation as the collegiate tomb of professional scribae examines the frescoes of one of the most enigmatic funerary monuments of ancient Rome. The three chambers of the Hypogeum of the Aurelii, so-named from an mosaic inscription in one of the surviving chambers, contain a varied series of images that have long been considered an example of early Christian or Gnostic iconography. One hundred years after the monument’s discovery Dr Bradley challenges earlier theories and concludes that far from having religious significance the pictures reveal a world of professional pride among a group of what we might today call ‘white collar workers’. Although not among the rich and famous of Imperial Rome, the deceased nevertheless rose from a state of slavery to positions within the bureaucracy at the centre of an empire at its height. Although part of a strictly hierarchical, and male-dominated, society the community to which the Aurelii belonged provided an environment of comparative equality: a community that acknowledged the contribution and expertise of both women and children in their profession. The pride in their achievement is reflected in the decoration of the tomb in which they expected to spend eternity. This study, the first in modern times to examine all the extant images in detail, will be of interest, not only to historians of ancient Roman art, but also to social historians who wish to more fully understand the lives of those who helped support the running of an empire.

About the Author
JOHN W. BRADLEY was born in Birmingham in 1956. He graduated with a degree in Construction and Economics before embarking on a thirty year career in the construction industry primarily in London and the Middle East. During the 1990s he was also involved in environmental politics using his background in industry to challenge the conventional rationale behind many of today’s political and economic decisions. Changing profession in 2005 Dr Bradley gained a first-class degree and Masters in Classics at Royal Holloway College, University of London with dissertations on early Christian art and republican Roman religion. In 2011 he commenced his PhD at the same college, initially under the supervision of Professor Amanda Claridge then Dr Zena Kamash. An initial project on the broader aspects of the evolution of art in the catacombs of Rome ultimately focused on the frescoes that make up the subject of this book when existing theories and explanations appeared unsatisfactory. In addition to his interest in the art of ancient Rome his interests include classical music, military history and environmentalism. He has lived in Brentford, west London for thirty years where he shares a home and allotment with his wife Susan.
FORTHCOMING: Greek Art in Motion Studies in honour of Sir John Boardman on the occasion of his 90th Birthday edited by Rui Morais, Delfim Leão, Diana Rodríguez Pérez with Daniela Ferreira. Paperback; iv+528pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (230 colour plates). (Print RRP £75.00). 485 2018. ISBN 9781789690231. Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication on Greek Art gathers a large number of studies presented at the International Congress ‘Greek Art in Motion’. Held in honour of Sir John Boardman’s 90th birthday, the congress took place at the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, 3-5 May, 2017.

The volume first presents eight contributions by the keynote speakers who, as friends and students of Sir John, present a debate and a problematisation of Greek Art from the archaeological and historical point of view.

Thereafter, 45 papers are divided into the different themes considered during the congress, all of which have greatly benefited from Sir John's researches throughout his long and distinguished academic career: Sculpture, Architecture, Terracotta and Metal, Greek Pottery, Coins, Greek History and Archaeology, Greeks Overseas, Reception and Collecting, Art and Myth.

About the Editors
RUI MORAIS was born in Porto in 1969 and has a degree in History, variant of Archaeology from the University of Coimbra. He has a Masters in Urban Archaeology, PhD in Archaeology, Technology and Materials from University of Minho. He was Professor at Minho University and is currently an Assistant Professor with Aggregation at the Faculty of Arts, Oporto University. Among his research, he has dedicated special attention to the study of trade in antiquity, with numerous published works, individually or with other national and foreign authors. He is researcher in the Classical and Humanistic Centre at Coimbra University (CECH). He was a consultant of the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation for antiques. He is a member of the Scientific Committee of the IBERIA GRAEGA Project.

DELFIM LEÃO is a Professor at the Institute of Classical Studies and a researcher at the Center for Classical and Humanistic Studies, University of Coimbra. His main areas of interest are ancient history, law and political theory of the Greeks, theatrical pragmatics, and the ancient novel. He also has a strong interest in digital humanities. Among his main recent works are D. F. Leão and P. J. Rhodes, ‘The Laws of Solon. A new Edition, with Introduction, Translation and Commentary’ (London, I. B. Tauris, 2015), and a second revised edition in 2016; D. F. Leão and G. Thür (Hrsg.) ‘Symposion 2015. Vorträge zur griechischen und hellenistischen Rechtsgeschichte’ (Wien, Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2016). Along with Lautaro Roig Lanzillotta, he is the editor of Brill’s ‘Plutarch Studies’.

DIANA RODRÍGUEZ PÉREZ is a Junior Research Fellow at Mougins Museum in Classical Art and Material Culture at Wolfson College, University of Oxford, and was previously the Research Assistant for the Beazley Archive Pottery Database at the Classical Art Research Centre. Before moving to Oxford, she held a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Edinburgh (FECYT). She received a PhD (Doctor Europaea) from the University of León, Spain (The Snake in the Ancient Greek World: Myth, Rite and Image), an MPhil in History of Art from the University of León, and an MPhil in Archaeology and Heritage from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. From 2010 to 2011 she worked as a translator at the European Parliament in Luxemburg, and was a DAAD Fellow at the Institut für klassische Archäologie of the University of Heidelberg from 2008 to 2009. In the summer of 2017 she was Tytus Scholar at the Department of Classical Studies of the University of Cincinnati (US).

DANIELA FERREIRA is currently a PhD student at the Department of Prehistory, Ancient History and Archeology of Complutense University of Madrid, Spain, and a researcher at UI&D CITCEM - Transdisciplinary Research Centre «Culture, Space and Memory», Portugal. She is also a recipient of a FCT (Portuguese national funding agency for science, research and technology) grant since 2015. Daniela holds a Master’s degree in Archaeology from the University of Oporto (Portugal), with a focus
FORTHCOMING: Practices of Personal Adornment in Neolithic Greece Πρακτικές Προσωπικής Κόσμησης στη Νεολιθική Ελλάδα by Fotis Ifantidis. Paperback; xxxvi+596 pages; 121 figures + fully illustrated catalogue (31 plates in colour). Greek text with English Summary. (Print RRP £80.00). 75 2019. ISBN 9781789691139. Book contents pageBuy Now

The objective of this book is the reconsideration of the practices of personal adornment during the Neolithic period in Greece, through the assemblage, extensive bibliographic documentation, and critical evaluation of all the available data deriving from more than a hundred sites in the mainland and the Aegean islands –an archaeological archive of wide geographical and chronological scope. In addition, a thorough study of the personal ornament corpus from the Middle-Late Neolithic Dispilio in Kastoria, an important lakeside settlement in north-western Greece, was conducted.

The book begins with an overview of the anthropological and archaeological literature on theoretical and methodological issues concerning practices of personal adornment. Then follows an examination of the problems and key points of study regarding personal adornment in Neolithic Greece, as well as a critical evaluation of the methodological approaches and classification schemes that have been applied in previous archaeological works. Subsequently, the technologies and processes of production, consumption, recycling, deposition, and distribution of personal ornaments in Neolithic Greece are discussed. Finally, the social correlates of personal adornment are explored, as they are reflected in the choice of different raw materials (shell, clay, bone, stone, and metal) and ornament types (beads, pendants, annulets, and so forth).

About the Author
FOTIS IFANTIDIS studied archaeology at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. His academic research is focused on personal adornment practices in prehistory, and on the interplay between photography and archaeology, with case studies the Athenian Acropolis, the ancient city of Kalaureia on the island of Poros, and the Neolithic settlements of Dispilio and Koutroulou Magoula. Among his publications are Spondylus in Prehistory (co-authored with M. Nikolaidou), Camera Kalaureia (co-authored with Y. Hamilakis) and Archaeographies: Excavating Neolithic Dispilio.

Greek description
Στόχος του βιβλίου είναι η επανεξέταση των πρακτικών προσωπικής κόσμησης κατά τη νεολιθική περίοδο στην Ελλάδα μέσω της επανεκτίμησης των διαθέσιμων στοιχείων που προέρχονται από περισσότερες από εκατό ανεσκαμμένες νεολιθικές θέσεις, καθώς και η λεπτομερειακή μελέτη του corpus κοσμημάτων που προέρχονται από τη λιμναία θέση της Μέσης-Νεότερης Νεολιθικής περιόδου στ&#
FORTHCOMING: NVMINA MAGNA: Roma e il culto dei Grandi Dei di Samotracia by Emiliano Cruccas. Paperback; 175x245mm; 170pp; 1 table, 73 figures (21 plates in colour). Italian text throughout. 507 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . ISBN 9781789690910. Buy Now

The cult of the Great Gods of Samothrace, which became popular starting as early as the 7th century BC in the eastern Mediterranean, is characterised by regional differences concerning cultural manifestations and relationships with local deities. Confused and identified with the so-called Cabiri, these deities had their main sanctuaries on the islands of Samothrace and Lemnos and in Thebes, in Boeotia. The connection between these deities and others like Dioscuri, Penates and Lares and their protective function seem to be a key to understanding the complex syncretism that characterises the cult of the Great Gods from the period of Roman conquests in the Eastern world. The literary sources seem to highlight, in fact, in the period in which the interests in the Eastern world are crucial to the foreign policy of Rome, an evident attempt to identify the Kabiroi of Samothrace with typically Roman gods like Lares and Penates. The aim of this book is to underline the main aspects of the cult in light of the influences of Roman cultural and mythological substratum.

Il culto dei Grandi Dei di Samotracia, diffuso nel Mediterraneo orientale a partire almeno dal VII secolo a.C., è caratterizzato da differenze nei diversi bacini geografici, sia per ciò che concerne le manifestazioni culturali, sia per quanto riguarda i rapporti con le divinità locali. Confusi ed identificati con i cosiddetti Cabiri, queste divinità avevano i loro principali santuari sulle isole di Samotracia e Lemno e a Tebe di Beozia. La loro connessione con i Dioscuri, i Penati e i Lari e la loro funzione protettiva sembrano essere la chiave di lettura per comprendere il complesso sincretismo che caratterizza il culto dei Grandi Dei a partire dalla conquista romana del Mediterraneo occidentale. Le fonti letterarie sembrano evidenziare, infatti, nel periodo nel quale le azioni di politica estera di Roma si concentrano in Oriente, una forte volontà di identificare gli dei di Samotracia con divinità tipicamente romane come Lari e Penati. Lo scopo di questo libro è quello di mettere in evidenza i principali aspetti del culto attraverso l’analisi delle influenze del sostrato culturale e mitologico di Roma.

About the Author
EMILIANO CRUCCAS completed his degree (2002) and his specialisation in Classical Archaeology (2006) at the University of Cagliari and received his PhD (2011) from the University of Tübingen (with a thesis on the cult of the Kabiroi and Great Gods). He worked on a two-year contract at the Young Researchers project at the University of Cagliari and holds a three-year postdoctoral grant. He is now (2013-present day) field director for the ISTHMOS excavation project in the Punic-roman city of Nora (south Sardinia).

EMILIANO CRUCCAS ha conseguito presso l’Università di Cagliari la laurea (2002) e la specializzazione in Archeologia Classica (2006). È Dottore di ricerca con una tesi sul culto dei Cabiri e dei Grandi Dei discussa all’Università di Tübingen (2011). Ha svolto ricerca presso l’Università di Cagliari con un contratto di due anni per Giovani Ricercatori e con un assegno di ricerca di tre anni. Attualmente dirige sul campo il progetto di scavo ISTHMOS nella città punico-romana di Nora (sud Sardegna).
FORTHCOMING: De la provincia Celtiberia a la qūrā de Santabariyya: Arqueología de la Antigüedad tardía en la provincia de Cuenca (siglos V-VIII d.C.) by Rafael Barroso Cabrera. Paperback; 205x290mm; 630pp; 174 figures, 5 tables, 2 maps, 80 plates (black & white throughout). Spanish text with extended English summary. (Print RRP £75.00). 498 2019. ISBN 9781789690644. Buy Now

The central position of the province of Cuenca, Spain, was a decisive factor in its relationship with Toledo, the capital of the Visigothic kingdom. Also, its location meant that, from the middle of the 6th Century, it was directly affected by some of the most relevant historical episodes of those times: the foundation of the royal city of Reccopoli, the establishment of the Servitanus monastery, the transformation of Toledo as the metropolitan seat of the Carthaginian province and the military campaigns against the imperial forces. Parallel to this, archaeological excavations document a process of disrupting the old urban centres in favour of small populations within their municipal territory. This process was resolved with a shift of power centres towards other cities supported by the political power of Toledo: Toledo itself in the case of Segobriga, Reccopoli in the Arcavica’s case and Illunum to the detriment of Valeria. In this way, the ancient Roman cities were reduced to serve as a symbolic reference of the small villages that developed in the shadow of the old urban centres. This volume presents a historical and archaeological study of the province of Cuenca in Late Antiquity. The study concludes with an examination of the archaeological collection from the province, which has been divided into three large groups: monumental sculpture and epigraphic items, ceramic productions and metalwork arts. The first group is mainly constituted by the findings made in the excavations of Cabeza de Griego (Segobriga). Most of the pottery productions correspond to vessels placed as funerary deposits. Due to the absence of excavations, the ceramics for kitchen and storage use are hardly represented, whereas there is an overrepresentation of types destined for use as libations or offerings. Finally, most of the elements of industrial arts correspond to elements of the Latin-Mediterranean fashion or Byzantine style of the 7th Century. The almost total absence of materials corresponding to the Pontic-Danubian fashion also should be noted.

La posición central de la provincia de Cuenca ha sido el factor determinante en su relación con Toledo, la capital del reino visigodo. Esta situación fue la causa también de que, desde mediados del siglo VI, se viera directamente afectada por algunos de los episodios históricos más relevantes del momento: la fundación de la ciudad regia de Recópolis, el establecimiento del monasterio Servitano, la transformación de Toledo en sede metropolitana de la provincia cartaginesa y las campañas militares contra los ejércitos imperiales. De forma paralela, las excavaciones arqueológicas documentan un proceso de desestructuración de los antiguos centros urbanos a favor de pequeñas poblaciones de su territorio. Este proceso se resolvió con un cambio de centros de poder hacia otras ciudades apoyadas por el poder político de Toledo: Toledo mismo en el caso de Segóbriga, Recópolis en el caso de Arcávica e Illunum en detrimento de Valeria. De este modo, las ciudades romanas quedaron reducidas servir como referentes simbólicos de las pequeñas poblaciones que se desarrollaron a la sombra de los antiguos centros urbanos. El presente trabajo se completa con el estudio de la colección arqueológica procedente de la provincia, que se ha dividido en tres grandes grupos: escultura monumental y epigrafía, producciones cerámicas y artes industriales. El primer grupo está constituido principalmente por los hallazgos realizados en las excavaciones de Cabeza de Griego (Segóbriga). Por otro lado, la mayoría de las producciones de cerámica corresponden a vasijas colocadas como depósitos funerarios. Debido a la ausencia de excavaciones, la cerámica de cocina y de almacenamiento apenas aparece representada, mientras que hay una sobrerrepresentación de tipos destinados a libaciones u ofrendas. Finalmente, la mayoría de los materiales de las artes industriales corresponden a elementos de la moda latino-mediterránea o del estilo
FORTHCOMING: Urbanisation in the Time of Claudius in the Western Provinces of the Empire by Erika Cappelletto. Paperback; 205x290mm; 314pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £50.00). 487 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . ISBN 9781789690507. Buy Now

This volume analyses Claudius’ activities in the provinces of the western Empire in order to get an idea of his political attitude in a broader context and see how his interests in the provinces influenced the urban works.

The first aim of the project was to find structures, urban development and changes in the cities which were directly connected to Claudius; the second was to reflect on planning issues and strategies adopted by the emperor. A comprehensive examination of new buildings, or additions to prior ones (with statues, for example), was conducted in order to understand the underlying intentions, as well as how, and in which way, the prototypes in Italy influenced construction in the provinces. The final aim was connected to Venturi’s work, who deals with Claudius’ activities in Italy and in particular at Rome and Ravenna. The question was whether the trends found by Venturi can also be applied to the provinces. As a result of these investigations, the author has been able to propose new trends which might explain the emperor’s political actions.

About the Author
ERIKA CAPPELLETTO received a degree from the University of Venice with a thesis about the representation of spinning implements on gravestones. She gained her Masters from the same university with a study of the black glazed pottery from Pompeii. During this period, she participated in different projects in Italy and studied for six months at Ankara with the Erasmus project. Later, she moved to Heidelberg where she completed her PhD. She has participated in international projects and conferences, frequented workshops and undertaken an internship in digital archaeology (3d reconstruction and modelling). She currently works in cultural heritage in Germany.
FORTHCOMING: Rethinking the Concept of ‘Healing Settlements’: Cults, Constructions and Contexts in the Ancient World edited by Maddalena Bassani, Marion Bolder-Boos and Ugo Fusco. Paperback; 205x290mm; 166pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £35.00). 483 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . ISBN 9781789690378. Buy Now

This volume brings together papers dealing with therapeutic aspects connected to thermo-mineral sites both in Italy and in the Roman Provinces, as well as cultic issues surrounding health and healing. The first part of the book consists of contributions that are focused on the numerous problems concerning the exploitation of curative springs and the settlement patterns at spa sites in terms of topography, infrastructure, architecture, cult, society and economy, emphasizing the particularities accompanying the use of beneficial sources and comparing them to that of common sweet waters. The papers in the second part of the volume are concentrated on religious aspects connected to health, fertility and healing, focusing especially on sites located at particular natural surroundings such as caves and water sources. Together, the contributions in this book give us an idea of the amount and quality of research currently being undertaken in different parts of the Roman world (and complemented by one paper on the Greek world) on the topic of health and healing associated with cults and salutiferous waters.

About the Author
MADDALENA BASSANI graduated with distinction in Classical Literature with archaeology specialization at Padua University. She is the author of approximately seventy publications and is a member of the editorial boards for Antenor Quaderni, Hesperìa. Studi sulla Grecità d'Occidente and Venetia/Venezia. Quaderni adriatici di storia e archeologia lagunare. In 2014 she obtained the National Scientific Qualification to function as Associate Professor.

MARION BOLDER-BOOS studied Classical Archaeology, Assyriology and Prehistory at the universities of Heidelberg and Cambridge, attaining her MA in 2005 and her PhD in 2010 from Heidelberg University. She has participated in various excavations (Phylakopi in Greece, Magdalensberg in Austria and Carthage in Tunisia) and has publishing on a wide range of subjects, such as Roman sanctuaries and deities, Roman urbanism, history of archaeology, ancient colonisation and Phoenician and Punic archaeology. Since 2006 she has been Assistant Professor in Classical Archaeology at Technical University Darmstadt.

UGO FUSCO has a BA in Classics and a MA in Classical Archaeology from Sapienza University of Rome, as well as a PhD in Classical Archaeology from the University of Pisa. He has excavated in Italy (Volterra, Rome, Veii and Grumento) and abroad (in London), investigating urban and rural sites. He has worked on various themes including: Roman architecture, prosopography, Latin epigraphy, topography of the suburbs of Rome, Roman archaic history and cults relating to water and mystery. He recently expanded his interests to include Greek architecture, considering the subject of double temples in Greece.
FORTHCOMING: Funerary Archaeology and Changing Identities: Community Practices in Roman-Period Sardinia by Mauro Puddu. Paperback; 205x290mm; 210pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £40.00). 472 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . ISBN 9781789690002. Buy Now

Three main research-questions intertwine in this volume. These are, first, the theoretical issue of how we can infer identities from archaeology; second, what is the material relationship between Sardinia's communities and the Roman world's power and culture when looking at the burial evidence on the ground; third, how our interpretive frameworks of today's world and symbolic structure can affect our understanding of the past. This book attempts to answer these three questions by analysing in detail the funerary evidence from mostly-unpublished burial sites from southern and central Sardinia that can become key to an alternative interpretation of the island and of other Roman Provinces. The questions are answered throughout the book by drawing on social studies, particularly post-colonial approaches to the history of the past, interpretive frameworks on the Roman world, and semiotic theories. By looking in-depth at the archaeological evidence from Sardinia's burials, this book retrieves the active and creative role played by the local communities in shaping back the Roman-world within the specific material and historical conditions they lived in.

About the Author
MAURO PUDDU has spent most of his years as an archaeologist researching Sardinia. After studying at the Universita degli Studi di Cagliari for his BA in Cultural Heritage and his first Masters in Classical Archaeology, he decided to broaden up his research horizons by taking a second Masters at University College London in Theoretical Archaeology. He applied the knowledge acquired in Italy and the United Kingdom to research the funerary practices of Roman-period Sardinia during his PhD at the University of Cambridge, which he has recently completed. During a decade of research, the author has taken part in numerous successful archaeological projects, including the excavation of “La Sella del Diavolo”, Cagliari, run by the Soprintendenza archeologica di Cagliari; the Al-Mafjar Project in Jericho, Palestine, run by Birzeit University and the Khalili Research Centre, University of Oxford; and the Interamna Lirenas Project, run by the University of Cambridge. While working on his future research projects and publications, the author has been working as an archaeologist around London and Cambridge for the last three years, taking part in a vast number of projects, including the excavation of the Westminster School next to Westminster Abbey.

Table of Contents (Provisional)
PREFACE
1. ROMAN-PERIOD SARDINIA: A SEMIOTIC THEORY OF IDENTITY
2. BURIALS OF SARDINIA: METHODOLOGY OF DATA COLLECTION
3.FUNERARY PRACTICE AND THE URBAN COMMUNITIES OF SULCI
4.FUNERARY PRACTICE AND RURAL COMMUNITIES OF MASULLAS
5. FUNERARY PRACTICES AND URBAN COMMUNITIES IN KARALES
6. CONNECTING THE DOTS: SULCI, MASULLAS, KARALES AND THE MEDITTERRANEAN
7. SARDINIA’S COMMUNITIES AND THE MEDITERRANEAN AT LARGE
APPENDIX 1
APPENDIX 2: COARSE WARE TYPOLOGY OF CERAMICS FROM MASULLAS
NEW: Introduzione alle antichità di Ventotene Ricerche archeologiche nell’isola di Ventotene 1 by Giovanni Maria De Rossi and Salvatore Medaglia. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+120 pages; 158 figures (81 plates in colour). Italian text. 469 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 44. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690170. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690187. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Ventotene is a small island located in the Tyrrhenian sea, known in Antiquity as Pandateria. The site hosts the ruins of a large Roman villa for otium dated to the Augustan age where, during the first century AD, many women related to imperial families were exiled and enclosed. Notable figures exiled to Ventotene include Agrippina the Elder, Julia Livilla and Claudia Octavia, amongst others. This volume is an introduction to the roman antiquities of the island and is the first of a series of thematic monographs dedicated to the island. The first part of the book offers a brief overview of the geology of the island and reviews the studies and archaeological excavations carried out in Ventotene since the 18th century. The central part of the monograph is dedicated to the reconstruction of the historical events that have affected the island and to the development of the archaeological topography of the Roman age. The final chapter examines the numerous underwater archaeological discoveries made in the waters surrounding the island.

Ventotene è una piccola isola del medio Tirreno conosciuta nell’antichità con il nome di Pandateria. In questo luogo si conservano gli imponenti resti di una villa romana di età augustea destinata all’otium. Nel corso del I sec. d.C. l’isola funse da luogo di prigionia per una serie di donne legate alla famiglia imperiale che vi furono mandate in esilio. La prima di esse fu, nel 2 a.C., Giulia: era stata accusata di impudicizia sulla base della ‘Lex Iulia de adulteriis coercendis’ e rimase nell’isola con sua madre Scribonia, che la seguì volontariamente, fino al 3 d.C. Nel 29 d.C. la relagatio ad insulam toccò ad Agrippina Maggiore esiliata su ordine di Tiberio: la figlia di Giulia e di Vipsanio Agrippa morì a Ventotene nel 33 d.C. e le sue spoglie furono recuperate e riportate in pompa magna a Roma da Caligola nel 37 d.C. Dal 39 al 41 d.C. l’imperatore Caligola confinò a Pandateria sua sorella Iulia Livilla. Nel 62 d.C. Nerone mandò in esilio a Ventotene Ottavia, sua prima moglie, che vi morì solo pochi giorni dopo. L’ultima esiliata fu, nel 95 d.C., Flavia Domitilla, nipote di Domiziano, accusata di giudaismo. Questo volume costituisce un’introduzione alle antichità romane di Ventotene ed è il primo di una serie contributi monografici dedicati da Archaeopress Publishing al patrimonio archeologico isolano. Nella prima parte del libro si offre una breve panoramica sulla geologia e sulla storia degli studi e degli scavi che hanno interessato Ventotene sin dal XVIII secolo. La parte centrale della monografia è dedicata alla ricostruzione dei tempi e dei modi che hanno caratterizzato lo sviluppo insediamentale dell’isola e si fornisce un esauriente quadro della topografia di età imperiale. Il capitolo finale prende in esame le numerose testimonianze archeologiche recuperate nelle acque che circondano Ventotene.

About the Authors
Giovanni Maria De Rossi (Rome, 1942), Professor of Topography of ancient Italy at University of Salerno, has published many books about ancient and medieval Topography. He has directed archaelogical excavations in Italy; he conceived and designed the Archaeological Park and Historical and Archaeological Museum in Ventotene island; he has directed, in Ventotene, the archaeological excavations and, for twenty years, the Museum. | Giovanni Maria De Rossi (Roma, 1942), Professore Ordinario di Topografia dell’Italia Antica presso l’Università di Salerno, è autore di molte pubblicazioni scientifiche di Topografia antica e medievale. Ha diretto numerosi scavi in Italia. Ha ideato il Parco Archeologico e il Museo Storico Archeologico dell’Isola di Ventotene, dirigendo, nell’isola, gli scavi e, per 20 anni, il Museo.

Salvatore Medaglia (Crotone, 1971) is a classical archaeologist. He holds a PhD in Ancient Topography from the University of Salento and a joint Post-PhD in Landscape Archaeology at the University of Calabria and the University o
NEW: At the Crossroads of Greco-Roman History, Culture, and Religion Papers in Memory of Carin M. C. Green edited by Sinclair W. Bell and Lora L. Holland. Paperback; 175x245mm; xxiv+276 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 3 plates in colour. 468 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690132. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690149. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

At the Crossroads of Greco-Roman History, Culture, and Religion brings together recent research from a range of upcoming and well-established scholars to demonstrate the richness of the cross-cultural exchange of ideas around the ancient Mediterranean along with the reception of and continuing dialogues with these ideas in the medieval and modern worlds. The crossroads theme both honours the memory of our late colleague and friend Carin M. C. Green, who published an important book on the cult of Diana—one of whose aspects was Trivia, the goddess of crossroads—and emphasizes how each encounter of new topic or genre forces the reader to pause and think before proceeding down the new path.

The contents are arranged accordingly under three headings: (1) Greek philosophy, history, and historiography; (2) Latin literature, history, and historiography; and (3) Greco-Roman material culture, religion, and literature. These papers also coincide in myriad ways across the three headings, tracing themes such as friendship, leadership, and the reception of ideas in the arenas of philosophy, historiography, manuscript studies, poetry, medicine, art, and war. Within this delimited framework, the volume’s diversity of topics and approaches to a range of genres in the Greco- Roman world is intended both to appeal to the general scholar with varied interests and to offer students a wide scope through which to consider those genres.

About the Editors
SINCLAIR W. BELL is a classical archaeologist and art historian who teaches at Northern Illinois University. He is the co-editor of ten books, the Associate Editor of Etruscan and Italic Studies, and the author of numerous works on Etruscan and Roman art and archaeology. He is a recipient of fellowships from the American Academy in Rome, the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst, and the George A. and Eliza Gardner Howard Foundation.

LORA L. HOLLAND chairs the department of Classics at the University of North Carolina at Asheville. Her main area of research is the religions of the Roman Republic but she has published on a wide range of topics, including Greek tragedy, Roman comedy, and the history of women in Roman religion. She is a former Blegen Research Fellow at Vassar College, Visiting Fellow in Greek and Roman Religion at the Center for Hellenic Studies, and Visiting Scholar at the American Academy in Rome.
NEW: A Bestiary of Monsters in Greek Mythology by Spyros Syropoulos. Paperback; 148x210mm; viii+140 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (21 colour plates). (Print £19.99). 451 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919504. £19.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919511. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £19.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Greek myths abound in images of beauty and perfection: charming gods, attractive goddesses, and handsome heroes, all of them standards of physical and spiritual flawlessness. However, the ancient Greeks were not fond of absolutes. No god or hero is shown without blemishes in character and ethics, and some are even physically imperfect, like Hephaestus, who is ugly and lame. Another element that dominates Greek mythology is the idea of balance. Good and evil, light and darkness, hubris and punishment. What could not be missing from this world is the image of reversed beauty: monstrosity. The aim of this book is to explore the realm of the imaginary world of Greek mythology and present the reader with a categorization of monstrosity, referring to some of the most noted examples in each category.

About the Author
SPYROS SYROPOULOS is an Associate Professor of Ancient Greek Literature at the Dept of Mediterranean Studies of the University of the Aegean in Rhodes. He is the acting Vice-Rector of the University of the Aegean (2014-2018). Since 2006, he teaches Ancient Greek Theater at the Open University of Greece. He is the director of the Masters Course ‘Theater as a social and political institution during antiquity’ at the Department of Mediterranean Studies of the University of the Aegean. He is the founder and editor of the electronic journal ELECTRYONE (http://www.electryone.gr) and since 2017 he is the General Secretary of the Greek delegation at the European University Association.
NEW: Winifred Lamb: Aegean Prehistorian and Museum Curator by David W. J. Gill. Paperback; 148x210mm; 340pp. (Print RRP £30.00). 448 2018 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918798. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918804. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Buy Now

Winifred Lamb was a pioneering archaeologist in Anatolia and the Aegean. She studied classics at Newnham College, Cambridge, and subsequently served in naval intelligence alongside J. D. Beazley during the final stages of the First World War. As war drew to a close, Sydney Cockerell, Director of the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, invited Lamb to be the honorary keeper of Greek antiquities. Over the next 40 years she created a prehistoric gallery, marking the university’s contribution to excavations in the Aegean, and developed the museum’s holdings of classical bronzes and Athenian figure-decorated pottery. Lamb formed a parallel career excavating in the Aegean. She was admitted as a student of the British School at Athens and served as assistant director on the Mycenae excavations under Alan Wace and Carl Blegen. After further work at Sparta and on prehistoric mounds in Macedonia, Lamb identified and excavated a major Bronze Age site at Thermi on Lesbos. She conducted a brief excavation on Chios before directing a significant project at Kusura in Turkey. She was recruited for the Turkish language section of the BBC during the Second World War, and after the cessation of hostilities took an active part in the creation of the British Institute of Archaeology at Ankara. a.

About the Author
David Gill is Professor of Archaeological Heritage at the University of Suffolk and Visiting Research Fellow in the School of History at the University of East Anglia. He is a former Rome Scholar at the British School at Rome, and Sir James Knott Fellow at Newcastle University. He was responsible for the Greek and Roman collections at the Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge, before moving to Swansea University where he was Reader in Mediterranean Archaeology. In 2012 he received the Outstanding Public Service Award from the Archaeological Institute of America for his research on cultural property.

Table of Contents (Provisional)
Introduction
Chapter 1 - The Lamb Family and Early Years
Chapter 2 - Cambridge and Classics
Chapter 3 - The Hope Vases and Naval Intelligence
Chapter 4 - The First Year in Athens (1920–21)
Chapter 5 - Prehistory and the Fitzwilliam Museum
Chapter 6 - Mycenae, Sparta and Macedonia
Chapter 7 - The Fitzwilliam Museum: Developing the Classical Collections
Chapter 8 - The Eastern Aegean: Lesbos and Chios
Chapter 9 - Anatolia and Kusura
Chapter 10 - The War Years
Chapter 11 - The British Institute of Archaeology at Ankara
Bibliography
Index
NEW: Grabados rupestres en La Mancha centro: documentación y estudio de un patrimonio desconocido Rock engravings in La Mancha center: documentation and study of an unknown heritage by Rocío Ramiro Rodero, Víctor Manuel López-Menchero Bendicho, Ángel Marchante Ortega, Ángel Javier Cárdenas Martín-Buitrago, Pedro Miguel García Zamorano and Jorge Onrubia Pintado. Paperback; 203x276mm; 116 pages; illustrated throughout with 67 plates in colour. Spanish text with English abstract. 63 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919962. £36.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919979. Book contents pageDownload

This book deals with the documentation and interpretation of the rock sites located in La Mancha center (Spain), from the detailed study of the symbols that have been engraved in the rock. These sites, from historical times, can provide valuable information for the study of the mentalities and beliefs of the popular classes during the Modern Age, strongly influenced by the atmosphere created after the Counter-Reformation. Crosses, calvaries, orbs, human and animal representations, letters, cup-marks and game boards make up an authentic symbolic universe, of clear Christian roots, whose understanding is possible to achieve even though it requires collaboration between multiple fields of knowledge such as archaeology, theology, numismatics, heraldry, architecture, sculpture, painting...

Unfortunately, researchers have paid scant attention to the issue at hand, assuming paradigms that from our point of view should be reviewed, such as the authorship of the petroglyphs or their chrono-cultural affiliation. The study of the rock formations located in La Mancha center can shed light on these and other subjects, providing a good starting point in order to improve the documentation and interpretation of historical rock engravings in other parts of the world.

El presente libro aborda la documentación e interpretación de las estaciones rupestres localizadas en La Mancha centro (España), a partir del estudio pormenorizado de los símbolos que han sido grabados en la roca. Estas estaciones, de época histórica, pueden proporcionar valiosa información para el estudio de las mentalidades y creencias de las clases populares durante la Edad Media y la Edad Moderna, fuertemente influenciadas por la atmósfera creada tras la Contrarreforma. Cruces, calvarios, orbes, representaciones humanas y de animales, letras, cazoletas y tableros de juego conforman un auténtico universo simbólico, de clara raíz cristiana, cuya comprensión es posible alcanzar aunque requiere de la colaboración entre múltiples ramas del saber como la arqueología, la teología, la numismática, la heráldica, la arquitectura, la escultura, la pintura...

Desafortunadamente, hasta el momento los investigadores han prestado escasa atención al tema que nos ocupa, asumiendo paradigmas que desde nuestro punto de vista deben ser revisados, como la autoría de los petroglifos o su adscripción crono-cultural. El estudio de las estaciones rupestres localizadas en La Mancha centro puede arrojar luz sobre estos y otros temas, proporcionando un buen punto de partida de cara a mejorar la documentación e interpretación de los grabados rupestres de época histórica en otros puntos del mundo.
NEW: Oikèma ou pièce polyvalente: recherches sur une installation commerciale de l’Antiquité grecque by Pavlos Karvonis. Paperback; 203x276mm; 110pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. French text. 60 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919399. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919405. Book contents pageDownload

This volume discusses the evolution of oikema, which is the most common type of commercial facility in ancient Greece. The study covers a large area including Continental Greece, the Aegean islands, the Ionian islands and the west coast of Asia Minor. The author, after a thorough analysis, proposes a new terminology for commercial and industrial facilities. The book also presents the architectural characteristics and the equipment of oikemata and discusses their location and relationship with other buildings. The ownership, use and maintenance of oikemata are also discussed. It is argued that oikemata provided merchants and craftsmen with a suitable working space and contributed to the gradual abandonment of houses as working places, especially in cities that developed in the Hellenistic period. Their characteristics corresponded perfectly well to the needs of Greek commerce.

PAVLOS KARVONIS studied archaeology in Athens from 1994 to 1998. In 2000, he finished his Masters degree at the University of Paris X-Nanterre and in 2004 he defended a thesis entitled “Lieux et locaux de vente dans la Grèce égéenne du IVe au Ier siècle av. J.-C.” at the same University. In 2006, he worked for the Archaeological Society at Athens, and since 2007 he has been working for the Academy of Athens in the Tabula Imperii Romani program. He has published two volumes on the Aegean islands and Attica, and has published several articles on commercial architecture. He is also preparing the publications of two commercial buildings located on the western shore of the island and participates in a research programme on stone and its use on Delos.

Table of Contents
Avant-propos
English Summary
Nomenclature
Le vocabulaire antique des installations commerciales
Les critères d’identification des pièces polyvalentes
L’apparition de la pièce polyvalente
Les activités attestées dans les pièces polyvalentes
Les caractéristiques des pièces polyvalentes
La gestion des pièces polyvalentes
Les pièces polyvalentes et l’organisation du commerce
Conclusion
Bibliographie
Index des lieux
Index des mots grecs
Index des auteurs anciens
Index des inscriptions
Origine des illustrations
NEW: Dinamiche insediative nelle campagne dell'Italia tra Tarda Antichità e Alto Medioevo by Angelo Castrorao Barba. Paperback; 203x276mm; ii+180 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in Italian with English abstracts. 47 2018 Limina/Limites: Archaeologies, histories, islands and borders in the Mediterranean (365-1556) 6. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918231. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918248. Book contents pageDownload

This volume gathers together a series of selected contributions about settlement patterns in the Italian countryside between Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. This volume aims to show a critical overview of a range of some of the most recent research carried out on late antique and early medieval Italy (Friuli Venezia Giulia, Liguria, Emilia Romagna, Tuscany, Lazio, Apulia and Calabria), and to enhance our current knowledge as well as to provide innovative interpretative frameworks to gain a better understanding of rural settlement dynamics.

About the Editor
ANGELO CASTRORAO BARBA (Palermo, 1983) is currently a Fellow at the University of Palermo (Sicily, Italy). His principal fields of interest are Late Antique and Early Medieval Archaeology and the transformations of landscape and settlement patterns from Roman times to the Middle Ages in the Mediterranean area. In 2013, he obtained a PhD in Medieval Archaeology (University of Siena) with a dissertation about the end of Roman villas in Italy between Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages (AD 200-800). In 2014, he received a post-graduate Masters Diploma in GIS & Remote Sensing (Centre for Geo Technologies / Siena). In 2014-2015 he was a guest researcher at VU University Amsterdam and a postdoctoral fellow at the Royal Netherlands Institute in Rome (KNIR). In summer 2018 he was a postdoctoral fellow at the DFG Center for Advanced Studies ‘Migration and Mobility in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages’ of the University of Tübingen. For the period 2018/2020 he is a postdoctoral scholar in the Getty-sponsored workshop series ‘Mediterranean Palimpsests: Connecting the Art and Architectural Histories of Medieval & Early Modern Cities’. Currently (2016-2018), he is a research fellow on the project ‘Harvesting Memories’ (University of Palermo / Soprintendenza BB.CC.AA. of Palermo) which aims to study the ecology and archaeology of rural landscapes in the Sicani Mountains (C-W Sicily).
How Did the Persian King of Kings Get his Wine? The upper Tigris in antiquity (c.700 BCE to 636 CE) by Anthony Comfort and Michał Marciak. Paperback; 175x245mm; iv+148 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (46 plates in colour). (Print RRP £32.00). 457 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919566. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919573. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

How did the Persian King of Kings Get His Wine? the upper Tigris in antiquity (c.700 BCE to 636 CE) explores the upper valley of the Tigris during antiquity. The area is little known to scholarship, and study is currently handicapped by the security situation in southeast Turkey and by the completion during 2018 of the Ilısu dam. The reservoir being created will drown a large part of the valley and will destroy many archaeological sites, some of which have not been investigated. The course of the upper Tigris discussed here is the section from Mosul up to its source north of Diyarbakır; the monograph describes the history of the river valley from the end of the Late Assyrian empire through to the Arab conquests, thus including the conflicts between Rome and Persia. It considers the transport network by river and road and provides an assessment of the damage to cultural heritage caused both by the Saddam dam (also known as the Eski Mosul dam) in Iraq and by the Ilısu dam in south-east Turkey. A catalogue describes the sites important during the long period under review in and around the valley. During the period reviewed this area was strategically important for Assyria’s relations with its northern neighbours, for the Hellenistic world’s relations with Persia and for Roman relations with first the kingdom of Parthia and then with Sassanian Persia.

About the Authors
ANTHONY COMFORT is an independent scholar associated with the Centre for the Study of Greek and Roman Antiquity at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. After a career in the secretariat of the European Parliament, he completed a doctoral dissertation dealing with the roads on the frontier between Rome and Persia at Exeter University under the supervision of Stephen Mitchell. He is a specialist in the use of satellite imagery for archaeology in the Middle East but is now responsible for a project concerning the Roman roads of south-west France, where he lives.

MICHAL MARCIAK, PhD (2012), Leiden University, is an Assistant Professor at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków (Poland). He has published extensively on Northern Mesopotamia, including two monographs Izates, Helena, and Monobazos of Adiabene (Harrassowitz, 2014) and Sophene, Gordyene, and Adiabene: Three Regna Minora of Northern Mesopotamia Between East and West (Brill, 2017). He is currently also the Principal Investigator of the Gaugamela Project (in cooperation with the Land of Nineveh Archaeological Project of the University of Udine, Italy) which is dedicated to the identification of the site of the Battle of Gaugamela (331 BCE).
Papers in Italian Archaeology VII: The Archaeology of Death Proceedings of the Seventh Conference of Italian Archaeology held at the National University of Ireland, Galway, April 16-18, 2016 edited by Edward Herring & Eòin O’Donoghue. Paperback; 205x290mm; 504pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 435 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919214. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919221. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £80.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Archaeology of Death: Proceedings of the Seventh Conference of Italian Archaeology held at the National University of Ireland, Galway, April 16-18, 2016 includes more than 60 papers, with contributors from the British Isles, Italy and other parts of continental Europe, and North and South America, which consider recent developments in Italian archaeology from the Neolithic to the modern period. Each region of Italy is represented, with specific sections of the volume devoted to Etruria, South Italy, and Sicily. Other sections have a chronological focus, including Italian Prehistory, the Roman period, and Post Antiquity. Following the primary theme of the meeting, the majority of papers revolve around the archaeology of death; numerous contributions analyse the cultural significance of death through examinations of funerary rituals and mortuary practices, while others analyse burial data for evidence of wider social and political change. Various papers consider new and recent discoveries in Italian archaeology, while others ask fresh questions of older datasets. In addition, a number of contributions showcase their employment of new methodologies deriving from technological innovations. The volume opens with a dedicatory section to mark the achievements of the Accordia Research Institute, and to celebrate the careers of two of its founders, Ruth Whitehouse and John Wilkins.

About the Editors
EDWARD HERRING is Senior Lecturer in Classics at National University of Ireland, Galway. His principal research area is the archaeology of South Italy in the first millennium BC. A Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries since 2006, he held the A.D. Trendall Fellowship at the Institute of Classical Studies in London in 2011. His publications include Explaining Change in the Matt-Painted Pottery of Southern Italy (Oxford, 1998), (with R.D. Whitehouse and J.B. Wilkins) Botromagno. Excavation and Survey at Gravina in Puglia, 1979-1985 (London, 2000), and Patterns in the Production of Apulian Red-Figure Pottery (Newcastle, 2018).

Eóin O’Donoghue is based in the Department of Classics at Brock University, Canada. He specialises in Etruscan and Roman archaeology and excavates at Murlo with the Poggio Civitate Excavation Project and on the island of Pantelleria with the Brock University Archaeological Project at Pantelleria.
Handel in Krisenzeiten: Ägyptisch-mykenische Handelsbeziehungen in der Ramessidenzeit by Birgit Schiller. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+208 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. German text with English summary. (RRP £35.00). 434 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918675. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918682. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book provides an overview of the sites of Mycenaean pottery finds in Egypt and Nubia. Data from thirty-six sites in Egypt and twelve sites in Nubia are presented. The context of the vessels and sherds dates from the reign of Akhenaten (18th Dynasty) to that of Ramesses VI (20th Dynasty). The imported vessels were found in the capital cities as well as in fortresses, other cities and tombs. Stirrup jars and flasks came to light frequently.

Copies of Mycenaean stirrup jars made from clay, faience and stone were also found. The oldest sherd of an imitation vessel was found in Amarna; hence, the Mycenaean vessel shape (stirrup jar prevailing) was copied outside of Mycenaean Greece in the 18th Dynasty and filled with local liquids—possibly oil—and traded with Egypt. Egyptians not only imported vessels from the Levant but also produced imitation vessels themselves. Apparently, these vessels circulated only within Egypt.

Chemical analyses of sherds from different sites reveal that the vessels found in 18th Dynasty contexts were made on the Mycenaean mainland. During the Ramesside period (19th–20th Dynasty) trading contacts with Mycenaean Greece shifted to Cyprus, where high quality Mycenaean pottery was produced.

About the Author
Birgit Schiller studied Egyptology and Classical Archaeology (prioritising Bronze Age Archaeology) at the Humboldt University of Berlin. She completed her MA in Egyptology and wrote her PhD thesis in Classical Archaeology. Her defence of the thesis was made in 2012.

German Description: Dieses Buch gibt eine Übersicht über die in Ägypten und Nubien gefundene mykenische Keramik. An 36 Orten in Ägypten und an 12 verschiedenen Stellen in Nubien kam sie ans Tageslicht. Zeitlich reichen die Funde von der Regierungszeit Echnatons (18. Dynastie) bis zu Ramses VI. (20. Dynastie). Die Gefäße wurden im Wohnbereich, mithin bei den Lebenden, wie auch als Grabbeigabe, für das Leben im Jenseits verwendet. Das militärische Personal wurde ebenfalls mit mykenischen Produkten, vermutlich Öl, versorgt.

Eine Auflistung der Nachahmungen mykenischer Bügelkannen, die aus Ton, Fayence und Stein (Kalzit) gefertigt wurden, findet sich ebenfalls hier. Die älteste Nachahmung (sog. Simple Style-Keramik) stammt aus Amarna, so dass deren Import etwa gleichzeitig mit dem Import der Ware aus dem mykenischen Gebiet beginnt. So sind sie teils aus der Levante kommend mit lokaler Flüssigkeit – vermutlich Öl – nach Ägypten verhandelt worden. Auch die Ägypter haben ihrerseits die Bügelkanne nachgemacht, wobei gerade die Tongefäße wohl eher für den heimischen Markt gedacht waren.

Chemische Analysen des Tons haben ergeben, dass die Keramik, die in Kontexten der 18. Dynastie gefunden wurde, aus dem mykenischen Kernland, der Argolis, stammt. Während der Ramessidenzeit (19.-20. Dynastie) verlagerte sich der Handel nach Zypern, wo hochwertige mykenische Keramik hergestellt wurde.

Die Autorin studierte an der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Ägyptologie und Klassische Archäologie, wo sie den Schwerpunkt auf die Ägäische Bronzezeit legte. Sie schloss das Studium mit dem Magister in Ägyptologie ab und schriebt ihre Doktorarbeit in der Klassischen Archäologie zur mykenischen Keramik in Ägypten. Die Arbeit wurde 2012 verteidigt.
Treinta años de Arqueología Medieval en España edited by Juan Antonio Quirós Castillo. Paperback; 203x276mm; xii+418 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English preface and introduction (Print RRP £64.00). 58 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919238. £64.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919245. Book contents pageDownload

This book presents, in sixteen papers, recent developments and some of the main topics seen in academic Medieval Archaeology studies in Spain. The papers explore some of the emergent and consolidated topics of the discipline, such as landscapes, cities, rural spaces, bio-archaeological records, archaeology of architectures, agrarian archaeology, post-Roman archaeology, colonial archaeology in the Canary Islands and the archaeology of religious minorities, opening new lines of enquiries and providing new theoretical and methodological approaches. An overview of Medieval Archaeology studies in Spain is offered, proposing a wide range of topics for discussion. Finally, the book explores the connections between Spanish Medieval Archaeology and other European traditions, specifically, English, Italian and Portuguese Medieval Archaeology.

About the Editor
Juan Antonio Quirós is a Professor of Medieval Archaeology at the University of the Basque Country, Honorary Senior Research Associate at the Institute of Archaeology (University College London), and Visiting Fellow at All Souls College (University of Oxford). He is the director of the ‘Heritage and Cultural Landscapes Research Group’ of the University of the Basque Country and the 'Rural Medieval Research Group', CSIC-UPV/EHU. His principal interests lie in the study of the archaeology of landscapes, the archaeology of rural communities, Mediterranean Archaeology, Archaeology of Architectures, and the study of Social Complexity. Besides, he is very interested in a multi-proxy and multidisciplinary approach to cultural resources. Some of his recent works include ‘Arqueología de una comunidad campesina medieval: Zornoztegi’ (Bilbao, 2018); ‘Longhouses, house biography and social complexity in Early Medieval Northwestern Iberia’ (Arqueología de la Arquitectura 2017); ‘Local identities and desertions in Late Medieval period’ (Reti Medievali, 2017); ‘Social complexity in Early Medieval rural communities’ (Oxford, 2016); and ‘Agrarian Archaeology in Early Medieval Europe’ (Quaternary International 346, 2014). Currently, he is preparing a book about the Archaeology of Medieval Peasantry.
When Archaeology Meets Communities: Impacting Interactions in Sicily over Two Eras (Messina, 1861-1918) by Antonino Crisà. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+416 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £55.00). 446 . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917913. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917920. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

When Archaeology Meets Communities examines the history of nineteenth-century Sicilian archaeology through the archival documentation for the excavations – official and casual – at Tindari, Lipari and nearby minor sites in the Messina province from Italy’s Unification to the end of the First World War (1861-1918). The area and historical period have been fully neglected by past scholars and need in-depth investigation. The substantial evidence includes sets of approximately six hundred new records and black and white images from Italian and UK archives.

The historical reconstruction, based on analysis of these records, lays the foundations for the entire volume and forms the basis from which the book develops innovative outlines on Sicilian archaeology. The structure follows this central concept. Furthermore, the volume seeks: a) to clarify relationships between the Italian Ministry of Public Education, the Museum of Palermo and local government authorities (‘3-level’ structure of interaction) and to pinpoint contacts with the contemporary social context; b) to compare archaeological research during the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies and the post-Unification period in northern Sicily in terms of methods, history of collecting, antiquities safeguarding and legislation; and c) to contextualise this work in terms of the evolution of archaeology and social change in the wider Italian and European contexts.

About the Author
ANTONINO CRISÀ is an archaeologist, ancient historian and numismatist, and currently research fellow at the University of Warwick, Department of Classics and Ancient History. He studied at the University of Milan (BA 2004, MA 2008) and worked as a ‘Classics Teaching Assistant’ at the University of Leicester (2012-16), where he obtained his PhD in Archaeology (2015). As a field archaeologist, he has excavated in Sicily (Tindari), Sardinia (Nora), northern Italy (Milano, Calvatone, Bagnolo San Vito, Adria, Bergamo, Casale sul Sile) and Syria (Palmyra). His research explores numismatics and the history of archaeology in Sicily between the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries (antiquarianism, coin collectors, nineteenth-century archaeological excavations, archives and museum collection). Dr Crisà has been honoured by the publication of his best numismatic papers within the Italian National Competition for Young Numismatists (Cronaca Numismatica) (2006) and Premio M. Cagiati – XV International Numismatic Congress of Taormina (Accademia Italiana di Studi Numismatici) (2015).
Travellers in Ottoman Lands The Botanical Legacy edited by Ines Aščerić-Todd, Sabina Knees, Janet Starkey and Paul Starkey. Paperback; 160x230mm; xxii+358 pages; 2 maps, 7 tables, 167 figures (139 plates in colour). (Print RRP £60.00). 438 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919153. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919160. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This collection of around twenty papers has its origins in a two-day seminar organised by the Association for the Study of Travel in Egypt and the Near East (ASTENE) in conjunction with the Centre for Middle Eastern Plants at the Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh (RBGE), with additional support from Cornucopia magazine and the Turkish Consulate General, Edinburgh. This multi-disciplinary event formed part of the Ottoman Horizons festival held in Edinburgh in 2017 and attracted a wide range of participants from around the world, including several from Turkey and other parts of the Middle East.

This splendidly illustrated book focuses on the botanical legacy of many parts of the former Ottoman Empire — including present-day Turkey, the Levant, Egypt, the Balkans, and the Arabian Peninsula — as seen and described by travellers both from within and from outside the region. The papers cover a wide variety of subjects, including Ottoman garden design and architecture; the flora of the region, especially bulbs and their cultural significance; literary, pictorial and photographic depictions of the botany and horticulture of the Ottoman lands; floral and related motifs in Ottoman art; culinary and medicinal aspects of the botanical heritage; and efforts related to conservation.

About the Editors
DR INES AŠČERIĆ-TODD is a Teaching Fellow in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Edinburgh. Her research interests include social and cultural history of the Middle East and the Ottoman Empire, Sufism and dervish orders. She is the author of Dervishes and Islam in Bosnia: Sufi Dimensions to the Formation of Bosnian Muslim Society, in the Brill series ‘The Ottoman Empire and its Heritage’ (Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2015).

DR SABINA KNEES has edited the Flora of the Arabian Peninsula and Socotra, since 2005. Before joining The Centre for Middle Eastern Plants (CMEP) at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE) in 2005, Sabina was a principal editor on the European Garden Flora, and a Stanley Smith Research Fellow based at the RBGE. Sabina is a member of the Horticultural Taxonomy Group (Hortax), the IUCN SSC Arabian Plant Specialist Group and the Executive Committee of the Friends of Socotra.

DR JANET STARKEY has edited the Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies since 2007. A former lecturer at Durham University, she has published extensively on travellers in the Middle East. Her most recent book, The Scottish Enlightenment Abroad: the Russells of Braidshaw in Aleppo and on the Coast of Coromandel (Leiden & Boston: Brill), was published in March 2018.

PROFESSOR PAUL STARKEY, a specialist in Arabic literature and culture, is Emeritus Professor at Durham University and is currently Vice-President of the British Society for Middle Eastern Studies (BRISMES) and Chairman of the Banipal Trust for Arab Literature. His translation of The Book of the Sultan’s Seal by Youssef Rakha won the 2015 Saif Ghobash Banipal Prize for Arabic Literary Translation, and his translation of The Shell by Mustafa Khalifa won a Sheikh Hamad Award for Translation and International Understanding in 2017.
The Luwians of Western Anatolia Their Neighbours and Predecessors by Fred Woudhuizen. Paperback; 175x245mm; iv+162 pages; 35 illustrations, 11 tables (3 colour plates). 405 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918279. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918286. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £26.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In scholarly literature, there is much attention given to the Hittites and the Mycenaean Greeks, but the Luwians of Western Anatolia are notoriously neglected. Therefore, a study focussing on the latter is desirable. In this book, the presently available information on the western Luwians is assembled. This entails, primarily, the epigraphic evidence in the form of Luwian hieroglyphic inscriptions from the region and the historical information which can be deduced from it, as well as historical Hittite sources. As a prerequisite for the reconstruction of the history of the western Luwians during the Middle and Late Bronze Ages, the thorny question of the geography of their habitat needs to be tackled. This can now be done in an adequate manner owing to the most recent discoveries. Apart from Luwian hieroglyphic, the Luwians of Western Anatolia also used cuneiform script. Based on the linguistic data from both categories of evidence, a sketch of their language is presented. It must be realized, though, that not all inhabitants of Western Anatolia were speakers of the Luwian language. Thus, it will be argued that their northern neighbours in the Troad spoke a different language, of Thraco-Phrygian type. Finally, the Luwians were not autochthonous in the region, but preceded by speakers of a different Indo-European tongue, most adequately defined as Old Indo-European in Hans Krahe’s terms.

About the Author
FRED WOUDHUIZEN, born in 1959, graduated in Mediterranean Pre- and Protohistory at the University of Amsterdam (1985). He earned his PhD in 2006 at Erasmus University, Rotterdam, with a dissertation on ‘The Ethnicity of the Sea Peoples’. As an expert Luwologist, he is well-known for his books and articles on the Luwian dialects of Anatolia and the wider Aegean. Among his books, mention should be made of ‘Luwian Hieroglyphic Monumental Rock and Stone Inscriptions from the Hittite Empire Period’ (2004) and ‘Selected Luwian Hieroglyphic Texts: The Extended Version’ (2011).

Table of Contents
Preface; 1. The Homeland of the Luwians; 2. Geography of Western Anatolia; 3. Origin of the Luwian Hieroglyphic Script; 4. Luwian Hieroglyphic Evidence on the Great Kingdom of Assuwa; 5. Western Anatolia under Hittite Rule; 6. Western Anatolia in the Final Stage of the Bronze Age; 7. Amenhotep III: Historical Background to his Aegean Policy; 8. The Arzawan Language; 9. The Language of the Trojans; 10. Evidence for an Old Indo-European Substrate in Western Anatolia; Bibliography