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NEW: Egitto, Iraq ed Etruria nelle fotografie di John Alfred Spranger Viaggi e ricerche archeologiche (1929-1936) by Stefano Anastasio and Barbara Arbeid. Paperback; 205x290mm; 178 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Italian text with English summary. 512 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691269. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691276. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume – in Italian, with an English summary – presents the 1930s archaeological photo-albums of John Alfred Spranger (1889-1968). Engineer, topographer, mountain climber, archaeologist, art collector and photographer, Spranger traveled extensively – in the Balkans, Greece, Egypt and the Near East, Canada, Central Asia – and left several photo albums detailing archaeological explorations as well as travel memories. In the 1920s-1930s, he took part in a number of Etruscan excavations in Tuscany, together with Harry Burton, the photographer of the Tomb of Tutankhamun. With a pioneering approach, they used the photo-camera to document the excavation work in progress. The albums are dedicated to a trip to Egypt in 1929, a trip to Mesopotamia (Iraq) in 1936 and some surveys and excavations carried out in Etruria (Tuscany, Italy) in 1929-1935. Spranger’s photos are particularly meaningful, especially because he combined his skills in using the camera with a great expertise in archaeology and topography. His photos make it possible to understand, after almost a century, how many Egyptian, Mesopotamian and Etruscan sites appeared at the time of their first excavations.

About the Authors
STEFANO ANASTASIO has carried out archaeological researches in Italy (Sardinia, Tuscany), Syria, Turkey, Jordan and currently works at the Archaeological Photo Archive of the Superintendency of Florence. His main research interests are the Mesopotamian Iron Age pottery and architecture, the building archaeology and the use of the early photo archives for the study of the Near Eastern archaeology.

BARBARA ARBEID is an archaeologist at the Superintendency of Florence, appointed to the archaeological heritage protection service. Her main research interests are the archaeology of Norther Etruria, the Etruscan bronze craftsmanship, the archaeological collecting and photography.

Italian Description
Il volume – in italiano con riassunto in inglese – è dedicato agli album fotografici realizzati negli anni Trenta del Novecento da John Alfred Spranger (1889-1968): fu ingegnere, topografo, alpinista, archeologo, collezionista e fotografo. Viaggiò molto – nei Balcani, in Grecia, in Egitto e nel Vicino Oriente, in Canda e in Asia centrale – lasciandoci molti album fotografici dedicati ai suoi viaggi e alle sue ricerche archeologiche. Negli anni Venti e Trenta partecipò a ricognizioni e scavi archeologici in Toscana, assieme a Harry Burton, il fotografo della Tomba di Tutankhamun. Con un approccio pionieristico, ambedue sperimentarono l’uso della macchina fotografica per documentare lo scavo archeologico. Gli album presentati sono dedicati a due viaggi, uno in Egitto nel 1929 e l’altro in Mesopotamia (Iraq) nel 1936, e a ricognizioni e scavi condotti in siti etruschi della Toscana tra 1929 e 1935. Le fotografie di Spranger sono particolarmente significative perché riflettono sia la competenza del fotografo che quella del topografo e dell’archeologo, e ci permettono di capire, a quasi un secolo di distanza, quale fosse l’aspetto di numerosi siti egizi, mesopotamici ed etruschi, al momento della loro prima indagine archeologica.

Biografia
STEFANO ANASTASIO, archeologo, ha svolto ricerche in Italia (Sardegna, Toscana), Siria, Turchia e Giordania. Attualmente lavora all’Archivio Fotografico Archeologico della Soprintendenza di Firenze. Si interessa soprattutto di ceramica e architettura dell’età del Ferro in Mesopotamia, di Building archaeology e dell’uso delle fotografie antiche per lo studio dell’archeologia vicinorientale.

BARBARA ARBEID è archeologa presso la Soprintendenza di Firenze, con incarichi di tutela del patrimonio. Il suo ambito di studio principale è la civiltà dell'Etruria settentroinale, con particolare interesse per la bronzistica, ma ha svolto anche ricerche riguardanti la storia del collezionismo e della fotografia in ambito archeologico.
NEW: Rethinking the Concept of ‘Healing Settlements’: Water, Cults, Constructions and Contexts in the Ancient World edited by Maddalena Bassani, Marion Bolder-Boos and Ugo Fusco. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+176 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 15 plates in colour. (Print RRP £35.00). 483 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 52. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690378. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690385. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Rethinking the Concept of ‘Healing Settlements’: Water, Cults, Constructions and Contexts in the Ancient World brings together papers dealing with therapeutic aspects connected to thermomineral sites both in Italy and in the Roman Provinces, as well as cultic issues surrounding health and healing. The first part of the book consists of contributions that are focused on the numerous problems concerning the exploitation of curative springs and the settlement patterns at spa sites in terms of topography, infrastructure, architecture, cult, society and economy, emphasizing the particularities accompanying the use of beneficial sources and comparing them to that of common freshwaters. The papers in the second part of the volume concentrate on religious aspects connected to health, fertility and healing, focussing especially on sites located at particular natural surroundings such as caves and water sources. Together, the contributions in this book give us an idea of the amount and quality of research currently being undertaken in different parts of the Roman world (and complemented by one paper on the Greek world) on the topic of health and healing associated with cults and salutiferous waters.

About the Author
MADDALENA BASSANI graduated with distinction in Classical Literature with archaeology specialization at Padua University. She is the author of approximately seventy publications and is a member of the editorial boards for Antenor Quaderni, Hesperìa. Studi sulla Grecità d'Occidente and Venetia/Venezia. Quaderni adriatici di storia e archeologia lagunare. In 2014 she obtained the National Scientific Qualification to function as Associate Professor.

MARION BOLDER-BOOS studied Classical Archaeology, Assyriology and Prehistory at the universities of Heidelberg and Cambridge, attaining her MA in 2005 and her PhD in 2010 from Heidelberg University. She has participated in various excavations (Phylakopi in Greece, Magdalensberg in Austria and Carthage in Tunisia) and has publishing on a wide range of subjects, such as Roman sanctuaries and deities, Roman urbanism, history of archaeology, ancient colonisation and Phoenician and Punic archaeology. Since 2006 she has been Assistant Professor in Classical Archaeology at Technical University Darmstadt.

UGO FUSCO has a BA in Classics and a MA in Classical Archaeology from Sapienza University of Rome, as well as a PhD in Classical Archaeology from the University of Pisa. He has excavated in Italy (Volterra, Rome, Veii and Grumento) and abroad (in London), investigating urban and rural sites. He has worked on various themes including: Roman architecture, prosopography, Latin epigraphy, topography of the suburbs of Rome, Roman archaic history and cults relating to water and mystery. He recently expanded his interests to include Greek architecture, considering the subject of double temples in Greece.
NEW: Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 3 2018 edited by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Patricia Kögler. Paperback; 210x297mm; xvi+208 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (43 plates in colour). Papers in English and German. 3 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691719. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 2399-1852-3-2019. Book contents pageDownload

ARTICLES
Notes on a Hellenistic Milk Pail – by Yannis Chairetakis
Chasing Arsinoe (Polis Chrysochous, Cyprus): A Sealed Early Hellenistic Cistern and Its Ceramic Assemblage – by Brandon R. Olson, Tina Najbjerb & R. Scott Moore
Hasmonean Jerusalem in the Light of Archaeology – Notes on Urban Topography – by Hillel Geva
A Phoenician / Hellenistic Sanctuary at Horbat Turit (Kh. et-Tantur) – by Walid Atrash, Gabriel Mazor & Hanaa Aboud with contributions by Adi Erlich & Gerald Finkielsztejn
Schmuck aus dem Reich der Nabatäer – hellenistische Traditionen in frührömischer Zeit – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom

ARCHAEOLOGICAL NEWS AND PROJECT
Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project: Excavations at Pyla-Vigla in 2018 – by Thomas Landvatter, Brandon R. Olson, David S. Reese, Justin Stephens & R. Scott Moore
Bookmark: Ancient Gems, Finger Rings and Seal Boxes from Caesarea Maritima. The Hendler Collection – by Shua Amorai-Stark & Malka Herskovitz

BOOK REVIEWS
Nina Fenn, Späthellenistische und frühkaiserzeitliche Keramik aus Priene. Untersuchungen zu Herkunft und Produktion – by Susanne Zabehlicky-Scheffenegger
Raphael Greenberg, Oren Tal & Tawfiq Da῾adli, Bet Yerah III. Hellenistic Philoteria and Islamic al- Ṣinnabra. The 1933–1986 and 2007–2013 Excavations – bY Gabriel Mazor
Mohamed Kenawi & Giorgia Marchiori, Unearthing Alexandria’s archaeology: The Italian Contribution – by Carlo De Mitri
NEW: The Hypogeum of the Aurelii A new interpretation as the collegiate tomb of professional scribae by John Bradley. Paperback; 205x290mm; xiv+192 pages; 4 tables, 136 figures (81 plates in colour). (Print RRP £38.00). 486 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 50. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690477. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690484. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Hypogeum of the Aurelii: A new interpretation as the collegiate tomb of professional scribae examines the frescoes of one of the most enigmatic funerary monuments of ancient Rome. The three chambers of the Hypogeum of the Aurelii, so-named from an mosaic inscription in one of the surviving chambers, contain a varied series of images that have long been considered an example of early Christian or Gnostic iconography. One hundred years after the monument’s discovery Dr Bradley challenges earlier theories and concludes that far from having religious significance the pictures reveal a world of professional pride among a group of what we might today call ‘white collar workers’. Although not among the rich and famous of Imperial Rome, the deceased nevertheless rose from a state of slavery to positions within the bureaucracy at the centre of an empire at its height. Although part of a strictly hierarchical, and male-dominated, society the community to which the Aurelii belonged provided an environment of comparative equality: a community that acknowledged the contribution and expertise of both women and children in their profession. The pride in their achievement is reflected in the decoration of the tomb in which they expected to spend eternity. This study, the first in modern times to examine all the extant images in detail, will be of interest, not only to historians of ancient Roman art, but also to social historians who wish to more fully understand the lives of those who helped support the running of an empire.

About the Author
JOHN W. BRADLEY was born in Birmingham in 1956. He graduated with a degree in Construction and Economics before embarking on a thirty year career in the construction industry primarily in London and the Middle East. During the 1990s he was also involved in environmental politics using his background in industry to challenge the conventional rationale behind many of today’s political and economic decisions. Changing profession in 2005 Dr Bradley gained a first-class degree and Masters in Classics at Royal Holloway College, University of London with dissertations on early Christian art and republican Roman religion. In 2011 he commenced his PhD at the same college, initially under the supervision of Professor Amanda Claridge then Dr Zena Kamash. An initial project on the broader aspects of the evolution of art in the catacombs of Rome ultimately focused on the frescoes that make up the subject of this book when existing theories and explanations appeared unsatisfactory. In addition to his interest in the art of ancient Rome his interests include classical music, military history and environmentalism. He has lived in Brentford, west London for thirty years where he shares a home and allotment with his wife Susan.
NEW: Human Mobility in Archaeology: Practices, Representations and Meanings Ex Novo: Journal of Archaeology, Volume 3, 2018 edited by Maja Gori, Martina Revello Lami and Alessandro Pintucci. 3 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691214. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload

It has been abundantly demonstrated that theories and paradigms in the humanities are influenced by historical, economic and socio-cultural conditions, which have profoundly influenced archaeology’s representation of migration. This was mostly conceived as the study of the movement of large and homogenous population groups, whose identity was often represented as ethnically characterized. The present-day shift of attention from collective to individual agency and the countless facets of migration goes hand in hand with new socio-political and cultural scenarios such as the extraordinary migratory flows into Europe, shifting boundaries, alternative forms of citizenship and identity, and the emergence of emotive reactionism.

The third issue of Ex Novo gathers multidisciplinary contributions addressing mobility to understand patterns of change and continuity in past worlds; reconsider the movement of people, objects, and ideas alongside mobile epistemologies, such as intellectual, scholarly or educative traditions, rituals, practices, religions and theologies; and provide insights into the multifaceted relationship between mobile practices and their shared meanings and how they are represented socially and politically.

Table of Contents
Maja GORI, Martina REVELLO LAMI & Alessandro PINTUCCI
Editorial: Practices, Representations and Meanings of Human Mobility in Archaeology

Paraskevi ELEFANTI & Gilbert MARSHALL
Mobility during the Upper Palaeolithic Greece: Some Suggestions for the Argolid Peninsula

Maurizio CRUDO
Greek Migrations along the Ionian Coast (Southern Italy)

Anna RAUDINO
Variation in Material Culture: Adoption of Greek Ceramics in an Indigenous Sicilian Site (8th century BC)

Maria ÁLVAREZ-FOLGADO
The Jewish Diaspora in the Roman Empire. Diaspora, Social Agents and Social Networks: Towards the Creation of a New Analytical Toolkit

Domiziana ROSSI
A Road to Fīrūzābād

Marijn STOLK
Exploring Immigrant Identities: The Link between Portuguese Ceramics and Sephardic Immigrants in 17th Century Amsterdam

Jesùs GARCÍA SANCHEZ
From War Material Culture to Popular Heritage, and Beyond. The PSP “Cancelli di Venosa” as paradigms of Object Biography Theory.

Reviews
A. Falcone & A. D’Eredità (eds.) ARCHEOSOCIAL L’Archeologia Riscrive il Web: Esperienze, Strategie e Buone Pratiche, Rende (CS): Dielle Editore, 2018, 195 pp. Reviewed by Paola DI GIUSEPPANTONIO DI FRANCO
NEW: Practices of Personal Adornment in Neolithic Greece Πρακτικές Προσωπικής Κόσμησης στη Νεολιθική Ελλάδα by Fotis Ifantidis. Paperback; xxxvi+596 pages; 121 figures + fully illustrated catalogue (31 plates in colour). Greek text with English Summary. 75 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691139. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691146. Book contents pageDownload

The objective of this book is the reconsideration of the practices of personal adornment during the Neolithic period in Greece, through the assemblage, extensive bibliographic documentation, and critical evaluation of all the available data deriving from more than a hundred sites in the mainland and the Aegean islands –an archaeological archive of wide geographical and chronological scope. In addition, a thorough study of the personal ornament corpus from the Middle-Late Neolithic Dispilio in Kastoria, an important lakeside settlement in north-western Greece, was conducted.

The book begins with an overview of the anthropological and archaeological literature on theoretical and methodological issues concerning practices of personal adornment. Then follows an examination of the problems and key points of study regarding personal adornment in Neolithic Greece, as well as a critical evaluation of the methodological approaches and classification schemes that have been applied in previous archaeological works. Subsequently, the technologies and processes of production, consumption, recycling, deposition, and distribution of personal ornaments in Neolithic Greece are discussed. Finally, the social correlates of personal adornment are explored, as they are reflected in the choice of different raw materials (shell, clay, bone, stone, and metal) and ornament types (beads, pendants, annulets, and so forth).

About the Author
FOTIS IFANTIDIS studied archaeology at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. His academic research is focused on personal adornment practices in prehistory, and on the interplay between photography and archaeology, with case studies the Athenian Acropolis, the ancient city of Kalaureia on the island of Poros, and the Neolithic settlements of Dispilio and Koutroulou Magoula. Among his publications are Spondylus in Prehistory (co-authored with M. Nikolaidou), Camera Kalaureia (co-authored with Y. Hamilakis) and Archaeographies: Excavating Neolithic Dispilio.

Greek description
Στόχος του βιβλίου είναι η επανεξέταση των πρακτικών προσωπικής κόσμησης κατά τη νεολιθική περίοδο στην Ελλάδα μέσω της επανεκτίμησης των διαθέσιμων στοιχείων που προέρχονται από περισσότερες από εκατό ανεσκαμμένες νεολιθικές θέσεις, καθώς και η λεπτομερειακή μελέτη του corpus κοσμημάτων που προέρχονται από τη λιμναία θέση της Μέσης-Νεότερης Νεολιθικής περιόδου στ&#
FORTHCOMING: Archaic and Classical Harbours of the Greek World The Aegean and Ionian Sea contexts by Chiara Maria Mauro. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+116 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £30.00). 516 2019. ISBN 9781789691283. Book contents pageBuy Now

Archaic and Classical Greek Harbours in the Aegean and Ionian Seas explores the archaeology and history of ancient harbours and focuses on the Greek world during the Archaic and Classical eras. Its objective is to establish a consensus on three fundamental questions: What locations were the most propitious for the installation of harbours? What kinds of harbour-works were built and for what purpose? What harbour forms were documented? These subjects have been addressed by evaluating multiple forms of evidence (archaeological, geographical, nautical, textual, iconographic and geological) in the context of the Aegean and eastern Ionian maritime settings.

About the Author
CHIARA MARIA MAURO gained an MA in Classical Archaeology at the University of Pisa (Italy) in 2012 with a dissertation on Phoenician seafaring in the Archaic period, and in 2014 she completed a master’s degree in Teaching History, Geography and History of Art at the Autonomous University of Madrid (Spain). In 2016 she obtained a PhD in Studies on the Ancient World from the Complutense University of Madrid (Spain). In 2015 she was Visiting Research Student at the University Alma Mater (Bologna, Italy); in October 2017 she was awarded an Irish Research Council Postdoctoral Fellowship to work on the project ‘Ancient Harbours in the Greek World: A study of Aegean and eastern Ionian Sea harbours from the dawn of the city-state to the Classical period’. She is currently Postdoctoral Fellow at the Haifa Center for Mediterranean History in the Department of Maritime Civilizations.
FORTHCOMING: Greek Art in Motion Studies in honour of Sir John Boardman on the occasion of his 90th Birthday edited by Rui Morais, Delfim Leão, Diana Rodríguez Pérez with Daniela Ferreira. Paperback; iv+510 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (230 colour plates). 485 2018. ISBN 9781789690231. Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication on Greek Art gathers a large number of studies presented at the International Congress ‘Greek Art in Motion’. Held in honour of Sir John Boardman’s 90th birthday, the congress took place at the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, 3-5 May, 2017.

The volume first presents eight contributions by the keynote speakers who, as friends and students of Sir John, present a debate and a problematisation of Greek Art from the archaeological and historical point of view.

Thereafter, 45 papers are divided into the different themes considered during the congress, all of which have greatly benefited from Sir John's researches throughout his long and distinguished academic career: Sculpture, Architecture, Terracotta and Metal, Greek Pottery, Coins, Greek History and Archaeology, Greeks Overseas, Reception and Collecting, Art and Myth.

About the Editors
RUI MORAIS was born in Porto in 1969 and has a degree in History, variant of Archaeology from the University of Coimbra. He has a Masters in Urban Archaeology, PhD in Archaeology, Technology and Materials from University of Minho. He was Professor at Minho University and is currently an Assistant Professor with Aggregation at the Faculty of Arts, Oporto University. Among his research, he has dedicated special attention to the study of trade in antiquity, with numerous published works, individually or with other national and foreign authors. He is researcher in the Classical and Humanistic Centre at Coimbra University (CECH). He was a consultant of the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation for antiques. He is a member of the Scientific Committee of the IBERIA GRAEGA Project.

DELFIM LEÃO is a Professor at the Institute of Classical Studies and a researcher at the Center for Classical and Humanistic Studies, University of Coimbra. His main areas of interest are ancient history, law and political theory of the Greeks, theatrical pragmatics, and the ancient novel. He also has a strong interest in digital humanities. Among his main recent works are D. F. Leão and P. J. Rhodes, ‘The Laws of Solon. A new Edition, with Introduction, Translation and Commentary’ (London, I. B. Tauris, 2015), and a second revised edition in 2016; D. F. Leão and G. Thür (Hrsg.) ‘Symposion 2015. Vorträge zur griechischen und hellenistischen Rechtsgeschichte’ (Wien, Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2016). Along with Lautaro Roig Lanzillotta, he is the editor of Brill’s ‘Plutarch Studies’.

DIANA RODRÍGUEZ PÉREZ is a Junior Research Fellow at Mougins Museum in Classical Art and Material Culture at Wolfson College, University of Oxford, and was previously the Research Assistant for the Beazley Archive Pottery Database at the Classical Art Research Centre. Before moving to Oxford, she held a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Edinburgh (FECYT). She received a PhD (Doctor Europaea) from the University of León, Spain (The Snake in the Ancient Greek World: Myth, Rite and Image), an MPhil in History of Art from the University of León, and an MPhil in Archaeology and Heritage from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. From 2010 to 2011 she worked as a translator at the European Parliament in Luxemburg, and was a DAAD Fellow at the Institut für klassische Archäologie of the University of Heidelberg from 2008 to 2009. In the summer of 2017 she was Tytus Scholar at the Department of Classical Studies of the University of Cincinnati (US).

DANIELA FERREIRA is currently a PhD student at the Department of Prehistory, Ancient History and Archeology of Complutense University of Madrid, Spain, and a researcher at UI&D CITCEM - Transdisciplinary Research Centre «Culture, Space and Memory», Portugal. She is also a recipient of a FCT (Portuguese national funding agency for science, research and technology) grant since 2015. Daniela holds a Master’s degree in Archaeology from the University of Oporto (Portugal), with a focus
FORTHCOMING: Arqueología funeraria y paleopatología de la población religiosa de Jerez en época moderna: una primera aproximación by Gonzalo Castro Moreno. Paperback; 203x276mm; 378 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (272 plates in colour). Spanish text. (Print RRP £95.00). 80 2019. ISBN 9781789691429. Book contents pageBuy Now

The main objective of this book has been to open a line of research into the religious population of the city of Jerez de la Frontera, in southern Spain, during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries – the ‘Modern Age’ - which until now has not been thoroughly investigated. The research focusses on the archaeological and paleopathological remains of the religious population. The archaeological excavations were supported with the existing archival material, and enabled the first assessment of Jerez society to be carried out, including a whole series of elements that have not been studied thus far, such as the causes of death and disease suffered by the people of the city.

To this end, a study was carried out examining the pathologies found in the skeletal remains housed at the municipal archaeological museum of Jerez de la Frontera, which originated mainly from epidemic burials.

Spanish Description El principal objetivo de este libro ha sido abrir una línea de investigación hasta ahora inédita en la ciudad de Jerez de la Frontera, en el sur de España, la cual es el estudio social a través de los restos arqueológicos y paleopatológicos de la población religiosa en la ciudad durante la Edad Moderna, y más concretamente los siglos XVI y XVII. En base a las intervenciones arqueológicas realizadas y con el apoyo del material de archivo existente hemos podido llevar a cabo una primera valoración de la sociedad jerezana con toda una serie de elementos hasta ahora no estudiados, como son las causas de muerte y enfermedades sufridas por los habitantes de la ciudad.

Para ello se ha realizado un estudio con las patologías halladas en los restos óseos de los depósitos del museo arqueológico municipal de Jerez de la Frontera, y que fueron hallados principalmente en enterramientos epidémicos. Igualmente se ha podido exponer un principio de localización de las zonas usadas como lugares inhumación y su posterior uso tras el cambio en las costumbres funerarias a principios del siglo XIX, con lo que se ha realizado una visión de la influencia en el ámbito del nuevo urbanismo de la ciudad.

Resumen
Doctor en historia por la Universidad de Cádiz (2016), con la siguiente tésis doctoral: Arqueología Funeraria y Paleopatología de la población religiosa de Jerez en época moderna: Una primera aproximación, dirigida por los doctores Dario Bernal y Miguel Botella de la Universidad de Cádiz y de Granada respectivamente. Licenciado en historia por la Universidad de Sevilla (2003), Master en Patrimonio Histórico Arqueológico por la Universidad de Cádiz (2010), con la tesina titulada: La Cripta del Teatro Thebussem (Medina Sidonia, Cádiz), una primera aproximación antropológica y paleopatológica a la comunidad religiosa de los siglos XVII y XVIII.
FORTHCOMING: Conflict Landscapes: An Archaeology of the International Brigades in the Spanish Civil War by Salvatore Garfi. Paperback; 175x245mm; 220pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £35.00). 530 2019. ISBN 9781789691344. Buy Now

This book is an archaeological exploration of the conflict landscapes encountered by volunteers of the International Brigades in the Spanish Civil War of 1936-39. A great deal is known about the Brigades in terms of inter-world war geopolitics, their history and make-up. But less is known about the materiality of the landscapes in which they lived, fought, and died.

The Spanish Civil War was a relatively static conflict. As in the First World War, it consisted of entrenched Republican government lines facing similarly entrenched Nationalist (rebel) lines, and these ran north to south across Spain. Fighting was intermittent, so the frontline soldiers had to settle in, and make what was an attritional war-scape, a place to live in and survive. This research examines one such war-scape as a place of ‘settlement’, where soldiers lived their daily lives as well as confronting the rigours of war – and these were the volunteers of the International Brigades, both foreign and Spanish, who occupied a section of lines southeast of Zaragoza in Aragón in 1937 and 1938.

This research draws, not only on the techniques of landscape archaeology, but also on the writings of international volunteers in Spain – in particular, George Orwell – and it incorporates historical photography as a uniquely analytical, archaeological resource.

About the Author
SALVATORE GARFI has been a professional archaeologist since 1974, working on a range of projects from the prehistoric to the contemporary. Besides working in Britain, he has worked in Egypt, Southern Arabia, and elsewhere in the Middle East. Since 2010, he has specialised in the archaeology of modern conflict, and his doctoral research was on the late 20th Century conflict in Western Sahara. He was a post-doctoral Leverhulme Fellow in the School of Cultures, Languages and Area Studies, University of Nottingham (2015-2018), and co-founder of the International Brigades Archaeological Project (IBAP), which ran from 2014 to 2015.

Table of Contents

List of Figures
Acknowledgements
PART ONE
Chapter 1: Introduction
Chapter 2: The Spanish Civil War
PART TWO
Chapter 3: On Trenches and Field Fortifications
Chapter 4: Trench Systems as Settlement Archaeology: The Salient at Mediana de Aragón
PART THREE
Chapter 5: Experiencing the Mediana Lines
Chapter 6: An Archaeology from Photographs: Imaging the Aragón Front Lines
Chapter 7: History in ‘Three Dimensions’
Appendix: Tables
Bibliography
FORTHCOMING: La raccolta e la distribuzione dell’acqua a Ventotene in età romana Ricerche archeologiche nell’isola di Ventotene 2 by Giovanni Maria De Rossi. Paperback; 205x290mm; 380pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Italian text. (Print RRP £65.00). 527 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . ISBN 9781789691467. Buy Now

La raccolta e la distribuzione dell’acqua a Ventotene in età romana is presented in two parts. The first examines the topographical and technical problem of the water supply on the island of Ventotene, where there is an absence of natural springs. The second, consisting of separate entries, analyses the individual components of the water supply system built by the Romans on the island. The Roman installation developed in two phases alongside changes in life at the villa located at Ventotene: the first connected to a residence used for otium, the second to an official site of relegatio ad insulam.

The Roman architect exploited the island’s natural slope to collect rainwater in a large initial reservoir, later known as the ‘Cistern of the Prisoners’, surmounted by a vast catchment basin: from here a conduit departed which, through various branches, reached the ‘heart’ of the villa extending over the promontory of Punta Eolo and the port facilities. The water was channelled from the cistern by an extensive network of tunnels, dug, depending on the height, either wholly or partially into the tufa or built on the surface.

Even during the second phase, when the villa was turned into a large and elaborate residential complex used throughout the year, it could rely only on rainwater as a resource. The Roman architect was thus forced to increase the collection areas, attempting to capture as much water as possible. This was achieved by increasing the number of large initial collection tanks, dislocating them strategically around the island to ensure that each of the sectors with the highest residential density and main infrastructure installations had its own independent resource alongside the standard existing resources. The number of catchment basins also multiplied considerably along the route of the main conduit and its branches.

About the Author
GIOVANNI MARIA DE ROSSI (Rome 1942), Full Professor of Topography of Ancient Italy at the University of Salerno, has published many articles and books on ancient and medieval topography. He has directed archaeological excavations in Italy, and he conceived and designed the Archaeological park and Historical-Archaeological museum at Ventotene island, where he has been director for over twenty years.

Italian Description
Il volume si compone di due parti. Nella prima viene esaminato il problema topografico e tecnico relativo all’approvvigionamento idrico dell’isola di Ventotene, in rapporto alla sostanziale assenza di sorgenti d’acqua. Nella seconda, composta di schede, si analizzano le singole componenti del sistema idrico costruito dai Romani nell’isola. L’impianto romano va inserito nelle due fasi di vita della villa realizzata a Ventotene: la prima legata a una residenza per l’otium, la seconda a una sede ufficiale per la relegatio ad insulam.

L’architetto romano sfruttò il naturale pendio dell’isola per raccogliere acqua piovana in un grande serbatoio iniziale, poi detto “Cisterna dei Carcerati”, sormontato da un vastissimo compluvio di raccolta: da qui partiva un condotto che raggiungeva, con varie diramazioni, il “cuore” della villa distesa sul promontorio di Punta Eolo e gli impianti portuali. Lo smistamento dell’acqua dal serbatoio venne affidato a una capillare rete di cunicoli, scavati, a seconda delle quote, interamente o parzialmente nel tufo oppure costruiti in superficie. Per aumentare notevolmente la quantità d’acqua messa a disposizione dell’impianto, si realizzarono lungo i condotti abbinamenti formati da compluvi di superficie e cisterne di raccolta.

Potendo contare, anche per la seconda fase, in cui però la villa erta stata trasformata in un grande e articolato complesso residenziale da utilizzarsi per tutto l’anno, sulla sola risorsa delle piogge, all’architetto romano di turno non rimase che l’espediente di aumentare i punti di raccolta, cercando così di captar
FORTHCOMING: Atlas of Ceramic Fabrics 2 Italy: Southern Tyrrhenian. Neolithic – Bronze Age by Sara T. Levi, Valentina Cannavò and Daniele Brunelli with contributions by Andrea Di Renzoni. Paperback; 175x245mm; 160pp; 40 figures, 17 tables and 16-page colour plate section containing 163 illustrations. (Print RRP £35.00). 525 2019. ISBN 9781789691177. Buy Now

Atlas of Ceramic Fabrics 2. Italy: Southern Tyrrhenian. Neolithic – Bronze Age presents and interprets the petrographic composition of pre and protohistoric pottery (6th-1st mill. BCE) found in the southwestern part of Italy. It is the second in a series of atlases organized according to geographical areas, chronology and types of wares. In this book, 890 samples from 29 sites are discussed, as a result of more than 50 years of interdisciplinary archaeological, technological and archaeometric research by the author’s team. 90 petrographic fabrics (the potters’ ‘recipes’) are defined and presented based on their lithological character - a tool that can be used to compare the different components of the ceramic pastes and to check possible provenance of non-local pots.

The volume is organized in chapters focused on methodology, fabric description and distribution, followed by the archaeological implications and the database, with contributions by Andrea Di Renzoni (CNR-ISMA, Roma). Illustrations and descriptions of the fabrics and the list of samples provide a rigorous and transparent presentation of the data. The archaeological implications are discussed, cross-correlating the origin with technology, variability, standardization, chronology, function, social organization, circulation, style, typology and cultural identity. The volume aims to demonstrate that technological variability is as important as stylistic distinctions.

About the Authors
SARA T. LEVI research focuses on the ancient pottery through an integrated approach, and on the archaeology of central Mediterranean. She obtained a PhD in Archaeology at the Sapienza University in Rome (1996). Her findings have been published in scientific journals and books, including a volume on the Italo-Mycenaean pottery (2014). Since 2015 she has been teaching at Hunter College in New York, after teaching eight years at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia. Since 2009 she leads the interdisciplinary archaeological investigations at Stromboli (Aeolian Islands) and at Cannatello (Agrigento). Both projects hold international field school for students in a multidisciplinary environment.

VALENTINA CANNAVÒ research focuses on the archaeometric investigation of ancient pottery. She is a research fellow at University of Modena and Reggio Emilia where she obtained the PhD in Archaeological Science (2010). Valentina teaches pottery technology (Ferrara University) to the graduate students, she is in charge of the database of prehistoric pottery and is the director of the field laboratory at Stromboli (Aeolian Islands).

DANIELE BRUNELLI research focuses on the petrography, geochemistry and tectonics of oceanic ridges. He obtained his PhD at the University of Bologna (2002). Since 2007 he has been teaching at the University of Modena, associated research at CNR-ISMAR, invited professor at the University of Brest and the Institute de Physique du Globe de Paris. He supports the development of the petrographic and geochemical approach of the archaeo-team by bringing the expertise of the geological exploration of the volcanic terrains and the availability of cutting-edge analytical approaches.

Table of Contents (Provisional)
1. Introduction: Q&A
2. Fabrics
2.1. Classification
2.2. Lithology
2.3. Geographical areas and sites
2.4. Comparison with Northern Tyrrhenian
2.5. Comparison with other Sicilian areas
3. Archaeological implications
3.1. Chronological and functional trends
3.2. Raw materials and paste preparation
3.3. Circulation
3.4. Social organization of production
3.5. Stylistic and technological interactions
4. Databases
DB1 Samples by fabric
DB2 Samples by site
DB3 Fabrics (description)
DB4 Fabrics (microscope images)
5. Bibliography
FORTHCOMING: Country in the City: Agricultural Functions of Protohistoric Urban Settlements (Aegean and Western Mediterranean) edited by Dominique Garcia, Raphaël Orgeolet, Maia Pomadère and Julian Zurbach. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+200; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (32 plates in colour). (Print RRP £35.00). 518 2019. ISBN 9781789691320. Book contents pageBuy Now

The existence of an opposition between rural and urban spaces is an important question for our societies, and one that has been posed since the radical transformations of the 20th century and the so-called ‘end of the peasants’. In this context it becomes also a question for archaeologists and historians. This book assembles contributions on the place of agricultural production in the context of urbanization in the Late Bronze and Early Iron Age Mediterranean. The contributions concentrate on the second-millennium Aegean and the protohistoric north-western Mediterranean. They offer a reflection on the nature of urbanization and its consequences for rural spaces near cities and on the many ways in which rural spaces and agricultural activities may be intertwined with urban spaces – a reconsideration of the very nature of urbanism. A deliberate accent is laid on the comparative perspectives between different regions and periods of Mediterranean protohistory, and on the integration of all kinds of sources and research methods, from texts to survey to environmental archaeology.

About the Editors
DOMINIQUE GARCIA is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Aix-Marseille and, since 2014, has been president of the lnstitut national de recherches archéologiques préventives (National Institute of Preventive Archaeological Research).

RAPHAËL ORGEOLET is Senior Lecturer in Mediterranean Bronze Age Archaeology at Aix-Marseille University. His main research interests focus on habitat, funeral practices and society. He has participated in various archaeological projects in the Mediterranean and especially in the Aegean and is now leading the excavations of the Neolithic and Bronze Age site of Kirrha in Mainland Greece.

MAIA POMADÈRE is a Senior Lecturer in Aegean Archaeology at the University of Paris 1-Panthéon Sorbonne and member of the UMR 7041-ArScAn. Her research interests encompass Aegean Bronze Age and Early Iron Age archaeology, especially architecture and funerary practices. She has been directing an archaeological excavation in the Minoan town of Malia in Crete since 2005, and is co-directing a geoarchaeological project on the same site.

JULIEN ZURBACH is Senior Lecturer in Greek history at the ENS Paris. He is working on agricultural practices, land distribution and workforce in the Aegean world from the Late Bronze Age to the Archaic period. He concentrates particularly on Mycenaean epigraphy and has led field projects in Kirrha (Phocis) and Miletus (Ionia).
FORTHCOMING: Macedonia–Alexandria: The Monumental Funerary Complexes of the Late Classical and Hellenistic Age by Dorota Gorzelany. Paperback; 175x245mm; 244pp; 76 Figures (44 full colour, 32 monochrome). (Print RRP £32.00). 517 2019. ISBN 9781789691368. Buy Now

The type of monumental tomb that developed in Macedonia in the late Classical period was undoubtedly the most impressive of all the Greek funerary complexes. It was a burial chamber with a vestibule, built of stone blocks, vaulted and furnished with an architectural facade, concealed under a large tumulus rising above the ground. The concept of the Macedonian sepulcher, which the Macedonians and Greeks settling in Alexandria ad Aegyptum, the city founded by Alexander the Great on the Egyptian coast, brought with them, influenced the structural form of the underground tombs that were developed in the new city. ‘Macedonia–Alexandria’ explores the scope of this influence, comparing in synthetic form the structural elements of the cist graves, chamber and rock-cut tombs of Macedonia with the Alexandrian hypogea, while taking into account the different geographical factors that conditioned them. This is followed by a presentation of the facade and interior decoration, and a discussion of the themes of wall painting inside the tombs and a characteristic of the surviving tomb furnishings.

The Macedonian tomb reflects in its form Greek eschatological beliefs ingrained in the mystery religions and the social ideology of the Macedonian kingdom. The assimilation of these beliefs is seen in the architectural arrangements, the vestibule and chamber plan, the facade (in Macedonia) or courtyard (in Alexandria), the structural and architectural interior decoration, and the furniture found in the chamber. These elements refer to palace architecture and determine the symbolic function of the tomb. The cult of the dead aspect is emphasized by wall painting iconography, the form of burial and the nature of the grave goods accompanying the deceased. In Alexandria, the role of rituals celebrated in the family tombs is attested by the declining size of burial chambers in favour of the vestibules and by the introduction of an open courtyard as well as the presence of altars. With regard to the ideology behind the Alexandrian complexes, the author explores the issue of the coexistence and the popularity of Egyptian beliefs adopted into Alexandrian sepulchral art, emphasizing the differences in the perception of the role of the tomb in the Macedonian and Egyptian consciousness.

About the Author
DOROTA GORZELANY studied Mediterranean Archaeology at the Jagiellonian University, Krakow, where she received her PhD in 2005. Since 1999 she has been a keeper of the ancient art collection in the Princes Czartoryski Museum (National Museum in Krakow) and a curator of the Gallery of Ancient Art. Since 2005 she has taught Ancient Art at the Pontifical University of John Paul II and since 2018 at the University of Silesia. She is a member of ICOM-Poland and Commission on the Archaeology of the Mediterranean Countries in the Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences (PAU). Her research focusses on Greek and Roman iconography and the history of the museum collection.

Table of Contents
Introduction
Chapter I Historical outline
Chapter II Types of funerary complexes from the territory of Macedonia
Chapter III Types of funerary complexes in Alexandria
Chapter IV Symbolism of the architectural forms, painted decoration and interior furnishings of tombs from Macedonia
Chapter V Symbolism of the architectural forms, painted decoration and interior furnishings of tombs from Alexandria
Summary
Bibliography
Index of localities and tombs
Topical index
FORTHCOMING: Rus Africum IV: La fattoria Bizantina di Aïn Wassel, Africa Procuonsularis (Alto Tell, Tunisia) Lo scavo stratigrafico e i materiali edited by Mariette de Vos Raaijmakers and Barbara Maurina. Paperback; 205x290mm; 400pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Italian text with English abstracts. (Print RRP £75.00). 515 2019. ISBN 9781789691153. Buy Now

Aïn Wassel is the only rural site of Africa Proconsularis which has been excavated using the stratigraphic method and the detailed results are published in this volume thanks to an archaeological field survey of the surrounding rural region. The interpretation of the stratigraphic sequence of the excavated area was able to determine a precise chrono-typology of pottery and amphoras, and to outline the importance of the Vandal and Byzantine period, which was confirmed by additional data from the survey.

The excavation provided evidence of sustainable intensive mixed farming: an oil mill and press, a grain hand mill, a sundial, bones of cattle and dromedaries raised for labour, transport, milk, meat, skins, wool. Remains of fowl, such as a partridge and fragments of ash tree, pine and olive stones were found and analyzed. Local imitations of African Red Slip (ARS) wares were identified for the first time, and three new types of amphoras of large dimensions were discovered and classified as Aïn Wassel 1, 2 and 3. The excavation proved that in the 7th c. AD North Africa was still very active and dynamic, where regional trade used both fluvial and ground transportation. Until recently, this was considered a period of crisis, abandonment of the countryside and ruralization of cities; it was not so.

About the Editors
MARIETTE DE VOS RAAIJMAKERS, BA and MA Utrecht, PhD Leiden, is retired Full Professor of Classical Archaeology at the University of Trento (Italy) where she founded in 1994 the Laboratorio di Archeologia e Scienze Affini. She conducted archaeological fieldwork in Italy (Rome, Pompeii, Sicily, Isera, Tivoli, Ventotene) from 1968, in North Africa from 1994 and in Turkey from 2003-2005. Her research interests lie in domestic architecture and late-antique and rural archaeology in Tunisia, Algeria and Cilicia.

BARBARA MAURINA is Archaeological Curator at the Museo Civico di Rovereto Foundation. She received her BA in Roman Archaeology from the University of Trento, an advanced degree from the University of Trieste, her PhD in ‘Cultures of the Roman Provinces’ from the University of Siena and she has attended post-degree courses at the Institute of Archaeology of the University College London. She has been collaborator at various universities, museums and institutes and has taken part in several archaeological campaigns in Italy and abroad. Her main research interests include Roman and Late antique material culture, Roman wall coatings and fieldwork. In the years 1994-1996 she took part in the archaeological excavation of Aïn Wassel in Tunisia and afterwards she studied the amphorae coming from the site.

Italian Description
Fino ad oggi Aïn Wassel è l'unico sito rurale dell'Africa Proconsularis che è stato scavato con metodo stratigrafico, pubblicato in dettaglio e contestualizzato grazie al survey archeologico della regione circostante. L'interpretazione della sequenza stratigrafica dei 252 m2 scavati ha permesso di determinare una precisa crono-tipologia di vasellame e anfore, e di delineare l'importanza del periodo vandalo e bizantino, come confermato da altri dati provenienti dall'indagine sul campo.

Gli scavi dimostrano un'agricoltura mista intensiva sostenibile: un elemento di macina e una pressa olearia, una macina manuale per cereali, una meridiana, ossa di bovini e dromedari, allevati per lavoro, trasporti, latte, carne, pelli e lana. Resti di uccelli, come una pernice e frammenti di frassini, noccioli di pino e ulivo sono stati trovati e analizzati. Le imitazioni locali delle ceramiche di sigillata africana (African Red Slip) sono identificate per la prima volta durante lo scavo di Aïn Wassel e l'indagine sul campo nella regione circostante. Tre nuovi tipi di anfora di grandi dimensioni furono scoperti ad Aïn Wassel e classificati come Aïn Wassel 1, 2 e 3. Lo scavo dimostrò che nel 7°secolo il Nord Africa era ancora molto attivo e dinamico
FORTHCOMING: Greco-Roman Cities at the Crossroads of Cultures: The 20th Anniversary of Polish-Egyptian Conservation Mission Marina el-Alamein edited by Grażyna Bąkowska-Czerner and Rafał Czerner. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+312 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (128 colour plates). (Print RRP £60.00). 513 2019. ISBN 9781789691481. Book contents pageBuy Now

The ancient town discovered at the site of today’s Marina el-Alamein (located on the northern coast of Egypt) developed from the 2nd century BC to the 6th century AD. It found itself at the crossroads of several civilisations: Hellenic, later replaced by Roman, and ultimately Christian, and was always strongly influenced by Egyptian tradition. A variety of cultures appeared and met here and grew in strength – then their significance weakened – but they always co-existed and influenced one another. The syncretism prevailing here is notable in the spheres of art, architecture, religion and worship.

2015 marked thirty years since the discovery of the remains of the ancient city, which, for many centuries, had been unknown to the world. The remains were found unexpectedly during the preparatory work for the construction of a modern tourist settlement on the Mediterranean coast, and the significance and extraordinary value of the discovery was immediately recognised. Now the ancient city, and the historic remains of its buildings, are gradually coming to light.

The Jubilee was twofold, since 2015 marked also the 20th anniversary of the setting up of the Polish-Egyptian Conservation Mission, Marina el-Alamein. Throughout this time, both architectural and archaeological research have been carried out at the site, many discoveries have been made, numerous relics of historic building structures have been preserved, and conservation methods have been improved. In the jubilee year, researchers who work on archaeological sites and towns with a similar history and position in the ancient world in the realms of art and culture were invited to contribute to a scientific discussion and exchange of experiences. The contributors were representatives of different disciplines and research methodologies: archaeologists, architects, Egyptologists, specialists in religious studies, historians and conservators. The papers in the present volume encompass interdisciplinary reviews of both new and long-term studies carried out in various regions of the ancient world.

The papers present research that was conducted in different regions ranging from ancient Mauritania, through Africa, Egypt, Cyprus, Palestine, Syria, as well as sites in Crimea and Georgia. The topography of cities, the architecture of public buildings, as well as houses and their décor — architectural, sculptural and painted — are presented. Religious syncretism and the importance of ancient texts are discussed. Studies on pottery are also presented. The volume includes studies on the conservation of architectural remains, sculpture and painting. Several articles are devoted to the study of Marina el-Alamein; others talk about ancient Alexandria, Deir el-Bahari, Hermopolis Magna, Bakchias, Pelusium, Kom Wasit, Berenike, Ptolemais, Apollonia, Palmyra, Nea Paphos, as well as Chersonesus Taurica and Apsarus.
FORTHCOMING: NVMINA MAGNA: Roma e il culto dei Grandi Dei di Samotracia by Emiliano Cruccas. Paperback; 175x245mm; 170pp; 1 table, 73 figures (21 plates in colour). Italian text throughout. 507 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . ISBN 9781789690910. Buy Now

The cult of the Great Gods of Samothrace, which became popular starting as early as the 7th century BC in the eastern Mediterranean, is characterised by regional differences concerning cultural manifestations and relationships with local deities. Confused and identified with the so-called Cabiri, these deities had their main sanctuaries on the islands of Samothrace and Lemnos and in Thebes, in Boeotia. The connection between these deities and others like Dioscuri, Penates and Lares and their protective function seem to be a key to understanding the complex syncretism that characterises the cult of the Great Gods from the period of Roman conquests in the Eastern world. The literary sources seem to highlight, in fact, in the period in which the interests in the Eastern world are crucial to the foreign policy of Rome, an evident attempt to identify the Kabiroi of Samothrace with typically Roman gods like Lares and Penates. The aim of this book is to underline the main aspects of the cult in light of the influences of Roman cultural and mythological substratum.

Il culto dei Grandi Dei di Samotracia, diffuso nel Mediterraneo orientale a partire almeno dal VII secolo a.C., è caratterizzato da differenze nei diversi bacini geografici, sia per ciò che concerne le manifestazioni culturali, sia per quanto riguarda i rapporti con le divinità locali. Confusi ed identificati con i cosiddetti Cabiri, queste divinità avevano i loro principali santuari sulle isole di Samotracia e Lemno e a Tebe di Beozia. La loro connessione con i Dioscuri, i Penati e i Lari e la loro funzione protettiva sembrano essere la chiave di lettura per comprendere il complesso sincretismo che caratterizza il culto dei Grandi Dei a partire dalla conquista romana del Mediterraneo occidentale. Le fonti letterarie sembrano evidenziare, infatti, nel periodo nel quale le azioni di politica estera di Roma si concentrano in Oriente, una forte volontà di identificare gli dei di Samotracia con divinità tipicamente romane come Lari e Penati. Lo scopo di questo libro è quello di mettere in evidenza i principali aspetti del culto attraverso l’analisi delle influenze del sostrato culturale e mitologico di Roma.

About the Author
EMILIANO CRUCCAS completed his degree (2002) and his specialisation in Classical Archaeology (2006) at the University of Cagliari and received his PhD (2011) from the University of Tübingen (with a thesis on the cult of the Kabiroi and Great Gods). He worked on a two-year contract at the Young Researchers project at the University of Cagliari and holds a three-year postdoctoral grant. He is now (2013-present day) field director for the ISTHMOS excavation project in the Punic-roman city of Nora (south Sardinia).

EMILIANO CRUCCAS ha conseguito presso l’Università di Cagliari la laurea (2002) e la specializzazione in Archeologia Classica (2006). È Dottore di ricerca con una tesi sul culto dei Cabiri e dei Grandi Dei discussa all’Università di Tübingen (2011). Ha svolto ricerca presso l’Università di Cagliari con un contratto di due anni per Giovani Ricercatori e con un assegno di ricerca di tre anni. Attualmente dirige sul campo il progetto di scavo ISTHMOS nella città punico-romana di Nora (sud Sardegna).
FORTHCOMING: De la provincia Celtiberia a la qūrā de Santabariyya: Arqueología de la Antigüedad tardía en la provincia de Cuenca (siglos V-VIII d.C.) by Rafael Barroso Cabrera. Paperback; 205x290mm; 630pp; 174 figures, 5 tables, 2 maps, 80 plates (black & white throughout). Spanish text with extended English summary. (Print RRP £75.00). 498 2019. ISBN 9781789690644. Buy Now

The central position of the province of Cuenca, Spain, was a decisive factor in its relationship with Toledo, the capital of the Visigothic kingdom. Also, its location meant that, from the middle of the 6th Century, it was directly affected by some of the most relevant historical episodes of those times: the foundation of the royal city of Reccopoli, the establishment of the Servitanus monastery, the transformation of Toledo as the metropolitan seat of the Carthaginian province and the military campaigns against the imperial forces. Parallel to this, archaeological excavations document a process of disrupting the old urban centres in favour of small populations within their municipal territory. This process was resolved with a shift of power centres towards other cities supported by the political power of Toledo: Toledo itself in the case of Segobriga, Reccopoli in the Arcavica’s case and Illunum to the detriment of Valeria. In this way, the ancient Roman cities were reduced to serve as a symbolic reference of the small villages that developed in the shadow of the old urban centres. This volume presents a historical and archaeological study of the province of Cuenca in Late Antiquity. The study concludes with an examination of the archaeological collection from the province, which has been divided into three large groups: monumental sculpture and epigraphic items, ceramic productions and metalwork arts. The first group is mainly constituted by the findings made in the excavations of Cabeza de Griego (Segobriga). Most of the pottery productions correspond to vessels placed as funerary deposits. Due to the absence of excavations, the ceramics for kitchen and storage use are hardly represented, whereas there is an overrepresentation of types destined for use as libations or offerings. Finally, most of the elements of industrial arts correspond to elements of the Latin-Mediterranean fashion or Byzantine style of the 7th Century. The almost total absence of materials corresponding to the Pontic-Danubian fashion also should be noted.

La posición central de la provincia de Cuenca ha sido el factor determinante en su relación con Toledo, la capital del reino visigodo. Esta situación fue la causa también de que, desde mediados del siglo VI, se viera directamente afectada por algunos de los episodios históricos más relevantes del momento: la fundación de la ciudad regia de Recópolis, el establecimiento del monasterio Servitano, la transformación de Toledo en sede metropolitana de la provincia cartaginesa y las campañas militares contra los ejércitos imperiales. De forma paralela, las excavaciones arqueológicas documentan un proceso de desestructuración de los antiguos centros urbanos a favor de pequeñas poblaciones de su territorio. Este proceso se resolvió con un cambio de centros de poder hacia otras ciudades apoyadas por el poder político de Toledo: Toledo mismo en el caso de Segóbriga, Recópolis en el caso de Arcávica e Illunum en detrimento de Valeria. De este modo, las ciudades romanas quedaron reducidas servir como referentes simbólicos de las pequeñas poblaciones que se desarrollaron a la sombra de los antiguos centros urbanos. El presente trabajo se completa con el estudio de la colección arqueológica procedente de la provincia, que se ha dividido en tres grandes grupos: escultura monumental y epigrafía, producciones cerámicas y artes industriales. El primer grupo está constituido principalmente por los hallazgos realizados en las excavaciones de Cabeza de Griego (Segóbriga). Por otro lado, la mayoría de las producciones de cerámica corresponden a vasijas colocadas como depósitos funerarios. Debido a la ausencia de excavaciones, la cerámica de cocina y de almacenamiento apenas aparece representada, mientras que hay una sobrerrepresentación de tipos destinados a libaciones u ofrendas. Finalmente, la mayoría de los materiales de las artes industriales corresponden a elementos de la moda latino-mediterránea o del estilo
FORTHCOMING: Urbanisation in the Time of Claudius in the Western Provinces of the Empire by Erika Cappelletto. Paperback; 205x290mm; 314pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £50.00). 487 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . ISBN 9781789690507. Buy Now

This volume analyses Claudius’ activities in the provinces of the western Empire in order to get an idea of his political attitude in a broader context and see how his interests in the provinces influenced the urban works.

The first aim of the project was to find structures, urban development and changes in the cities which were directly connected to Claudius; the second was to reflect on planning issues and strategies adopted by the emperor. A comprehensive examination of new buildings, or additions to prior ones (with statues, for example), was conducted in order to understand the underlying intentions, as well as how, and in which way, the prototypes in Italy influenced construction in the provinces. The final aim was connected to Venturi’s work, who deals with Claudius’ activities in Italy and in particular at Rome and Ravenna. The question was whether the trends found by Venturi can also be applied to the provinces. As a result of these investigations, the author has been able to propose new trends which might explain the emperor’s political actions.

About the Author
ERIKA CAPPELLETTO received a degree from the University of Venice with a thesis about the representation of spinning implements on gravestones. She gained her Masters from the same university with a study of the black glazed pottery from Pompeii. During this period, she participated in different projects in Italy and studied for six months at Ankara with the Erasmus project. Later, she moved to Heidelberg where she completed her PhD. She has participated in international projects and conferences, frequented workshops and undertaken an internship in digital archaeology (3d reconstruction and modelling). She currently works in cultural heritage in Germany.
FORTHCOMING: Funerary Archaeology and Changing Identities: Community Practices in Roman-Period Sardinia by Mauro Puddu. Paperback; 205x290mm; 210pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £40.00). 472 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . ISBN 9781789690002. Buy Now

Three main research-questions intertwine in this volume. These are, first, the theoretical issue of how we can infer identities from archaeology; second, what is the material relationship between Sardinia's communities and the Roman world's power and culture when looking at the burial evidence on the ground; third, how our interpretive frameworks of today's world and symbolic structure can affect our understanding of the past. This book attempts to answer these three questions by analysing in detail the funerary evidence from mostly-unpublished burial sites from southern and central Sardinia that can become key to an alternative interpretation of the island and of other Roman Provinces. The questions are answered throughout the book by drawing on social studies, particularly post-colonial approaches to the history of the past, interpretive frameworks on the Roman world, and semiotic theories. By looking in-depth at the archaeological evidence from Sardinia's burials, this book retrieves the active and creative role played by the local communities in shaping back the Roman-world within the specific material and historical conditions they lived in.

About the Author
MAURO PUDDU has spent most of his years as an archaeologist researching Sardinia. After studying at the Universita degli Studi di Cagliari for his BA in Cultural Heritage and his first Masters in Classical Archaeology, he decided to broaden up his research horizons by taking a second Masters at University College London in Theoretical Archaeology. He applied the knowledge acquired in Italy and the United Kingdom to research the funerary practices of Roman-period Sardinia during his PhD at the University of Cambridge, which he has recently completed. During a decade of research, the author has taken part in numerous successful archaeological projects, including the excavation of “La Sella del Diavolo”, Cagliari, run by the Soprintendenza archeologica di Cagliari; the Al-Mafjar Project in Jericho, Palestine, run by Birzeit University and the Khalili Research Centre, University of Oxford; and the Interamna Lirenas Project, run by the University of Cambridge. While working on his future research projects and publications, the author has been working as an archaeologist around London and Cambridge for the last three years, taking part in a vast number of projects, including the excavation of the Westminster School next to Westminster Abbey.

Table of Contents (Provisional)
PREFACE
1. ROMAN-PERIOD SARDINIA: A SEMIOTIC THEORY OF IDENTITY
2. BURIALS OF SARDINIA: METHODOLOGY OF DATA COLLECTION
3.FUNERARY PRACTICE AND THE URBAN COMMUNITIES OF SULCI
4.FUNERARY PRACTICE AND RURAL COMMUNITIES OF MASULLAS
5. FUNERARY PRACTICES AND URBAN COMMUNITIES IN KARALES
6. CONNECTING THE DOTS: SULCI, MASULLAS, KARALES AND THE MEDITTERRANEAN
7. SARDINIA’S COMMUNITIES AND THE MEDITERRANEAN AT LARGE
APPENDIX 1
APPENDIX 2: COARSE WARE TYPOLOGY OF CERAMICS FROM MASULLAS
Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture: Subscriptions and Back-Issues One volume published annually edited by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph (Heads of Editorial Board). ISBN 2399-1844-HOME. Book contents pageBuy Now

For the Hellenistic Period ceramics and other commodities of daily life represent probably the most neglected objects in archaeological research. Yet, the study of Hellenistic material culture has intensified during the last twenty years, with a focus clearly on what is by far the largest category of finds, pottery. Meanwhile research has gained momentum, but still there has unfortunately been no parallel development in the media landscape. Apart from monographs, the publication of conference proceedings, which usually follow several years after the event, have remained the principal method of disseminating research results. Still lacking is a publication appearing regularly and at short intervals, that focusses research on Hellenistic pottery and is easily accessible.

The Journal of Hellenistic Pottery – JHP – wants to close this gap.

JHP is scheduled to appear once a year, more often if necessary. It should provide a forum for all kinds of studies on Hellenistic pottery and everyday objects. Apart from professional articles, the journal will contain book reviews, short presentations of research projects (including dissertations) and general news. The Editorial Board is headed by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph.

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Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture: Subscription Portal for Online Access by One volume published annually. Edited by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph (Heads of Editorial Board). ISBN 2399-1844-PORTAL. Download

Welcome to the online portal for access to volumes of the Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture (JHP).

For the Hellenistic Period ceramics and other commodities of daily life represent probably the most neglected objects in archaeological research. Yet, the study of Hellenistic material culture has intensified during the last twenty years, with a focus clearly on what is by far the largest category of finds, pottery. Meanwhile research has gained momentum, but still there has unfortunately been no parallel development in the media landscape. Apart from monographs, the publication of conference proceedings, which usually follow several years after the event, have remained the principal method of disseminating research results. Still lacking is a publication appearing regularly and at short intervals, that focusses research on Hellenistic pottery and is easily accessible.

The Journal of Hellenistic Pottery – JHP – wants to close this gap.

JHP is scheduled to appear once a year, more often if necessary. It should provide a forum for all kinds of studies on Hellenistic pottery and everyday objects. Apart from professional articles, the journal will contain book reviews, short presentations of research projects (including dissertations) and general news. The Editorial Board is headed by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph.

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NEW: The Mycenaean Cemetery at Achaia Clauss near Patras People, material remains and culture in context by Constantinos Paschalidis with contributions by Photini J. P. McGeorge and Wiesław Więckowski. Paperback; 205x290mm; xxiv+510 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (277 plates in colour). (Print RRP £90.00). 436 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919191. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919207. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Mycenaean Cemetery at Achaia Clauss near Patras: People, material remains and culture in context comprises the study of the finds from the excavation of the Mycenaean cemetery of Clauss near Patras, carried out by the University of Ioannina and the Archaeological Society at Athens from 1988 to 1992, under the direction of Professor Thanassis Papadopoulos. In the course of the excavation project, fifteen chambered tombs were located and researched in detail, to be added to those already known from the pre-war excavations by Nikolaos Kyparissis. The presentation of the topic expands into seven thematic chapters: from a general review of the cemetery space and the sites, to analytical description of the excavation, remarks on the architecture, study of the finds, analysis of the burial customs and finally, narration of the overall history of the cemetery according to chronological period and generation of its occupants. The eighth and last chapter is an addendum including a brief presentation of the anthropological analysis of the skeletal material by Photini J. P. McGeorge and Wiesław Więckowski. The Mycenaean cemetery at Achaia Clauss near Patras presents fragments of the life and death of some members of a local community that existed for almost four centuries at the western end of the Mycenaean world.

About the Author
CONSTANTINOS PASCHALIDIS was born in Athens in 1973. He studied History at the Ionian University, Corfu, and Archaeology at the University of Ioannina, where he successfully composed his doctoral thesis on the Mycenaean cemetery at Clauss, near Patras. Starting in 1992 he has participated in and worked for several archaeological projects (excavations, surveys and study-seasons) in Crete, Keos, Kythnos, Achaea, Argolid, Kefalonia, Ithaca, Corfu, Chalkidiki in Greece, as well as at the sites of Ghor as Safi and Tell Kafrein in Jordan. Since 2002 he is a Curator of Antiquities at the Department of Prehistoric, Egyptian, Cypriot and Near Eastern Collections of the National Archaeological Museum at Athens, and from 2012 he holds the position of Secretary at the Central Archaeological Council of the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports. Paschalidis.
NEW: Etnicidad vs. Aculturación: Las necrópolis castellanas de los siglos V-VI d.C. y el asentamiento visigodo en la Península Ibérica. Una mirada desde la meseta sur by Rafael Barroso Cabrera. Paperback; 203x276mm; 238 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Spanish text with English summary. (Print RRP £35.00). 72 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690798. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690804. Book contents pageDownload

The Visigoth settlement in the Iberian Peninsula and its relationship with the archaeological record of the 5th-6th centuries AD continues to be one of the most controversial issues in Spanish archaeology. The controversy relates to politics as much as it relates to archaeological research with two points remaining particularly controversial: the alleged use of the Visigoth past by the Francoist intelligentsia as an ideological affirmation of the regime and the contribution of archaeologist Julio Martínez Santa-Olalla in supporting and enabling this re-interpretation of Visigothic archaeology.

The purely archaeological aspect of the controversy relates to an archaeological interpretation, stemming from the ranks of the so-called New Archeology, of the Castilian necropoleis containing grave goods of Pontic-Danubian type. This interpretation places special emphasis on social and cultural phenomena above the ethnic criteria defended by the Vienna School.

This volume approaches the ideological question that underlies these controversies, as well as their repercussions in the direction adopted by later archaeological investigations in relation to the history of Spain. The author attempts to deconstruct the work of Martínez Santa-Olalla and places it in the context of the scientific production of his time. At the same time, it relativizes the role played by the Visigoth period in the Francoist ideological construction.

Once the discussion is framed in these terms, the author dedicates his study to a refutation of the cultural interpretation of the phenomenon of the Visigothic necropoleis of the Castilian plateau based on the archaeological data and by comparing this data with literary sources. The study also addresses two other historical problems that could be related to the Gothic settlement in the Castilian plateau: the creation of the bishopric of Segovia and the flourishing of the city of Toledo.

El asentamiento visigodo en la Península Ibérica y su relación con el registro arqueológico de los siglos V-VI d.C. continúa siendo en la actualidad una de las cuestiones más controvertidas de la arqueología española. Gran parte de esa controversia tiene que ver con aspectos que trascienden a la propia investigación arqueológica y nos sitúan en el plano de la política. Así, a la hora de abordar el problema hay dos puntos que han resultado especialmente polémicos: la presunta utilización del pasado visigodo por parte de la intelectualidad franquista como afirmación ideológica del régimen y la contribución del arqueólogo burgalés Julio Martínez Santa-Olalla en la fijación del esquema de arqueología visigoda.

Por otro lado, el aspecto puramente arqueológico de la controversia tiene que ver con la interpretación que desde las filas de la denominada New Archaeology se viene realizando de las necrópolis castellanas con ajuares de tipo póntico-danubiano. Dicha interpretación hace especial hincapié en fenómenos sociales y culturales por encima de los criterios étnicos defendidos por la Escuela de Viena. El presente estudio aborda de forma lúcida la cuestión ideológica que subyace detrás de la polémica, así como las repercusiones que ha tenido en la posterior dirección adoptada por la investigación arqueológica en relación con la propia historia de España. En este sentido, el autor realiza un ejercicio de deconstrucción de la figura de Martínez Santa-Olalla y lo sitúa en el contexto de la producción científica de su época. Al mismo tiempo, relativiza el papel desempeñado por el periodo visigodo en la construcción ideológica franquista.

Una vez situada la discusión en estos términos, el autor dedica su estudio a una refutación de la interpretación en clave cultural del fenómeno de las necrópolis visigodas de la meseta castellana desde los propios datos arqueológicos y a partir del cotejo de estos datos con los testimonios que proporcionan las fuentes literarias. Además, el presen
Journal of Greek Archaeology: Subscriptions and Back-Issues One volume published annually in October/November edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). ISBN 2059-4674-HOME. Book contents pageBuy Now

An annual, international peer-reviewed English-language journal specializing in synthetic articles and in long reviews. The scope of this journal is Greek archaeology both in the Aegean and throughout the wider Greek-inhabited world, from earliest Prehistory to the Modern Era. Thus we include contributions not just from traditional periods such as Greek Prehistory and the Classical Greek to Hellenistic eras, but also from Roman through Byzantine, Crusader and Ottoman Greece and into the Early Modern period. Outside of the Aegean contributions are welcome covering the Archaeology of the Greeks overseas, likewise from Prehistory into the Modern World. Greek Archaeology for the purposes of the JGA thus includes the Archaeology of the Hellenistic World, Roman Greece, Byzantine Archaeology, Frankish and Ottoman Archaeology, and the Postmedieval Archaeology of Greece and of the Greek Diaspora. the Editorial Board is headed by Professor John Bintliff (Edinburgh University, U.K. and Leiden University, The Netherlands).A full mission statement and information on the editorial and advisory board is available here.

A free 70+ page sampler is available to download in our Open Access section designed to act as an introduction and taster to the scope and style of this new journal. It includes one complete paper and two review articles as well as full contents listings for Volume 1.

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JGA Volume 1, 2016
JGA Volume 2, 2017
JGA Volume 3, 2018

KOINON: Subscriptions and Back-Issues edited by Nicholas J. Molinari (General Editor). ISBN 2631-5874-HOME. Book contents pageBuy Now

As the name indicates, KOINON is a journal that encourages contributions to the study of classical numismatics from a wide variety of perspectives. The editors will consider papers concerning iconography, die studies, provenance research, forgery analysis, translations of excerpts from antiquarian works, specialized bibliographies, corpora of rare varieties and types, ethical questions on laws and collecting, book reviews, etc. All papers go through a process of peer review orchestrated by the General Editor.

A free sampler is available to download designed to act as an introduction and taster to the scope and style of this new journal. It includes two complete papers, full contents listings for Volume 1 and subscription information.

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KOINON Volume 1, 2018

NEW: Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 3 2018 edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). Paperback; vi+526 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (107 colour plates). 3 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690316. £60.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690323. £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now


NEW: KOINON: The International Journal of Classical Numismatic Studies Volume 1, 2018 Inaugural Issue edited by Nicholas J. Molinari (General Editor); Shawn Caza, Lloyd W.H. Taylor (Associate Editors). Paperback; 220x280mm; vi+152 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (45 plates in colour). 1 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690293. £35.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690309. £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

As the name indicates, KOINON is a journal that encourages contributions to the study of classical numismatics from a wide variety of perspectives. The journal will include papers concerning iconography, die studies, provenance research, forgery analysis, translations of excerpts from antiquarian works, specialized bibliographies, corpora of rare varieties and types, ethical questions on laws and collecting, book reviews, and more. The editorial advisory board is made up of members from all over the world, with a broad range of expertise covering virtually all the major categories of classical numismatics from archaic Greek coinage to late Medieval coinage.

Table of contents for the inaugural issue:
Why a New Journal in Classical Numismatics? An Editorial by Nicholas J. Molinari

GREEK NUMISMATICS
Sophocles’ Trachiniae and the Apotheosis of Herakles: The Importance of Acheloios and Some Numismatic Confirmations – by Nicholas J. Molinari
Provenance Lost and Found: Alfred Bourguignon – by John Voukelatos
A Philip III Tetradrachm Die Pair Recycled by Seleukos I – by Lloyd W.H. Taylor
Blundered Era Date on Coin of Arados, Civic Year 119 – by Martin Rowe

ROMAN NUMISMATICS
Sotto l’egida di Minerva: Echi monetali delle imprese britanniche da Cesare ai Severi – by Luigi Pedroni
A Doubted Variety of M. Aemilius Scaurus and P. Plautius Hypsaeus Vindicated – by Jordan Montgomery and Richard Schaefer
Redating Nepotian’s Usurpation and the Coinage of Magnentius – by Shawn Caza
A previously unrecorded reverse for Constantine I – by Victor Clark

ORIENTAL NUMISMATICS
The Dating and the Sequence of the Persid Frataraka Revisited – by Wilhelm Müseler
The Kilwa Coins of Sultan al-Ḥasan ibn Sulaymān in their Historical Context – by N.J.C. Smith
An Introduction to Parthian Silver Fractions, The Little Anomalies of Arsacid Coinage – by Bob Langnas
An interesting denaro tornese of the Barons Revolt of 1459-1464 and some considerations regarding Nicola II di Monforte – by Andrei Bontas

A CATALOG OF NEW VARIETIES
Die Bleifunde der römisch-republikanischen Anlage von Sanisera, Menorca Archäologische und archäometrische Analyse by Regine Müller. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+248 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (54 plates in colour). 462 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 46. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919887. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919894. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume includes the archaeological and archaeometrical analysis of the lead finds from the Roman Republican military fort of Sanisera in northern Minorca. The fort was built after the Roman conquest of the island in 123 BC and abandoned during the last third of the 1st century BC. By correlating typological-archaeological and scientific methods, the site’s unusual large number of lead objects/artefacts are examined within their find context and reviewed for superregional connections to contemporary sites within the Mediterranean. Furthermore, based upon the results of the find analyses as well as the examination of written sources, the site’s embedding within the historical context of the development of the late Roman Republic and early Imperial times is presented, especially in respect to the conquest of the Mediterranean and the consolidation of the Roman authority there.

Die vorliegende Arbeit umfasst die archäologische und archäometrische Analyse der Bleifunde der römisch-republikanischen Militäranlage von Sanisera im Norden Menorcas. Die Anlage entstand nach 123 v. Chr. in Folge der Eroberungen der Baleareninseln und wurde spätestens im letzten Drittel des 1. Jh. v. Chr. aufgegeben. Anhand der Korrelation typologisch-archäologischer und naturwissenschaftlicher Methoden wird hier die ungewöhnlich hohe Anzahl von Bleifunden aus der Anlage innerhalb ihres Fundkontextes analysiert und auf überregionale Verbindungen zu kontemporären Fundorten im Mittelmeerraum überprüft. Darüber hinaus erfolgt - basierend auf den Ergebnissen der Fundanalyse sowie der Auswertung von Schriftquellen - die Einbindung der Anlage in den historischen Kontext der späten römischen Republik und frühen Kaiserzeit, besonders im Zusammenhang mit der Eroberung des Mittelmeerraums und der Konsolidierung der römischen Vorherrschaft dort.

About the Author
REGINE MÜLLER studied Early- and Prehistorical Archaeology, Medieval History and Philosophy at the Justus-Liebig-University in Giessen. Her Magister thesis encompassed the archaeological analyses of the early medieval graveyard of Sindelsdorf, district of Weilheim-Schongau. The author participated at the excavations of the Roman military fort in Sanisera, Menorca for several years. Resulting from this, the study of the site’s lead objects within the frame of a PhD thesis at the Goethe-University in Frankfurt was undertaken. She still researches isotope analyses of lead slingshots and has been working for several years now as an archaeologist in Germany.

REGINE MÜLLER hat an der Justus-Liebig-Universität in Gießen Vor- und Frühgeschichte, Mittlere Geschichte und Philosophie studiert. Ihre Magisterarbeit behandelte die archäologische Analyse des frühmittelalterlichen Gräberfeldes von Sindelsdorf, Kr. Weilheim-Schongau. Aus der mehrjährigen Grabungstätigkeit in der römischen Militäranlage von Sanisera im Norden Menorcas ging die vorliegende Untersuchung zu deren Bleifunden im Rahmen einer Dissertation an der Goethe-Universität-Frankfurt hervor. Die Studien zur Bleiisotopenanalyse, vornehmlich von Schleuderbleien, setzte sie auch im Anschluss an die Dissertation weiter fort. Seit mehreren Jahren ist sie in Deutschland als Archäologin tätig.
To Die in Style! The Residential Lifestyle of Feasting and Dying in Iron Age Stamna, Greece by Gioulika-Olga Christakopoulou. Paperback; 175x245pp; ii+77 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 445 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919351. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919368. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £22.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Symposium in Stamna both as a concept and as a process involved the presence of prominent citizens of the social establishment, as testified by the large cauldrons, tripod jars and tripod vessels present. This study re-examines the cemeteries studied to date, isolating tombs with unique architecture or peculiar structures with individual features, in order to investigate the complex identity of the elite group ideologies.

The finding and studying of such a large number of PRG tombs (500 ca) presents a good representative example for discussing the perception of death, and how it was confronted through the mourning ritual. The data also presents an opportunity to examine the creation of individual and collective memory in a population that operated in this privileged location, redefining as such the cultural landscape of the Protogeometric era. The pre-existing theoretical framework, the methodology of the managing and displaying of grief and their correlation with already-studied and exalted geographical parallels, integrate Stamna into the cultural chain of populations ruled by an overall-systematic design of a particular cultural ideology.

About the Author
GIOULIKA-OLGA CHRISTAKOPOULOU was born in Patras in 1968 and holds a degree in History and Archaeology from the University of Ioannina, and a PhD in Archaeology from the National Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. For the past twenty-five years she has been working as an archaeologist in the Ephorate of Antiquities in Achaia, Greece. She also worked as a Lecturer until 2014, teaching ‘Ancient Monumental Topography’ in the Department of Museology, Museography and Exhibition Planning, at the University of Applied Studies, Western Greece. She has dedicated special attention to the study of the Iron Age in Ancient Stamna, Aetolia, and her research and publications focus on the population movement, burial architecture and burial rituals of this period.