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NEW: Agia Varvara-Almyras: An Iron Age Copper Smelting Site in Cyprus edited by Christina Peege in collaboration with Philippe Della Casa and Walter Fasnacht. xii+294 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (100 colour plates). 415 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918156. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918163. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Iron Age copper smelting site situated near the Cypriot village Agia Varvara is of particular importance among the ancient copper processing places in the Near East because it has revealed spatial as well as technological aspects of copper production in a hitherto rarely-seen depth of detail. Agia Varvara-Almyras: an Iron Age Copper Smelting Site in Cyprus presents the results of a comprehensive post-excavation analysis of the stratigraphy (part I), also of the geology, metallurgical materials (furnaces, tuyeres), finds (pottery, furnace lining, stone tools), as well as a synthesis of the copper smelting technology at Agia Varvara-Almyras (part II).

The excavation analysis not only focuses on pyrotechnical information from individual furnaces, but also provides a detailed study of the spatial organisation as well as of the living conditions on the smelting site. An elaborate reconstruction of the features in a 3D model allows the visualisation of formerly-dispersed loci of copper production. Based on this virtual rebuilding of the hillock named Almyras, it becomes clear that archaeometallurgy must be unchained, and the idea of an ‘operational chain’ must be replaced by a more multidimensional research strategy labelled as an ‘operational web’. The present volume aims to stimulate future excavations which pay attention to the reasons behind the exploitation of the riches of the island, as well as to the needs of the markets where the final product was very likely to have been appreciated as a strategic commodity, by power players operating on the island as well as by ordinary people in need of a repair to an everyday commodity which had broken.

About the Editors
CHRISTINA PEEGE graduated at the Department of Classical Archaeology at the University of Zurich. She started her academic career as a research assistant at the Chair of Ancient History in Zurich, and as a scientific collaborator at the Mint Cabinet in the City of Winterthur. After having participated in archaeological excavations conducted by cantonal archaeology services in Switzerland, she started as a trench supervisor under the auspices of Walter Fasnacht at the excavation of Agia Varvara-Almyras. She completed her doctoral studies with this comprehensive publication of the excavation results at the University of Zurich in January 2017.

PHILIPPE DELLA CASA graduated in Roman Provincial Archaeology before taking his PhD with a thesis on the Bronze Age necropolis of Velika Gruda, Montenegro in 1994. He then engaged in a series of large Adriatic and Alpine projects on settlement survey and excavation, landscape history, as well as social and economic archaeology including mining archaeology. Since 2002, he has held the Chair of Prehistoric Archaeology at the University of Zurich as a full professor.

WALTER FASNACHT graduated in primary and secondary teaching before the award of his master’s degree in Prehistoric Archaeology and Geology at the University of Zurich. He is the director of the Almyras Excavation Cyprus. He has been lecturer in archaeometallurgy at the Universities of Fribourg and Zurich, curator of archaeology at the Swiss National Museum, researcher at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research as well as a member of the Swiss School of Archaeology in Eretria, Greece. He founded the Swiss Association of Experimental Archaeology and is an active teacher and educator.
NEW: ARAMAZD Subscriptions and Back-Issues Armenian Journal of Near Eastern Studies (AJNES) edited by Aram Kosyan (Editor–in–Chief). One volume published annually in 1-2 issues. 11 2017. ISBN 1829-1376-HOME. Book contents pageBuy Now

Established in 2006 by the Association for Near Eastern and Caucasian Studies in corporation with Institute of Oriental Studies and Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography (National Academy of Sciences of Armenia) AJNES is the only periodical in the Republic of Armenia devoted exclusively to the investigation of ancient and medieval cultures of the Near East and the Caucasus. Articles appearing in its pages are contributions of scholars of international reputation in history, archaeology, philology, art, religion and science.

Archaeopress was pleased to take on publishing duties in 2017, handling subscriptions for future volumes and back-issue sales. Subscriptions are available in print and online with special rates for private individuals.

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NEW: Ash-Sharq Subscriptions and Back-Issues Bulletin of the Ancient Near East: Archaeological, Historical and Societal Studies edited by Laura Battini (editor-in-chief). One volume published annually in 2 issues.ISBN 2513-8529-HOME. Book contents pageBuy Now

Ash-sharq is a journal devoted to short articles on the archaeology, history and society of the Ancient Near East. It is published twice a year. The editorial board is headed by Laura Battini (Paris, UMR 7192-Collège de France, France).

SUBSCRIBE: click here to subscribe (2018: Volume 2, 2 issues).

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Ash-sharq Vol 1 No 1-2, 2017
NEW: Journal of Greek Archaeology: Subscriptions and Back-Issues One volume published annually in October/November edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). ISBN 2059-4674-HOME. Book contents pageBuy Now

An annual, international peer-reviewed English-language journal specializing in synthetic articles and in long reviews. The scope of this journal is Greek archaeology both in the Aegean and throughout the wider Greek-inhabited world, from earliest Prehistory to the Modern Era. Thus we include contributions not just from traditional periods such as Greek Prehistory and the Classical Greek to Hellenistic eras, but also from Roman through Byzantine, Crusader and Ottoman Greece and into the Early Modern period. Outside of the Aegean contributions are welcome covering the Archaeology of the Greeks overseas, likewise from Prehistory into the Modern World. Greek Archaeology for the purposes of the JGA thus includes the Archaeology of the Hellenistic World, Roman Greece, Byzantine Archaeology, Frankish and Ottoman Archaeology, and the Postmedieval Archaeology of Greece and of the Greek Diaspora. the Editorial Board is headed by Professor John Bintliff (Edinburgh University, U.K. and Leiden University, The Netherlands).A full mission statement and information on the editorial and advisory board is available here.

A free 70+ page sampler is available to download in our Open Access section designed to act as an introduction and taster to the scope and style of this new journal. It includes one complete paper and two review articles as well as full contents listings for Volume 1.

SUBSCRIBE: click here to subscribe (2018: Volume 3, 1 issue).

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FORTHCOMING: Composite Artefacts in the Ancient Near East Exhibiting an Imaginative Materiality, Showing a Genealogical Nature edited by Silvana Di Paolo. 108pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 424 2018. ISBN 9781784918538. Buy Now

The complex relationship between environment, materials, society and materiality with reference to the composite artefacts in the ancient Near East is the topic of this book. On the one hand are the objective and natural attributes of materials, possibly exalted from their transformation: a form of fascination immanent in all kinds of technical activity which promotes the transition from the ordinary into an ‘extra-ordinary’ realm, imbuing the object with new meaning. On the other is the idea that properties of materials are not fixed attributes of ‘matter’ but are processual as well as relational: the qualities of artefacts are subjective and included in the worldview of artisans making them, as well as in the mind of those who observe or appreciate them. Thus, the craftsmanship is oriented to the achievement of sophisticated products through assemblage techniques and the blending of contrasting properties and qualities of materials. The term ‘composite’ is a combination of the power of technology and the ability to form new images: the strict relationship between creativity, technology and manufacturing produces novel interactions and solutions.

Although the primary concern of this volume is to provide specific case studies in which theoretical assumptions and hypotheses can be applied to the ancient evidence, nevertheless most of the papers take not only the general perspective, such as the relationship between materials and humans, but also a defined body of evidence – material, textual, visual, through which to address the issue. This volume represents a first attempt to conceptualise the construction and use of composite artefacts: the richness of approaches, the development of new issues arising from specific case studies, and the overturning of widely accepted ideas demonstrate the growing interest towards this category of objects and the opportunity to enlarge this field of study for the future.

About the Editor
SILVANA DI PAOLO (PhD Rome 2001) has been a researcher at the Institute for Studies of Ancient Mediterranean of the Italian National Council of Research (CNR) since 2001. She is the Director of the series Biblioteca di Antichità Cipriote, a member of the scientific board of al-Sharq (published in Paris) and the editorial board of Rivista di Studi Fenici published by ISMA. As CNR researcher she is co-coordinator of different projects in collaboration with European and not-European foreign institutions. She is Co-Director of the QANATES project in Iranian Kurdistan. She has written extensively on the relationship between art and power, the location and styles of workshops, the social meaning of works of art, as well as on material culture of the 2nd millennium BC. She is currently working on the concepts of similarity in assemblages of artefacts and routinisation of the artisanal production in the Ancient Near East, as well as on the applications of the shape and semantic analysis on Mesopotamian glyptics.

Table of Contents
Silvana Di Paolo – Introduction: New Lines of Enquiry for Composite Artefacts?
Section 1. The Planning: Materiality and Imagination
Silvana Di Paolo – From Hidden to Visible. Degrees of Mental and Material Construction of an ‘Integrated Whole’ in the Ancient Near East
Alessandro Di Ludovico – A Composite Look at the Composite Wall Decorations in the Early History of Mesopotamia
Section 2. Symbols in Action
Chikako Watanabe – Composite Animals Representing the Property of Thunder in Mesopotamia.
Elisa Roßberger – Shining, Contrasting, Enchanting: Composite Artefacts from the Royal Tomb of Qatna
Megan Cifarelli – Entangled Relations over Geographical and Gendered Space: Multi-Component Personal Ornaments at Hasanlu
Section 3. Sum of Fragments, Sum of Worlds
Jean M. Evans – Composing Figural Traditions in the Mesopotamian Temple
Frances Pinnock – Polymaterism in Early Syrian Ebla
Ann
FORTHCOMING: Naturvorstellungen im Altertum Schilderungen und Darstellungen von Natur im Alten Orient und in der Klassischen Antike edited by Florian Schimpf, Dominik Berrens, Katharina Hillenbrand, Tim Brandes and Carrie Schidlo. ii+285 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (56 colour plates). German text. 411 2018. ISBN 9781784918255. Buy Now

Everyone who investigates pre-modern concepts of nature cannot avoid a critical reflection on the ancient understandings of it. Here, “nature” is understood in the sense of a seemingly untouched space, largely independent of human culture. While this concept of “nature” is prevalent in modern times, the reconstruction of ancient ideas is difficult in that concepts of nature, if at all present, emphasize other aspects. For example, the Greek term φύσις in pre-Hellenistic times defines the nature of a thing rather than an untouched environment. A word for “nature” in this sense has not been handed down to us in the remaining texts of the Ancient Near East and Classical Antiquity. Nevertheless, such concepts can certainly be reconstructed from descriptions of nature to be found in literature and the representations of natural elements in art.

The present volume aims at identifying these concepts of nature in texts as well as in archaeological remains of the Ancient Near Eastern and the Greek culture from the Archaic to the Hellenistic period. Contributions from the fields of archaeology and philology are juxtaposed for each time period in chronological order. This arrangement provides a good overview of the concepts of nature prevailing throughout different period and cultures.

About the Editors
FLORIAN SCHIMPF studied Classical Archaeology and History at the universities of Frankfurt and Istanbul, whilst gaining practical experiences by participating in excavations in Priene (Turkey), Portugal and on the Balkans. In 2013 he joined the Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature” at the University of Mainz with a project on natural sanctuaries in ancient Greece and Asia Minor. His research interests lie in the fields of religious history, Greek cult practices and metrology.

DOMINIK BERRENS studied Classical Philology and Biology at the University of Freiburg. From 2013-2017 he was part of the Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature” at the University of Mainz, where he received his doctorate with a dissertation on social insects in antiquity in 2016. Since October 2017 he has been a postdoctoral researcher working on the project “NOSCEMUS – Nova Scientia: Early Modern Science and Latin” funded by the European Research Council at the University of Innsbruck. His research interests lie in pre-modern scientific texts and ancient drama.

KATHARINA HILLENBRAND studied Classical Philology and German Studies at the Universities of Würzburg and Frankfurt. In 2014 she joined the Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature” at the University of Mainz with a project on concepts of volcanic phenomena in Roman antiquity. Currently she is working at the department of Classical Philology at the University of Frankfurt. Her research interests lie in the fields of ancient meteorology, the literary formation of natural phenomena and Neronian literature.

TIM BRANDES studied Ancient Near Eastern Studies and Egyptology at the University of Göttingen. Since 2014 he is a member of the Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature” at the University of Mainz, where he is working on a project on Babylonian and Assyrian concepts of time. His research interests lie in the fields of Assyrian and Babylonian astronomy, scholarship and religion.

CARRIE SCHIDLO studied Classical Archaeology, Egyptology and Near Eastern Studies at the University of Göttingen after working as a pharmaceutical technical assistant. From 2014 till 2016 she was part of the Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature” at the University of Mainz. Since 2017 she has been working at the General Medical Council of Rhineland-Palatinate. Her areas of research are the Hellenistic and Roman periods of Egypt, especially their funerary customs, as well as ancient medicine and archaeobotany.
FORTHCOMING: The Luwians of Western Anatolia: Their Neighbours and Predecessors by Fred Woudhuizen. 232pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 405 2018. ISBN 9781784918279. Buy Now

In scholarly literature, there is much attention given to the Hittites and the Mycenaean Greeks, but the Luwians of Western Anatolia are notoriously neglected. Therefore, a study focussing on the latter is desirable. In this book, the presently available information on the western Luwians is assembled. This entails, primarily, the epigraphic evidence in the form of Luwian hieroglyphic inscriptions from the region and the historical information which can be deduced from it, as well as historical Hittite sources. As a prerequisite for the reconstruction of the history of the western Luwians during the Middle and Late Bronze Ages, the thorny question of the geography of their habitat needs to be tackled. This can now be done in an adequate manner owing to the most recent discoveries. Apart from Luwian hieroglyphic, the Luwians of Western Anatolia also used cuneiform script. Based on the linguistic data from both categories of evidence, a sketch of their language is presented. It must be realized, though, that not all inhabitants of Western Anatolia were speakers of the Luwian language. Thus, it will be argued that their northern neighbours in the Troad spoke a different language, of Thraco-Phrygian type. Finally, the Luwians were not autochthonous in the region, but preceded by speakers of a different Indo-European tongue, most adequately defined as Old Indo-European in Hans Krahe’s terms.

About the Author
FRED WOUDHUIZEN, born in 1959, graduated in Mediterranean Pre- and Protohistory at the University of Amsterdam (1985). He earned his PhD in 2006 at Erasmus University, Rotterdam, with a dissertation on ‘The Ethnicity of the Sea Peoples’. As an expert Luwologist, he is well-known for his books and articles on the Luwian dialects of Anatolia and the wider Aegean. Among his books, mention should be made of ‘Luwian Hieroglyphic Monumental Rock and Stone Inscriptions from the Hittite Empire Period’ (2004) and ‘Selected Luwian Hieroglyphic Texts: The Extended Version’ (2011).

Table of Contents
Preface; 1. The Homeland of the Luwians; 2. Geography of Western Anatolia; 3. Origin of the Luwian Hieroglyphic Script; 4. Luwian Hieroglyphic Evidence on the Great Kingdom of Assuwa; 5. Western Anatolia under Hittite Rule; 6. Western Anatolia in the Final Stage of the Bronze Age; 7. Amenhotep III: Historical Background to his Aegean Policy; 8. The Arzawan Language; 9. The Language of the Trojans; 10. Evidence for an Old Indo-European Substrate in Western Anatolia; Bibliography
Il complesso monumentale di Baitokaike (Hoson Sulaiman – Siria) by Tarek Ahmad. vii+116 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (55 colour plates). Italian text with English summary. 391 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 34. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917746. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917753. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £26.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The architecture of the temple at Baitokaike shares the characteristics that are typical of the Phoenician region especially during the imperial era. Baitokaike corresponds to that Phoenician tradition, but our knowledge about the foundation of these shrines and their development is still limited. This study aims to deepen this topic, while proposing new chronological phases of the site, starting from the time when it was an open cult place, through the architectural analysis of its buildings. In addition, it reexamines the Seleucid and Roman privileges of the sanctuary in order to extend our understanding of the territory of Baitokaike: agriculture, production and trade, the connecting roads and transport to nearby urban centers. Finally, the study of the iconography of the Greco-Latin inscriptions on site reveal the nature of the Zeus cult at Baitokaike as well as the rituals and processions that took place in the sanctuary.

This monograph also contains three appendices. The first is a collection of the Greek-Latin inscriptions found on the site, and includes an unpublished inscription found on an altar in the sanctuary. The second appendix constitutes a numismatic study of 46 coins uncovered during the excavation of 2004. Finally, the last appendix presents a catalogue of selected archaeological finds like pottery sherds, bronze and bones objects.

Italian description:
Il complesso di Baitokaike (Hoson Sulaiman) è considerato uno degli esempi più peculiari di santuari rurali romani in Siria che pongono la problematica relativa alla creazione dei luoghi di culto extraurbani e il loro sviluppo architettonico durante il periodo classico. Questo lavoro si propone di affrontare tale problematica su un piano archeologico e storico esaminando nel dettaglio la morfologia spaziale e architettonica del complesso di Baitokaike tramite un’analisi comparata dei suoi edifici con altre strutture religiose siriane e dell’Asia Minore, e mediante una accurata classificazione delle sue evidenze epigrafiche, numismatiche e di altri materiali archeologici, per lo più inediti, provenienti dai recenti scavi nel sito. Il libro è teso a discutere anche lo status politico e amministrativo di Baitokaike e il suo territorio sacro durante l’epoca ellenistica e romana tramite uno studio epigrafico delle sue iscrizioni, soprattutto quelle relative ai privilegi concessi dai Seleucidi e confermati successivamente dagli imperatori romani. Il fulcro di questo lavoro, dunque, è quello di riesaminare l’architettura del complesso monumentale di Baitokaike e di proporre un suo nuovo inquadramento cronologico.

Tarek Ahmad è un assegnista di ricerca della Philipp Schwartz Iniziative della Fondazione di Alexander von Humboldt presso l’università di Heidelberg in Germania, dove esegue un progetto di ricerca sul tema: “Il paesaggio sacro rurale nella Siria romana; studio architettonico e paesaggistico”, sul quale ha pubblicato alcuni articoli. Ahmad ha conseguito il suo dottorato in Archeologia presso l’università La Sapienza (Roma 1) in Italia sotto la supervisione della Prof.ssa Eugenia Equini Schneider ed era un docente all’università di Damasco in Siria e membro di varie missioni archeologiche.
Palmyra 1885: The Wolfe Expedition and the Photographs of John Henry Haynes by Benjamin Anderson and Robert G Ousterhout. 128 pages; lavishly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 3 2016. ISBN 9780956594877. £19.95 (No VAT). Buy Now

European adventurers began exploring Palmyra's priceless Roman ruins in the 17th century, but it wasn't until the advent of photography that the public became aware of its scale and majesty. In 1885, the sight of Palmyra astounded members of the Wolfe Expedition as they journeyed home from Mesopotamia. The group's photographer, John Henry Haynes, documented the monumental temples, tombs and colonnades in more than a hundred invaluable images. Since then, Haynes and his work have largely been forgotten, and the forces of the self-styled Islamic State have destroyed the key monuments of this world-renowned site, including the glorious Temple of Bel. Haynes's images of Palmyra - published here for the first time - are all the more poignant. The Syrian city of Palmyra - known as ‘the Pearl of the Desert’ - was one of the most important cultural centres of the ancient world. A key stop on the Silk Road, it was a vital link between the East and the West, and a prize fought over by successive conquering armies.

Table of Contents:
Introduction; The Photographer; The Wolfe Expedition; Palmyra and its Desert Queen; The Topography of Palmyra; Beasts, Men and Stones: Palmyra in Photography and Imagination; The Wolfe Expedition in Palmyra

About the Authors:
Benjamin Anderson is assistant professor of the History of Art at Cornell University. He studies the visual and material cultures of the eastern Mediterranean and adjacent landmasses, with a particular focus on late antique and Byzantine art and architecture. His first book, Cosmos and Community in Early Medieval Art (Yale University Press, 2017), is a finalist for the 2018 Charles Rufus Morey Book Award of the College Art Association. The second, The Tragic Image: Fate and Form from Byzantium to the Baroque, will address the "Oracles of Leo the Wise" and related oracular images. He publishes regularly on the history of archaeology and the urban history of Constantinople. Anderson was David E. Finley Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, National Gallery of Art (2009-12); and has received fellowships from the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst, and the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz (Max-Planck-Institut). He currently serves on the Governing Board of the Byzantine Studies Association of North America.

Robert Ousterhout (Ph.D. University of Illinois) has taught in the History of Art Department at the University of Pennsylvania since 2007. Previously he was Professor of Architectural History at the University of Illinois, where he taught for more than twenty years. A recognized specialist in Byzantine architecture, his research focuses on the documentation and interpretation of the vanishing architectural heritage of the eastern Mediterranean. His current fieldwork concentrates on Byzantine architecture, monumental art, and urbanism in Constantinople, Cappadocia, and Jerusalem. Since 2011 he has co-directed the “Cappadocia in Context” graduate seminar, a summer field school for Koç University.


Reviews:
‘…As in the case of Ousterhout’s earlier volume on Haynes, the images are beautifully reproduced on high-quality paper.... In sum, by calling attention to John Henry Haynes’s sojourn at Palmyra in April of 1885, the authors have done a real service to those interested in the past and future of this important site, as well as to students of the history of American archaeology and archaeological photography.’ – Pau Kimball, Bilkent University (Byrn Mawr Classical Review, 2017)
Ziyaret Tepe: Exploring the Anatolian frontier of the Assyrian Empire by Timothy Matney, John MacGinnis, Dirk Wicke and Kemalettin Köroğlu. 232 pages; 392 colour plates. 3 2017. ISBN 9780956594891. £16.95 (No VAT). Buy Now

This volume presents a vivid record in words and pictures of a dig on the Anatolian borders of Mesopotamia that ended recently after nearly two decades. Designed in the format of a survey book, Ziyaret Tepe: Exploring the Anatolian frontier of the Assyrian Empire captures the sense of intimacy and immediacy of the project.

Ziyaret Tepe, the ancient city of Tušhan, was a provincial capital of the Assyrian Empire, in its day the greatest empire the world had ever seen. The excavations captured in this innovative book uncovered the palace of the governor, the mansions of the elite and the barracks of the rank and file, charting the history of the empire from its expansion in the early 9th century BC to its fall three centuries years later.

The great mound of Ziyaret Tepe, with its accumulated layers rising 22 metres above the surrounding plain, is a record of thousands of years of human occupation. In the course of 18 seasons of fieldwork, both the lower town and the mound looming up over it yielded the secrets of Tušhan, today in southeast Turkey, near the border with Syria. This has always been frontier country.

Elaborate wall paintings, a hoard of luxury items burned in a cremation ritual 2,800 years ago, and a cuneiform tablet that hints at a previously unknown language are among the team’s exceptional finds.

The story of the project is told by the specialists who dedicated years of their lives to it. Geophysicists, ceramicists, readers of cuneiform, experts in weaving, board games and Neo-Assyrian politics joined archaeologists, zooarchaeologists, archaeobotanists and many others. But this is no dry field book of dusty digging. Both accessible and scholarly, it is a lively, copiously illustrated record of excavations involving the whole team, a compelling demonstration of the collaboration – the science, artistry and imaginative reconstruction – that makes modern archaeology so absorbing.

Table of Contents:
1: The origins of Assyria and its Culture; 2: The excavation team gets to work; 3: Work on the Tušhan excavation begins; 4: Ziyaret Tepe reveals its rich and varied finds; 5: Conservation and communication

About the Editors:
Timothy Matney is an archaeologist with a specialization in Early Bronze Age urbanism and the archaeology of the Assyrian Empire in the Iron Age. He has directed excavations in Turkey for the past two decades. His other field experience spans a range of archaeological periods in Syria, Iraq, Israel, India, Azerbaijan, Great Britain, and the United States. He is currently Professor of Archaeology at the University of Akron in Ohio, USA.

Dr. John MacGinnis did both his degree and his PhD at Cambridge University and is a specialist in the archaeology and inscriptions of ancient Babylonia and Assyria, on which he has published extensively. He has worked on sites across the middle east, including Cyprus, Egypt, Iraq, Syria, Sudan and Turkey. For fifteen years he was a field director at the site of Ziyaret Tepe, the ancient Assyrian provincial capital of Tušhan. He has worked on many sites in Iraq, particularly in Iraqi Kurdistan, and has since 2011 been Archaeological Advisor to the High Commission for Erbil Citadel Revitalisation. He is currently based at the British Museum as Lead Archaeologist in a training scheme for archaeologists from across the whole of Iraq and is also a Research Associate at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research.

John Henry Haynes: A Photographer and Archaeologist in the Ottoman Empire 1881–1900 by Robert G Ousterhout. 152 pages; lavishly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 1 2016. ISBN 9780956594860. £22.95 (No VAT). Buy Now

Virtually unknown today, John Henry Haynes (1849-1910) may be regarded as the father of American archaeological photography. His travels took him from Athens to Istanbul and on to Mesopotamia. In this landmark study, now revised with additional unpublished photographs published for the first time, Robert G. Ousterhout assesses his unique blend of artistry and documentation. Although he had scant academic credentials and just a short training in 'aesthetic' photography, John Henry Haynes broke new ground. In 1900 he uncovered an astounding cache of 23,000 cuneiform tablets that told us much of what we know about the Sumerian literary tradition. And with his discerning eye and artistic sensibility, he captured astonishing sights, many never photographed before, and many no longer in existence. Ultimately he was the victim of rivalry, snobbery and outright skulduggery and died 'broken in body and spirit'.

Table of Contents:
Introduction; Early Life; Sailing to Assos: A Foothold in the East; Travels with a Camera: Anatolia, Syria and Mesopotamia; Baghdad and Beyond: The Unsung Hero of Nippur; An Eye for the Picturesque: The Photographer as Artist; Coda

About the Author:
Robert Ousterhout (Ph.D. University of Illinois) has taught in the History of Art Department at the University of Pennsylvania since 2007. Previously he was Professor of Architectural History at the University of Illinois, where he taught for more than twenty years. A recognized specialist in Byzantine architecture, his research focuses on the documentation and interpretation of the vanishing architectural heritage of the eastern Mediterranean. His current fieldwork concentrates on Byzantine architecture, monumental art, and urbanism in Constantinople, Cappadocia, and Jerusalem. Since 2011 he has co-directed the “Cappadocia in Context” graduate seminar, a summer field school for Koç University.
Alexandria and Qumran: Back to the Beginning by Kenneth Silver. xxvi+586 pages; 42 figures, 11 maps and plans (24 plates in colour). 381 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917289. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917296. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This year, 2017, marks 70 years since the discovery of the famous Dead Sea Scrolls at Khirbet Qumran by the Dead Sea in 1947. The Dead Sea Scrolls are one of the most well-known archaeological discoveries of the 20th century. This book addresses the proto-history and the roots of the Qumran community and of the Dead Sea Scrolls in the light of contemporary scholarship in Alexandria, Egypt. Alexandria, as the centre for Hellenistic Jews and the location of the Library of Alexandria, forms a key to understanding the theme of the book. The relationship of this context to the thoughts of the Essenes, the Jewish philosopher Philo of Alexandria, the Jewish Therapeutae of Egypt living in the neighbourhood of Alexandria and the Pythagoreans are especially studied in this work. Historical sources (both Jewish and Classical authors) and archaeological evidence are taken into account in the wider Graeco-Roman context. The connection between the Jewish Therapeutae in the Lake Mareotis region and the Palestinian Essenes is explained by the ‘Jewish Pythagoras’ based on the idea that the movements share the same philosophical tradition based on Judaism and Pythagoreanism. The prototypes of the Dead Sea Scrolls are explained in their Egyptian context, in association with the Library of Alexandria, the Egyptian temple manuals, and the formation of libraries in the Hellenistic period including that of Qumran.

About the Author:
Dr Kenneth Silver is a historian and professional archaeologist, who has lived and worked for decades in the Near East. He is a specialist in Hellenistic and Roman archaeology, history and numismatics. He has worked with archaeological material in Israel, Egypt, Jordan, Syria and Turkey. He has previously published a number of scientific articles and monographs in this field. His current research interests include the study of early Jewish-Christian relations and the history of early Christianity. Presently he is the director of a survey and mapping project in Northern Mesopotamia studying the border zone between the late Roman/ Byzantine Empire and Persia.
Bridging Times and Spaces: Papers in Ancient Near Eastern, Mediterranean and Armenian Studies Honouring Gregory E. Areshian on the occasion of his sixty-fifth birthday edited by Pavel S. Avetisyan and Yervand H. Grekyan. xx+404 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 371 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916992. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917005. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Bridging Times and Spaces is composed of papers written by colleagues of Professor Gregory E. Areshian on the occasion his 65th birthday reflecting the breadth and diversity of his scholarly contributions. The range of presented papers covers topics in Near Eastern, Mediterranean and Armenian archaeology, theory of interpretation in archaeology and art history, interdisciplinary history, historical linguistics, art history, and comparative mythology. The volume opens with an extensive interview given by Gregory Areshian, in which Gregory outlines the pathways of his academic career, archaeological discoveries, different intellectual quests, and the organic connections between research questions that he explored across different social sciences and the humanities, stressing the importance of periodizations in interdisciplinary history as well as his views on holism and interdisciplinary studies.

About the Editors Pavel Avetisyan is a former student of Gregory Areshian during his study at the Yerevan State University in 1975-1980; he now leads together with Gregory and Kristine Martirosyan-Olshansky the joint Armenian-American archaeological team at the excavations of the Neolithic settlement at Masis Blur, Armenia. Pavel received his PhD in 2003 (Chronology and Periodization of the Middle Bronze Age of Armenia) and D.Sc. in 2014 (Armenian Highland during the 24-9th centuries BC. The Dynamics of Socio-Cultural Transformations, according to Archaeological Data). His areas of research are Old World archaeology and the Neolithic and Iron Age cultures of Transcaucasia, devoting his studies also to the periodizations and chronology of the Bronze and Iron Ages of Transcaucasia. Professor Avetisyan is the Director of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia and Professor at the Yerevan State University.

Yervand Grekyan is a leading researcher at the Institute of Oriental Studies, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia and Associate Professor at the Armenian State Pedagogical University. He received his PhD in 2002 (History of the Mannean Kingdom) and defended his habilitation thesis on the structure of the Urartian Kingdom at the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia in 2016 (Biainili-Urartu. State and Society). Dr Grekyan’s interests are ancient history and culture of the Near East and especially of the Armenian Highland in the Late Bronze and Iron Ages.
Shifting Sand: Journal of a cub archaeologist, Palestine 1964 by Julian Berry. ii+88 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white with 21 plates in colour. 359 2017 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916596. £18.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916602. Institutional Price £18.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Shifting Sand is the journal of Julian Berry, then a 17-year-old archaeologist, written on-site during excavations in Deir Alla, Jordan, in 1964. The dig was organized by the University of Leiden and led by Dr Henk Franken who was looking to find a material context for Old Testament narratives, and to build a stratigraphic chronology to mark the transition from the Bronze through to the early Iron Ages based mainly around pottery finds.

When the author was working on the site, three clay tablets were discovered from the late Bronze Age with early Canaanite inscriptions, that when translated in 1989 showed that Deir Alla was the Biblical Pethor, and that it had been attacked by Israelites from Pithom in Egypt. Later a wall inscription was found in Aramaic dating to 880-770BCE referencing the prophet Balaam.

Berry was as much interested by what was going on above ground as below, and kept a detailed journal of the daily lives of the archaeologists and life in the camp. The dig also had many fascinating and famous archaeologists visiting, including Father Roland de Vaux, and Diana Kirkbride.

During breaks from the dig Berry went on a number of journeys in Jordan, Lebanon and Syria and he describes their cities, but also the very tranquil agricultural countryside that he found at that time. He discovered adventure when a drunk taxi driver tried to murder him as he resisted his advances; later he was caught up in a revolt against Hafez al-Assad in Homs, father of Bashir, and was asked by a taxi driver if he had come to Damascus to see the public hanging.

Above all this book should be read as fascinating insight into the lives of archaeologists over 50 years ago, and the very close links between the European team, the Arab workmen, and the daily life in a simple mud-brick village.

About the Author
Julian Berry was born in 1946; his father was a sugar refiner and his mother an artist and interior decorator. At the age of nine he was consigned to boarding school, first to Twyford, and then to Winchester, where his father hoped he would become a fly-fisherman. In fact he developed two key interests at school, archaeology and letterpress printing. He was able to escape at the age of 17, as soon as he had learnt that he had got into Oxford, and with the help of Sir Mortimer Wheeler he signed up to join a Dutch dig in Jordan, where he arrived in January 1964.

This book is about his youthful experiences as an archaeologist, and his travels at the time around Jordan, Syria, and Lebanon.

After Oxford he went on to found a letterpress book printing company, The Compton Press, which produced over 500 editions before its demise in 1980 along with virtually all of the British letterpress book production industry.

He went on to work in marketing and became fascinated by the use of ‘data science’ as we now call it to predict human behaviour. This led to his founding a company that develops software solutions for marketers, where he is currently employed.


Knossos and the Near East A contextual approach to imports and imitations in Early Iron Age tombs by Vyron Antoniadis. xii+170 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 14 plates in colour. 351 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916404. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916411. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In this book, Dr Vyron Antoniadis presents a contextual study of the Near Eastern imports which reached Crete during the Early Iron Age and were deposited in the Knossian tombs. Cyprus, Phoenicia, North Syria and Egypt are the places of origin of these imports. Knossian workshops produced close or freer imitations of these objects. The present study reveals the ways in which imported commodities were used to create or enhance social identity in the Knossian context. The author explores the reasons that made Knossians deposit imported objects in their graves as well as investigates whether specific groups could control not only the access to these objects but also the production of their imitations. Dr Antoniadis argues that the extensive use of locally produced imitations alongside authentic imports in burial rituals and contexts indicates that Knossians treated both imports and imitations as items of the same symbolic and economic value.
Lost and Now Found: Explorers, Diplomats and Artists in Egypt and the Near East edited by Neil Cooke and Vanessa Daubney. xx+295 pages; illustrated throughout with 42 plates in colour. 344 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916275. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916282. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Long distance travel and mass tourism are not recent phenomena. This collection of papers from the 2015 ASTENE Conference in Exeter demonstrates that over the centuries many individuals and groups of people have left the safety of their family home and travelled huge distances both for adventure and to learn more about other peoples and places. Some travels were to help establish trade routes, while others were for personal pleasure and knowledge. Many of those who travelled have left little or no record but in a few cases their travels can be determined from the brief encounters they had with other travellers who noted these chance meetings in their journals and diaries, which they later used to inform and write for publication accounts of their own travels and impressions.

The 18 papers in this rich and varied collection include: finding the lost diary of a member of the Prussian scientific expedition to Egypt of 1842-45 that was hiding in ‘plain sight’ among other books; the illustrated journal of a Croatian travelling through Egypt, Nubia and Sudan in 1853-4 and the hardships endured; the competition between Officers of the East India Company to find the fastest trade routes through Syria between India and the Red Sea; and identifying the Dutch artist who made paintings of Constantinople and later travelled to India before joining the Bombay Artillery as a Lieutenant-fireworker. All 18 papers are the product of hours of careful research by their authors among original manuscripts and books tracked down in archives, libraries and private collections around the world.
Cedar Forests, Cedar Ships Allure, Lore, and Metaphor in the Mediterranean Near East by Sara A. Rich. x+280 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 249 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913656. £36.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913663. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £36.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

It is commonly recognized that the Cedars of Lebanon were prized in the ancient world, but how can the complex archaeological role of the Cedrus genus be articulated in terms that go beyond its interactions with humans alone? And to what extent can ancient ships and boats made of this material demonstrate such intimate relations with wood? Drawing from object-oriented ontologies and other ‘new materialisms,’ Cedar Forests, Cedar Ships constructs a hylocentric anti-narrative spreading from the Cretaceous to the contemporary. With a dual focus on the woods and the watercraft, and on the considerable historical overlap between them, the book takes another step in the direction of challenging the conceptual binaries of nature/culture and subject/object, while providing an up-to-date synthesis of the relevant archaeological and historical data.

Binding physical properties and metaphorical manifestations, the fluctuating presence of cedar (forests, trees, and wood) in religious thought is interpreted as having had a direct bearing on shipbuilding in the ancient East Mediterranean. Close and diachronic excavations of the interstices of allure, lore, and metaphor can begin to navigate the (meta) physical relationships between the forested mountain and the forest afloat, and their myriad unique realities.
Late Roman to Late Byzantine/Early Islamic Period Lamps in the Holy Land The Collection of the Israel Antiquities Authority by Varda Sussman. iv+635 pages; highly illustrated throughout in black and white with 10 colour plates. 321 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915704. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915711. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume illustrates lamps from the Byzantine period excavated in the Holy Land and demonstrates the extent of their development since the first enclosing/capturing of light (fire) within a portable man-made vessel. Lamps, which held important material and religious functions during daily life and the afterlife, played a large role in conveying art and cultural and political messages through the patterns chosen to decorate them. These cultural, or even more their religious affinities, were chosen to be delivered on lamps (not on other vessels) more than ever during the Byzantine period; these small portable objects were used to ‘promote’ beliefs like the ‘press’ of today. Each cultural group marked the artifacts / lamps with its symbols, proverbs from the Old and New Testaments, and this process throws light on the deep rivalry between them in this corner of the ancient world.

The great variety of lamps dealt with in this volume, arranged according to their various regions of origin, emphasizes their diversity, and probably local workshop manufacture, and stands in contrast to such a small country without any physical geographic barriers to cross, only mental ones (and where one basket of lamps could satisfy the full needs of the local population). The lamps of the Byzantine period reflect the era and the struggle in the cradle of the formation of the four leading faiths and cultures: Judaism (the oldest), Samaritanism (derived from the Jewish faith), newly-born Christianity – all three successors to the existing former pagan culture – and the last, Islam, standing on a new threshold.

Unlike during the former Greek and Roman periods of rule, the land of Israel during the Byzantine period did not really have a central government or authority. The variety of the oil lamps, their order and place of appearance during the Byzantine period can be described as a ‘symphony played by a self-conducted orchestra, where new soloists rise and add a different motet, creating stormy music that expresses the rhythm of the era’.

This volume, like the author’s earlier books on this subject, is intended to create a basis for further study and evaluation of the endless aspects that lamps bring to light and which are beyond the capacity of any single scholar.

About the Author:
Varda Sussman was born in Palestine (now Israel) and graduated from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem (BA and MA) in the faculties of Prehistory and Archaeology. She majored in prehistory with Professor M. Stekelis, in Classical archaeology with Professor M. Avi Yonah, and in ancient history with Professor B. Mazar. She studied for one year in the Oriental Institute in Chicago (USA). From 1950, while studying and working at the Department of Antiquity (now the Israel Antiquities Authority), she participated in various archaeological excavations. In 1964 she became curator / keeper of all treasures (finds) discovered since 1948 and developed the system of storage which enabled students and scholars to obtain, examine and study the material which she had catalogued. Among the catalogued finds were many oil lamps which were objects of artistic and historical significance. Two exhibitions were held of the material: the first on Decorated Jewish Oil Lamps (with catalogue) in 1972 in The Israel Museum, the second illustrating the regional lamps of the northern part of the country in the University of Haifa Museum. These established the recognition of typical workshops which had fashioned special lamps for the use of the Jewish and Samaritan populations. The author’s Ornamented Jewish Oil Lamps from the Fall of the Second Temple through the Revolt of Bar Kochba was published in Hebrew by Mosad Bialik and the Israel Exploration Society in 1972; it was translated into English and published by Aris & Phillips Ltd in 1982. She has also published other articles concerning various aspect of art derived from oil lamps, and a num
Stone Vessels in the Near East during the Iron Age and the Persian Period (c. 1200-330 BCE) by Andrea Squitieri. iv+284 pages; illustrated throughout with 50 plates in colour. 318 2017 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 2. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915520. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915537. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book focuses on the characteristics and the development of the stone vessel industry in the Near East during the Iron Age and the Persian period (c. 1200 – 330 BCE). Three main aspects of this industry are investigated. First, the technology behind the manufacture of stone vessels, the tools and techniques, and how these changed across time. Second, the mechanisms of exchange of stone vessels and how these were affected by the changing political landscape through time. Third, the consumption patterns of stone vessels in both elite and non-elite contexts, and how these patterns changed through time. The aim is to evaluate how the formation of new regional states, occurred in the Iron Age I-II, and their subsequent inclusion within large-scale empires, in the Iron Age III and Persian period, transformed the Near Eastern societies by exploring how the stone vessel industry was affected by these transformations. For the period and area under analysis, such a comprehensive study of stone vessels, covering a wide area and connecting this industry to the broader socioeconomic and political landscapes, has never been attempted before.

About the Author:
Andrea Squitieri obtained BA (2006) and MA (2008) at the University of Torino (Italy) in Archaeology of the Near East, with a final dissertation on alabaster vessels in the Mediterranean during the 1st millennium BC. He continued his academic career at the University College, London, where he completed the PhD in 2015 with a thesis on stone vessels in the Iron Age and the Persian period. Andrea has participated in excavation projects in Turkmenistan (Parthian Nisa), Sardinia (Tharros), Syria (Tell Afis), Turkey (Tell Atchana), Israel (Tell es-Safi/Gath) and in Iraqi Kurdistan (Gird-i Bazar and Qalat-i Dinka). Since 2015, he has been a member of the Peshdar Plain Project directed by prof. K. Radner of the Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich (Germany). He is also involved in the project for the study of the stone materials from Shahr-i Sokhta (east Iran), held in the Museum of Oriental Art of Rome (Italy).
Sweet Waste: Medieval sugar production in the Mediterranean viewed from the 2002 excavations at Tawahin es-Sukkar, Safi, Jordan by Richard E. Jones and contributors. 245pp; Illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Published by Potingair Press.ISBN 9780956824035. £45.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

The history of cane sugar from its origins in the east to its status as a luxury foodstuff and even medicine in the medieval period to a commodity produced and consumed globally in today’s world is well known. Yet archaeologically, sugar is an invisible commodity, its presence usually being inferred from the humble sugar pots used in the last stages of its sophisticated production process. This book attempts to redress the imbalance between history and archaeology by reporting on the excavation of a medieval sugar refinery, Tawahin es-Sukkar near Safi, situated south of the Dead Sea in Jordan. There it was possible to explore many of the steps in the sugar-making process. The book’s title refers to the industrial waste whose study has shed light on those steps. To place this refinery in chronological and economic context, excavation was extended to the adjacent ‘support town’ of Khirbet Shaykh ‘Isa; the book presents its results.

The available archaeological evidence for sugar production across the Mediterranean is reviewed. There is particular emphasis on the sugar vessels and the light they can shed on the poorly understood relationship between primary production centres, refining, storage and consumption centres. The book, which is fully illustrated, can be profitably read by archaeologists, archaeological scientists, historians and visitors to Jordan alike.

About the Author: Richard Jones has wide-ranging experience in archaeological science in the Mediterranean and especially in Greece and Italy The production and distribution of pottery is one of his main interests. Until recently he was Senior Lecturer in archaeological science at the University of Glasgow.
Suyanggae and Her Neighbours in Haifa, Israel Proceedings of the 20th (1) Congress June 21–28, 2015 edited by Sharon Gonen and Avraham Ronen. 156 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 313 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915384. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915391. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Proceedings of the 20th symposium: Suyanggae and Her Neighbours. The 20th symposium took place across two meetings, the first in Haifa, Israel and the second in Danyang, Republic of Korea. This proceedings volume gathers papers, abstracts and posters from the meeting in Haifa, which took place from 21–28 June 2015.
Amphorae in the Eastern Mediterranean by Hakan Öniz. vi+198 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 307 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915162. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915179. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Amphorae in the Eastern Mediterranean is designed to share the subject of amphorae which were found on the Mediterranean coast of Turkey with the wider scholarly community. Amphorae from the shipwrecks discovered during underwater research, as well as the amphora specimens held in the region’s largest museum, Antalya Museum, are examined. To widen the scope of the book, the Aydın Aytuğ collection, which consists of amphorae collected in the region, is also included. Mediterranean amphorae which have not been found during excavations and underwater research undertaken by the author’s team up to now, are also presented. The amphorae and amphora-laden shipwrecks that are examined derive from the research carried out between 2011 and 2015, conducted in Antalya province in Lycia, Pamphylia and Rough West Cilicia regions, and off the coast of Silifke, which is a part of Rough East Cilicia. This research has obtained a wealth of new information, leading to a fresh look at the archaeology in this area.

About the Author:
Hakan Oniz studied at the Department of Art History and Archaeology, Eastern Mediterranean University, and obtained MA and PhD in underwater archaeology at Selcuk University of Konya in Turkey. He is one of the founders of UNESCO Uni Twin Underwater Archaeology Network and between 2012 and 2015 served as its first coordinator. He is the director of Selcuk University Underwater Research Centre and head of the Underwater Archaeology Division of the same University. He is also head of the Underwater Archaeology research projects in Turkish Mediterranean Coast, member of ICOMOS-ICUCH (International Committee of Underwater Cultural Heritage), specialist member of ICOMOS Turkey – National Committee of Underwater Cultural Heritage, member of UNESCO National Observation Committee of Underwater Archaeology. As an Assistant Professor he lectures on underwater archaeology and underwater photography at several universities in Turkey and Europe.
Parcours d’Orient Recueil de textes offert à Christine Kepinski edited by Bérengère Perello et Aline Tenu. xiv+242 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 9 colour plates. Papers in French and English; all abstracts in both French and English. 294 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914585. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914592. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume contains 23 articles written by 26 authors in order to express the extent of their respect and friendship for Christine Kepinski. The topics addressed in their papers reflect the scientific work of Christine Kepinski, who always promoted interdisciplinary approaches and developed multi-scale analysis from the object itself to regional study. Several papers are directly connected to fieldwork she conducted in Iraq and in Turkey: Haradum and the Middle Euphrates area, Tilbeshar and Kunara. Others are devoted to material study, notably glyptic, seals and sealing practices. Others evoke Syria: she never directed archaeological excavation there but she always integrated Syria in her studies. Finally, some are inspired by Christine Kepinski’s interest for urban life. The chronological time span of the book as well as the various specialisations of the authors clearly show the great value of her scientific background guided by her taste for the Orient.

Reviews:

'In total, the 23 written contributions in French or English not only reflect the interests of [Christine Kepinski], but they do justice to her fine work.' - Daniel Bonneterre, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières (Histara les comptes rendus (translated from the French), 2017) - read the full review here: http://histara.sorbonne.fr/cr.php?cr=3125
Ceramiche vicinorientali della Collezione Popolani by Stefano Anastasio and Lucia Botarelli. vi+200 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Italian text with English summary. 282 2016 La Collezione Orientale del Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Firenze 3. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914646. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914653. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The volume – in Italian, with an English summary – illustrates the Popolani Collection, that was donated to the Archaeological Museum of Florence by Carlo Popolani, a physician who lived in Damascus in the early 20th century. The collection consists of ancient pottery vessels, terracotta oil-lamps, glazed Islamic tiles, Romano-Byzantine glassware, as well as various objects from the Damascene antique market. In particular, the rich group of glazed tiles is very representative of the typical Mamluk and Ottoman production that flourished in Damascus between the XV and XVIII century.

Italian Description:
Il volume – in italiano con un riassunto in inglese – illustra la Collezione Popolani, donata al Museo Archeologico di Firenze da Carlo Popolani, un medico vissuto a Damasco agli inizi del Novecento. La collezione è composta da vasellame ceramico, lucerne in terracotta, mattonelle invetriate islamiche, vetri di età romana e bizantina, cui si aggiungono vari oggetti acquistati sul mercato antiquario damasceno. Il ricco gruppo di mattonelle invetriate, in particolare, è rappresentativo della produzione mamelucca e ottomana che fiorì a Damasco tra XV e XVIII secolo.

Stefano Anastasio, archeologo, è stato uno dei curatori del primo volume della collezione orientale del Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Firenze. Ha svolto ricerche archeologiche in Siria, Turchia, Giordania. Si occupa in particolare di ceramica di età del Ferro, archeologia dell’architettura, storia della ricerca archeologica nel Vicino Oriente fino alla seconda guerra mondiale.

Lucia Botarelli, archeologa, ha conseguito il titolo di dottore di ricerca presso l’Università di Siena nel 2006, con una tesi sulla ceramica romana e protobizantina da Efestia (Lemnos), proseguendo gli studi con borse presso la Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Atene, l’Università di Heidelberg, la Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa. Ha svolto ricerche in Italia, in Grecia e Giordania.
Managing Archaeological Collections in Middle Eastern Countries A Good Practice Guide by Dianne Fitzpatrick. x+115 pages; black & white throughout. 290 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914882. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914899. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £26.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Collections management practice is an often ignored aspect of archaeological research and salvage activities in many Middle Eastern countries, yet literally thousands of artefacts are recovered every year with no real strategies for managing them sustainably into the future. In this guide, archaeologist Dianne Fitzpatrick sees archaeological collections management not in terms of a last-ditch effort to solve on-site storage crises and preservation problems at the end of a project, but as a means of integrating achievable good-practice strategies into research designs and site management plans from the start, or for that matter, at any time that assist project directors and local Antiquities Directorates.

Strategies designed to protect and preserve ensure the cultural significance and research potential of artefacts is maintained throughout the archaeological process and encourages those creating, managing and preserving archaeological collections to work toward the same goals. Merging together conservation-led principles with current on-site practice in a practical manner, Managing Archaeological Collections in Middle Eastern Countries aims to be a good practice standard or checklist.

About the Author:
Dianne Fitzpatrick completed her Bachelor of Archaeology at La Trobe University in Melbourne. Her studies allowed her to explore the discovery of the historic and prehistoric past by studying archaeological objects created by our ancestors. To better engage in the archaeological process she studied contemporary field archaeology at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, zooarchaeology and ancient technologies. Her studies also focused on the archaeology of ancient civilizations examining the methods and theories used to generate archaeological knowledge. The skills she developed allowed her to critically evaluate the way to set up research projects for collecting, analysing artefacts and interpreting material remains which underpinned her doctoral research at the University of Melbourne completed in 2015. She has worked as an excavator and independent researcher at Neolithic, Neo-Assyrian, Hellenistic and Bronze Age/Iron Age archaeological sites in Israel, Jordan, Syria and Turkey.
Le décor architectural artuqide en pierre de Mardin placé dans son contexte regional: contribution à l’histoire du décor géométrique et végétal du Proche-Orient des XIIe-XVe siècles by Deniz Beyazit. xx+552 pages; illustrated throughout with 302 colour plates. French text. 285 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911225. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911232. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £80.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Artuqids were one of the successor dynasties that rose to power in the aftermath of the eleventh-twelfth century invasion of Western and Central Asia by the Seljuq Turks. While the political power of the Artuqids was limited to the Diyar Bakr, a small region in northern Jazira corresponding to Southeastern Turkey, their artistic legacy is noteworthy. The many surviving Artuqid monuments, built over three hundred years (early 12th – early 15th century), and their decoration exemplify the mastery of stone carving which is reflected in intricate designs and motifs. Mardin, alongside other Artuqid centers such as Amid, Mayyafariqin and Hisn Kayfa, was set within a larger zone of diverse Christian and Islamic artistic traditions.

This book defines Mardin’s artistic context in relation to the other Artuqid centers, as well as the neighboring zones that encompass Anatolia, the Caucasus, Iran, Iraq, Syria and Egypt. During the Artuqid period an original style developed in Mardin and the Diyar Bakr, which itself was rooted in a well-established local school of stone carving. Connected with Christian traditions found in the Syriac Tur ‘Abdin and in Late Antique Syria, the decoration also compares with that of monuments in Armenia and Georgia, and resonates with artistic practices seen in areas controlled by the regional Muslim powers of the time: the Zangids, Ayyubids, Mameluks, Great and Anatolian Seljuqs and the Ilkhanids. The Artuqid buildings reflect the spirit of the time, when the Jazira served as an artistic platform, fostering the circulation of ideas that led to new inspiration, and open-minded rulers and patrons, curious and receptive to new creations, stimulated the creative efforts of architects, stone carvers and craftsmen. The decorated monuments also attest to the existence of significant economic wealth and the need to commission sophisticated buildings that magnified the political and social status of the ruling elite’s.

French description:
Les Artuqides comptaient parmi les nombreuses dynasties successeurs (« successor states ») qui sont arrivées simultanément au pouvoir à la suite de l’invasion des Turcs Seljuqides dont les armées avaient conquis, au cours des XIe et XIIe siècles, de vastes territoires s’étendant des limites de la Chine occidentale à la Méditerranée orientale. Bien que le pouvoir politique des Artuqides fût limité à une petite région, le Diyar Bakr – au nord de la Jazira correspondant à la Turquie du sud-est – l’héritage artistique qu’ils ont légué est pourtant remarquable. Les nombreux monuments artuqides et leur décor architectural, créés sur une période de trois siècles (du début du XIIe au début du XVe siècle), témoignent de la maîtrise de la sculpture et de la taille de pierre qui se reflète dans des motifs et compositions complexes. Mardin, à l’instar des autres centres artuqides d’Amid, Mayyafariqin et Hisn Kayfa, se situe dans une zone englobant diverses traditions artistiques chrétiennes et musulmanes.

Ce livre détermine le contexte artistique de Mardin par rapport aux autres centres artuqides, ainsi qu’aux zones voisines comprenant l’Anatolie, le Caucase, l’Iran, l’Iraq, la Syrie et l’Egypte. Durant la période artuqide, un style original se développe à Mardin ainsi qu’au Diyar Bakr. Ce style puise lui-même sa source dans une école locale bien établie de tailleur de pierre. Bien qu’étant liée aux précédentes traditions chrétiennes du Tur ‘Abdin syriaque et à la Syrie de l’Antiquité tardive, la décoration se compare également avec les monuments de l’Arménie et de la Géorgie, et résonne avec les traditions artistiques observées dans les régions contrôlées par les pouvoirs régionaux musulmans de l’époque : les Zangides, Ayyubides, Mamelukes, Grands Seldjuqides, Seldjuqides d’Anatolie et les Ilkhanides. Les monuments artuqides reflètent l’esprit d’une époque durant laquelle la Jazira était une sorte de plateforme artistique qui favorisait la circul
The Archaeology and History of the Church of the Redeemer and the Muristan in Jerusalem A Collection of Essays from a Workshop on the Church of the Redeemer and its Vicinity held on 8th/9th September 2014 in Jerusalem edited by Dieter Vieweger and Shimon Gibson. 322 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 266 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914196. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914202. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Muristan is situated in the heart of the Old City of Jerusalem and was a prime property in medieval times with numerous churches, a hospice, and a large hospital complex. This monograph contains fifteen chapters written by leading scholars from around the world dealing with the archaeological and historical aspects of the Muristan from the Iron Age through to Ottoman times. A number of chapters also address its immediate urban surroundings, notably the complex of structures associated with the Church of the Holy Sepulchre on the north and the Church of St John the Baptist to the south-west. Key chapters in this monograph are dedicated to the history of the Church of the Redeemer and on its underlying archaeological remains. Many of the chapters are based on research that was originally presented at an international workshop held in Jerusalem in 2014.

About the Editors:
Dieter Vieweger (born 1958) is the managing Director of the German Protestant Institute of Archaeology in Jerusalem and Amman (www.deiahl.de), Professor at the Church University of Wuppertal, Director of the Biblical Archaeological Institute at Wuppertal (www.bainst.de), Visiting Professor at the Private University of Witten-Herdecke, and Director of a number of archaeological research projects conducted in Jordan, Israel and Palestine (www.tallziraa.de; www.durch-die-zeiten.info).

Shimon Gibson (born 1958) is a Visiting Professor of Archaeology in the History Department at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and is the Head of the Archaeology Department in the University of the Holy Land, Jerusalem. His academic interests include the Archaeology of the Holy Land, History of Photography, and Jerusalem. He has many publications to his name, and directs archaeological projects (www.digtmountzion.com).
Making Pictures of War Realia et Imaginaria in the Iconology of the Ancient Near East edited by Laura Battini. xi+88 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 256 2016 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 1. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914035. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914042. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book brings together the main discussions that took place at an international conference on the iconology of war in the ancient Near East, a subject never addressed at an international meeting before. The articles span the 3rd to the 1st millennium, with a special stress on the Neo-Assyrian period. They try to respond to many questions about representations of war: what is ‘warrior’ iconography and on what basis it can be defined? Did the war scenes follow a specific directory whereby they adopted the most varied forms? Can we determine the most usual conditions for the creation of pictures of wartime (such as periods of great change)? Were the war scenes referring to specific historical events or were they generic representations? What can a society accept from the representations of war? What did war images silence and why? What is a ‘just’ punishment for enemies and thus the ‘just’ representation of it? Who has control of the representation and therefore also the memory of war? Who is the real subject of war representations? What emerges from all the articles published here is the relevance of textual data in any analysis of iconological material. And this is not only true for iconology, but for all the archaeological material discovered at historical sites.
The Wisdom of Thoth Magical Texts in Ancient Mediterranean Civilisations edited by Grażyna Bąkowska-Czerner, Alessandro Roccati and Agata Świerzowska. ii+130 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 15 colour plates. 204 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912475. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912482. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume represents a selection of contributions on Mediterranean themes from a wider international interdisciplinary conference on Magical Texts in Ancient Civilizations, organised by the Centre for Comparative Studies of Civilizations at Jagiellonian University in Kraków in Poland between 27-28 June 2013. The meeting welcomed researchers from Hungary, Italy, Poland and Ukraine, covering various disciplines including comparative civilizations, comparative religions, linguistics, archaeology, anthropology, history and philosophy.

In the past ‘magic’ was often misunderstood as irrational behaviour, in contrast to the tradition of philosophical or rational thought mostly based on Greek models. Evidence collected from ancient high cultures, like that of Pharaonic Egypt, includes massive amounts of documents and treatises of all kinds related to what has been labelled ‘magic’. Today it cannot be written off as merely a primitive or ‘lesser human’ phenomenon: the awareness of magic remains to the present day in many societies, at all social levels, and has not been generally replaced by what might be considered as more advanced thinking. The researches in this volume focus heavily on Egypt (in particular Predynastic, Pharaonic, Hellenistic, Roman and Christian evidence), but Near Eastern material was also presented from Pagan (Ugaritic) and Christian (Syriac) times.
Structured Deposition of Animal Remains in the Fertile Crescent during the Bronze Age by José Luis Ramos Soldado. vi+58 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Access Archaeology . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912727. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912697. Book contents pageDownload

Although most of the animal remains recorded throughout the archaeological excavations consist usually of large assemblages of discarded and fragmented bones, it is possible to yield articulated animal skeletons in some cases. Most of them have been usually picked up from sacred and/or funerary contexts, but not all of them might fit necessarily in ritual and symbolic interpretations, and not all of the structured deposit of animal remains may be explained due to anthropic factors. In addition, zooarchaeology has traditionally focused on animal domestication, husbandry and economy, and species identification above all, shutting out further discussion about these type of findings. Moreover, the limited condition of the data is also another issue to bear in mind. Thus, the aim of this paper has been to draw up a literature review of the structured deposits of animal remains during the third and second millennia BC in the Ancient Near East for its subsequent classification and detailed interpretation. In this survey it has been attested that not only most of the articulated animal remains have been found in ritual and/or funerary contexts but also that all species recorded– but some exceptions–are domestic. Hence, I argue in this paper that there is a broad religious attitude towards the main domesticated animals of human economy in the Ancient Near East, based on the closeness of these animals to the human sphere. Therefore, it seems that domesticated animals were powerful constituents in the cultural landscape of these regions, never simply resources.

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