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NEW: Pious Pilgrims, Discerning Travellers, Curious Tourists: Changing Patterns of Travel to the Middle East from Medieval to Modern Times edited by Paul and Janet Starkey. Paperback; 160x230mm; 422 pages; Illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (91 pages in colour). 686 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697520. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697537. Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Pious Pilgrims, Discerning Travellers, Curious Tourists: Changing patterns of travel to the Middle East from medieval to modern times comprises a varied collection of seventeen papers presented at the biennial conference of the Association for the Study of Travel in Egypt and the Near East (ASTENE) held in York in July 2019, which together will provide the reader with a fascinating introduction to travel in and to the Middle East over more than a thousand years.

As in previous ASTENE volumes, the material presented ranges widely, from Ancient Egyptian sites through medieval pilgrims to tourists and other travellers of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The papers embody a number of different traditions, including not only actual but also fictional travel experiences, as well as pilgrimage or missionary narratives reflecting quests for spiritual wisdom as well as geographical knowledge. They also reflect the shifting political and cultural relations between Europe and the Near and Middle East, and between the different religions of the area, as seen and described by travellers both from within and from outside the region over the centuries. The men and women travellers discussed travelled for a wide variety of reasons — religious, commercial, military, diplomatic, or sometimes even just for a holiday! — but whatever their primary motivations, they were almost always also inspired by a sense of curiosity about peoples and places less familiar than their own. By recording their experiences, whether in words or in art, they have greatly contributed to our understanding of what has shaped the world we live in. As Ibn Battuta, one of the greatest of medieval Arab travellers, wrote: ‘Travelling — it leaves you speechless, then turns you into a storyteller!’

Table of Contents (provisional)
Introduction – Paul and Janet Starkey ;
1. Pilgrimage as Travel – Jacke Phillips ;
2. Ibn Jubayr’s Riḥla Reconsidered – Paul Starkey ;
3. ‘Gardens of Paradise’ – Janet Starkey ;
4. ‘Wady Ghrásheca’: an unknown Christian site in Sir Gardner Wilkinson’s unpublished manuscripts from the Eastern Desert – Jan Ciglenečki & Blaž Zabel ;
5. Exploring the Ottoman Empire: the travels of Peter Mundy (1597–c.1667) in Turkey 1617–1620 – Jennifer Scarce ;
6. With a radius most accurately divided into 10,000 parts: John Greaves and his scientific survey of Egypt in 1638–1639 – Ronald E. Zitterkopf ;
7. Dimitrie Cantemir, the ‘Orpheus of the Turkish Empire’ (1673– 1723) – Cristina Erck ;
8. The Artist William Page (1794–1872) and his travels in Greece and western Turkey in the first half of the nineteenth century – Brian J. Taylor ;
9. Jacob Röser: a Bavarian physician travelling the Ottoman Empire in 1834–1835 – Joachim Gierlichs ;
10. Publishing with ‘Modern Taste and Spirit’ – Paulina Banas ;
11. ‘Mr and Mrs Smith of England’: a tour to Petra and east of Jordan in 1865 – David Kennedy ;
12. Anton Prokesch-Osten Jr (1837–1919) – Angela Blaschek ;
13. William Wing Loring, George Brinton McClellan and Ulysses S. Grant: American Civil War Generals in Egypt during the 1870s – Mladen Tomorad ;
14. Consular Agents and Foreign Travellers in Upper Egypt in the Nineteenth Century – Terence Walz ;
15. A Luxor Room with a View at Pagnon’s Hotels – Sylvie Weens ;
16. Richard A. Bermann, the Desert and the Mahdi: an Austrian writer’s fascination with Egypt and the Sudan – Ernst Czerny ;
17. Unlawful Acts and Supernatural Curses: the fictional traveller in Bram Stoker’s The Jewel of Seven Stars (1903) – Rebecca Bruce ;
Notes on Contributors ;
Index
NEW: Lost Worlds of Ancient and Modern Greece Gilbert Bagnani: The Adventures of a Young Italian Archaeologist in Greece, 1921-1924 by D. J. Ian Begg. Hardback; 380pp; 14 figures; 5 maps. 604 2020 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694529. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694536. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

By day, young Gilbert Bagnani studied archaeology in Greece, but by night he socialised with the elite of Athenian society. Secretly writing for the Morning Post in London, he witnessed both antebellum Athens in 1921 and the catastrophic collapse of Christian civilisation in western Anatolia in 1922. While there have been many accounts by refugees of the disastrous flight from Smyrna, few have been written from the perspective of the west side of the Aegean. The flood of a million refugees to Greece brought in its wake a military coup in Athens, the exile of the Greek royal family and the execution or imprisonment of politicians, whom Gilbert knew.

Gilbert’s weekly letters to his mother in Rome reveal his Odyssey-like adventures on a voyage of discovery through the origins of western civilisation. As an archaeologist in Greece, he travelled through time seeing history repeat itself: Minoan Knossos, Byzantine Constantinople and Ottoman Smyrna were all violently destroyed, but the survivors escaped to the new worlds of Mycenaean Greece, Renaissance Venice and modern Greece.

At Smyrna in the twentieth century, history was written not only by the victors but was also recorded by the victims. At the same time, however, the twentieth century itself was so filled with reports of ethnic cleansings on such a scale that the reports brutalized the humanity of the supposedly civilized people reading about them, and the tragedy of Smyrna disappeared from public awareness between the cataclysmic upheavals of the First and Second World Wars.

About the Author
Ian Begg studied archaeology in Greece at the America School of Classical Studies in Athens. For this book, the author retraced Gilbert Bagnani's footsteps around Greece, the Aegean, Turkey and Libya. He has not only participated in excavations in Sicily, Greece, Crete and Egypt but also initiated a survey on the island of Karpathos especially for the chapter in this volume.

Reviews
Gilbert Bagnani, the subject of Ian Begg’s book, was unknown to me, and I am glad to have made his acquaintance. The book covers the period 1921-1924. Gilbert comes across as a fascinating character, who encountered the Levant at a critical time for both the Greece of Eleftherios Venizelos and the Turkey of Mustapha Kemal Atatürk. He was bilingual in Italian (from his father) and English (from his mother): an archaeologist but always more than that. He knew and was helped by the excellent William Miller, which led to his contributing incisive articles about the politics of Greece and the Levant to the Morning Post in London. As a member of the Italian School of Archaeology in Athens he travelled around Greece and the islands and found himself in Asia Minor at a critical phase of the Greek occupation and Kemal’s war of independence. All this and much more is described in Gilbert’s letters to his mother. His grasp of local and international politics was impressive. He and Begg paint sparkling pen pictures of personalities such as Bosdari, the Italian ambassador during the Great War, and later Governor of the Dodecanese, Prince Demidoff the Russian ambassador, Harold Lamb the British Consul at Smyrna and family, Greek personalities such as Stratos, Kalapothakis, Karapanos, and colleagues at the Italian School. Gilbert emerges as clever, sometimes arrogant, fascinated by people especially from high society, and with a weakness for royalty. Begg does him justice in a well sourced book. This is a lively account of a formidable personality, scholar and archaeologist in the making. The black and white photographs by Gilbert himself are excellent. – Sir Michael Llewellyn Smith, British Ambassodor to Greece 1996 – 1999 ;

Gilbert Bagnani, of Italian and Canadian extraction, arrived in Greece at the age of 21, already well-connected through his parents’ social and professional circles. He was ostensibly studying Greek A
NEW: Ash-Sharq - Bulletin of the Ancient Near East Vol 4 2020 Archaeological, Historical and Societal Studies edited by Laura Battini (editor-in-chief). Paperback; 175x254mm; 324 pages; illustrated throughout. Papers in English and Arabic. 4 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697803. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697810. £10.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £68.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Please note the 2020 volume has been released in one extended issue, rather than in two separate parts.

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NEW: The Turkish Long-Necked Lute Saz or Bağlama by Hans de Zeeuw. Paperback; 175x245mm; 138 pages; 70 figures, colour throughout. 675 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694321. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694338. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £26.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The saz or bağlama, a generic name for long-necked lutes in Turkey, plays an important role in the Turkish musical culture. It forms the core of all folk musical ensembles and orchestras and is a popular instrument in the arabesque, entertainment, and pop music. It is the instrument par excellence in Turkish music education and in the religious rituals of the Âlevi and Bektaşi. The saz or bağlama can also be heard as a solo instrument on international concert stages. Acknowledging the instrument’s unique place in Turkey, The Turkish Long-Necked Lute Saz or Bağlama, an updated and revised edition of the Dutch book Turkse Langhalsluit of bağlama, mainly focusses on its cultural and historical background while briefly discussing various saz or bağlama types and their construction, tuning, and playing techniques.

About the Author
Hans de Zeeuw began to take bağlama lessons and became interested in its long and fascinating history while working at the Free University in Amsterdam and studying at the Open University. This led him to decide to break of his studies and focus, for many years, on research into the Turkish saz or bağlama under the supervision of Dr Leo Plenckers of the Department of Musicology of the University of Amsterdam and Dr Okan Murat Öztürk of the Devlet Konservatuvarı of the Başkent Üniversitesi in Ankara. In 2009 he published De Turkse Langhalsluit of bağlama (Turkish Long-Necked Lute or Bağlama) with the support of the Dutch Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds. His lecture to the Uluslararası Müzik Kongresi in Istanbul in 2006 was published in Türkiyede Müzik Kültürü in 2011. A short article about the Ottoman tanbûr, The Ottoman Tanbûr. Introducing the Long-Necked Lute of Ottoman Classical Music, followed in 2018. İn 2019, his book Tanbûr Long-Necked Lutes along the Silk Road and beyond, supervised by Dr Saskia Willaert of the Musical Instruments Museum in Brussels, Dr Alper Maral of the Sanat Tasarım Fakültesi, Müzik ve Sahne Sanatları Bölüm, of the Yıldız Teknik Üniversitesi, and Dr Martin Greve in Istanbul, was published by Archaeopress in Oxford. At the moment he is working as a freelance researcher, living in Istanbul, on an in-depth study of the Ottoman tanbûr.
FORTHCOMING: New Frontiers in Archaeology: Proceedings of the Cambridge Annual Student Archaeology Conference 2019 edited by Kyra Kaercher, Monique Arntz, Nancy Bomentre, Xosé L. Hermoso-Buxán, Kevin Kay, Sabrina Ki, Ruairidh Macleod, Helena Muñoz-Mojado, Lucy Timbrell and Izzy Wisher. Paperback; 203x276mm; 308 pages; illustrated throughout (83 pages of colour). Print RRP: £48.00. 127 2020. ISBN 9781789697940. Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is the result of the Cambridge Annual Student Archaeology Conference (CASA), held at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research from September 13–15, 2019. CASA developed out of the Annual Student Archaeology Conference, first held in 2013, which was formed by students at Cambridge, Oxford, Durham and York. In 2017, Cambridge became the home of the conference and the name was changed accordingly. The conference was developed to give students (from undergraduate to PhD candidates) in archaeology and related fields the chance to present their research to a broad audience.

The theme for the 2019 conference was New Frontiers in Archaeology and this volume presents papers from a wide range of topics such as new geographical areas of research, using museum collections and legacy data, new ways to teach archaeology and new scientific or theoretic paradigms. From hunting and gathering in the Neolithic to the return of artefacts to Turkey, the papers contained within show a great variety in both geography and chronology. Discussions revolve around access to data, the role of excavation in today’s archaeology, the role of local communities in archaeological interpretation and how we can ask new questions of old data. This volume presents 18 papers arranged in the six sessions with the two posters in their thematic sessions.
PRE-ORDER: On the Borders of World-Systems: Contact Zones in Ancient and Modern Times by Yervand Margaryan. Paperback; 156x230mm; 148pp; 32 figures (Print RRP: £30.00). 599 2020. ISBN 9781789693416. Buy Now

This book is forthcoming in Spring/Summer 2020. Click here to download the pre-order form and save 20%

On the Borders of World-Systems: Contact Zones in Ancient and Modern Times was initiated by a multidisciplinary group of authors and examines the historical, archaeological, and political interpretations of world-systems theory and geocivilizational analysis.

The main goal of this monograph is to find the solution to a major problem: the study of worldwide practice, oriented towards the problems of the modern social world as a system. The main focus is the borderland—'limes'—which resembles an impenetrable cordon, and an open, interactive environment. In this sphere of inter-world encounters, different civilizations developed, exchanges of goods and ideas took place.

The macrosociological issues of ancient and modern history are presented through five articles, or case-studies, concentrating on the Taurus-Caucasus region, which functioned as a contact zone throughout the different periods.

About the Editor
Yervand Margaryan is a leading historian from the Republic of Armenia. His main area of research is the history of the ancient world, particularly problems of Classical-period social relations, religion (Mithraism), identity, and World System theory. He is currently Head of the Department of World History and Foreign Regional Studies at the Russian-Armenian University, Yerevan and Leading Researcher at the Institute of History, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia.
New Agendas in Remote Sensing and Landscape Archaeology in the Near East Studies in Honour of Tony J. Wilkinson edited by Dan Lawrence, Mark Altaweel and Graham Philip. Paperback; 205x290mm; 346 pages; 181 figures, 22 tables, 10 plates (46 pages of colour). 662 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695731. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695748. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

New Agendas in Remote Sensing and Landscape Archaeology in the Near East is a collection of papers produced in honour of Tony James Wilkinson, who was Professor of Archaeology at Durham University from 2006 until his death in 2014. Though commemorative in concept, the volume is an assemblage of new research representing emerging agendas and innovative methods in remote sensing. The intention is to explore the opportunities and challenges faced by researchers in the field today, and the tools, techniques, and theoretical approaches available to resolve them within the framework of landscape archaeology. The papers build on the traditional strengths of landscape archaeology, such as geoarchaeology and settlement pattern analysis, as well as integrating data sources to address major research questions, such as the ancient economy, urbanism, water management and the treatment of the dead. The authors demonstrate the importance of an interdisciplinary approach for understanding the impact of human activity on shaping the landscape and the effect that landscape has on sociocultural development.

About the Editors
Dr Dan Lawrence is an Associate Professor in the department of Archaeology at Durham University and director of the Archaeology Informatics Laboratory, a specialist hub for remote sensing and computational approaches to the archaeological record. He has directed landscape survey projects across the Middle East and Central Asia, and is currently working on the publication of survey work in Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan. ;

Mark Altaweel
is Reader in Near East Archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. He has taught courses and conducted research on Near Eastern history and archaeology, using GIS, computational modelling, big data analytics, remote sensing methods, and socialecological theory. He has led many projects in the Near East while being also involved in various research projects on complex systems in other disciplines. ;

Graham Philip is Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology in the Department of Archaeology, Durham University. He has served as Editor of the journal Levant since 2008. He excavated the Chalcolithic / Early Bronze Age site of Tell esh-Shuna North in Jordan (1991-94) and currently directs a collaborative project with the American University of Beirut at the Neolithic and EBA site of Tell Koubba in North Lebanon.
Stone in Metal Ages Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 6, Session XXXIV-6 edited by Francesca Manclossi, Florine Marchand, Linda Boutoille and Sylvie Cousseran-Néré. Paperback; 205x290mm; 134 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (24 pages in colour). Papers in English and French. 659 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696677. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696684. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Set-up a Standing Order to save 20% on XVIII UISPP World Congress proceedings volumes or save even more by pre-ordering the full set at a special low bundle price. Click here to see full offer details.

Session XXXIV-6 of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4–9 June 2018, Paris, France): ‘Stone in Metal Ages’ was divided in two parts. The first, ‘Late stone talks: Lithic industries in Metal Ages’, was concerned with knapping. The papers dealt with lithic technology, use-wear analyses and the relation between the decline of stone and the development of metallurgy. The second, ‘Let there be rock and metal: l’outillage en pierre des métallurgistes préhistoriques de la mine à l’atelier’, was designed for papers focussing on stone tools used for metallurgy. This publication combines these two parts. Despite the fact that metal took the place of stone in many spheres, the analysis of lithic products created during the Metal Ages has seen progressive development. Objects and tools made of flint, chert and other stone materials remain important components of the archaeological record, and their study has offered new perspectives on ancient societies. Not only have many aspects of the everyday life of ancient people been better understood, but the socioeconomic and cultural systems associated with the production, circulation and use of stone tools have offered new information not available from other realms of material culture.

About the Editors
Francesca Manclossi is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and she is affiliated at the Centre de Recherche Français de Jérusalem. ;

Florine Marchand is part of an experimental archaeology team investigating the pressure techniques with the collaboration of Archéorient of Jalès (Casteljau-et-Berrias, France). ;

Linda Boutoille held a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellowship and subsequently a Royal Irish Academy Research Grant, based at Queen’s University Belfast. ;

Sylvie Cousseran-Néré is an archaeologist of the French National Archaeological Research Institute (Inrap).
Le commerce régional et international au Xe siècle en Syrie d'après le trésor monétaire de Buseyra et d'autres trésors de l'époque by Alaa Aldin Al Chomari. Paperback; 205x290mm; 420pp; 82 figures, 44 tables and illustrated catalogue. French text. 648 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695298. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695304. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The treasure of Buseyra is preserved in the museum of Deir az-Zour in Syria. The coins in the hoard cover a large period from the Sassanian Sovereign Khusrô II (590/1-628) until the terminal date 331H/ 941. These coins offer precious information, not only about a large number of mints but about the periods and quantities of minting activity.

This treasure is important because it is the first complete hoard of the 10th century discovered in the al-Djazīra area. According to Tomas Noonan, the Middle East and Central Asian hoards only amount to ten per cent of the treasures found in northern and eastern Europe and the Nordic countries. In comparing contemporaneous 10th-century silver hoards, and especially the relation between the numbers of coin dies and their representation of their products, we can obtain insights into the flows of money and the balance of payments for each area and each minting city.

Alaa Aldin Al Chomari is a visiting scholar at the Forschungsstelle für Islamische Numismatik, Tübingen University, developing a database for the recording of North Syrian coin finds in a project funded by the Gerda Henkel Foundation. Previously he was Professor of Islamic Archeology and History at the University of Aleppo and at the University of Damascus, Suwaida Branch.

French Description
Le trésor monétaire de Buseyra couvre une grande période étalée de la période du souverain sassanide Khusrô II (590/1-628) jusqu’à l’année 331H/941. La composition générale de ce trésor de 3108 dirhams, dont 531 sont fragmentaires, est la suivante : 3 pièces Sassanides, un dirham Arabo-sassanide, 3 pièces Umayyades réformées, 2 pièces Umayyades d’Espagne, 2762 pièces ʿAbbāsides, un dirham Ṭūlūnide, un dirham Ḥamdānide, 9 pièces Dulafides, 45 pièces Ṣaffārides, 40 pièces banū Bānīdjūr, 201 pièces Sāmānides, 2 pièces Sādjides, 2 pièces Zaydites en Djurdjān, 36 monnaies indéterminées ( monnaies totalement usées ou flans non frappés). Le trésor de Buseyra est l’un des trésors du Xème siècle découvert dans le domaine du califat ʿabbāside qui nous fournit le nombre entier des fragments qu’il contient. Ce trésor est conservé au musée de Deir az-Zour en Syrie. La quantité des pièces qu’il renferme offre d’utiles renseignements tant sur la diversité des ateliers monétaires que sur les années de frappe, dont certaines sont rares, voire inédites. Le fait qu’un grand nombre de pièces ont été frappées au même atelier, permet des observations d’ordre statistique sur la métrologie. Il faut mentionner la grande importance de ce trésor, car il est le premier trésor du dixième siècle, découvert dans la région d’al-Djazīra.
Glazed Brick Decoration in the Ancient Near East edited by Anja Fügert and Helen Gries. Paperback; 205x290mm; 130 pages; 97 figures, 5 tables (61 colour pages). 645 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696059. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696066. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Glazed bricks applied as a new form of colourful and glossy architectural decor first started to appear in the early Iron Age on monumental buildings of the Ancient Near East. It surely impressed the spectators then as it does the museum visitors today. Glazed Brick Decoration in the Ancient Near East comprises the proceedings of a workshop held at the 11th International Congress of the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East (ICAANE) at Munich in April 2018, organised by the editors. Over the last decade excavations have supplied new evidence from glazed bricks that once decorated the facades of the Ancient Near East’s public buildings during the Iron Age (1000–539 BC) and especially significant progress has been achieved from revived work on glazed bricks excavated more than a century ago which today are kept in various museum collections worldwide. Since the latest summarising works on Ancient Near Eastern glazed architectural décors have been published several decades ago and in the meantime considerable insight into the subject has been gained, this volume aims to provide an updated overview of the development of glazed bricks and of the scientific research on the Iron Age glazes. Furthermore, it presents the on-going research on this topic and new insights into glazed bricks from Ashur, Nimrud, Khorsabad, and Babylon.

About the Editors
Anja Fügert received her master’s degree in Near Eastern Archaeology at the Freie Universität Berlin in 2005 with a dissertation on the Old Babylonian palace at Uruk. From 2005 to 2014 she was a staff member of the research project Tell Sheikh Hamad / Syria and in 2013 she defended her PhD on the Neo-Assyrian glyptics from this site. After working as a freelance illustrator in the Egyptian National Museum in Cairo she did a 2-year traineeship at the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin. She also taught courses of Near Eastern Archaeology at the Freie Universität Berlin and at the Georg-August-Universität Göttingen. Since December 2017 she is the head of the editorial office of the Orient-Department of the German Archaeological Institute. Together with Helen Gries, she initiated and directs the project The Reconstruction of the Glazed Brick Facades from Ashur in the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin (GlAssur).

Helen Gries obtained MA in Near Eastern Archaeology at Johannes Gutenberg-Universität of Mainz in 2010. In 2011 she started her PhD as a member of the Graduate School ‘Formen von Prestige in Kulturen des Altertums’ at Ludwig-Maximilians- Universität of Munich. In 2014 she completed her PhD at Munich with a dissertation on the Ashur temple at Ashur. She has undertaken fieldwork in Syria, Iran, Lebanon, and Jordan. In 2014 and 2015 she was postdoc researcher and lecturer at Institute of Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Munich. Since 2015 she is researcher and curator for Mesopotamia at the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin. Together with Anja Fügert, she directs the project The Reconstruction of the Glazed Brick Facades from Ashur in the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin (GlAssur), which is funded by the German Research Foundation since 2018.
Die vermeintlich pergamenische Importkeramik in Ephesos Studien zur Typologie, Provenienz und Herstellungstechnik von so genannter Weißgrundiger Ware, Applikenkeramik und Pergamenischer Sigillata by Asuman Lätzer-Lasar. Paperback; 314 pages; 18 figures, 4 tables plus 64 plates (74 colour pages). German text. 643 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696097. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696103. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Die vermeintlich pergamenische Importkeramik in Ephesos is the first comparative study of three ceramic ware groups, namely Appliqué Ware, White-grounded ware and Pergamene Sigillata, which appear in Ephesos (on the Aegean coast of modern day Turkey) but, until now, were considered to be products made in and imported from Pergamon; one ware group was even named after the city. However, using intensive archaeometrical analysis tools, such as thin-section and microscopy, this study seeks to demonstrate that most of the ceramic objects were produced locally. Futhermore, the book presents stunning new data that showing the very differing technical knowledge among the ancient potters of Western Asia Minor. Emerging out of the archaeometrical analyses, the book provides a list of concrete parameters for the identification of provenance in the field. Furthermore, this study encompasses the first typochronology for the three ware groups, which allows future excavations in the wider region to set up a fine chronology of their contexts based on ceramic evidences.

Asuman Lätzer-Lasar is currently a research associate at the Max Weber Centre for Advanced Cultural and Social Studies at the University of Erfurt. At the same time, she is also a member of the DFG-Center for Advanced Studies ‘Religion and Urbanity. Reciprocal transformations’. Previously, she has been the Assistant Director of the International Center for Advanced Studies Morphomata at the University of Cologne, where she also graduated in Archaeology of the Roman Provinces, Classical Archaeology and Ancient Sinology. Her PhD-project was financed by the a.r.t.e.s. Graduate School of the University of Cologne.

German Description:
Mit Die vermeintlich pergamenische Importkeramik in Ephesos konnten vorherige Annahmen in der Forschungsgeschichte zu der Herkunft der drei Warengruppen namens Applikenkeramik, Weißgrundige Ware und Pergamenische Sigillata, die als Importe aus Pergamon gehalten wurden, anhand von archäometrischen Analysen widerlegt und als lokal gefertigte Produkte identifiziert werden. Neben der archäometrischen Provenienzbestimmung wurden neue Erkenntnisse über das technologische Wissen der antiken Töpfer und zur Arbeitsorganisation in Werkstätten präsentiert. Die Auflistung von Unterscheidungsparametern bei Fabricuntersuchungen, sowie die Typochronologie liefern eine Grundlage für zukünftige Auswertungen von Fundkontexten des westlichen Kleinasiens während des Hellenismus und der frühen Kaiserzeit.

Asuman Lätzer-Lasar ist wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin am Max-Weber-Kolleg für kultur- und sozialwissenschaftliche Studien der Universität Erfurt. Gleichzeitig ist sie Mitglied bei der DFGKollegforschungsgruppe „Religion und Urbanität: Wechselseitige Formierungen“ (FOR 2779). Zuvor war sie Geschäftsführerin beim Internationalen Kolleg Morphomata der Universität zu Köln. Sie studierte Provinzialrömische Archäologie, Klassische Archäologie und Ältere Sinologie an der Universität zu Köln und der Tamkang University in Danshui/Taiwan. Ihre Promotion wurde von der a.r.t.e.s. Graduiertenschule mit einem Vollstipendium finanziert.
Working at Home in the Ancient Near East edited by Juliette Mas and Palmiro Notizia. Paperback; 175x245mm; 124 pages; 30 figures, 4 tables. 628 2020 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 7. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695915. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695922. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Working at Home in the Ancient Near East brings together the papers and discussions from an international workshop organized within the framework of the 10th International Congress on the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East held in Vienna in April 2016. The volume examines the organization, scale, and the socio-economic role played by institutional and non-institutional households, as well as the social use of domestic spaces in Bronze Age Mesopotamia. The invited speakers – archaeologists, philologists, and historians specializing in ancient Mesopotamia – who approached these topics from different perspectives and by analyzing different datasets were encouraged to exchange their views and to discuss methodological concerns and common problems.

This volume includes seven archaeological- and philological-oriented essays focusing on specific sites and archives, from northern Mesopotamia to southern Babylonia. The contributions assembled in the present volume seek to bridge the gap between archaeological records and cuneiform sources, in order to provide a more accurate reconstruction of the Mesopotamian economies during the 3rd and 2nd millennium BC.

About the Editors
Juliette Mas is an archaeologist specializing in Near Eastern pre-classic pottery and domestic architecture. She completed her PhD in 2013 at Lyon 2 University (France) and was awarded a Post-doctoral fellowship (2013-2016) at the University of Liege (Belgium), where she was also a scientific collaborator. She is currently a post-doctoral researcher at the Collège de France (UMR 7192 - PROCLAC). Since 2001, she has been involved in various international archaeological missions in the Near East and has overseen the study and publication of Bronze age pottery collections from Syrian and Iraqi archaeological sites.

Palmiro Notizia is a post-doctoral researcher in Assyriology at the Università di Pisa. Previously, he was a JAE-Doctor fellow at the Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales (CSIC, Madrid) and a postdoctoral researcher at the Università degli Studi di Messina. His research interests focus on the social and economic history of Mesopotamia in the third and second millennia BCE. He has edited and studied unpublished cuneiform documents in the British Museum, the Yale Babylonian Collection, the Harvard Semitic Museum and the Cornell University Cuneiform Collections.
The Genesis of the Textile Industry from Adorned Nudity to Ritual Regalia The Changing Role of Fibre Crafts and Their Evolving Techniques of Manufacture in the Ancient Near East from the Natufian to the Ghassulian by Janet Levy. Paperback; 205x290mm; 350pp; 171 figures, 13 tables. RRP: £52.00. 623 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694482. £52.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694499. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £52.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Genesis of the Textile Industry from Adorned Nudity to Ritual Regalia documents and evaluates the changing role of fibre crafts and their evolving techniques of manufacture and also their ever-increasing wider application in the lives of the inhabitants of the earliest villages of the Ancient Near East. It is a broad-spectrum enquiry into fibre working in a broad swathe from Mesopotamia across Persia and Anatolia to the Nile Valley. It focuses, however, on the southern Levant from incipient sedentism in the Natufian culture, c. 13,000 cal BCE to the Ghassulian culture, c. 4500-3800/3700 cal BCE.

This is the first comprehensive study addressing the fibre technologies of the southern Levant on a long chronological axis. Currently, fibre crafts play only a minor role in archaeological thinking. This research demonstrates the magnitude and also the indispensable role that fibre crafts have played in the quotidian events, activities and practices of the inhabitants of the region. It has created an awareness of the substantial, often invisible, presence of fibre-craft products which was hitherto lacking in archaeological thought.

About the Author
Janet Levy is affiliated with the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel. Her research focuses on a broad spectrum of fibre technologies attested from initial sedentism in the southern Levant c.13,000 BCE and their role within the regional cultures. In addition to the study of archaeological sources, her approach is based on experimental replication in tandem with ethnographic input, primarily from beyond the southern Levant.
The Hippodrome of Gerasa A Provincial Roman Circus by Antoni A. Ostrasz with Ina Kehrberg-Ostrasz. Paperback; 205x290mm; 504 pages; 261 figures (77 plates in colour). 616 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918132. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918149. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Hippodrome of Gerasa: A Provincial Roman Circus publishes the unique draft manuscript by the late architect and restorer Antoni Ostrasz, the study of Roman circuses and the complex fieldwork for the restoration of the Jarash Hippodrome, a work in progress abruptly ended both in writing and in the field by his untimely death in October 1996. The manuscript is presented as it is in order to retain the authenticity of his work. It is, therefore, an unusual publication providing the researcher as well as restorer of ancient monuments with unparalleled insights of architectural studies for anastyloses. Compendia A and B have been added to supplement the incomplete segments of the manuscript with regard to his studies as well as archaeological data. This concerns the excavation and preparation for the restorations and the archaeological history or stratigraphic history of the site from the foundations to primary use as a circus to subsequent occupancies of the circus complex. The study of the architectural and archaeological remains at the hippodrome encapsulates the sequence of the urban history of the town from its early beginnings to Roman Gerasa and Byzantine and Islamic Jarash, including vestiges of the seventh century plague and still visible earthquake destructions, as well as Ottoman settlements.

About the Authors
Antoni Adam Ostrasz M.Eng PhD (Warsaw 1958, 1967) began his overseas work as research architect with the Polish Archaeological Centre in Cairo from 1961-1966 before joining expeditions to Alexandria, Palmyra and Nea Paphos. He was commissioned by the Syrian Authorities at Palmyra to prepare the restorations of several monuments, recently destroyed. He continued his architectural studies at Fustat and later joined the ‘Jarash Archaeological Project’ where he studied and restored the Umayyad House and the Church of Bishop Marianos. In 1984, the Dept of Antiquities appointed him as permanent director for the restoration project of the Hippodrome at Jarash. ;

Ina Kehrberg-Ostrasz graduated in Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Sydney where she completed her postgraduate thesis on Cypriot ceramics. She began excavating in Jordan with the University of Sydney in 1975, followed by several international and long-term archaeological projects at Jarash and other Decapolis cities in Jordan. She became Hon. Research Fellow at the University of Sydney, and was made Hon. Lecturer at ANU/Canberra in 2019 where she offers Masterclasses in the study of ceramics and other artefacts.
The Neolithic Lithic Industry at Tell Ain El-Kerkh Excavation Reports of Tell el-Kerkh, Northwestern Syria 1 by Makoto Arimura. Paperback; 205x290mm; 388 pages; 158 figures, 192 tables, 132 plates. Print RRP: £60.00. 618 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694567. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694574. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Northwest Syria during the Neolithic period has been less well studied than the rest of the northern Levant, where Neolithisation first took place in the Near East. The Neolithic Lithic Industry at Tell Ain El-Kerkh presents the first attempt to unveil the Neolithisation process in northwest Syria, with the techno-typological studies of the flintstone implements from Tell Ain el-Kerkh in the Rouj basin in Idlib, which was an important large Neolithic site occupied from the from the 9th to the 7th millennium BC.

Examination of the lithic record from Tell Ain el-Kerkh revealed techno-morphological changes in flint tools during the long Neolithic sequence from the Early Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB) to the end of the Pottery Neolithic. The author interprets such changes in stone tools in the socio-economic context of the Neolithic. Through the comparison between the data obtained from Tell Ain el-Kerkh and other Neolithic sites in the northern Levant, the regional characteristics of northwest Syria during the Neolithic period are highlighted. In the end, two important issues in the Neolithic Levant, diffusion of the PPNB culture and the PPNB collapse, are discussed based on the results of this study.

This volume includes substantial original data, drawings, and analysis of lithics from Neolithic sites in Syria, which will be useful for future discussion of the changes in material culture in relation with the Neolithisation process in the Near East.

About the Author
Makoto Arimura is a professor at Tokai University, Japan. He obtained his undergraduate degree in archaeology (1995) from the University of Tsukuba, Japan, under Professor Akira Tsuneki, and his PhD in archaeology (2007) from the Université Lumière Lyon 2, France, under Professor Olivier Aurenche and Dr Éric Coqueugniot. After a project assistant post at the Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Kyoto (2006), he worked at the Tokyo National Research Institute for Cultural Properties (NRICP) as a research fellow (2007–2012). He taught at Kanazawa University as an associate professor in museology (2013–2016). Arimura has participated in the excavation of Near Eastern prehistoric sites such as Tell el-Kerkh and Dja’de el-Mughara, Syria. His primary research topic is the transformation of human society during Neolithisation, through changes in material culture, particularly the transition of stone tool manufacturing technology in the Neolithic Near East.
Wonders Lost and Found: A Celebration of the Archaeological Work of Professor Michael Vickers edited by Nicholas Sekunda. Paperback; 205x290mm; 230 pages; 152 figures (82 pages in colour). 608 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693812. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693829. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Wonders Lost and Found: A celebration of the archaeological work of Professor Michael Vickers comprises, in all, twenty-one contributions, all on archaeological themes, written by friends and colleagues of Professor Michael Vickers, commemorating his contribution to archaeology. The contributions, reflecting the wide interests of Professor Vickers, range chronologically from the Aegean Bronze Age, to the use made of archaeology by dictators of the 19th and 20th centuries. Seven contributions are related to the archaeology of Georgia, where the Professor has worked most recently, and has made his home.

About the Editor
Nicholas Sekunda was born in 1953 and lived in England for the first part of his life, completing his studies at Manchester University. He has held research positions at Monash University in Melbourne and at the Australian National University in Canberra. He then worked for a British Academy research project as sub-editor for the Lexicon of Greek Personal Names in Oxford, and later taught ancient history for a year at Manchester University. Since 1994 Nicholas has lived in Poland, where his father was born. He has taught at the Nikolaus Copernicus University, Toruń, and currently holds the post of Head of Department of Mediterranean Archaeology at Gdansk University. He has participated in excavations in England, Poland, Iran, Greece, Syria and Jordan, and now co-directs excavations at Negotino Gradište in the Republic of North Macedonia. He is the author of a number of books concerning Greek Warfare.
Weaving in Stones: Garments and Their Accessories in the Mosaic Art of Eretz Israel in Late Antiquity by Aliza Steinberg. Paperback; 205x290mm; 380pp; 321 figures in colour and black & white. (Print RRP: £55.00). 581 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693218. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693225. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Weaving in Stones: Garments and Their Accessories in the Mosaic Art of Eretz Israel in Late Antiquity is the first book to trace and document the garments and their accessories worn by some 245 figures represented on approximately 41 mosaic floors (some only partially preserved) that once decorated both public and private structures within the historical-geographical area of Eretz Israel in Late Antiquity. After identifying, describing and cataloguing the various articles of clothing, a typological division differentiating between men’s, women’s and children’s clothing is followed by a discussion of their iconographic formulae and significance, including how the items of clothing and accessories were employed and displayed and their ideological and social significance. The book is copiously illustrated with photographs of mosaics and other artistic media from throughout the Greek, Roman and Byzantine world, with particular emphasis on the examples from Eretz Israel.

About the Author
Dr Aliza Steinberg received her PhD from the Department of Art History, Tel Aviv University. Her academic research is focused on garments and their accessories in the Mosaic Art of Eretz Israel in Late Antiquity.
Bridge of Civilizations: The Near East and Europe c. 1100–1300 edited by Peter Edbury, Denys Pringle and Balázs Major. Hardback; 176x250mm; xx+318 pages; 170 figures, 10 maps. (Print RRP £65.00). 576 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693270. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693287. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume brings together 22 of the papers presented at a conference held in Esztergom, Hungary, in May 2018 to coincide with the 800th anniversary of the crusade of King Andrew II of Hungary to the Holy Land in 1217–18. The theme, Bridge of Civilizations, was chosen to highlight aspects of the links and contrasts between Europe and the areas around the eastern Mediterranean that were visited and occupied by western crusaders and settlers in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, giving special attention to the evidence provided by archaeology and material culture, as well as historical sources.

The results of the joint Syrian-Hungarian Archaeological Mission (SHAM) to the Hospitaller castle of Margat (al-Marqab) highlighted in this volume include an up-to-date overview of the structural development of the site from 1187 to 1285, as well as particular studies of the wall paintings, cooking installations and pottery. SHAM’s recent rescue work at Crac des Chevaliers also provides the basis for studies of the water-management system and medieval burials revealed in its courtyard, while other papers examine the masonry marks and surviving evidence of medieval trebuchet damage at both castles. Other papers focus on the medieval castles of Karak (Jordan) and Jubayl (Lebanon), the medieval buildings of Latakia (Syria), the impact of the Crusades on buildings in Cairo, historic bridges in Lebanon, the medieval chapels of Yanouh-Mghayreh and Edde-Jbeil (Lebanon), piscinas in Crusader churches in the East, the images of donors found in medieval Lebanese churches, and the activity of late thirteenth-century Western metal-workers in Cyprus.

Papers focusing more particularly on historical sources include a new edition of a late eleventh- to twelfth-century pilgrimage itinerary from Hungary to the Holy Land, a discussion of two minor military orders in Hungary, and the portrayal of Sultan al-Kāmil in a contemporary western account of the Fifth Crusade.

About the Editors
Peter Edbury is Emeritus Professor of Medieval History in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. He has published widely on the history and institutions of the kingdoms founded by the crusaders in the Near East and has re-edited the legal treatises by John of Ibelin (2003) and Philip of Novara (2009).

Denys Pringle is Emeritus Professor in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. In addition to his four-volume corpus, The Churches of the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem (1993–2009), his recent publications include a volume of translated texts, Pilgrimage to Jerusalem and the Holy Land, 1187–1291 (2012), and a volume of collected studies, Churches, Castles and Landscape in the Frankish East (2013).

Balázs Major is an archaeologist, Arabist and historian by training and holds a PhD from Cardiff University. He is the director of the Institute of Archaeology at Pázmány Péter Catholic University and a lecturer in the Department of Arabic Studies.
Armenian Archaeology: Past Experiences and New Achievements edited by Aram Kosyan, Pavel Avetisyan, Arsen Bobokhyan and Yervand Grekyan. Paperback; 165x235mm; 494 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (160 colour pages). 10 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693935. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693942. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This special edition of Aramazd: Armenian Journal of Near Eastern Studies is dedicated to the 25th anniversary of the Republic of Armenia and summarises the studies conducted in Armenia in the field of archaeology (1991-2016).

Contributions included in this volume cover a significant time span, from Lower Palaeolithic to the Middle Ages. The articles summarise the archaeological surveys conducted by joint international expeditions and partly by Armenian archaeologists.

The volume also introduces the bio-bibliography of several outstanding representatives of Armenian archaeologists of the past whose activities enhanced the establishment and development of the Armenian archaeological school.
La naissance des cités-royaumes cypriotes by Thierry Petit. Paperback; 175x245mm; 168pp. 587 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693478. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693485. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Three theories vie to explain the causes, characteristics and chronology behind the emergence of Iron Age Cypriot city-kingdoms: Achaean, Phoenician and autochthonous. Privileged by scholars until as recently as the 1980s, the first linked the emergence of the Cypriot city-state to the great Achaean migrations at the end of the second millennium. Epic foundation myths, telling of cities founded by Achaean heroes returning from Troy, were seen as fabled versions of events unfolding ostensibly at the outset of the Iron Age. The writings of D.W. Rupp cast doubt on the Achaean theory, by placing these developments at a much later date (8th c. BCE) and tracing their origins to the growing influence of the Phoenicians. This hypothesis was hotly contested, giving rise to a third theory, according to which the Cypriot Iron Age was essentially a continuation of the island’s Bronze Age civilisation. The latter theory now holds sway and is scarcely ever contested. The Cypriot city-kingdoms that we observe in the historical period (7th-4th c. BCE) are said to have arisen, after a few decades of instability, as early as the 11th century. Their political and administrative structures would have undergone little more than consolidation in the 8th century, before enjoying their floruit during the Archaic and Classical periods and finally disappearing amid the Wars of the Diadochi at the start of the Hellenistic period.

By recasting these developments within the broader context of the re-emergence of state structures in the eastern Mediterranean, La naissance des cités-royaumes cypriotes reassesses the arguments advanced by champions of the received theory. It likewise situates the phenomenon within a firmer theoretical (i.e. anthropological) framework, intended to establish well-defined distinctions. Furthermore, it proposes a shared typology that can accommodate other political entities, traces of which are found throughout the Geometric period (11th-8th c. BCE). Not only does the archaeological evidence compel us to question whether events unfolded as suggested, it reinforces a more nuanced variant of the Phoenician theory. Various state markers, though abundant in the 8th century (Cypro-Geometric III), seem indeed conspicuously absent during Cypro-Geometric I and II. Excavations at one such city-state, the palace of Amathus, have yielded compelling indications as to when a lasting dynasty originally arose. From them, we can surmise that the Kingdom of Amathus was the first of its kind. While the process no doubt took several decades, under no circumstances did it occur before the 9th century BCE. This coincides, moreover, with the wave of resurgent state-building that swept the eastern Mediterranean and engulfed even more westerly regions like the Aegean.

À propos de l'origine des cités-royaumes cypriotes connues aux époques archaïque et classique (VIIe-IVe s. av.), trois théories s'affrontent, que l'on peut respectivement appeler la « théorie achéenne », la « théorie phénicienne » et la « théorie autochtone ». C'est cette dernière qui actuellement fait consensus. Selon ses défenseurs, les poleis de l'île auraient été constituées en royaumes dès le XIe s. en prenant pour base une organisation politique et socio-économique héritée de l'Âge du Bronze. Dans cet ouvrage, l'auteur entend démontrer que cette vision des choses est erronée et ne se fonde sur aucune évidence archéologique ou textuelle. En dépit d'une certaine hiérarchisation sociale visible dans les ensevelissements, les polities cypriotes du début de l'Âge du Fer (I-II) ne constituent pas des États, mais des entités moins centralisées que l'on peut désigner du terme de « chefferies ». Les différents corrélats anthropologiques de l'État ne sont pas visibles avant la fin du IXe s. C'est surtout au VIIIe s. (Cypro-Géométrique III/ Cypro-Archaïque I) que des changements profonds ont lieu, à la suite des contacts croissants avec les Phéniciens et de leur i
Digging Up Jericho Past, Present and Future edited by Rachael Thyrza Sparks, Bill Finlayson, Bart Wagemakers and Josef Mario Briffa SJ. Paperback; 205x290mm; 320pp. 584 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693515. £54.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693522. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £54.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Digging Up Jericho: Past Present and Future, arising from a conference exploring the heritage, archaeology and history of the Jericho Oasis, includes contributions by 21 internationally significant scholars.

This is the first volume to offer a holistic perspective on the research and public value of the site of Jericho – an iconic site with a long and impressive history stretching from the Epipalaeolithic to the present day. Once dubbed the ‘Oldest City in the World’, it has been the focus of intense archaeological activity and media interest in the 150 years since its discovery. From early investigations in the 19th century, through Kathleen Kenyon’s work at the site in the 1950s, to the recent Italian-Palestinian Expedition and Khirbat al-Mafjar Archaeological Project, Jericho and its surrounding landscape has always played a key role in our understanding of this fascinating region. Current efforts to get the site placed on the World Heritage List only enhance its appeal.

Covering all aspects of work at the site, from past to present and beyond, this volume offers a unique opportunity to re-evaluate and assess the legacy of this important site. In doing so, it helps to increase our understanding of the wider archaeology and history of the Southern Levant.

About the Editors
Rachael Thyrza Sparks is Associate Professor and Keeper of the Institute of Archaeology’s Collections at University College London.

Bill Finlayson is Professor of Prehistoric Environment and Society in the Human Origins and Palaeoenvironments Research Group at Oxford Brookes University and a Visiting Professor in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Reading.

Bart Wagemakers is a lecturer in Ancient and Religious History at the Institute Archimedes at the University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht.

Josef Mario Briffa SJ is a lecturer at the Pontifical Biblical Institute in Rome and a Roman Catholic priest.
Carving Interactions: Rock Art in the Nomadic Landscape of the Black Desert, North-Eastern Jordan by Nathalie Østerled Brusgaard. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+206 pages; 216 figures, 32 tables (129 colour pages). 577 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693119. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693126. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Safaitic rock art of the North Arabian basalt desert is a unique and understudied material, one of the few surviving traces of the elusive herding societies that inhabited this region in antiquity. Yet little is known about this rock art and its role in the desert societies. Why did these peoples make carvings in the desert and what was the significance of this cultural practice? What can the rock art tell us about the relationship between the nomads and their desert landscape? This book investigates these questions through a comprehensive study of over 4500 petroglyphs from the Jebel Qurma region of the Black Desert in north-eastern Jordan. It explores the content of the rock art, how it was produced and consumed by its makers and audience, and its relationship with the landscape. This is the first-ever systematic study of the Safaitic petroglyphs from the Black Desert and it is unique for the study of Arabian rock art. It demonstrates the value of a material approach to rock art and the unique insights that rock art can provide into the relationship between nomadic herders and the wild and domestic landscape.

About the Author
Nathalie Østerled Brusgaard (PhD, Leiden University) is an archaeologist specialising in rock art studies and social zooarchaeology. Nathalie has worked on excavations in the Netherlands and Germany and on rock art surveys in Jordan and the USA.
Maritime-Related Cults in the Coastal Cities of Philistia during the Roman Period Legacy and Change by Simona Rodan. Paperback; 175x245mm; ii+212 pages; 40 figures (26 pages in colour). 571 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 60. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692563. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692570. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Maritime-Related Cults in the Coastal Cities of Philistia during the Roman Period questions the origins and the traditions of the cultic rites practised during Roman times along the southern shores of the Land of Israel. This area was known since biblical times as ‘Peleshet’ (Philistia), after the name of one of the Sea Peoples that had settled there at the beginning of the Iron Age. Philistia’s important cities Jaffa, Ashkelon, Gaza and Rafiah were culturally and religiously integrated into the Graeco-Roman world. At the same time, each city developed its own original and unique group of myths and cults that had their roots in earlier periods. Their emergence and formation were influenced by environmental conditions as well as by ethno-social structures and political circumstances. Philistia’s port cities served as crossroads for the routes connecting the main centres of culture and commerce in ancient times. Most of their cults were closely associated with the sea, and reflect the existential dependency of the inhabitants on the sea that supplied them with sustenance and livelihood and was regarded as a divine beneficent power. The myths also echo the lives of the sailors, their beliefs and fears derived from encountering the dangers of the sea: storms, floods, reefs and giant fish portrayed as monsters. The population of the cities was of mixed and varied ethnic and cultural origins. This was the result of the waves of conquests and migrations over the ages, yet each city was noted for its unique ethnic components. The book also deals with the political circumstances, which had a decisive impact on the formation of religious life and cultic rites in all four cities. It sheds new light to the understanding of the events and historical processes in the region.

About the Author
Simona Rodan is a historian whose field of research are the beliefs, customs and cultic practices in the ancient Mediterranean world, and their reflection in literature and art from the ancient period to the modern times. She holds a PhD in Maritime Civilizations from the University of Haifa. Rodan is the author of The Goddess of Luck, the City and the Sea: The Cult of Tyche and Fortuna in the Coastal Cities of Eretz Israel (2014) (in Hebrew) and Aegean Mercenaries in Light of the Bible: Clash of Cultures in the Story of David and Goliath (2015).
Mobile Peoples – Permanent Places: Nomadic Landscapes and Stone Architecture from the Hellenistic to Early Islamic Periods in North-Eastern Jordan by Harmen Huigens. Paperback; 203x276mm; 270 pages; 183 figures, 25 tables (152 pages in colour). (Print £65.00). 96 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693133. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693140. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Mobile Peoples – Permanent Places explores the relationship between nomadic communities who resided in the Black Desert of north-eastern Jordan between c. 300 BC and 900 AD and the landscapes they inhabited and extensively modified. Although these communities were highly mobile, moving through the desert following seasonal variation in natural resources, they significantly invested in the landscapes they frequented by erecting highly durable stone architecture, and by carving rock art and inscriptions. Although these inscriptions, known as Safaitic, are relatively well studied, the archaeological remains had received little attention until recently.

This book focuses on the architectural features, including enclosures and elaborate burial cairns, that were created in the landscape some 2000 years ago and which were used and revisited on multiple occasions. It explores how nomadic communities modified these landscapes by presenting new data from remote sensing, field surveys, and excavations. To better understand the purpose of these modifications and how this changed through time, the landscape is further analysed on various temporal and geographic scales.

This book particularly deals with the archaeological landscapes of the Jebel Qurma region of north-eastern Jordan. It is part of the Landscapes of Survival project, a research programme based at Leiden University that has brought together both archaeologists and epigraphers to work on this fascinating region.

About the Author
Harmen Huigens is a landscape archaeologist who investigates processes of modifying and encountering human living space in the ancient Near East. He received his doctorate from the Faculty of Archaeology, Leiden University (2018).
Why Did Ancient States Collapse? The Dysfunctional State by Malcolm Levitt. Paperback; 203x276mm;56 pages; 4 tables, 1 diagram (black & white throughout). 93 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693027. £18.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693034. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Ancient states were rooted in agriculture, sedentism and population growth. They were fragile and prone to collapse, but there is no consensus on the causes or meaning of collapse, and there is an ongoing debate about the importance, nature and even existence of state-wide collapse.

Explanations of collapse in terms of the competing mono-causal factors are found inferior to those incorporating dynamic, interactive systems. It is proposed that collapse should be explained as failure to fulfil the ancient state’s core functions: assurance of food supplies, defence against external attack, maintenance of internal peace, imposition of its will throughout its territory, enforcement of state-wide laws, and promotion of an ideology to legitimise the political and social status quo.

To fulfil these functions certain necessary conditions must be met. The legitimacy of the political and social status quo, including the distribution of political power and wealth, needs to be accepted; the state should be able to extract sufficient resources to fulfil its functions such as defence; it must be able to enforce its decisions; the ruling elite should share a common purpose and actions; the society needs to reflect a shared spirit (asibaya) and purpose across elites and commoners who believe it is worthy of defence.

Weaknesses and failure to meet any condition can interact to exacerbate the situation: maladministration, corruption and elite preoccupation with self-aggrandisement can induce fiscal weakness, reduced military budgets and further invasion; it can induce neglect of key infrastructures (especially water management). Inequality, a commonly neglected factor despite ancient texts, can erode asibaya and legitimacy and alienate commoners from the defence of the state.

These themes are explored in relation to the Egyptian Old Kingdom, Mycenae, the Western Roman Empire (WRE), and the Maya. They all exhibit, to varying degrees, weaknesses in meeting the above conditions necessary for stability.

About the Author
Malcolm Levitt held posts as lecturer in economics at Liverpool and Hallsworth Fellow at Manchester University (where his interest in state collapse originated) before joining HM Treasury where he became Senior Economic Adviser. He then moved to the OECD and later served as Chef de Division in the European Commission.

Since completing his MA in Archaeology at the UCL Institute of Archaeology in 2018 he has concentrated on deepening the theoretical basis of his dissertation on why ancient states collapsed.
Par la bêche et le stylet! Cultures et sociétés syro-mésopotamiennes Mélanges offerts à Olivier Rouault edited by Philippe Abrahami and Laura Battini. Paperback; 205x290mm; 300 pages; 139 figures; 18 tables (39 colour pages). 564 2019 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 5. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692822. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692839. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is a tribute to the career of Professor Olivier Rouault who has conducted extensive research in the fields of both Assyriology and Ancient Near Eastern archaeology. The book is composed of 25 papers written by his colleagues, friends and former students from Belgium, France, Great Britain, Italy, Israel, Japan, The Netherlands, Poland, Syria and the United States. The contributions presented here combine archaeological, iconographic and Assyriological studies from the Neolithic to the 1st millennium BC, covering whole of Mesopotamia and regions of Anatolia and the Levant. Nine papers deal with the data of Terqa, Mari and Qasr Shemamok, sites close to Professor Olivier Rouault’s main field of research. He published cuneiform tablets from Mari and Terqa and worked as a director of archaeological missions at Terqa and Qasr Shemamok. The book is divided into six main topics: Palace and Administration, Temples and Cults, Families and Societies, Literatures and Historiography, Representation and Symbolic Aspects, Cultural Markers and Stratigraphy – all the topics that attracted Professor Olivier Rouault during his fruitful career. More intimate texts recounting memories of moments shared with Olivier punctuate the reading of these contributions.

About the Editors
Philippe Abrahami is an Assyriologist, Professor of History and Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Lille, France (CNRS Laboratory HALMA UMR 8164).

Laura Battini is an archaeologist specialised in the Ancient Near East. She is currently a researcher at the French National Centre of Scientific Research (Laboratory PROCLAC, UMR 7192, directed by Thomas Römer). Laura created a new journal for the Ancient Near East (Ash sharq, Archaeopress), and is the editor of the archaeological series Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology.
Aleksei P. Okladnikov: The Great Explorer of the Past. Volume I A biography of a Soviet archaeologist (1900s - 1950s) by A. K. Konopatskii, translated by Richard L. Bland and Yaroslav V. Kuzmin. Paperback; 148x210mm; xxiv+410 pages; 30 black & white figures. (Print RRP: £24.99). 547 2019 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692044. £24.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692051. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Aleksei P. Okladnikov: The Great Explorer of the Past is about the life and works of Aleksei P. Okladnikov (1908– 1981), a prominent archaeologist who spent more than 50 years studying prehistoric sites in various parts of the Soviet Union—mainly in Siberia and Central Asia as well as in Mongolia. Okladnikov made numerous fascinating discoveries in the 1930s, including the first Neanderthal remains in the USSR at Teshik Tash (Uzbekistan) and unique figurines at the Upper Palaeolithic site of Buret’ in the Angara River basin (Eastern Siberia). His research and achievements are presented on the background of ideological campaigns inspired by the Communist Party in the 1920s–1950s, a subject that is very rarely described in non-Russian sources. Particular attention is given to the debunking of the ‘Japhetic theory’ and the ‘new doctrine of language’ developed by Nikolai Y. Marr, an Oriental scholar and specialist in languages who in the 1920s–early 1930s was a formal leader of Soviet archaeology. Marr’s principles of linguistic studies were mechanically transmitted to several fields of the humanities, including archaeology, and were mandatory for every Soviet scholar. In 1950 an abrupt end to Marr’s theories was enacted by Josef Stalin. Details of these events—important for development of archaeology, ancient history, and linguistics in the USSR—were never previously described.

The book is for archaeologists, historians, and everyone who is interested in the history of scholarship (particularly the humanities) in the twentieth century.

Contributors to this volume:
Aleksander K. Konopatskii was born in 1951 in Tambovka County, Amur Province, USSR. After graduating from Suvorov’s Military Boarding School in Ussuriisk (Maritime Province), he met Aleksei P. Okladnikov in 1969. Konopatskii became a cadet at the Novosibirsk Military-Political Academy but dropped out in 1972 and joined the Institute of History, Philology and Philosophy, Siberian Branch of the USSR Academy of Sciences. Since this time, he was closely associated with Okladnikov, assisting in fieldwork, travel and preparation of scientific reports. In 1974, Konopatskii graduated from Kemerovo State University in History (including archaeology). In the 1970s, he studied prehistoric sites on the shore of Lake Baikal in Siberia, and gained the Candidate of Sciences (PhD-equivalent) degree in 1979; in the 1980s and early 1990s, he excavated ancient sites in the lower course of the Amur River (Russian Far East). Since 1998, Konopatskii has been an Assistant Professor of the Novosibirsk General Military Academy where he teaches humanities.

Richard L. Bland studied Alaskan prehistory in the 1970s – 1990s (PhD 1996, University of Oregon). He has translated numerous books and articles on the archaeology of Northeastern Siberia and the Russian Far East, helping to bring the rich Soviet/Russian records of prehistory and early history to the international scholarly community.

Yaroslav V. Kuzmin has been studying geoarchaeology of the Russian Far East, Siberia and neighbouring Northeast Asia since 1979 (PhD 1991; DSc. 2007). He has also assisted in translating and editing books on the archaeology of eastern Russia.

Reviews
'This biography of Okladnikov sheds light on both his adventurous life and Soviet archaeology in general, which is still little known in the West.'—Stephen Leach, Antiquity 2020 Vol. 94
Journeys Erased by Time: The Rediscovered Footprints of Travellers in Egypt and the Near East edited by Neil Cooke. Paperback; 160x230mm; xvi+350 pages; Illustrated throughout (89 colour pages). 557 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692402. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692419. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Members of the Association for the Study of Travel in Egypt and the Near East (ASTENE), founded in 1997, continue to research, hold international conferences, and publish books and essays in order to reveal the lives, journeys and achievements of these less well-known men and women who have made such a contribution to the present day historical and geographical knowledge of this region of the world and who have also given us a better understanding of its different peoples, languages and religions.

The men and women from the past who are written about in this volume are a mixture of the incredibly rich or the very poor, and yet they have one thing in common, the bravery to tackle an adventure into the unknown without the certainty they would ever return home to their families. Some took up the challenge as part of their job or to create a new business, one person travelled to learn how to create and manage a harem at his house in London, others had no choice because as captives in a military campaign they were forced to make journeys into Ottoman controlled lands not knowing exactly where they were, yet every day they were looking for an opportunity to escape and return to their homes, while hoping the next person they met would guide them towards the safest route.

Apart from being brave, many of these men and women travellers have something else in common: they and others they encountered have left a collective record describing their travels and their observations about all manner of things. It is these forgotten pioneers who first gathered the facts and details that now fill numerous modern guidebooks, inflight magazines and websites.
Ash-Sharq - Bulletin of the Ancient Near East Vol 3 No 1-2 2019 Archaeological, Historical and Societal Studies edited by Laura Battini (editor-in-chief). Paperback; 175x245mm; ii+120 pages; illustrated throughout (28 pages in colour). 3 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692006. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692013. £10.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £68.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Please note printed issues 1-2 are despatched as two individual volumes. The digital journal is presented in one volume containing both issues.

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